Calligraphy Yang Xin
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History/ Examples of Chinese Calligraphy

History/ Examples of Chinese Calligraphy

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  • http://www.imperialtours.net/calligraphy.htm Calligraphy: reflections of the divine According to ancient lore, when a Chinese man named Cangjie learned the divine secret of writing, the spirits were so angry that millet rained from heaven. Perhaps this was because one of the first applications of the Chinese pictograph system was in the practise of divination . This long-standing association between pictographs and the occult forces of nature helps explain the historic and continuing importance the Chinese people attach to writing and to the art of calligraphy. On a par with painting, the art of calligraphy has gone through a long evolution resulting in the development of various styles and schools. It is generally divided into five scripts: the seal script ( zhuanshu ), the official or clerical script ( lishu ), the regular script ( kaishu ), the grass script ( caoshu ) and the running script ( xingshu ). Zhuanshu (seal script) is the most archaic, and can be seen on oracle bones (used for divination) dating back to the Shang and Zhou dynasties (14th century-476 BC). Because of its long, developmental history however, there was great regional variation in its characters. In the above illustration for example, there are 40 different versions of the same auspicious character, shou (longevity). L ishu (official script) was developed during the Qin dynasty (221-207 BC) in an attempt to standardise writing throughout the empire. This script can be seen on many stone inscriptions of the period. Kaishu (regular script) of which the oldest extant example dates soon after to the Wei Kingdom (220-265 AD), simplified the lishu . Its characters are the closest to the modern form, being square and architectural in style. On the basis of the kaishu (regular script), the caoshu (grass script) was developed to allow for a quicker, more fluid style of writing. The final style, or xingshu (running script), lies somewhere between the kaishu (regular) and caoshu (grass) scripts in that at times the strokes are controlled and regular and at other times free and flowing. These are the three scripts most frequently used in modern times - master calligraphers compare them to a person standing (kaishu ), walking (xingshu ) and running (caoshu ). An individual's writing is considered sufficiantly crucial that children are trained from a young age to perfect their writing technique. It is thought that a person's character and refinement can be gleaned from her style, the finest scripts being infused with the writer's vital, creative energy. Thus, calligraphic strokes will often be described in such organic terms as the 'bone', 'flesh', 'muscle' and 'blood' or with reference to such natural Chinese Calligraphy T he history of Chinese calligraphy is as long as that of China itself.  Calligraphy is one of the highest forms of Chinese art.  In studying Chinese calligraphy one must learn something of the origins of Chinese language and of how they were originally written.  However, except for those brought up in the artistic traditions of the country, its aesthetic significance seems to be very difficult to grasp. Chinese calligraphy serves the purpose of conveying thought but also shows the 'abstract' beauty of the line . Rhythm, line, and structure are more perfectly embodied in calligraphy than in painting or sculpture.     A rtistic Characters and rules: * Every Chinese character is built up in its own square with variety of structure and composition. * There are drawing of only three basic forms: the circle, the triangle, and the square. * For each character there is a definite number of strokes and appointed positions for them in relation to the whole. No stroke may be added or deleted for decorative effect. * Strict regularity is not required. The pattern should have a living movement http://www.asia-art.net/calligraphy.htm
  • A Self-Study Course in Running Script (in English)   Code: b00rus1 Price: $19.95 Shipping Weight: 1.00 pounds       Quantity: Add To Basket   A Self-Study Course in Running Script (Introduction and Instruction in English) Compiled and Written by Huang Quanxin Published by Sinolingua, First Edition 1998 ISBN 7800524566; 258 mm x 188 mm / 10.03 inch x 7.06 inch, paperback, 152 pages Chinese calligraphy has a long history, ranging from the keeping of records by tying knots before Cang Jie invented writing, to the characters on earthenware discovered at Dawenkou and inscriptions on bones or tortoise shells of the Shang Dynasty (c. 16th-11th century BC). Chinese characters fall into the following styles: regular, running, grass, official and seal scripts. Seal scripts may be divided into large and small characters; official scripts, into Qin and Han styles; grass characters, into Zhang (cursive official), Jin (modern) and Kuang (wild) scripts; and regular characters, into Wei and Tang scripts. Chinese calligraphy not only reflects the character of individual calligrapher, but also presents the style and flavors of different regions and eras. China has always regarded calligraphy as the quintessence of Chinese culture and a national treasure as well. Calligraphy is a required course at school and every educated person must study calligraphy. Anyone who wishes to have a good command of Chinese calligraphy must have a good teacher and a good book. At the present time when it is hard to find a good teacher, good teaching materials are very important. Professor Huang Quanxin has compiled the Chinese Calligraphy Teach-Yourself Series in six books: A Self-Study Course in Regular Script, A Self-Study Course in Wei Stone Inscriptions, A Self-Study Course in Running Script, A Self-Study Course in Grass Script, A Self-Study Course in Official Script, and A Self-Study Course in Seal Script. Each book consists of the following chapters: A Brief Introduction, Techniques, Strokes, Radicals, Structure, The Art of Composition, Creation, Copying, and Appreciation, which should help beginners learn the rudiments, and other learners improve their calligraphy techniques. With standard model characters, systematic theories for self-study, illustration and texts, the Chinese Calligraphy Teach-Yourself Series is well formatted, informative and interesting. Student may appreciate Chinese calligraphy while practicing the models in the books to improve their accomplishments and techniques. http://www.china-guide.com/arts/calligraphyru.html
  • http://www.paulnoll.com/China/Culture/language-pictographs.html Chinese Characters have developed and evolved over time.
