Entering the conversation:
Academic journals and your
development as a scholar
Paul M. Rogers PhD
February 26, 2014
Overview
“Scholarly Journals” are also called:

• “Academic” Journals
• “Peer-Reviewed” Journals
• “Refereed” Journals
Sch...
Audience

Scholars, researchers, and students in the field
Authors

Written by specialists and scholars
Often include author's credentials
Possibilities:
• Handbooks/Encyclopedias/Review articles
• Find articles/books from reference lists
• Use advanced search ...
Handbooks, encyclopedias, etc.
• Why?
•
•
•
•

Background info/definitions
Overview of theories and authors
Key researcher...
Encyclopedias
• Great
background
and overview
• Key
issues, etc.
References…
Database searching
Use the thesaurus
• Find better or more terms
Finding studies that use a particular
research design
• Try adding “literature review”
• you will see examples of lit revi...
Search alerts
Journal alerts
• Set up in database like
Education Research
Complete

• Or set up from
publisher/journal
website
Wikipedia
For more info and help…
• http://library.gmu.edu/research/liais.html
http://library.gmu.edu/research/liais.html
Entering the conversation: Academic journals and your development as a scholar
Entering the conversation: Academic journals and your development as a scholar
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Entering the conversation: Academic journals and your development as a scholar

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Very quick overview aimed to help students begin searching for relevant scholarly journals in their fields.

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Entering the conversation: Academic journals and your development as a scholar

  1. 1. Entering the conversation: Academic journals and your development as a scholar Paul M. Rogers PhD February 26, 2014
  2. 2. Overview “Scholarly Journals” are also called: • “Academic” Journals • “Peer-Reviewed” Journals • “Refereed” Journals Scholarly journals are often "refereed" before publication by an editorial board or outside scholars
  3. 3. Audience Scholars, researchers, and students in the field
  4. 4. Authors Written by specialists and scholars Often include author's credentials
  5. 5. Possibilities: • Handbooks/Encyclopedias/Review articles • Find articles/books from reference lists • Use advanced search features in databases • Search for articles using a particular research methods • Create search alerts • Google Scholar
  6. 6. Handbooks, encyclopedias, etc. • Why? • • • • Background info/definitions Overview of theories and authors Key researchers and issues Find keywords (for searching)
  7. 7. Encyclopedias • Great background and overview • Key issues, etc.
  8. 8. References…
  9. 9. Database searching
  10. 10. Use the thesaurus • Find better or more terms
  11. 11. Finding studies that use a particular research design • Try adding “literature review” • you will see examples of lit reviews, plus get an overview of some aspect of your topic • Or “narrative” or “quantitative” etc.
  12. 12. Search alerts
  13. 13. Journal alerts • Set up in database like Education Research Complete • Or set up from publisher/journal website
  14. 14. Wikipedia
  15. 15. For more info and help… • http://library.gmu.edu/research/liais.html
  16. 16. http://library.gmu.edu/research/liais.html

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