Bringing the Power of Project Management to Communities throughout the World

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This is an overview of PMI Educational Foundation programs that help students realize their dreams through education, give primary and secondary school students the skills that they need to succeed, …

This is an overview of PMI Educational Foundation programs that help students realize their dreams through education, give primary and secondary school students the skills that they need to succeed, and provide a better response to tragedy through training opportunities for humanitarian workers.

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  • PRESENTER #1 I’m here to provide you with an update and overview of the PMI Educational Foundation and demonstrate how you can use the power of project management in your community to make a difference in the lives of others and be Greater Than Yourself. Introduce yourself, your role in the real world, and your role as the chief volunteer at PMIEF. You would then add in a very personal story about yourself, what PM has done for you, and why you want to bring this to the world at large – or why you want to give others the same opportunity – this portion should be 30 seconds to 1 minute. You could pick the one thing that you like best about PMIEF and connect that back to why this motivates you. Making it personal, personal, and personal is what will help people remember. Now let me tell you about the PMIEF, what it does, and how we can work together.
  • If we believe, and I think we all do, that project management is truly a profession, then project management should have as its foundation all the pillars of a true profession. Some of those pillars are: It is a full time occupation It has a distinct body of knowledge Accredited schools for training Certification or licensure A professional organization A Code of Ethics And its member contribute to public service The function of the PMI Educational Foundation is to serve the public good. The PMI Strategic Plan supports this tenet of professionalism. One of the Strategic Principles within the PMI Strategic Plan states that PMI shall encourage individuals/groups to participate in and support social good causes.
  • The mission of the Educational Foundation is to promote project management principles globally to communities including students, non-profit organizations, and society-at-large. While PMI focuses on making project management indispensible for business results, the PMI Educational Foundation helps to leverage project management for social good. The PMI Educational Foundation is the philanthropic arm of PMI. Under the U.S. tax code, it is a supporting organization of PMI, although it is a separately incorporated nonprofit organization. Even though the name, “PMI Educational Foundation”, may sound like we are a private foundation, we are not. We operate based on donations. In its work, the Foundation is focused on being a grant-giving organization. We don’t operate like a component, by creating great initiatives, gathering volunteers, and then executing those initiatives. We couldn’t possibly reach the entire globe this way. So we provide grants for others to create curricula, tools, partnerships and so forth. In some situations, the foundation will facilitate the creation of a program with external partners and then shift back toward its grant giving focus. The extent of grant giving that the foundation is able to do is dependent upon its ability to raise funds.
  • Although the Educational Foundation has been in existence since 1991, it went through a major revision of its programs and activities in 2006/2007 – resulting in three programs areas: Building a better prepared workforce – through education – and helping college students realize their dreams through education. So far, PMIEF has awarded over $270,000 in university scholarships & awards Building a better prepared society – through programs that give youth a better chance of success in life by helping them build 21 st century skills. Our grants have created curricula and piloted Project Management Life Skills classes for primary and secondary school students Building a better prepared response in future times of need – by improving the response to tragedy and helping non-profit organizations efficiently and effectively use their resources. We have supported project management training in over 37 countries help improve the live of vulnerable people These program areas help us focus our efforts on what we can do best and helps us build support within the PMI community of friends. Since our change in focus two years ago, the foundation has grown in leaps and bounds.
  • We couldn’t do any our work without the generous support of our donors. Like a car that runs as long and as far as it has gasoline in the tank, the Foundation is able to accomplish only as much as we have the funds to support. As a charitable organization, the PMI Educational Foundation is very appreciative of all of the gifts we receive. Here are some of our most generous donors. As a demonstration of faith in the Foundation and support for our three program areas, the PMI Board of Directors made a matching gift contribution toward fund raising and operations of the foundation. Additionally, an initial leadership gift of $1 Million was pledged by IIL as the first significant donor, and subsequent commitments from Primavera, the University of Management and Technology, and Cadence Management Corporation followed.
  • Additionally, since 2006, 31 of our closest friends in the PMI community – PMI Components - have joined in making gifts in support of the foundation’s philanthropic activities. How many people’s component is on this list? We have many PMI members who support us as well. Some of you are in this room. We thank you for your support.
  • Over the years, the foundation has accomplished many things. Further, the foundation makes many products and downloads available at no cost via our website. These products that have been utilized by PMI members, components, non-profit organizations, teachers, companies and community organizations. Here are a few examples: [mouse click] Careers in Project Management is appropriate for teenagers and young adults so they may become interested and be able to envision a project management career [mouse click] Project Management Skills for Life is appropriate for teenagers and adults to understand how project management skills are useful in every day life [mouse click] The Project Management Methodology for Post-Disaster Reconstruction is based on the Guide to the PMBOK and tailored to the special focus of disaster relief. These first three products - Careers in Project Management, Project Management Skills for Life, and Project Management Methodology for Post-Disaster Reconstruction are available for download from the PMIEF web site at no cost. These free products are also available on CD’s. Many PMI chapters and volunteers have used these three products for social, educational and charitable outreach in their local communities and developed their own programs and products which they have shared with PMIEF. [mouse click] These example programs are shared as well on line so you can get started using these tools more easily. Our academic scholarships and awards are also on line. [mouse click] From our website you can see what scholarships are available, apply on line, and see the names of the winners from prior years.
  • The Foundation and its supporters are helping college students realize their dreams through education. Scholarships are one of the oldest programs of the Educational Foundation. Recently, we have broadened this program area to focus on Building a Better Prepared workforce for the future. Not only have we been able to expand the number of and amount of academic scholarships, but we now offers awards for study related to project management. This will potentially support initial employment opportunities for newly graduated project management students with humanitarian or environmental organizations through internships or apprenticeships, and enabling the introduction of project management education more broadly through the potential of funding visiting professorships. However, as with the other two program areas, new ways to achieve the intent of this program area will be added as they are identified and as funds are available.
