Interface Structures For LLL
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Interface Structures For LLL

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This presentation is a supplement to the article: “Towards an organisational model of ‘interface’ university structure as a means of serving Lifelong Learning needs”, by Pencho Mihnev and ...

This presentation is a supplement to the article: “Towards an organisational model of ‘interface’ university structure as a means of serving Lifelong Learning needs”, by Pencho Mihnev and Roumen Nikolov.

It is part of the book “Lifelong Learning in the Digital Age”:

Tom J. van Weert, Mike Kendall (Eds.) (2004). Lifelong Learning in the Digital Age: Sustainable for all in a changing world, IFIP Technical Committee 3 (Education) Lifelong Learning Working Track in the IFIP conference “E-Training Practices for Professional Organisations”, Pori, Finland, 7-11 July 2003. IFIP Conference Proceedings 266 Kluwer 2004, ISBN 1-4020-7842-0

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    Interface Structures For LLL Interface Structures For LLL Presentation Transcript

    • Towards an organisational model of 'interface' university structure as a means of serving the lifelong learning needs Pencho Mihnev Centre of Information Society Technologies Sofia University “St. Kl. Ohridski”, Bulgaria
    • Contents
      • Introduction
      • The Lifelong Learning
      • The Lifelong Learning demands upon the delivery structures
      • The nature of the higher education institutions
      • CIST as a Lifelong Learning service provider
      • Towards constructing a model of lifelong learning ‘interface’ university structures
      • Conclusion s
    • Introduction
      • Sofia University “St. Kliment Ohridski”
        • The first and the biggest Bulgarian HE Institution (HEI)
          • 35,000 students
          • >3,000 academic staff
          • 17 faculties, 76 Bachelor’s and over 200 Master’s degree programmes
      • Centre of Information Society Technologies (CIST)
        • Created 1996, interdisciplinary purposes
      • CIST work characteristics
        • Activities – IST research, training, and services
          • About 30 successful international projects
          • 14 of them related to learning, education, and training
        • Business-like structure, self sustainability
    • The relationship model of CIST
    • The Lifelong Learning
      • The new demands of economy, society, and individuals
        • The demands of the knowledge economy
        • The demands of the contemporary society
        • The personal demands
      • Adopted definition
        • “ All learning activity undertaken throughout life, with the aim of improving knowledge, skills and competencies within a personal, civic, social and/or employment-related perspective. ”
        • European Commission, 2000
      • Shortages of this definition? ( not addressed here)
      • Putting LLL in an overall framework of incentives
        • Is it important? Why? To whom?
    • The Lifelong Learning demands upon the delivery structures (1)
      • Inspected sources
        • European Commission 2001, 2002
          • Making a European Area of Lifelong Learning a Reality. COM(2001) 678 final
          • European Report on Quality Indicators of Lifelong Learning. Fifteen Quality Indicators , June 2002
        • World Bank reports, October 2002
          • Lifelong Learning in the Global Knowledge Economy: Challenges for Developing Countries.
          • Constructing Knowledge Societies: New Challenges for Tertiary Education .
    • The Lifelong Learning demands (2)
      • Learner skills demand:
        • “ technical” skills ( literacy, foreign language, mathematics, science, ICT skills, information processing, problem-solving, analytical skills )
        • interpersonal skills ( teamwork, leadership, communication skills )
        • methodological skills ( learning to learn, pursuing lifelong learning, coping with risk and change )
    • The Lifelong Learning demands (3)
      • ‘ Essence of learning’ demand
        • definition and aims of learning
        • culture of learning
        • variety of delivery forms and contexts
      • Institution management demand
        • resourcing
        • customers’ needs awareness
        • matching opportunities to interest
        • dealing with change and innovation
        • entrepreneurship and risk management
        • partnership approach ( internal and external )
    • The Lifelong Learning demands (4)
      • Accessibility demand
        • valuing all types of learning ( formal, non-formal, and informal )
        • facilitating access
        • social inclusion
      • Demand on consumer protection and fairness
        • quality assurance
        • assessment and certification ( non-traditional forms of learning )
        • awareness of available providers and learning pathways
    • The nature of higher education institutions (HEI)
      • Purposes ( Burton Clark, 1983 )
        • Processing and development of advanced knowledge
        • Enrichment and dissemination of the world’s intellectual heritage
        • Education of the intellectual human potential of the nations and the world
      • Our focus - at the following HEI characteristics:
        • Work organisation
        • Beliefs ( norms and values )
