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An incredible journey

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  • 1. You can travel with NASA from the infinitely big until the infinitely small
  • 2. In this travel it is very difficult to understand the distances. We begin at 10 million light-years (10 23 m.) and we finish at 10 -16 m. here on Earth. Good journey.
  • 3. 10 million light-years (10 23 m) from the Milky Way
  • 4. 1 million light-years (10 22 m) You can see some galaxies.
  • 5. 100.000 light-years (10 21 m) You can hardly see our galaxy!
  • 6. 10.000 light-years (10 20 m) You can see some stars in our galaxy.
  • 7. 1.000 light-years (10 19 m) Stars ten times nearer.
  • 8. 100 light-years (10 18 m) Stars...
  • 9. 10 light-years (10 17 m) Only stars...
  • 10. 1 light-year (10 16 m) Very small... we can see the Sun
  • 11. 1 trillion kilometres (10 15 m) The Sun... somewhat bigger
  • 12. 100 billion kilometres (10 14 m) We can see the Solar System. (Orbits of planets have been drawn.)
  • 13. 10 billion kilometres (10 13 m) Our Solar System.
  • 14. 1 billion kilometres (10 12 m) Orbits of: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars and Jupiter.
  • 15. 100 million kilometres (10 11 m) Orbits of: Venus, Earth and Mars.
  • 16. 10 million kilometres (10 10 m) Part of the orbit of the Earth.
  • 17. 1 million kilometres (10 9 m) You can see the orbit of the Moon.
  • 18. 100.000 kilometres (10 8 m) The Earth.
  • 19. 10.000 kilometres (10 7 m) Northern hemisphere.
  • 20. 1.000 Km (10 6 m) Satellite photograph (State of Florida USA).
  • 21. 100 Km (10 5 m) from the surface. Getting near the town of Tallahassee in Florida USA.
  • 22. 10 Km (10 4 m) You can hardly see the neighbourhoods.
  • 23. 1 Km (10 3 m) What a parachutist sees when he jumps.
  • 24. 100 metres (10 2 m) View from a helicopter.
  • 25. 10 metres (10 1 m) View from a building.
  • 26. 1 metre (10 0 m) What we see if we bend down...
  • 27. 10 centimetres (10 -1 m) You can touch the leaves.
  • 28. 1 centimetre (10 -2 m) You can see the structure of a leaf.
  • 29. 1 millimetre (10 -3 m) You can see the veins in a leaf.
  • 30. 100 micra (10 -4 m) You can almost see cells...
  • 31. 10 micra (10 -5 m) You can see cells.
  • 32. 1 micron (10 -6 m). You can see the nucleus of a cell.
  • 33. 1.000 angstroms (10 -7 m) Chromosomes appear.
  • 34. 100 angstroms (10 -8 m) You can see the DNA chain.
  • 35. 1 angstroms (10 -9 m) Chromosome blocks.
  • 36. 1 angstrom (10 -10 m) Electron clouds in a carbon atom. Our world is made up of this.
  • 37. 10 picometres (10 -11 m) Electron in the field of an atom.
  • 38. 1 picometre (10 -12 m) Empty space between the nucleus and the orbits of electrons.
  • 39. 100 fermis (10 -13 m) Atomic nucleus.
  • 40. 10 fermis (10 -14 m) The nucleus of a carbon atom.
  • 41. 1 fermi (10 -15 m) Face to face with a proton.
  • 42. 100 atometres (10 -16 m) You can see the ‘quark’ particles. End of the journey.
  • 43. Fernando Sastre Olamendi Conseguido de Original de la NATIONAL NASA (USA)