Consumer (re)connect: online marketing communications for Instima

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Consumer (re)connect: online marketing communications for Instima

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Advanced marketing communication skills lecture on reconnecting with consumers for Instima.

Advanced marketing communication skills lecture on reconnecting with consumers for Instima.

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  • 1. Consumer (re)connect. Why brands should commit acts, not ads and design conversation- worthy engagement. (and some other things that don‟t sound like I took it from the marketing bullsh*tbingo dictionary) Photo: Skittles© InSites Consulting Polle de Maagt (Insites Consulting) for Instima Conversation readiness 1
  • 2. Hello. I am Polle de Maagt. I failed in most things during my life (including being a rock star) but am still trying to reach #worlddomination. This time by helping companies change to be more about acts and conversations, less about ads. Guess that makes me a change agent.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 2
  • 3. Read the manual.Seriously.Read it.
  • 4. Let’s discussWaaay waaaaaaay back …And the people?Reconnecting with consumers.Acting like a change agent.Designing for engagement.Designing for sales.
  • 5. Waaay waaaaaaay back … … we started out trading goods and services for goods and services. One person helps another one with goods or service and gets rewarded for that. Happy people would tell others about it and that’s pretty much the way you grew your business. But businesses changed.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 5
  • 6. Some businesses started departments and different layers.Some people within these business didn’t even speak or see theircustomers anymore on a regular basis.
  • 7. Some businesses started to talk like a company, not like people.They installed fancy corporate communication policies.Some businesses changed personal contacts for marketing (even more: militairy) speak like„contact-strategy‟, “target” and “target-audience”.
  • 8. Some businesses felt personal contact cost them money andstarted callcenters and made it more difficult to contact them.Some businesses started to reward their employees for speed, share of wallet and upselling, notfor service quality or service.
  • 9. Some businesses started to think about how much money theycould make from different services, instead of supplying service.
  • 10. Some businessesadopted fancytechnology to dealwith people.Zappos does an amazing job in makingtechnology invisible and reallyunderstanding consumers.(Thanks Steven Verbruggen for the tip!)
  • 11. Some businesses felt that helping indivi-duals didn’t make that much sense.You might be surprised that 11% of all organizations doesn’t answercustomer emails. Even more when you know that exceeding customerexpectations builds loyalty (81% repeats, 63% recommends) and fallingbelow customer expectations erodes loyalty (5%/71%).So start helping.
  • 12. Some business started to stress their technical benefits, insteadof investing in real connections.
  • 13. Some businesses thought getting new customers was coolerthan keeping your current ones.
  • 14. Some businesses thought that if people don’t listen you justhave to scream louder.
  • 15. Some businesses over-rationalized and forgot about the power ofrandom kindness.
  • 16. Some businesses forgot that everything you do iscommunication. That employees talk and even more, acts talkloudest.
  • 17. And some businesses … well, you get the idea.
  • 18. Let’s discussWaaay waaaaaaay back …And the people?Reconnecting with consumers.Acting like a change agent.Designing for engagement.Designing for sales.
  • 19. And the people? They pretty much kept doing what they were already doing. They kept buying stuff. They kept talking about businesses and products. But somewhere, slowly they started to change. Because of the way businesses treated them, but also because of new technology that had emerged.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 19
  • 20. They started to be 24/7 and realtime.KLM helps customers Monday to Sunday from 8AM to 11PM. Thatis almost a 24/7/365 realtime customer support center. Imagine theimplications for your organization.
  • 21. They started to have a lower tolerance for bad customer service.
  • 22. They started orienting and buying online.
  • 23. They started expressing their love for brands and businesses inunprecedented ways.
  • 24. They used tools to make their own ideas happen.
  • 25. They started buying things together.What do you want your consumers to talk about? About pricing or something else?However, recognize the lead-potential and social buying mechanics.
  • 26. Let’s discussWaaay waaaaaaay back …And the people?Reconnecting with consumers.Acting like a change agent.Designing for engagement.Designing for sales.
  • 27. Reconnecting with consumers. And while businesses and people kept evolving, the gap widened and widened. And now we got to the point where companies should change. To reconnect again.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 27
  • 28. And it’s not about being on Facebook. Or Twitter.Yes, Twitter is huge. And Facebook even bigger. But they are both platforms, not endgoals. So it really is about if and how both can help you reach your end goal. Which ismost likely not about having a Facebook fan page and more about drivingconversations, customer retention, sales or brand value.