  • The zhuan script or seal character was the earliest form of writing. This script, often used in seals, is translated into English as the seal character, or as the "curly script" after the shape of its strokes. When, in 221 B. C., Emperor Qin Shi Huang unified the whole of China under one central government, he ordered his Prime Minister Li Si to collect and sort out all the different systems of writing hitherto prevalent in different parts of the country in a great effort to unify the written language under one system. What Li did, in effect, was to simplify the ancient zhuan (small seal) script. http://www.china-guide.com/arts/calligraphyrs.html
  • http://www.omniglot.com/writing/chinese.htm Most linguists believe that writing was invented in China during the latter half of the 2nd millenium BC and that there is no evidence to suggest the transmission of writing from elsewhere. The earliest recognisable examples of written Chinese date from 1500-950 BC (Shang dynasty) and were inscribed on ox scapulae and turtle shells - "oracle bones". In 1899 a scholar from Beijing named Wang Yirong noticed symbols that looked like writing on some "dragon bones" which he had been prescribed by a pharmacy. At that time "dragon bones" were often used in Chinese medicine and were usually animal fossils. Many more "oracle bones" were found in the ruins of the Shang capital near Anyang in the north of Henan province. The script on these "oracle bones" is known as çbçúï∂ (jia˘gu˘wén) - literally "shell bone writing". They were used for divination, a process which involved heating them then inspecting the resulting cracks to determine to answers to one's questions. The bones were then inscribed with details of the questions and the answers. Most of the questions involved hunting, warfare, the weather and the selection of auspicious days for ceremonies. Further information about the oracle bones: http://www.chinapage.com/oracle/oracle00.html http://www.lib.cuhk.edu.hk/uclib/bones/bones.htm A collection of oracle bones in the National Palace Museum near Taipei. Recently archaeologists in China have unearthed many fragments of neolithic pottery, the oldest of which date from about 4800 BC, inscribed with symbols which could be a form of writing. None of these symbols resemble any of the Shang characters and the likelyhood of deciphering them is remote given the paucity of material.
  • Arts: Calligraphy, Introduction to Chinese Calligraphy Calligraphy is understood in China as the art of writing a good hand with the brush. Chinese calligraphy (Brush calligraphy) is an art unique to Asian cultures. In the history of Chinese art, calligraphy has always been held in equal importance to painting. Shu (calligraphy) and Hua (painting) are the basic skills and disciplines of the Chinese literati. Chinese calligraphy, like the script itself, began with the hieroglyphs and, over the long ages of evolution, has developed various styles and schools, constituting an important part of the heritage of national culture. Chinese scripts are generally divided into five forms: the seal character (zhuan), the official or clerical script (li), the regular script (kai), the running hand (xing) and the cursive hand (cao). 1) The zhuan script or seal character was the earliest form of writing. This script, often used in seals, is translated into English as the seal character, or as the "curly script" after the shape of its strokes. When, in 221 B. C., Emperor Qin Shi Huang unified the whole of China under one central government, he ordered his Prime Minister Li Si to collect and sort out all the different systems of writing hitherto prevalent in different parts of the country in a great effort to unify the written language under one system. What Li did, in effect, was to simplify the ancient zhuan (small seal) script.   2) The lishu (official script) came in the wake of the xiaozhuan in the same short-lived Qin Dynasty (221 - 207 B. C.). This was because the xiaozhuan, though a simplified form of script, was still too complicated for the scribes in the various government offices who had to copy an increasing amount of documents. Cheng Miao, a prison warden, made a further simplification of the xiaozhuan, changing the curly strokes into straight and angular ones and thus making writing much easier. 3) The lishu was already very close to, and led to the adoption of, kaishu, regular script. The oldest existing example of this dates from the Wei (220-265), and the script developed under the Jin (265-420). The standard writing today is square in form, non-cursive and architectural in style. The characters are composed of a number of strokes out of a total of eight kinds-the dot, the horizontal, the vertical, the hook, the rising, the left-falling (short and long) and the right-falling strokes. Any aspirant for the status of calligrapher must start by learning to write a good hand in kaishu. 