Government ICT Strategy and Action
Plan to 2017
John Roberts
Director, Client Capability
• ICT Strategy and Action Plan launched 24 June 2013
• Where did it come from?
• What does it cover?
• What does it mean f...
Government expectations
1. Delivering an effective, efficient and fiscally responsible Public Sector
•NZ government has to...
Delivering Better Public Services
• Transforming how government uses IT to improve public services and bring
savings to ta...
Archives and the Government information system
• Colin MacDonald, Government CIO: “Good information
management is fundamen...
What is expected of the GCIO
Government sees the GCIO as central to delivering system change by:
• setting direction (poli...
ICT includes:
• Information management
• Technology infrastructure
• Technology-enabled business processes and services
• ...
Guiding Principles
• Centrally led, collaboratively delivered
led by the GCIO, delivered with and by agencies.
• Customer ...
Outcomes
• Service delivery models are more integrated, effective and efficient
• New value is realised from government-he...
Strategy and Action Plan
Investment and portfolio assurance
Informationsecurity
Privacybydesign
Accountability,decisionrig...
Services are digital by default
• Grow the digital channel
• Consolidate non-digital channels
• Enhance service design
Information is managed as an asset
• Unlock the value of information
• Embed trust and security
• Build information govern...
Investment and capability are shared
• Integrate ICT planning
• Accelerate the uptake of common capabilities
• Build workf...
Leadership and culture deliver change
• Re-organise capability
• Develop leadership
• Enhance governance and decision maki...
System Assurance
• Central agencies, the GCIO, departments and
agencies across the State Services all have a role
in provi...
The Strategy and Action Plan
• Sets a direction of travel with which agency-level planning should align
• Does not remove ...
Information is managed as an asset
• “the full value of government-held information will be recognised and
actively used”
...
Some key actions
• Information management, privacy and security framework
• Enhance information governance
• Review inform...
Strategic Information Management
• Clear information management leadership
• Supporting system level responses
• Privacy a...
Questions?
• The Strategy and related documents are at:
• http://ict.govt.nz/strategy
• Or email:
• rkadvice@dia.govt.nz
•...
All of government information technology strategy: What does this mean for records managers?
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All of government information technology strategy: What does this mean for records managers?

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Archives New Zealand Director, Client Capability, John Roberts (aka antiquarian and subject matter expertise in men's fashion), presents on the implications of the Strategy and Action plan for those who work with records and information in an ever changing environment.

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All of government information technology strategy: What does this mean for records managers?

  1. 1. Government ICT Strategy and Action Plan to 2017 John Roberts Director, Client Capability
  2. 2. • ICT Strategy and Action Plan launched 24 June 2013 • Where did it come from? • What does it cover? • What does it mean for records managers?
  3. 3. Government expectations 1. Delivering an effective, efficient and fiscally responsible Public Sector •NZ government has to do more with less 2. Public Service to be more innovative, enterprising, driven and focused on outcomes •clients demand robust, scalable, flexible ICT services that meet their needs 3. A strengthened system of assurance •to better manage risk and quality, to enhance trust and confidence 4. Functional leaders drive this change •“aimed at securing economies or efficiencies across departments, improving services or service delivery, developing expertise and capability across the Public Service, and ensuring business continuity”. [CAB Min (12) 16/10]
  4. 4. Delivering Better Public Services • Transforming how government uses IT to improve public services and bring savings to taxpayers • Result 9: New Zealand businesses will have a one-stop online shop for all government advice and support they need to run and grow their business • Reduce business interaction costs from dealing with government by 25% by 2017 • Result 10: easier completion of transactions with government in a digital environment • By 2017, average of 70% of New Zealander’s most common transactions with government completed in digital environment
  5. 5. Archives and the Government information system • Colin MacDonald, Government CIO: “Good information management is fundamental to everything we do. Good practices protect privacy.” • GCIO and Chief Archivist roles complementary • Archives deeply involved in All-of-Government work • ICT Strategy Task Force • Central and Local Government
  6. 6. What is expected of the GCIO Government sees the GCIO as central to delivering system change by: • setting direction (policy, strategy and standards) • prioritising and improving investment management system-wide • shaping and developing government capability • monitoring and reporting on performance • delivering $100 million in system-wide savings per annum, by 2017 • being the central point of coordination and reporting for managing information and technology risks, and the quality of government’s ICT-enabled projects and services • improving system-wide assurance
  7. 7. ICT includes: • Information management • Technology infrastructure • Technology-enabled business processes and services • This is not just a technology roadmap
  8. 8. Guiding Principles • Centrally led, collaboratively delivered led by the GCIO, delivered with and by agencies. • Customer centric customers inform service design and delivery • Build trust and confidence underpins our ability to use digital channels • Simplify by design remove complexity, fragmentation and duplication • Share by default capabilities shared by default, rather than by exception • Openness and transparency non-personal information is open by default ICT Strategy and Action Plan
  9. 9. Outcomes • Service delivery models are more integrated, effective and efficient • New value is realised from government-held information assets • Agencies have migration pathways for aging legacy systems • Scarce capabilities and resources are more available to agencies • Scale and efficiencies continue to be leveraged • Assurance systems better manage risk and quality • There is more partnering with the private sector and NGOs • The pace of change and benefits delivery is increased ICT Strategy and Action Plan
  10. 10. Strategy and Action Plan Investment and portfolio assurance Informationsecurity Privacybydesign Accountability,decisionrights Rapid incident response System assurance Services are digital by default Information is managed as an asset Investment and capability are shared Leadership and culture deliver change Fiscalsustainability
  11. 11. Services are digital by default • Grow the digital channel • Consolidate non-digital channels • Enhance service design
  12. 12. Information is managed as an asset • Unlock the value of information • Embed trust and security • Build information governance and capability
  13. 13. Investment and capability are shared • Integrate ICT planning • Accelerate the uptake of common capabilities • Build workforce capability
  14. 14. Leadership and culture deliver change • Re-organise capability • Develop leadership • Enhance governance and decision making • Collaborate, communicate and engage
  15. 15. System Assurance • Central agencies, the GCIO, departments and agencies across the State Services all have a role in providing ICT assurance • The GCIO is required to provide assurance that ICT risks and processes within the State Services are identified and effectively managed
  16. 16. The Strategy and Action Plan • Sets a direction of travel with which agency-level planning should align • Does not remove the need for initiatives to progress through normal processes such as business cases and the Cabinet paper process • Action plan regularly refreshed as individual initiatives are validated, approved, re- shaped or re-prioritised Pre-requisites for success 1. Providing clarity – shared vision, shared direction 2. Committed leadership – driven at all levels 3. Cluster-based – new operating models need to be in place 4. Funding – targeted investments to achieve specific outcomes 5. System-wide assurance – ICT risks and processes are identified and effectively managed
  17. 17. Information is managed as an asset • “the full value of government-held information will be recognised and actively used” • Government recordkeeping practices will be ‘digital from inception’ • Whole-of-life information management will be value focused, support the development of new joined-up services, and be open by default
  18. 18. Some key actions • Information management, privacy and security framework • Enhance information governance • Review information policy and legislation • Deliver a cloud enterprise content management ‘as-a-Service’ solution • Centres of expertise [including] for information management
  19. 19. Strategic Information Management • Clear information management leadership • Supporting system level responses • Privacy and security as outcomes of good information management • IM good practice embedded in common capabilities • Coherence across multiple mandates
  20. 20. Questions? • The Strategy and related documents are at: • http://ict.govt.nz/strategy • Or email: • rkadvice@dia.govt.nz • Or ask now!
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