Ho hap p5 (anh)
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Ho hap p5 (anh)

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  • Fig. 8.7
  • Fig. 8.8
  • pg.152b
  • pg.152a
  • pg.152d
  • pg.152c

Ho hap p5 (anh) Ho hap p5 (anh) Presentation Transcript

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  • Respiratory System: Exchange of Gases Ch. 10 Human Respiratory System Figure 10.1 Nose Passageway for air Mouth Passageway for food and air Epiglottis Covers larynx during swallowing Pleural membranes Cover the lungs and line the chest cavity Lung Organ of gas exchange Intercostal muscle Moves ribs during respiration Nasal cavity Filters, warms, and moistens air Larynx (Voice box) Production of sound Trachea (Windpipe) Main airway Bronchi Branching airways Pharynx (Throat) Common passageway for air, food, and liquid Alveoli Air sacs for gas exchange Right lung Left lung Rib Diaphragm Skeletal muscle of respiration UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT
  • The Upper Respiratory Tract Figure 10.2 Nasal cavity External nose Nostril Tongue Larynx Esophagus Epiglottis Glottis Pharynx Opening of the auditory tube Sinuses Trachea
  • The Lower Respiratory Tract Figure 10.3 Trachea Bronchioles Left bronchus Clusters of alveoli Larynx Right bronchus
  • Gas Exchange Between the Blood and Alveoli Figure 10.8a (1 of 3)
  • Gas Exchange Between the Blood and Alveoli Figure 10.8a (2 of 3) and (3 of 3)
  • Respiratory Cycle Figure 10.9
  • Measurement of Lung Capacity Figure 10.10a
  • How O 2 and CO 2 are Transported in Blood Figure 10.12 (1 of 2)
  • How O 2 and CO 2 are Transported in Blood Figure 10.12 (2 of 2)
  • Regulation of Breathing Figure 10.13
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  • Copyright  The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
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  • Copyright  The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display.
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    • 3. Air pressure inside the lungs is decreased by increasing the size of the thoracic cavity; due to surface tension between the two layers of pleura, the lungs follow with the chest wall and expand.
    • 4. Muscles involved in expanding the thoracic cavity include the diaphragm and the external intercostal muscles .
    Respiratory muscles contract create negative pressure within the lungs (vacuum) and draw air into the lungs this is an “Active process”
    • 5. As the lungs expand in size, surfactant keeps the alveoli from sticking to each other so they do not collapse when internal air pressure is low.
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    • a. If either carbon dioxide or hydrogen ion concentrations rise, the central chemoreceptors signal the respiratory center, and breathing rate increases.
    • 3. Peripheral chemoreceptors in the carotid sinuses and aortic arch sense changes in blood oxygen concentration, transmit impulses to the respiratory center, and breathing rate and tidal volume increase.
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  • Oxyhemoglobin “ Oxygen loading” occurs in lungs
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  • “ Carbon dioxide unloading” Carbonic Anhydrase occurs in lungs
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  • “ Bicarbonate ion formation” Carbonic Anhydrase occurs in tissues
  • “ Oxygen unloading” occurs in tissues
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