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One Less Animal Abuse<br />By: Maritza, Rachel, & Sara<br />
What is Animal Abuse?<br />Cruelty to animals is the infliction of suffering or harm upon animals, other than humans, for ...
Facts About Animal Cruelty<br /><ul><li>In many circuses, wild and exotic animals are trained through the use of intimidat...
Elephants who perform in circuses are often kept in chains for as long as 23 hours a day from the time they are babies.
More than 15 million warm-blooded animals are used in research every year.
Scientists estimate that 100 species go extinct every day! That's about one species every 15 minutes.</li></li></ul><li><u...
Dog fighting and cock-fighting are illegal in all 50 states.
It is estimated that on average it takes 1,000 dogs to maintain a mid-sized racetrack operation. New greyhounds are contin...
Tens of thousands of wild and domesticated horses from the United States are cruelly slaughtered every year to be used for...
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Transcript of "One less life_lost_to_animal_abuse"

  1. 1. One Less Animal Abuse<br />By: Maritza, Rachel, & Sara<br />
  2. 2. What is Animal Abuse?<br />Cruelty to animals is the infliction of suffering or harm upon animals, other than humans, for purposes other than self-defense. More narrowly, it can be harm for specific gain, such as killing animals for food or fur use. Diverging viewpoints are held by jurisdictions throughout the world.<br />
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  5. 5. Facts About Animal Cruelty<br /><ul><li>In many circuses, wild and exotic animals are trained through the use of intimidation and physical abuse. Former circus employees have reported seeing animals beaten, whipped, poked with sharp objects and even burned to force them to learn their routines!
  6. 6. Elephants who perform in circuses are often kept in chains for as long as 23 hours a day from the time they are babies.
  7. 7. More than 15 million warm-blooded animals are used in research every year.
  8. 8. Scientists estimate that 100 species go extinct every day! That's about one species every 15 minutes.</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>If You Live in Pennsylvania, California, Florida, Rhode Island, Illinois, Virginia, Oregon, New York, New Jersey and Vermont you have the legal right to refuse to participate in dissection in class! In Louisiana, there is a State resolution and in Massachusetts, Maine, Maryland and New Mexico, there are Departments of Education resolutions in place that allow you to refuse to dissect, although it hasn’t yet become a law.
  9. 9. Dog fighting and cock-fighting are illegal in all 50 states.
  10. 10. It is estimated that on average it takes 1,000 dogs to maintain a mid-sized racetrack operation. New greyhounds are continually entering the system to replace greyhounds that grade-off due to injury, age or poor performance. There are currently over 30 tracks operating in the United States.
  11. 11. Tens of thousands of wild and domesticated horses from the United States are cruelly slaughtered every year to be used for horsemeat in Europe and Asia. Since the last horse slaughter plants in the U.S. were closed in 2007, thousands of horses have been shipped to Canada and Mexico for slaughter.</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>Many studies have found a link between cruelty to animals and other forms of interpersonal violence.
  12. 12. Neglect and abandonment are the most common forms of companion animal abuse in the United States.
  13. 13. A fur coat is pretty cool—for an animal to wear. Eighteen red foxes are killed to make one fox-fur coat, 55 minks to make a mink coat.</li></li></ul><li>How Can You Help<br />1. Get help for the animal. If you see someone hurting an animal or if you know of someone whose animal looks sick, injured, or deprived of adequate food, water, or shelter, get help. Call the police, your local animal shelter, or a trusted adult. Do not try to help the animal yourself—that could put you in danger.<br />2. Get the facts. Write everything down. As a witness, you'll need to provide the date, time, location, and any other details you can remember, including descriptions of the animal, the type of cruelty, and the person who may be responsible for it.<br />3. Get the word out. Educate your friends, family, and teachers about animal cruelty and its connection to human violence by sharing information and materials from The Humane Society of the United States's First Strike™ campaign. For more information, call 1-888-213-0956, or write to us at First Strike, The HSUS, 2100 L St., NW, Washington, DC 20037.<br />4. Be a role model. Let your actions be a guide. Be kind to animals and let others know that hurting animals is wrong. Speak up for animals and urge others to do the same.<br />5. Be a responsible pet owner. Don't let your cats and dogs roam. Cats are safest indoors. When outdoors, dogs should be walked on a leash or supervised in a fenced yard. It's up to you to keep your pets safe.<br />
  14. 14. 6. Keep a lookout. If you see a stray or injured animal, contact your local animal care and control agency or the police. Provide a description of the animal and the location.<br />7. Make the 'Net work. If you find an Internet site that promotes animal abuse, urge the service provider that hosts the web site to remove it immediately. You can find the address of the web site's provider at networksolutions.org.<br />8. Stop cruelty before it begins. Teach elementary schoolchildren in your community to be kind to animals via KIND News, a nine-times-a-year newspaper published expressly for kids. The prize-winning publication is produced by The National Association for Humane and Environmental Education (NAHEE), the youth service division of The HSUS. NAHEE also produces other publications and has programs like Adopt-a-Classroom. For more information, visit its web sites by following the links on the right.<br />9. Start a club. Start an animal protection club at your school. Visit the HumaneTeen web site and click on "Start a Club" for tips and activity suggestions.<br />10. Join the HumaneTeen Network. The HumaneTeen Network is a free online service that provides members with e-mail updates on the latest animal and environmental issues. To join, visit their web site and click on "Join the Network." For more information about animal cruelty, <br />
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  16. 16. We Will Not Be Denied<br />
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