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Towards an organisational model of 'interface' university structure as a means of serving the lifelong learning needs   Pe...
Contents <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>The Lifelong Learning </li></ul><ul><li>The Lifelong Learning demands upon...
Introduction <ul><li>Sofia University “St. Kliment Ohridski” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The first and the biggest Bulgarian HE ...
The relationship model of CIST
The Lifelong Learning <ul><li>The new demands of economy, society, and individuals </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The demands of th...
The Lifelong Learning demands upon the delivery structures (1) <ul><li>Inspected sources </li></ul><ul><ul><li>European Co...
The Lifelong Learning demands (2) <ul><li>Learner skills demand: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ technical” skills ( literacy, for...
The Lifelong Learning demands (3) <ul><li>‘ Essence of learning’ demand   </li></ul><ul><ul><li>definition and aims of lea...
The Lifelong Learning demands (4) <ul><li>Accessibility demand   </li></ul><ul><ul><li>valuing all types of learning ( for...
The nature of higher education institutions   (HEI) <ul><li>Purposes ( Burton Clark, 1983 ) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Processi...
Work organisation in HE <ul><li>Separate scientific disciplines </li></ul><ul><li>Linked in a form of a “ loosely coupled ...
Beliefs and authority <ul><li>The Beliefs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>rooted in the scientific truth </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>...
The innovation and change at understructure levels  <ul><li>Occurs mainly on disciplinary grounds </li></ul><ul><ul><li>fo...
HEI - Summary and conclusions <ul><li>Research universities are inner-directed </li></ul><ul><li>Service colleges are othe...
CIST as a lifelong learning service provider <ul><li>Delivery of specialised  training in   challenging  domains and topic...
Towards a model of lifelong learning ‘interface’ university structures   <ul><li>Interface ( the American National Standar...
Conclusion s <ul><li>The Interface is  NOT  merely a “transmission” structure that simply facilitates the organisation and...
Sources <ul><li>This presentation is a supplement to the article: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Towards an organisational model ...
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Interface Structures For LLL

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This presentation is a supplement to the article: “Towards an organisational model of ‘interface’ university structure as a means of serving Lifelong Learning needs”, by Pencho Mihnev and Roumen Nikolov.

It is part of the book “Lifelong Learning in the Digital Age”:

Tom J. van Weert, Mike Kendall (Eds.) (2004). Lifelong Learning in the Digital Age: Sustainable for all in a changing world, IFIP Technical Committee 3 (Education) Lifelong Learning Working Track in the IFIP conference “E-Training Practices for Professional Organisations”, Pori, Finland, 7-11 July 2003. IFIP Conference Proceedings 266 Kluwer 2004, ISBN 1-4020-7842-0

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Transcript of "Interface Structures For LLL"