  • 29. It’s not about being a big brand.With big brands come big problems. Never lookfor an excuse in just being a small company withlittle budgets. When it comes to connecting withconsumers, real relationships work. And size, foronce, doesn’t matter.
  • 30. And it certainly isn‟tabout being the firstmover in adopting newtechnology.Mobile, augmented reality, locationbased services are all just awesome.And yes, there is PR-value in being thefirst Augmented Reality bakery in yourneighborhood. But is that really whatyou want your consumers to talkabout?
  • 31. Reconnecting with consumers. We’ve grown so far apart, that we do not need small change, but radical change to reconnect. Change that finally brings consumers back in the boardroom. Change that embraces people, not targets consumers.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 31
  • 32. Over-the-top-delivery Makes negative conversations Over-delivery Makes positive conversations Expectation Delivery Gives no reason to talk Under-delivery Makes negative conversations Be maniacal about managing expectations. Under-promise, over-deliver in everything you do. Not only towards customers but also to your colleagues.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 32
  • 33. Act human.
  • 34. Really do something for your consumers.
  • 35. KLM showed they were really recognizingthe person behind every customer.With the KLM Surprise campaign, they surprised customers based on theirFoursquare and Twitter checkins. Talking about remarkable customer service …
  • 36. From ads to acts: Nike changed the way people run. Nike could have done another advertising campaign. Instead, they did everything to create the coolest running club ever, the Nike RunHouse. And they went even further, they used smart technology to make people run different routes and longer distances: the Nike+ Graffiti Challenge.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 36
  • 37. Embed new ways ofmeasuring success.Try measuring the Net PromoterScore to see how likely it is that yourcolleagues will recommend yourcompany.
  • 38. Isn‟t she cute? It helped Antwerp Zoo to capitalize ontheir unused potential: their animals and employees.It brought them 300.000 extra visitors, a nomination for product of the year and thebest thing … the number one carnival suit of that year.
  • 39. Act on your pot of gold. Recognize both monetary and conversation value.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 39
  • 40. Bring your sales where the customers are. Bring the sales where your clients are.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 40
  • 41. Embrace co-creation.More than 60% of all consumers and employees want to help to make yourproduct or organization really better. Facilitate them to do so.
  • 42. Advocacy is the new retention is the new acquisition.
  • 43. Embrace company culture and identity instead of marketing façade.
  • 44. Design to be conversation-worthy on every level. Design your acts to be worth talking about and worth sharing. Plan for touchpoints, people and conversion.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 44
  • 45. Let’s discussWaaay waaaaaaay back …And the people?Reconnecting with consumers.Acting like a change agent.Designing for engagement.Designing for sales.
  • 46. Acting like a change agent. That isn’t easy. That means we need change agents, people who help change companies and reconnect businesses and people. Actually, reconnect people within a business and people. Act like a change agent.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 46
  • 47. Conversations: Observe, Facilitate, Join. Watch, make it easy to share and join.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 47
  • 48. Define a clear goal and scope for your efforts. Make sure you are clear about goals, internal and external expectations.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 48
  • 49. Ben & Jerry’s a brand with high potential. Have a look at your brand/product portfolio and see what works. Ben & Jerry’s has a clear purpose, fans and an impressive digital infrastructure in place already. A logical choice to start your efforts.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 49
  • 50. Have a look at the consumer journey. What are the touchpoints that influence the consumer?© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 50
  • 51. Proactive versus reactive. Decide on reactive versus proactive and marketing versus service.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 51
  • 52. Touchpoints, people and content. Plan for three different kinds of properties.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 52
  • 53. Managing change. Implementing conversations and consumer connect isn’t easy. Use different change mechanisms to gradually change the organization.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 53
  • 54. Pilots: Intrinsic, Learning and Change KPI’s. Make sure pilot projects define clear goals on intrinsic KPI’s, learning KPI’s and change management KPI’s.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 54
  • 55. Telenet launched a new product that wasn’t finished: Telenet Yelo, an application to watch tv anywhere. Instead of waiting for the product to be completely finished or selling something that didn’t work, they asked their customers to help to make the product better.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 55
  • 56. Let’s discussWaaay waaaaaaay back …And the people?Reconnecting with consumers.Acting like a change agent.Designing for engagement.Designing for sales.
