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U5 jou231 bad_newsletter
 

U5 jou231 bad_newsletter

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U5_JOU231_BadNewsLetter.ppt

U5_JOU231_BadNewsLetter.ppt

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U5 jou231 bad_newsletter U5 jou231 bad_newsletter Presentation Transcript

  • Bad-news letters„ Purpose ƒ To deliver a strategic message that will not please the targeted individual„ Audience ƒ Usually just one person — and, often, you want something from him or her„ Media ƒ Paper; mailed (sometimes e-mail)„ Key to success ƒ Announcement of the explanation before the bad news Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education Inc., All rights reserved.
  • Bad-news letters„ Format ƒ With rare exceptions, one page ƒ On organization’s stationery ƒ Single-spaced ‚ Extra space between paragraphs and elements of the heading ƒ At bottom ‚ cc: ‚ P.S.: ‚ encl. Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education Inc., All rights reserved.
  • Bad-news letter format: HEADER Organization Letterhead 123 Front Street Miami, Florida 49876 555-111-2346DateMr./Ms. First and Last NamePerson’s Business TitleName of Person’s OrganizationOrganization’s Street AddressCity, State (no comma) ZIPDear Mr./Ms. Last Name:Text of letter starts here. Flush left, no indent. Single-spaced. Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education Inc., All rights reserved.
  • Five-part bad-news letter„ Part I (one paragraph) ƒ Begin courteously and neutrally. ‚ Perhaps find common ground to comment on. ‚ Be polite but not enthusiastic. ‚ Focus on positive relationship, if possible. ‚ If responding to a complaint, apologize — but not in a way that accepts responsibility. ‚ DON’T deliver the bad news. Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education Inc., All rights reserved.
  • Five-part bad-news letter„ Part II (beginning of new paragraph) ƒ Explain the reasons for the bad news. ƒ Avoid an abrupt change of tone in this new paragraph.„ Part III (middle of paragraph) ƒ State the bad news. ‚ Be clear and concise. ‚ Avoid a one-sentence paragraph. Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education Inc., All rights reserved.
  • Five-part bad-news letter„ Part IV (end of paragraph) ƒ Close the paragraph with something neutral or positive. Don’t let the bad news close the paragraph.„ Part V (new paragraph) ƒ Close courteously and neutrally, but don’t mention the bad news again (don’t apologize). ƒ If appropriate, mention a continuation of the relationship. © 2012 Pearson Education Inc., All rights reserved. Copyright
  • Bad-news letter format: CLOSINGAgain, thank you very much for your consideration of etc.Sincerely,Your Legible SignatureYour nameYour title Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education Inc., All rights reserved.
  • Bad-news letters„ Content and organization ƒ Avoid an unintentionally sexist greeting. ‚ Is Lynn Jones male or female? ƒ Use Ms. rather than Miss or Mrs. as a courtesy title. ‚ Unless you know that the recipient prefers one of the other titles Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education Inc., All rights reserved.
  • Bad-news letters„ Content and organization ƒ When you address recipient as “Dear Ms. Jones” ‚ Place a colon after “Jones.” ‚ Sign your first and last name at the bottom. ƒ When you address recipient as “Dear Lynn” ‚ Place a comma after “Lynn.” ‚ Sign only your first name at the bottom. ‚ Still type your first and last name (and title) under your signature. Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education Inc., All rights reserved.
  • Tips„ Avoid the pronouns I and you in any negative sentences — especially the bad-news sentence.„ Don’t be wordy — but don’t be so blunt that you sound rude.„ Never disparage your organization.„ Don’t apologize in a way that accepts blame.„ Avoid clichés.„ Use this organization in bad-news speeches and memos. Copyright © 2012 Pearson Education Inc., All rights reserved.