        • Authority ( decision-making processes, and power distribution & exercising )
        • Processes of change ( innovation )
    • Work organisation in HE
      • Separate scientific disciplines
      • Linked in a form of a “ loosely coupled system ”
      • Bottom heavy, adaptive and sustainable
      • The organisational fragmentation brings stability to HEI
      • Vertical grouping of organisation levels in HE system
        • “ superstructure ” level – the national HE system
        • “ structure ” level - the institutional level as a whole
        • “ understructure ” levels - faculty, department & individuals
      • The professional work - at the understructure levels, they possess a great deal of decision-making power
      • The guiding logic - the logic of the scientific discipline
    • Beliefs and authority
      • The Beliefs
        • rooted in the scientific truth
        • pursuing knowledge for its own sake
        • discipline loyalty (rather than institutional loyalty)
        • source of identity, authority, and power
        • affect the decision-making processes
      • The Authority
        • reflects the structures of work organisation and beliefs
        • decision-making processes - bottom heavy, made collegially on the basis of professional (disciplinary) and expert judgment
        • … so is the decision-making power possessed and exercised
    • The innovation and change at understructure levels
      • Occurs mainly on disciplinary grounds
        • follows the changes in the knowledge base, work patterns, and discoveries in the discipline
        • “ changes can be found anywhere , but cannot be found everywhere ”
      • Understructures are prone to resist other types of change :
        • primarily responsive to the demands in their scientific fields (other professors)
        • the large environmental forces as “ consumer demand ” and “ labor-force demand ” are largely resisted at that level
    • HEI - Summary and conclusions
      • Research universities are inner-directed
      • Service colleges are other way directed
      • When students abundant - teaching and services placed on a take-it-or-leave-it base
      • When students or resources in short supply, institutions are more responsive to the environmental needs
      • How a new university structure appears (structural changes)?
      • International transfer as a major route of change
      • The change, translated into prestige and honour, brings support for its sustainability
      • Summary (Clark): “Desired changes attenuate and fail unless they become a steady part of the structure of work , the web of beliefs , and the division of control ”
    • CIST as a lifelong learning service provider
      • Delivery of specialised training in challenging domains and topics
      • External marketing ( the market demands ) and internal marketing ( the university supply )
      • Matching the supply to the external demand
      • Development of CIST capacity for design and delivery of training in :
        • Information Society Technologies
        • Lifelong Learning Skills
      • Development of CIST- own delivery infrastructure
      • Work, based on key business characteristics
      • Ongoing human and organisation capacity development
    • Towards a model of lifelong learning ‘interface’ university structures
      • Interface ( the American National Standard, T1.523-2001 ) “ The point of interconnection between two distinct but adjacent communications systems having different functions ”
      • Key seven critical functions of interface structure
        • Business management function
        • Internal (university) politics function
        • Marketing function (internal and external)
        • Learning design function
        • Teaching (delivery) of lifelong learning skills
        • Learning (particularly e-Learning) infrastructure
        • Strategic internal HRD function
    • Conclusion s
      • The Interface is NOT merely a “transmission” structure that simply facilitates the organisation and administration of faculty-developed courses
      • The Interface transforms the academic knowledge supply ( advanced discipline-based knowledge and content teaching ) into full-fledged lifelong learning market products focused at solving concrete context-based learning problems.
      • In this transformation the Interface employs its own expertise capacity, puts “key ingredients” , and manages the transformation process
      • Two other points are also crucial:
        • Capacity to conduct successful within-university policy
        • Capacity to provide ongoing HRD for the staff & experts
    • Sources
      • This presentation is a supplement to the article:
        • “ Towards an organisational model of ‘interface’ university structure as a means of serving Lifelong Learning needs ”
        • by Pencho Mihnev and Roumen Nikolov
      • It is part of the book “Lifelong Learning in the Digital Age”
        • Tom J. van Weert, Mike Kendall (Eds.) (2004). Lifelong Learning in the Digital Age: Sustainable for all in a changing world , IFIP Technical Committee 3 (Education) Lifelong Learning Working Track in the IFIP conference “ E-Training Practices for Professional Organisations ” , Pori, Finland, 7-11 July 2003. IFIP Conference Proceedings 266 Kluwer 2004, ISBN 1-4020-7842-0