New Optimists - Kate Cooper on the Semantic web, food and Birmingham
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New Optimists - Kate Cooper on the Semantic web, food and Birmingham

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    New Optimists - Kate Cooper on the Semantic web, food and Birmingham New Optimists - Kate Cooper on the Semantic web, food and Birmingham Presentation Transcript

    • the new optimists forum welcome! Centre for Sustainability and InnovationMonday, 11 June 12
    • possible food futures for Birmingham 2050 the new optimistsMonday, 11 June 12
    • a radical change to the food supply chain?Monday, 11 June 12
    • a radical change to the food supply chain? Centre for Sustainability and InnovationMonday, 11 June 12
    • forum sponsorsMonday, 11 June 12
    • The New Optimists & the Forum • Began with the simple question What are you optimistic about to over regional scientists • Over 80 responded . . . a book launched at the 2010 British Science Festival (through a not-for-profit company) The New Optimists: Scientists View Tomorrow’s World & What It Means to Us • New Optimists Forum: a space for regional scientists to bend their minds to help meet the big challenges of the 21st century . . .Monday, 11 June 12
    • the big challenges • climate change, resource depletion, population pressures • but . . . BUT . . . BUT • yet “doing nothing is not an option” (Sir John Lawton, 2006 Lunar Society Annual Lecture)Monday, 11 June 12
    • working within our human cognition • Carolyn Steel: Hungry City . . . food as a means to understand the complexity of cities . . . • scenario planning as a thinking tool . . . • grounded in space (my home city) & time (2050 is beyond today’s planning systems but within our psyche) . . . • scientists bending their minds in facilitated conversations with live social media reporting . . . • computational and youngsters’ analytical brainpower (their skin as well as their DNA is in the game) • all under the watchful brief of a random grandmother . . .Monday, 11 June 12
    • Monday, 11 June 12
    • the forum: where we’re atMonday, 11 June 12
    • the forum: where we’re atMonday, 11 June 12
    • what we’ll be doing this evening • Introductions & scene setting • Understanding the nature of the technologies • How these technologies could make a difference to Birmingham by 2050 • What that means for now . . . and what nextMonday, 11 June 12
    • Birmingham & its immediate environsMonday, 11 June 12
    • Birmingham & its immediate environs • Birmingham is at the heart of the West Midlands conurbation, roughly 60K hectares (232 square miles).Monday, 11 June 12
    • Birmingham & its immediate environs • Birmingham is at the heart of the West Midlands conurbation, roughly 60K hectares (232 square miles). • The city’s population is about 1M people (density 9,450/m2), part of a conurbation of over 3.6M people.Monday, 11 June 12
    • Birmingham & its immediate environs • Birmingham is at the heart of the West Midlands conurbation, roughly 60K hectares (232 square miles). • The city’s population is about 1M people (density 9,450/m2), part of a conurbation of over 3.6M people. • Formerly a few hamlets, it grew explosively during the Industrial Revolution; it’s an 18th, 19th & 20th century city. • Swathes were badly bombed in WW2, redeveloped in the 1960s. • Its economy collapsed in the 1980s; it is still heavily dependent on the public sector. There has been significant investment in the central parts of the city over the last 20 years.Monday, 11 June 12
    • Birmingham & its immediate environs • It sits on the Birmingham Plateau, rising 500-1000 ft (150-300m) above sea level, between the basins of the Rivers Severn and Trent. It is served only by minor brooks and streams . . . & canals. • Water is pumped in from the Elan aquaduct built in 1904.Monday, 11 June 12
    • Birmingham & its immediate environs • It sits on the Birmingham Plateau, rising 500-1000 ft (150-300m) above sea level, between the basins of the Rivers Severn and Trent. It is served only by minor brooks and streams . . . & canals. • Water is pumped in from the Elan aquaduct built in 1904. • Originally part of the ancient Forest of Arden, there is still dense oak tree cover, aided by policies of our Quaker philanthropist forebears — there are 94K street trees. Many district names end with “-ley”; others have the name “heath”. • There is 3.2K hectares of parkland, plus the 1K hectares of Sandwell Valley.Monday, 11 June 12
    • Birmingham & its immediate environs • Originally part of the ancient Forest of Arden, there is still dense oak tree cover, aided by policies of our Quaker philanthropist forebears — there are 94K street tress. Many district names end with “-ley”; some have the name “heath”. • There is 3.2K hectares of parkland, plus the 1K hectare of Sandwell Valley. • The city has over 7K allotments, several community orchards, wildflower meadows, Bourneville and Moorpool garden estates, sizeable gardens aplenty.Monday, 11 June 12
    • Birmingham & its immediate environs • Originally part of the ancient Forest of Arden, there is still dense oak tree cover, aided by policies of our Quaker philanthropist forebears — there are 94K street tress. Many district names end with “-ley”; some have the name “heath”. • There is 3.2K hectares of parkland, plus the 1K hectare of Sandwell Valley. • The city has over 7K allotments, several community orchards, wildflower meadows, Bourneville and Moorpool garden estates, sizeable gardens aplenty. • The shire counties of the West Midlands has some very fertile agricultural and horticultural land.Monday, 11 June 12
    • Birmingham & its immediate environs • Geologically, the city is dominated by the Birmingham Fault, running from the Lickey Hills in the south-west to Sutton Coldfield in the north-east. • SE of the fault, the ground is largely Keuper Marl (layers of siltstone and mudstone) . . . • To the NW, there is a long ridge of Keuper Sandstone.Monday, 11 June 12
    • Birmingham & its immediate environs • Geologically, the city is dominated by the Birmingham Fault, running from the Lickey Hills in the south-west to Sutton Coldfield in the north-east. • SE of the fauly, the ground is largely Keuper Marl (layers of siltstone and mudstone) . . . • To the NW, there is a long ridge of Keuper Sandstone. • Similar to other UK cities, Birmingham has considerable urban heat effect. • Relative to other built-up areas in the UK, it is a snowy city due to its inland location and comparatively high elevation.Monday, 11 June 12
    • Birmingham & its immediate environs Tyseley Plant •366K tonnes of household waste burnt per year •providing 166MW electricity (average individual consumption is 5.85MW pa) •& 282K tonnes of CO2Monday, 11 June 12
    • Birmingham & its immediate environs Tyseley Plant •366K tonnes of household waste burnt per year •providing 166MW electricity (average individual consumption is 5.85MW pa) •& 282K tonnes of CO2 Possibility . . . a distributed energy generation systemMonday, 11 June 12
    • Birmingham & its immediate environs Tyseley Plant •366K tonnes of household waste burnt per year •providing 166MW electricity (average individual consumption is 5.85MW pa) •& 282K tonnes of CO2 Possibility . . . a distributed energy generation system •fuel: the detritus of 1-3.6M people •mini-plants: on currently non-productive former industrial land •heat by-product: fed into the city’s existing CHP systemMonday, 11 June 12
    • Monday, 11 June 12
    • Monday, 11 June 12
    • Monday, 11 June 12
    • Monday, 11 June 12