  1. 1. Towards an organisational model of 'interface' university structure as a means of serving the lifelong learning needs Pencho Mihnev Centre of Information Society Technologies Sofia University “St. Kl. Ohridski”, Bulgaria
  2. 2. Contents <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>The Lifelong Learning </li></ul><ul><li>The Lifelong Learning demands upon the delivery structures </li></ul><ul><li>The nature of the higher education institutions </li></ul><ul><li>CIST as a Lifelong Learning service provider </li></ul><ul><li>Towards constructing a model of lifelong learning ‘interface’ university structures </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion s </li></ul>
  3. 3. Introduction <ul><li>Sofia University “St. Kliment Ohridski” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The first and the biggest Bulgarian HE Institution (HEI) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>35,000 students </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>>3,000 academic staff </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>17 faculties, 76 Bachelor’s and over 200 Master’s degree programmes </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Centre of Information Society Technologies (CIST) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Created 1996, interdisciplinary purposes </li></ul></ul><ul><li>CIST work characteristics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Activities – IST research, training, and services </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>About 30 successful international projects </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>14 of them related to learning, education, and training </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Business-like structure, self sustainability </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. The relationship model of CIST
  5. 5. The Lifelong Learning <ul><li>The new demands of economy, society, and individuals </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The demands of the knowledge economy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The demands of the contemporary society </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The personal demands </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Adopted definition </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ All learning activity undertaken throughout life, with the aim of improving knowledge, skills and competencies within a personal, civic, social and/or employment-related perspective. ” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>European Commission, 2000 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Shortages of this definition? ( not addressed here) </li></ul><ul><li>Putting LLL in an overall framework of incentives </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Is it important? Why? To whom? </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. The Lifelong Learning demands upon the delivery structures (1) <ul><li>Inspected sources </li></ul><ul><ul><li>European Commission 2001, 2002 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Making a European Area of Lifelong Learning a Reality. COM(2001) 678 final </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>European Report on Quality Indicators of Lifelong Learning. Fifteen Quality Indicators , June 2002 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>World Bank reports, October 2002 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Lifelong Learning in the Global Knowledge Economy: Challenges for Developing Countries. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Constructing Knowledge Societies: New Challenges for Tertiary Education . </li></ul></ul></ul>
  7. 7. The Lifelong Learning demands (2) <ul><li>Learner skills demand: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ technical” skills ( literacy, foreign language, mathematics, science, ICT skills, information processing, problem-solving, analytical skills ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>interpersonal skills ( teamwork, leadership, communication skills ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>methodological skills ( learning to learn, pursuing lifelong learning, coping with risk and change ) </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. The Lifelong Learning demands (3) <ul><li>‘ Essence of learning’ demand </li></ul><ul><ul><li>definition and aims of learning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>culture of learning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>variety of delivery forms and contexts </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Institution management demand </li></ul><ul><ul><li>resourcing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>customers’ needs awareness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>matching opportunities to interest </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>dealing with change and innovation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>entrepreneurship and risk management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>partnership approach ( internal and external ) </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. The Lifelong Learning demands (4) <ul><li>Accessibility demand </li></ul><ul><ul><li>valuing all types of learning ( formal, non-formal, and informal ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>facilitating access </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>social inclusion </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Demand on consumer protection and fairness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>quality assurance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>assessment and certification ( non-traditional forms of learning ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>awareness of available providers and learning pathways </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. The nature of higher education institutions (HEI) <ul><li>Purposes ( Burton Clark, 1983 ) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Processing and development of advanced knowledge </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enrichment and dissemination of the world’s intellectual heritage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Education of the intellectual human potential of the nations and the world </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Our focus - at the following HEI characteristics: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Work organisation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Beliefs ( norms and values ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Authority ( decision-making processes, and power distribution & exercising ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Processes of change ( innovation ) </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Work organisation in HE <ul><li>Separate scientific disciplines </li></ul><ul><li>Linked in a form of a “ loosely coupled system ” </li></ul><ul><li>Bottom heavy, adaptive and sustainable </li></ul><ul><li>The organisational fragmentation brings stability to HEI </li></ul><ul><li>Vertical grouping of organisation levels in HE system </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ superstructure ” level – the national HE system </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ structure ” level - the institutional level as a whole </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ understructure ” levels - faculty, department & individuals </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The professional work - at the understructure levels, they possess a great deal of decision-making power </li></ul><ul><li>The guiding logic - the logic of the scientific discipline </li></ul>
  12. 12. Beliefs and authority <ul><li>The Beliefs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>rooted in the scientific truth </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>pursuing knowledge for its own sake </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>discipline loyalty (rather than institutional loyalty) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>source of identity, authority, and power </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>affect the decision-making processes </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The Authority </li></ul><ul><ul><li>reflects the structures of work organisation and beliefs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>decision-making processes - bottom heavy, made collegially on the basis of professional (disciplinary) and expert judgment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>… so is the decision-making power possessed and exercised </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. The innovation and change at understructure levels <ul><li>Occurs mainly on disciplinary grounds </li></ul><ul><ul><li>follows the changes in the knowledge base, work patterns, and discoveries in the discipline </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ changes can be found anywhere , but cannot be found everywhere ” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Understructures are prone to resist other types of change : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>primarily responsive to the demands in their scientific fields (other professors) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the large environmental forces as “ consumer demand ” and “ labor-force demand ” are largely resisted at that level </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. HEI - Summary and conclusions <ul><li>Research universities are inner-directed </li></ul><ul><li>Service colleges are other way directed </li></ul><ul><li>When students abundant - teaching and services placed on a take-it-or-leave-it base </li></ul><ul><li>When students or resources in short supply, institutions are more responsive to the environmental needs </li></ul><ul><li>How a new university structure appears (structural changes)? </li></ul><ul><li>International transfer as a major route of change </li></ul><ul><li>The change, translated into prestige and honour, brings support for its sustainability </li></ul><ul><li>Summary (Clark): “Desired changes attenuate and fail unless they become a steady part of the structure of work , the web of beliefs , and the division of control ” </li></ul>
  15. 15. CIST as a lifelong learning service provider <ul><li>Delivery of specialised training in challenging domains and topics </li></ul><ul><li>External marketing ( the market demands ) and internal marketing ( the university supply ) </li></ul><ul><li>Matching the supply to the external demand </li></ul><ul><li>Development of CIST capacity for design and delivery of training in : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Information Society Technologies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lifelong Learning Skills </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Development of CIST- own delivery infrastructure </li></ul><ul><li>Work, based on key business characteristics </li></ul><ul><li>Ongoing human and organisation capacity development </li></ul>
  16. 16. Towards a model of lifelong learning ‘interface’ university structures <ul><li>Interface ( the American National Standard, T1.523-2001 ) “ The point of interconnection between two distinct but adjacent communications systems having different functions ” </li></ul><ul><li>Key seven critical functions of interface structure </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Business management function </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Internal (university) politics function </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Marketing function (internal and external) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learning design function </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teaching (delivery) of lifelong learning skills </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learning (particularly e-Learning) infrastructure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strategic internal HRD function </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Conclusion s <ul><li>The Interface is NOT merely a “transmission” structure that simply facilitates the organisation and administration of faculty-developed courses </li></ul><ul><li>The Interface transforms the academic knowledge supply ( advanced discipline-based knowledge and content teaching ) into full-fledged lifelong learning market products focused at solving concrete context-based learning problems. </li></ul><ul><li>In this transformation the Interface employs its own expertise capacity, puts “key ingredients” , and manages the transformation process </li></ul><ul><li>Two other points are also crucial: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Capacity to conduct successful within-university policy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Capacity to provide ongoing HRD for the staff & experts </li></ul></ul>
  18. 18. Sources <ul><li>This presentation is a supplement to the article: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Towards an organisational model of ‘interface’ university structure as a means of serving Lifelong Learning needs ” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>by Pencho Mihnev and Roumen Nikolov </li></ul></ul><ul><li>It is part of the book “Lifelong Learning in the Digital Age” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tom J. van Weert, Mike Kendall (Eds.) (2004). Lifelong Learning in the Digital Age: Sustainable for all in a changing world , IFIP Technical Committee 3 (Education) Lifelong Learning Working Track in the IFIP conference “ E-Training Practices for Professional Organisations ” , Pori, Finland, 7-11 July 2003. IFIP Conference Proceedings 266 Kluwer 2004, ISBN 1-4020-7842-0 </li></ul></ul>
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