4) On the basis of lishu also evolved caoshu (grass writing or cursive hand), which is rapid and used for making quick but rough copies. It is the essence of the caoshu, especially jincao, that the characters are executed swiftly with the strokes running together. The characters are often joined up, with the last stroke of the first merging into the initial stroke of the next. They also vary in size in the same piece of writing, all seemingly dictated by the whims of the writer. A great master at caoshu was Zhang Xu (early 8th century) of the Tang Dynasty, noted for the complete abandon with which he applied the brush. It is said that he would not set about writing until he had got drunk. This he did, allowing the brush to "gallop" across the paper, curling, twisting or meandering in one unbroken stroke, thus creating an original style. 5) The best example and model for xingshu, all Chinese calligraphers will agree, is the Inscription on Lanting Pavilion in the hand of Wang Xizhi (321-379) of the Eastern Jin Dynasty. To learn to write a nice hand in Chinese calligraphy, assiduous and persevering practice is necessary. This has been borne out by the many great masters China has produced. Wang Xizhi, the great artist just mentioned, who has exerted a profound influence on, and has been held in high esteem by, calligraphers and scholars throughout history, is said to have blackened in his childhood all the water of a pond in front of his house by washing the writing implements in it after his daily exercises. Regarded as the most abstract and sublime form of art in Chinese culture, "Shu Fa" (calligraphy) is often thought to be most revealing of one's personality. During the imperial era, calligraphy was used as an important criterion for selection of executives to the Imperial court. Unlike other visual art techniques, all calligraphy strokes are permanent and incorrigible, demanding careful planning and confident execution. Such are the skills required for an administrator / executive. While one has to conform to the defined structure of words, the expression can be extremely creative. To exercise humanistic imagination and touch under the faceless laws and regulations is also a virtue well appreciated. By controlling the concentration of ink, the thickness and absorptivity of the paper, and the flexibility of the brush, the artist is free to produce an infinite variety of styles and forms. To the artist, calligraphy is a mental exercise that coordinates the mind and the body to choose the best styling in expressing the content of the passage. It is a most relaxing yet highly disciplined exercise indeed for one's physical and spiritual well being. Historically, many calligraphy artists were well-known for their longevity. http://www.china-guide.com/arts/vc00zhz.html
  • There was a vigorous revival of Confucianism in the Song that dominated the schools and the civil-service-examination system, as well as political discourse. Contributing to the diverse intellectual life of the time was one of China's greatest poets, Su Shi (1037-1101); the historian and conservative political leader Sima Guang; and the leaders of the movement know in the West as Neo-Confucianism, which was to spread throughout East Asia. Confucianism provided a faith for people to live by, a convincing account of the natural and human world, and a theoretical framework for state and society. It emphasized self-cultivation as a path not only to self-fulfillment but to the formation of a virtuous and harmonious society and state. Some might emphasize one aspect more than the other, but ideally, learning to be a better and wiser person went hand in hand with service to the larger social body. http://afe.easia.columbia.edu/song/intellectual/confucian/confucian.htm _________________ The historical importance of education in Chinese culture is derived from the teachings of Confucius and philosophers of the middle and late Chou eras. Fundamentally, these philosophies taught that social harmony could be achieved only if humans were free from deprivation and given proper education. Confucius taught that all people possessed the same potential, and that education was the corrective means to curb any tendencies to stray from ethical behavior. From the very first, Confucius made education available to students from all classes. Education in China has thus been a equalizing force from ancient times. It became the means by which individuals from even the humblest backgrounds could rise to great heights. Through the ethics of Confucius which informed the traditional curriculum, it was also a powerful mechanism for implementing the ethical and social norms of Chinese society. We know with some certainty that a state system of education was founded during the Han Period the emperor Wu-ti in 124BCE. Students who were admitted to the T'ai hsueh or Great Academy were destined for careers in the civil service after they passed the internal exams and were competitively selected for various positions. Initially only fifty-five students were admitted to the Great Academy. By 8 BCE, the Academy had an enrollment of three thousand students. During the Han Dynasty (202BCE-220CE) provincial schools were established and the Confucian tradition of education was spread across China. As the Academy developed the connection between scholarship and the personality cult of Confucius also became established. The connection between Confucius and the official Chinese educational system thus became permanently linked right into the present time. The