  • 57. Designing for engagement. The difference between online marketing, online marketing campaigns and gradual engagement.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 57
  • 58. Facebook forces engagement. A lot of campaigns are designed to collect Facebook likes. To be able to tap into the consumer news feed, however, a consumer had to have a recent interaction with a brand. "News Feed (…) is a constantly updating list of stories from people and Pages that you follow (…) bases this on a few factors: how many friends are commenting on a certain piece of content, who posted the content, and what type of content it is (e.g. photo, video, or status update)".© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 58
  • 59. Gradual engagement. Gradual engagement starts from small interactions between brands and consumers. Interactions, to engage consumers by little baby steps. Small steps that, all together, make a giant leap. But more importantly, people are engaged 24/7/365, not just during campaigning season.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 59
  • 60. Example? Skittles’ smart triggers. Using great copy and teasing visuals Skittles engages thousands of consumers every single time they post a wallpost on Facebook. It creates a continuous stream of small but extremely pleasant interactions.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 60
  • 61. Engagement funnel. Engagement isn’t just for fun. We’re working to build a brand here. Interactions should be designed to engage consumers, not to spam them or yelling louder and actually take them further into brand engagement.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 61
  • 62. Engagement funnel: campaigns versus programs. Campaigns are large adhoc efforts to force reach. Programs are constant small interactions to activate consumers to stay engaged or (preferably) move further into the engagement funnel. Thanks to my buddy Jourik Migom for highlighting the difference between campaigns and programs. Large campaign to gather followers Compelling copy Adwords campaign© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 62
  • 63. Il Giglio d’Oro, a simple bed & breakfast in Firenze turned every customer > advocate. It helped them to become the #1 bed & breakfast in Italy and #8 bed & breakfast in Europe. Conversion between stumbling and endorsing.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 63
  • 64. Turkcell created continuous live interaction. To promote it’s mobile offering, Turkcell created a live twitter-based game. Based on twitter interactions, post-its would be removed or changed. Conversion from stumbling to folllowing / endorsing.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 64
  • 65. The spotlight tactic. See KLM Surprise, Volkswagen Fun Theory, the Coca Cola Happiness machine and this one. A small thing worth sharing and putting a spotlight via media.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 65
  • 66. Let’s discussWaaay waaaaaaay back …And the people?Reconnecting with consumers.Acting like a change agent.Designing for engagement.Designing for sales.
  • 67. InSites Consulting Social sales.At the end of the day, we want to make money. The most obvious social sales is direct sales: convertpeople from your touchpoint to sales. However, a large part of eventual sales is consumer-initiated (e.g.they talk about products) or indirect (e.g. people see a facebook fanpage and go to the .com later).So, what can brands do to stimulate direct and indirect sales? Consumer initiated Giftwrap offering Affiliate Engage- ENGAGING ACTIVATING ment Stimulate consumer to talk so that Make it easy for consumers to program they activate their peers to buy. directly influence others to buy. Indirect Direct Social as PRIMING relevant Consumers have seen a social SOCIAL OFFERING brand presence but act later. Design the offering to be social. Source- Stimulate to act. Social as mapping Social as sales reach Brand initiated Polle de Maagt for InSites Consulting
  • 68. 1) Social as reach.It’s the 2011 equivalent of a mailinglist or bannering: just use social mediafor reach purposes.
  • 69. 2) Leverage social sales: buying together.Be smart in offering deals: make it social.
  • 70. 3) Have a conversation-worthy sales offering.Make sure people can talk about your offering.
  • 71. 4) Recognizing personal conversation value.Recognize both monetary and conversation value.
  • 72. You can forget most of the things I told you today.But please, remember these 5 things.
  • 73. 1) Businesses got out of touch with people without even realizing it. Be honest. Where did you get out of touch with the people who buy your products and services?© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 73
  • 74. 2) Nothing changed. Everything changed.Recognize you have to change the way you communicate. Commit acts, not ads.
  • 75. 3) Observe, Facilitate, Join.Watch, make it easy to share and join. Repeat.
  • 76. 4) Design to be conversation-worthy on every level. Design your acts to be worth talking about and worth sharing. Plan for touchpoints, people and conversion.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 76
  • 77. 5) Plan for engagement. Engagement isn’t just for fun. We’re working to build a brand here. Interactions should be designed to engage consumers, not to spam them or yelling louder and actually take them further into brand engagement.© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 77
  • 78. I hope I was conversation-worthy. If so: spread the word. Find me on twitter (@polledemaagt) or just send me an email at polle@insites.eu. Download the presentation at http://polle.me/instima2011© InSites Consulting Conversation readiness 78