Oscar Wilde
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Oscar Wilde

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Oscar Wilde Oscar Wilde Presentation Transcript

  • Oscar Wilde was an Anglo-Irish playwright, novelist,poet, and critic. He is regarded as one of the greatestplaywrights of the Victorian Era.In his lifetime he wrote nine plays, one novel, andnumerous poems, short stories, and essays.Wilde was a proponent of the Aesthetic movement,which emphasized aesthetic values more than moralor social themes. This doctrine is most clearlysummarized in the phrase art for arts sake.Besides literary accomplishments, he is also famous,or perhaps infamous, for his wit, flamboyance, andaffairs with men. He was tried and imprisoned for hishomosexual relationship (then considered a crime)with the son of an aristocrat.
  • Birth name: Oscar Fingal OFlahertieWills WildeBirth date: October 16, 1854Birth place: Dublin, IrelandNationality: Irish―The oldbelieveeverything; themiddle agedsuspecteverything: theyoung knoweverything.‖Oscar Wilde
  • Educated:Trinity College (Dublin)Magdalen College (Oxford)Father: Sir William Wilde (eye doctor)Mother: Jane Francesca Elgee (poet and journalist)Siblings: brother William, sister IsolaSpouse: Constance LloydChildren: two sons - Cyril and VyvyanOccupation: Playwright, novelist, poet, editor, criticPeriod: Victorian era (1837–1901)Literary movement: Aestheticism―Education is anadmirable thing, butit is well toremember fromtime to time thatnothing that isworth knowing canbe taught.‖Oscar Wilde
  • Famous Works:The Picture of Dorian Gray (novel)The Importance of Being Earnest (play)The Ballad of Reading Gaol (poem)Died: November 30, 1900 (aged 46) inParis, FranceResting place: La Pére LachaiseCemetery, Paris, France―I have the simplest tastes. I amalways satisfied with the best.‖―The secret of life is in art.‖Oscar Wilde
  • 1854 Born in Dublin1864 - 1871 Attends Portora Royal School,Enniskillen1871 - 1874 Attends Trinity College, Dublin1874 - 1879 Attends Magdalen College, Oxford1878 Wins Newdigate Prize for Ravenna (poem)1881 Publishes his first collection of poetry – Poems1882 Lectures in the United States and Canada.Writes his first play - Vera, or the Nihilists (was not asuccess)1883 Lectures in Britain and Ireland. Writes hissecond unsuccessful play, The Duchess of Padua―All art isquite useless.‖―Beauty is theonly thing thattime cannotharm.‖―I havenothing todeclare exceptmy genius.‖Oscar Wilde
  • 1884 Marries Constance Lloyd1885 His son, Cyril, is born1886 His son, Vyvyan, is born1887-1889 Edits Womans World magazine1888 Publishes The Happy Prince and Other Tales1889 -1890 Publishes several essays1891 Publishes two collections of short stories - LordArthur Saviles Crime and other Stories, and A House ofPomegranates. Publishes The Picture of Dorian Gray, hisfirst and only novel. Begins his friendship with LordAlfred Douglas – Bosie.
  • 1892 Writes two plays: Lady Windermeres Fan (greatsuccess) and Salome1893 Writes A Woman of No Importance1894 Writes The Importance of Being Earnest1895 Writes An ldeal Husband. At the height of histheatrical success, he sues Bosies father for libel,which leads to his own arrest for homosexualoffenses. He is found guilty for the crime of sodomyand sentenced to two years of hard labor.1897 While in prison, he writes De Profundis1898 Writes his best known poem, The Ballad ofReading Gaol. His wife, Constance, dies.1900 Dies of cerebral meningitis in Paris.―Be yourself;everyone elseis alreadytaken.‖Oscar Wilde
  • The Picture of Dorian Gray is the onlypublished novel by Oscar Wilde, appearing as the leadstory in Lippincotts Monthly Magazine on 20 June 1890,printed as the July 1890 issue of this magazine. Wildelater revised this edition, making several alterations, andadding new chapters; the amended version waspublished by Ward, Lock, and Company in April 1891.There were moments when he looked on evil simply asa mode through which he could realize his conceptionof the beautiful. – NarrationAnd mind you don’t talk about anything serious.Nothing is serious nowadays. At least, nothing shouldbe. – Dorian GrayI am tired of myself tonight. I should like to besomebody else. – Dorian GrayI love scandals about other people, but scandals aboutmyself don’t interest me. They have not got the charmof novelty. – Dorian Gray
  • The novel tells of a young man named Dorian Gray,the subject of a painting by artist Basil Hallward. Basilis impressed by Dorians beauty and becomesinfatuated with him, believing his beauty is responsiblefor a new mode in his art. Dorian meets Lord HenryWotton, a friend of Basils, and becomes enthralled byLord Henrys world view. Espousing a new hedonism,Lord Henry suggests the only things worth pursuing inlife are beauty and fulfillment of the senses. Realizingthat one day his beauty will fade, Dorian (whimsically)expresses a desire to sell his soul to ensure the portraitBasil has painted would age rather than he. Dorianswish is fulfilled, plunging him into debauched acts. Theportrait serves as a reminder of the effect each act hasupon his soul, with each sin displayed as adisfigurement of his form, or through a sign of aging.The Picture of Dorian Gray is considered a work ofclassic gothic fiction with a strong Faustian theme.
  • In a letter, Wilde said the main characters were reflections of himself: "Basil Hallward is whatI think I am: Lord Henry is what the world thinks me: Dorian is what I would like to be—inother ages, perhaps"The main characters are:Dorian Gray – a handsome and narcissistic young man who becomesenthralled with Lord Henrys idea of a new hedonism. He begins to indulgein every kind of pleasure, moral and immoral.Basil Hallward – an artist who becomes infatuated with Dorian.Dorian helps Hallward realize his artistic potential, as Basils portrait ofDorian proves to be his finest work. A devout Christian with conservativevalues, he is later murdered by Gray.Lord Henry "Harry" Wotton – an imperious anddecadent dandy who is a friend to Basil initially, but later becomes moreintrigued with Dorians beauty. Extremely witty, he is seen asa critique of Victorian culture at the end of the century, espousing a viewof indulgent hedonism. He conveys to Gray his world view, and Dorianbecomes corrupted as he attempts to emulate him, though Basil points outto Harry that "You never say a moral thing, and you never do a wrongthing."
  • Other characters include:Sibyl Vane – a beautiful and talented, but poor, actress and singer,with whom Dorian falls in love. Her love for him ruins her actingability, as she no longer finds pleasure in portraying fictional love whenshe is experiencing love in reality. She commits suicide after learningthat Dorian no longer loves her. Lord Henry likens her to Ophelia.James Vane – Sibyls brother, a sailor who leaves for Australia. He isextremely protective of his sister, especially as their mother cares onlyfor Dorians money. He is hesitant to leave his sister, believing Dorianwill harm her and promises to take vengeance if any harm should befallhis sister. After Sibyls death he becomes obsessed with killing Dorianand begins to stalk him. He dies in a hunting accident. His pursuit ofrevenge against Dorian Gray for the death of his sister emulates therole of Laertes, Ophelias brother in Hamlet.Alan Campbell – a chemist and once-time friend of Dorian; heended their friendship when Dorians reputation began to come intoquestion. Dorian blackmails him into disposing of Basils body;Campbell later commits suicide.Lord Fermor – Lord Henrys uncle, who informs his nephew aboutDorian Grays lineage.Victoria, Lady Wotton – Lord Henrys wife, who only appearsonce in the novel. Her husband treats her with disdain; she laterdivorces him.
  • Performed bySophia Polyanska10-A