curriculum at the Great Academy was based on the Confucian Five Classics and classes were taught by professors of the Five Classics who were known as po-shih. The basis of Chinese education did not change throughout the imperial history till the reign of the last Ch'ing emperors. During the Ch'ing Dynasty (1644-1912) both state and private schools were developed and students were able to buy places into these schools. In contrast to western education, particularly in regard to the model of higher education in Medieval and Renaissance universities where students were encouraged to engage in disputation, traditional Chinese education consisted primarily of rote learning and memorization of the Classics. This formula became standardized by the seventh century CE. Candidates for the Civil Service Imperial Exams were required to memorize a vast amount of classical material and were never required to demonstrate the ability to either theorize or challenge a particular premise. The purpose of the scholar class after all was: the creation of bureaucratic generalists familiar with an accepted ethical outlook and body of knowledge, not with the growth of knowledge or with academic specialization.1 The very democratic nature of Chinese education--i.e., that it offered a path of upward mobility to anyone who could survive the rigors of study and examinations--was established from the first by Confucius himself. A traditional saying attributed to him states that "those who work with their heads will rule, while those who work with their hands will serve." To that end, education thus became a strategy for survival in a country where poverty and hardship had challenged the lives of millions for countless millennia. http://www.csupomona.edu/%7Eplin/ls201/confucian2.html
  • http://www.paulnoll.com/China/Culture/language-Seal-script.html -image The lishu (official script) came in the wake of the xiaozhuan in the same short-lived Qin Dynasty (221 - 207 B. C.). This was because the xiaozhuan, though a simplified form of script, was still too complicated for the scribes in the various government offices who had to copy an increasing amount of documents. Cheng Miao, a prison warden, made a further simplification of the xiaozhuan, changing the curly strokes into straight and angular ones and thus making writing much easier. http://www.china-guide.com/arts/calligraphyrs.html -text
  • Display of seals from the Shanghai Museum
  • The lishu was already very close to, and led to the adoption of, kaishu, regular script. The oldest existing example of this dates from the Wei (220-265), and the script developed under the Jin (265-420). The standard writing today is square in form, non-cursive and architectural in style. The characters are composed of a number of strokes out of a total of eight kinds-the dot, the horizontal, the vertical, the hook, the rising, the left-falling (short and long) and the right-falling strokes. Any aspirant for the status of calligrapher must start by learning to write a good hand in kaishu. http://www.china-guide.com/arts/calligraphyrs.html
  • The best example and model for xingshu, all Chinese calligraphers will agree, is the Inscription on Lanting Pavilion in the hand of Wang Xizhi (321-379) of the Eastern Jin Dynasty. To learn to write a nice hand in Chinese calligraphy, assiduous and persevering practice is necessary. This has been borne out by the many great masters China has produced. Wang Xizhi, the great artist just mentioned, who has exerted a profound influence on, and has been held in high esteem by, calligraphers and scholars throughout history, is said to have blackened in his childhood all the water of a pond in front of his house by washing the writing implements in it after his daily exercises. Regarded as the most abstract and sublime form of art in Chinese culture, "Shu Fa" (calligraphy) is often thought to be most revealing of one's personality. During the imperial era, calligraphy was used as an important criterion for selection of executives to the Imperial court. Unlike other visual art techniques, all calligraphy strokes are permanent and incorrigible, demanding careful planning and confident execution. Such are the skills required for an administrator / executive. While one has to conform to the defined structure of words, the expression can be extremely creative. To exercise humanistic imagination and touch under the faceless laws and regulations is also a virtue well appreciated. By controlling the concentration of ink, the thickness and absorptivity of the paper, and the flexibility of the brush, the artist is free to produce an infinite variety of styles and forms. To the artist, calligraphy is a mental exercise that coordinates the mind and the body to choose the best styling in expressing the content of the passage. It is a most relaxing yet highly disciplined exercise indeed for one's physical and spiritual well being. Historically, many calligraphy artists were well-known for their longevity. http://www.china-guide.com/arts/calligraphyrs.html
  • http://www.paulnoll.com/China/Culture/language-Cursive-script.html
  • Shanghai Museum
  • Prof. Xin Yang discusses the “Four Treasures” The paper, the brush, the ink and the stone.
