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Online Policy Primer: Gmail

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Assignment 2 for Net303 - Create a short, succinct online presentation summarising the key features, and related issues, of the terms of use for an online service or platform.

Assignment 2 for Net303 - Create a short, succinct online presentation summarising the key features, and related issues, of the terms of use for an online service or platform.

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  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
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  • Oops and my references here:

    References:

    Culpan, T. (2011, May 9). Apple Brand Value at $153 Billion Overtakes Google for Top Spot. Bloomberg. Retrieved from http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2011-05-09/apple-brand-value-at-153-billion-overtakes-google-for-top-spot.html

    Hollister, S. (2011, February 27). Gmail accidentally resetting accounts, years of correspondence vanish into the cloud? (update). Engadget. Retrieved from http://www.engadget.com/2011/02/27/gmail-accidentally-resetting-accounts-years-of-correspondence-v/
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  • Hey Carolyn,

    I really liked your policy primer. As a Gmail user I regularly send myself important files which I rely on for my business, so I can access them when I'm not at home. From a business perspective it's quite alarming to think that my access to this information could be disrupted at any time without notice. Google is hardly doing poorly in the financial stakes (Culpan, 2011) so I don't think I'm going to be disrupted by it announcing bankruptcy, however no technology is infallible so it is a little concerning to think there is absolutely no protection or liability for loss of my data, especially when earlier this year 500,000 users lost all their emails (with only a third getting their data recovered) (Hollister, 2011). That being said, it is a free service and the cost of being liable for millions of users priceless information would surely be astronomical. I understand the risks and regularly make offline backups of my information.

    The thing I find most alarming is the fact that Google may change the terms at any time, without notice. Technically, that makes the other clauses almost redundant as they can essentially be changed to anything based on that single clause. Obviously though, there would be severe PR ramifications from Google so drastically contradicting its unofficial ‘Don’t Be Evil’ slogan. The optimist in me wants to assume that this clause is merely in the contract so users don’t have to agree to new terms every time this ever changing company adds a new service, though it is nonetheless frightening.

    While sometimes Terms and Conditions can seem extremely Draconian, I can, to an extent, understand why companies as large as Google write such all-encompassing legalese. I imagine it would be incredibly difficult to legislate this ever-changing online landscape. Check out my online policy primer here for Google+: http://www.slideshare.net/awardcurtin/google-the-terms-and-conditions-explained
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  • Hello Carolyn,

    Your presentation educates quite well about the content of the TOS of Gmail.
    Similar to my case which is SlideShare.net, Gmail can change their policies whenever they want to, without giving their user any notice. I have not been, like most users, aware of this fact because I did not read the TOS of any Email Provider until studying NET 303. (Kujat, 2011; Scott, 2011)

    Though, I have been aware of the fact that Gmail scans every email to place relevant adds next to the emails. The fact that you can have the option to turn this “service” off, have been unknown to me until I had a look at your Policy Primer.(Scott,2011)

    Your presentations shows that Gmail, just like SlideShare, gets most of the rights on the content their user publish, while I think it is shocking that Gmail has the right to give your content to third parties with whom Google Inc. has relationships.(Kujat, 2011 ; Scott 2011)

    Looking on the legal restrictions, Gmail user must enter their real contact details and a valid age to use the Service. While this seems to make sense, Google Inc. can bring the content into a personal relation and I think that this makes users of Gmail quite transparent and worries me the most about using Gmail as an email Service.(Scott, 2011)


    As you are using SlideShare to share your presentation, my presentation might interest you and I would love to hear your thoughts about my SlideShare.net presentation, which can be accessed here:
    http://www.slideshare.net/CurtinStud/net303-online-policy-primer-of-slidesharenet 

    Cheers,
    Chris


    References

    Kujat, C. (2011) Net303 Online Policy Primer of SlideShare.net. Retrieved from:
    http://www.slideshare.net/CurtinStud/net303-online-policy-primer-of-slidesharenet 

    Scott, C. (2011) Online Policy Primer: Gmail. Retrieved from:
    http://www.slideshare.net/pookiefly/online-policy-primer-gmail-9843067
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Online Policy Primer: Gmail Online Policy Primer: Gmail Presentation Transcript

