An incredible journey

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An incredible journey

  1. 1. You can travel with NASA from the infinitely big until the infinitely small
  2. 2. In this travel it is very difficult to understand the distances. We begin at 10 million light-years (10 23 m.) and we finish at 10 -16 m. here on Earth. Good journey.
  3. 3. 10 million light-years (10 23 m) from the Milky Way
  4. 4. 1 million light-years (10 22 m) You can see some galaxies.
  5. 5. 100.000 light-years (10 21 m) You can hardly see our galaxy!
  6. 6. 10.000 light-years (10 20 m) You can see some stars in our galaxy.
  7. 7. 1.000 light-years (10 19 m) Stars ten times nearer.
  8. 8. 100 light-years (10 18 m) Stars...
  9. 9. 10 light-years (10 17 m) Only stars...
  10. 10. 1 light-year (10 16 m) Very small... we can see the Sun
  11. 11. 1 trillion kilometres (10 15 m) The Sun... somewhat bigger
  12. 12. 100 billion kilometres (10 14 m) We can see the Solar System. (Orbits of planets have been drawn.)
  13. 13. 10 billion kilometres (10 13 m) Our Solar System.
  14. 14. 1 billion kilometres (10 12 m) Orbits of: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars and Jupiter.
  15. 15. 100 million kilometres (10 11 m) Orbits of: Venus, Earth and Mars.
  16. 16. 10 million kilometres (10 10 m) Part of the orbit of the Earth.
  17. 17. 1 million kilometres (10 9 m) You can see the orbit of the Moon.
  18. 18. 100.000 kilometres (10 8 m) The Earth.
  19. 19. 10.000 kilometres (10 7 m) Northern hemisphere.
  20. 20. 1.000 Km (10 6 m) Satellite photograph (State of Florida USA).
  21. 21. 100 Km (10 5 m) from the surface. Getting near the town of Tallahassee in Florida USA.
  22. 22. 10 Km (10 4 m) You can hardly see the neighbourhoods.
  23. 23. 1 Km (10 3 m) What a parachutist sees when he jumps.
  24. 24. 100 metres (10 2 m) View from a helicopter.
  25. 25. 10 metres (10 1 m) View from a building.
  26. 26. 1 metre (10 0 m) What we see if we bend down...
  27. 27. 10 centimetres (10 -1 m) You can touch the leaves.
  28. 28. 1 centimetre (10 -2 m) You can see the structure of a leaf.
  29. 29. 1 millimetre (10 -3 m) You can see the veins in a leaf.
  30. 30. 100 micra (10 -4 m) You can almost see cells...
  31. 31. 10 micra (10 -5 m) You can see cells.
  32. 32. 1 micron (10 -6 m). You can see the nucleus of a cell.
  33. 33. 1.000 angstroms (10 -7 m) Chromosomes appear.
  34. 34. 100 angstroms (10 -8 m) You can see the DNA chain.
  35. 35. 1 angstroms (10 -9 m) Chromosome blocks.
  36. 36. 1 angstrom (10 -10 m) Electron clouds in a carbon atom. Our world is made up of this.
  37. 37. 10 picometres (10 -11 m) Electron in the field of an atom.
  38. 38. 1 picometre (10 -12 m) Empty space between the nucleus and the orbits of electrons.
  39. 39. 100 fermis (10 -13 m) Atomic nucleus.
  40. 40. 10 fermis (10 -14 m) The nucleus of a carbon atom.
  41. 41. 1 fermi (10 -15 m) Face to face with a proton.
  42. 42. 100 atometres (10 -16 m) You can see the ‘quark’ particles. End of the journey.
  43. 43. Fernando Sastre Olamendi Conseguido de Original de la NATIONAL NASA (USA)

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