  • http://www4.ncsu.edu/~hubbe/Paper&ChineseCharacter.htm
  • Calligraphy shop in Xian
  • Proper way to hold the brush
  • http://plaza.ufl.edu/pzhu/project/project.htm From Penghua Zhu’s website.
  • Addition image- http://plaza.ufl.edu/pzhu/project/project.htm From Penghua Zhu’s website.
  • A character may consist of between 1 and 84 stokes. The strokes are always written in the same direction and there is a set order to write the strokes of each character. In dictionaries, characters are ordered partly by the number of stokes they contain. When writing Chinese, every character is given exactly the same amount of space, no matter how many strokes it contains. There are no spaces between characters and the characters which make up multi-syllable words are not grouped together, so when reading Chinese, you not only have to work out what the characters mean and how to pronounce them, but also which characters belong together. http://www.omniglot.com/writing/chinese.htm
  • Regarded as the most abstract and sublime form of art in Chinese culture, "Shu Fa" (calligraphy) is often thought to be most revealing of one's personality. During the imperial era, calligraphy was used as an important criterion for selection of executives to the Imperial court. Unlike other visual art techniques, all calligraphy strokes are permanent and incorrigible, demanding careful planning and confident execution. Such are the skills required for an administrator / executive. While one has to conform to the defined structure of words, the expression can be extremely creative. To exercise humanistic imagination and touch under the faceless laws and regulations is also a virtue well appreciated. By controlling the concentration of ink, the thickness and absorptivity of the paper, and the flexibility of the brush, the artist is free to produce an infinite variety of styles and forms. To the artist, calligraphy is a mental exercise that coordinates the mind and the body to choose the best styling in expressing the content of the passage. It is a most relaxing yet highly disciplined exercise indeed for one's physical and spiritual well being. Historically, many calligraphy artists were well-known for their longevity. http://www.china-guide.com/arts/calligraphyrs.html
  • The visiting Gov. of Oklahoma, Brad Henry was among the guests for Xin Yang’s Lecture.
  • The Chinese writing system    Chinese is written with characters known as hànzi (). Each character represents a syllable of spoken Chinese and also has a meaning. The characters were originally pictures of people, animals or other things but over the centuries they have become increasingly stylised and no longer resemble the things the represent. Many of the characters are actually compounds of two or more characters How many characters? The Chinese writing system an open-ended one, meaning that there is no upper limit to the number of characters. The largest Chinese dictionaries include about 56,000 characters, but most of them are archaic, obscure or rare variant forms. Knowledge of about 3,000 characters is sufficient to read Modern Standard Chinese. To read Classical Chinese though, you need to be familiar with about 6,000 characters. Usage Characters can be used on their own, in combination with other characters or as part of other characters. Click here to see how this works for the character for horse: Simplified characters In an effort to increase literacy, about 2,000 of the characters used in China have been simplified. These simplified characters are also used in Singapore, but in Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macau and Malaysia the traditional characters are still used. Here are some examples (simplified characters in red):
  • http://www.asia-art.net/chinese_calligraphy_paint.htm

Calligraphy Yang Xin Calligraphy Yang Xin Presentation Transcript

  • “ Chinese Calligraphy” History and Technique Compiled by Robert Ponzio Oak Hall School
  • Featuring: “ The Art of the Heart” A Lecture / Demonstration by Prof. Yang Xin University of Beijing 6/20/04
  • Dr. Sacho Sato
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  • Chinese Pictographs The development of the character wan (falling tone) (scorpion): from left to right, archaic Shang, oracle Shang, and modern. The development of the character yang (rising tone) (sheep): from left to right, archaic, small seal, and modern. Scorpion Sheep
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  • Cna yuo raed tihs? Olny 55 plepoe out of 100 can.  i cdnuolt blveiee taht I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd waht I was rdanieg. The phaonmneal pweor of the hmuan mnid, aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it dseno't mtaetr in waht oerdr the ltteres in a wrod are, the olny iproamtnt tihng is taht the frsit and lsat ltteer be in the rghit pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you can sitll raed it whotuit a pboerlm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe. Azanmig huh? yaeh and I awlyas tghuhot slpeling was ipmorantt!
  • Oracle Bone Script (Zhuan script or seal characters)
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  • Oracle Bones The earliest Oracle Bone dates back 8,000 years ago
  • The 1 st was discovered in N. Hunan Province in 1899.