  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn Scott Gmail by GoogleWhat are you really signing up for?
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn ScottWhen you first signed up for your Gmail account, did you read the Terms of Service or Privacy Policy?
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn ScottWhen you first signed up for your Gmail account, did you read the Terms of Service or Privacy Policy? More importantly, have you read them since?
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn ScottWhen you first signed up for your Gmail account, did you read the Terms of Service or Privacy Policy? More importantly, have you read them since?Because Google reserves the right to change them at any time...
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn ScottWhen you first signed up for your Gmail account, did you read the Terms of Service or Privacy Policy? More importantly, have you read them since?Because Google reserves the right to change them at any time... Without notice.
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn ScottSo if it’s been a while since you checked what you’ve agreed to, let me summarise your contract for you.
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn Scott Your PrivacyFirst of all, lets have a look at your privacy.
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn Scott Your Privacy When you sign up for aGmail account, they ask a few questions such asyour name, location and birthday.
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn Scott Your Privacy When you sign up for aGmail account, they ask a few questions such asyour name, location and birthday. It’s pretty basic, but it’s still your personal information...
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn Scott Your Privacy When you sign up for aGmail account, they ask a few questions such asyour name, location and birthday. It’s pretty basic, but it’s still your personal information......and if you think that’s all they’re collecting – guess again.
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn Scott Your PrivacyWhen you visit Gmail, Google logs certain information about you.This can include your browser information, IP address, date, time and your type of interaction.
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn Scott Your Privacy When you visit Gmail, Google logs certain information about you. This can include your browser information, IP address, date, time and your type of interaction. Ever noticed how the ads in your Gmail account seem relevant to your current email? Google uses information collected from youremails to “to help advertisers and publishers serve and manage ads across the web”. (Google, 2011)
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn Scott Your Privacy When you visit Gmail, Google logs certain information about you. This can include your browser information, IP address, date, time and your type of interaction. Ever noticed how the ads in your Gmail account seem relevant to your current email? Google uses information collected from youremails to “to help advertisers and publishers serve and manage ads across the web”. (Google, 2011) That doesn’t sound very private.
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn Scott Your PrivacyThe good news is that if you know where to goand what to do, you can opt out of this service.
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn Scott Your PrivacyThe good news is that if you know where to goand what to do, you can opt out of this service. However, Google advises that “after you deleteyour information, residual copies may take a period of time before they are deleted from our active servers and may remain in our backup systems”. (Google, 2011)
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn Scott Your ContentNow lets have a look at Your Content
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn Scott Your Content The good news here is that once you upload any content (such as aprofile picture) to your Gmail account, you “retain copyright and any other rights you already hold” (Google, 2007).
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn Scott Your Content The good news here is that once you upload any content (such as aprofile picture) to your Gmail account, you “retain copyright and any other rights you already hold” (Google, 2007).However, once you publish your content in your Gmail account, you give Google “a perpetual, irrevocable, worldwide, royalty-free, andnon-exclusive license to reproduce, adapt, modify, translate, publish,publicly perform, publicly display and distribute” (Google, 2007) that content.
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn Scott Your Content The good news here is that once you upload any content (such as aprofile picture) to your Gmail account, you “retain copyright and any other rights you already hold” (Google, 2007).However, once you publish your content in your Gmail account, you give Google “a perpetual, irrevocable, worldwide, royalty-free, andnon-exclusive license to reproduce, adapt, modify, translate, publish,publicly perform, publicly display and distribute” (Google, 2007) that content.You also give them the right to make your content “available to other companies, organizations or individuals with whom Google hasrelationships for the provision of syndicated services, and to use such Content in connection with the provision of those services” (Google, 2007).
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn Scott Your Content And remember, Google may at any time “pre-screen, review, flag,filter, modify, refuse or remove any or all Content” (Google, 2007).
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn Scott Your AccountFinally, let’s review your Gmail account details and your relationship with Google.
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn Scott Your AccountFinally, let’s review your Gmail account details and your relationship with Google. First of all, are you of legal age to form a contract with Google? Because if not, you are not eligible for a Gmail account.
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn Scott Your AccountFinally, let’s review your Gmail account details and your relationship with Google. First of all, are you of legal age to form a contract with Google? Because if not, you are not eligible for a Gmail account. Once you do sign up, part of your agreement is to keep your personal details as accurate and up to date as possible.
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn Scott Your AccountFinally, let’s review your Gmail account details and your relationship with Google. First of all, are you of legal age to form a contract with Google? Because if not, you are not eligible for a Gmail account. Once you do sign up, part of your agreement is to keep your personal details as accurate and up to date as possible. Incorrect information is a breech of the Terms of Service, which happens to be a good enough reason for Google to disable your Gmail account...
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn Scott Your Account...not that they need a reason. Google reserves the right to disable access to Gmail “to you or to users generally at Google’s sole discretion, without prior notice to you” (Google, 2007).
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn Scott Your Account...not that they need a reason. Google reserves the right to disable access to Gmail “to you or to users generally at Google’s sole discretion, without prior notice to you” (Google, 2007).However, if you wish to terminate your Gmail account, you need to notify Google.
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn Scott Your Account...not that they need a reason. Google reserves the right to disable access to Gmail “to you or to users generally at Google’s sole discretion, without prior notice to you” (Google, 2007).However, if you wish to terminate your Gmail account, you need to notify Google. In writing.
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn ScottRemember – the Gmail Terms of Service and Privacy Policy can change at any time, without notification.
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn ScottRemember – the Gmail Terms of Service and Privacy Policy can change at any time, without notification. Your Privacy. Your Content. Your Details.
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn ScottRemember – the Gmail Terms of Service and Privacy Policy can change at any time, without notification. Your Privacy. Your Content. Your Details. Your responsibility to stay informed.
  • Net303 Policy Primer by Carolyn Scott ReferencesGeneric profile picture, [Image]. (2011). Gmail - Settings. Retrieved 23 October, 2011 fromhttp://www.gmail.comGmail account settings, [Screenshot]. (2011). Gmail - Settings. Retrieved 23 October, 2011 fromhttp://www.gmail.comGmail account sign up, [Screenshot]. (2011). Create An Account. Retrieved 23 October, 2011 fromhttp://www.gmail.comGoogle. (2007). Google Terms of Service. Retrieved 23 October, 2011 fromhttp://www.google.com/accounts/TOSGoogle. (2011). Privacy Policy (Gmail). Retrieved 23 October, 2011 fromhttp://www.google.com/intl/en/privacy/privacy-policy.htmlGoogle coloured balls, [Image]. (2008). Google Terms of Service. Retrieved 23 October, 2011 fromhttp://www.google.com/accounts/TOSGmail logo, [Image]. (2011). Gmail. Retrieved 23 October, 2011 from http://www.gmail.comMail icon, [Image]. (2011). Gmail. Retrieved 23 October, 2011 from http://www.gmail.com