  • Since then, 150,000 more oracle bones have been found bearing more than 4,500 characters
  • A new discovery in Xanxi province reveals another 600 characters.
  • A lecture by Professor Yang Liluen examined the history and development of Chinese writing and discussed pottery that was unearthed in Texas and Arizona which bears Chinese Script. He also sited DNA studies by Emery University Scientists which points to a relationship between Native Americans and the Chinese.
  • Lishu or Clerical Script
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  • Confucianism Ask me about: Mencius vs. Xunxi! Confucianism provided a faith for people to live by, a convincing account of the natural and human world, and a theoretical framework for state and society. It emphasized self-cultivation as a path not only to self-fulfillment but to the formation of a virtuous and harmonious society and state. Some might emphasize one aspect more than the other, but ideally, learning to be a better and wiser person went hand in hand with service to the larger social body.
  • Lishu First Official Script Qin Dynasty (221-207 B.C.) Emperor Qin Shi Huang
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  • Great Wall
  • TOMB OF THE EMPORER QIN SHIHUANG (D. 210 BC) XIAN
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  • Kaishu or Regular Script “ Standing”
  • Kaishu or Regular Script The oldest existing example dates from the Wei (220-265), which simplified the Lishu. Kaishu script was further developed under the Jin (265-420) and continued to develop into the standard writing of today
  • Xingshu (semi cursive) lies somewhere between the kaishu (regular) and caoshu (grass) scripts in that at times the strokes are controlled and regular and at other times free and flowing. “ Walking”
  • Xingshu (semi cursive) “ Walking”
  • Caoshu - Grass or Cursive Script “ Running”
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  • This cursive style of calligraphy by Wen Zhengming (1470-1559) has been called "The Dance of the Brush." It is used as a means of artistic expression: the character itself is less important than its expressive quality .
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  • The Four Treasures
  • The INK
  • The STONE
  • The Brush
  • Paper was invented in China. It is said that paper was invented in the year 105 by a man called Cai Lun. He lived in Shaanxi province during the Han dynasty almost 1900 years ago. The Paper
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  • Prof. Yang Xin Beijing Univ. 6/19/04
  • Prof. Yang Xin Beijing Univ. 6/19/04
  • Prof. Yang Xin Beijing Univ. 6/19/04
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    • Penghua Zhu
    • University of Florida Graduate Student
    • http://plaza.ufl.edu/pzhu/project/project.htm
    Brush Holding Position
  • SPRING Three + Human + Sun = Spring
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  • 2 year Old Calligrapher
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  • 8 Basic Strokes of Chinese Calligraphy
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  • Dot Stroke
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  • 1. Dot Dian
  • 2. Horizontal Heng
  • 3. Vertical 4. Hook Shu Gou
  • 5. Raise Ti
  • 6. Aside Pie
  • 7. Left Falling Duan Pie
  • 8. Right Falling Na
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  • Shu Fa : ABSTRACTION
  • Horse
  • Anger Professor Yang Xin Calligraphy Demonstration Beijing University, 6/19/04
  • Professor Yang Xin Calligraphy Demonstration Beijing University, 6/19/04
  • Dragon
  • Dreaming
  • Jade
  • “ Coming of Spring” By Xin Yang “ I heard the girl was setting flowers downstairs”. Famous Tang Dynasty Poem
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  • Happiness
  • Karma
  • Smiling
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  • SPRING Three + Human + Sun = Spring
  • Spring
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  • Simplified Characters In an effort to increase literacy, about 2,000 of the characters used in China have been simplified. These simplified characters are also used in Singapore, but in Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macau and Malaysia the traditional characters are still used. Here are some examples (simplified characters in red):
  • Spring Summer Fall Winter
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  • Zhang Zuyi (1849-1917) Calligraphy in Clerical Script, ink on paper 52 3/8 x 26 inches Zhang Zuyi was born in Tongcheng, Anhui Province.  His was also known by his literary name Lei.  Zhang Zuyi learned the seal style calligraphy from ancient styles of Shigu and Zhongding.  His official style was the style of the Han Dynasty ( 202 B.C. -220 A.D.). and stone tablets.
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  • Three Kinds of Archaic Graphs and their Transitions to Modern Characters Top Row: Complex single-element graphs whose modern parallels are direct descendants of archaic forms. Middle Row: Simple multiple-element graphs lacking modern equivalents. Bottom Row: Complex multi-element graphs with either modern descendants or equivalents. Chinese Oracle Bone and Tortoise Shell Inscriptions