  • Just to give you an idea of how much this program area has grown, through the generous support of our donors - in 2007, the foundation awarded $30,000 in academic scholarships. In 2008, more than $80,000 was awarded along with another $10,000 in student awards. This year (2009), we expect to almost double that number and will award more than $150,000 in scholarships and student awards. More than 30 available scholarships range in value from partial funding to full tuition and include four $7,500 (US) Dr. Harold Kerzner Scholarships sponsored by the International Institute for Learning. Most of these are available to any student studying anywhere in the world as long as they are in a project management related field of study at an accredited school. Also available is paid partial tuition and full tuition from the University of Management and Technology. Last year we almost tripled the number and total amount of scholarships from the previous year. This year our scholarship program will continue to grow, and future donations will not only increase the number and value of the scholarships, but will also support grants for internships and professorships.
  • Giving youth a better chance at success is the cornerstone of a Better Prepared Society for Future Success. This is a photo of some the graduates and mentors from the Philadelphia High School Project Management Pilot Classes. You’ll hear more about this initiative shortly. Some of the foundation’s accomplishments in this area include: providing access to project management curriculum for use in primary and secondary school creation of a teaching fellowship for primary and secondary school teachers funding of books and PR for a Philadelphia High School PM Class supplying books to build a project management library in South Africa and two Philadelphia High Schools.
  • This photo shows the Kansas City Mid America Chapter, middle school project management class. The curriculum for this class can be downloaded from the PMIEF web site. Studies show that many new employees do not have the skills essential for job success such as teamwork, collaboration, communication, and leadership. You may ask yourself what does project management have to do with this and with youth? The skills needed to be a successful employee are also the same core skills of project management. Projects are the currency of modern-day work – they provide the learning vehicle to teach students essential 21st Century applied skills. Applying project management basics to teaching methods will improve education for all. In order to further this effort, the PMI Educational Foundation has formed the Project Learning Partnership with other foundations, corporations, educators, and content providers to assist with the program development. Some notable partners include: Oracle Education Foundation Buck Institute for Education George Lucas Education Foundation Global SchoolNet Foundation, and The Partnership for 21st Century Skills. The Oracle Education Foundation has created age-appropriate project management learning materials for teachers and has been pilot testing the training of it in various parts of the world. Through its support of the Project Learning Partnership comprising these and other organizations, the Educational Foundation is advancing the teaching of 21st century skills through project learning.
  • Over the past three decades, occurrences of natural disasters have followed a trend of increasing frequency and severity. Limited development resources are diverted to reconstruction which heightens the importance of using all assets efficiently and effectively. Improving project management maturity for humanitarian organizations will help them maximize critical resources for relief and development to increase the benefit to local communities. The PMI Educational Foundation has been working with leading international non-governmental organizations, NGOs, and PMI volunteers to address project management resource needs of their international and field-based staffs with the initial focus of both fundraising and grant giving being on the development of tools and methodologies and the training of local field-based personnel. Unlike corporations where an improvement in project management effectiveness and efficiency is expected to lead to more profits, for these non-governmental organizations, an improvement in project management effectiveness and efficiency is expected to lead to more lives being saved and more people being fed, clothed, and housed.
  • The foundation is funding an investigation into the value of setting up a global network of research and education centers focused on project management disaster-related research.
  • PRESENTER #2 Jump in and begin with a statement about yourself, your role in the real world, and your volunteer role at PMIEF. You would then add in a very personal story about yourself, what PM has done for you, and why you want to bring this to the world at large – or why you want to give others the same opportunity – this portion should be 30 seconds to 1 minute. You could pick the one thing that you like best about PMIEF and connect that back to why this motivates you. Making it personal, personal, and personal is what will help people remember. Now we’re going to discuss how you can get involved to make a difference.
  • In order to get involved you need ideas about what you can do. And, earlier we mentioned that you can download, free of charge, many items from the foundation’s website. Some of you in this room may already have done that or you may have given us your information to share with others – because the foundation also acts as a facilitator, sharing information that others have created. Many of these are also on our website for anyone’s use. One of the goals of the Foundation is to provide members and components with resources for outreach to non-profits, primary and secondary schools and future project managers. I underscore future project managers because the talent gap is a real issue, not only for us and our industry, but for the global economy as a whole. This is also an issue that will only be solved collectively not any one of us alone. I would like to give you a view of what kind of information you can find and how you search for it on the Foundation’s web site.
  • The Learning Zone houses tools for educational outreach as well as the application for training fellowships for primary and secondary teachers and administrators. This is also where you access Careers in Project Management, Skills for Life and project management curricula for primary and secondary schools. There also a listing for educational related component programs. Our goal is to share information and make it easier for members and chapters to reach out and share your project management skills with youth and other non-profit organizations.
  • As mentioned at the beginning of the presentation, the PMI Educational Foundation acts as a facilitator of information. We are sharing program information on what others throughout the world are doing with project management for social good, not only between our friends within the project management field, but also for use by society at large. Quite a bit of information is available to download at no cost from our website at www.pmief.org. Here are just a few examples of educational programs that PMI Components shared with us and are available for download from the website. You don’t have to recreate the wheel, learn from what others have accomplished!
  • The Kansas City Mid-America Chapter has a middle school program in one of the public schools funded by the Gates Foundation. It is an inner city school in an economically depressed environment in a struggling school system. In other words, this program is reaching one of the most needy populations in our society. Both this program and the Philadelphia program are truly giving youth a better chance at success. The Minnesota Chapter has a mentoring and coaching program for non-profit organizations in which they take applications from non-profits and pair them up with a coach to help train and coach them through a project. The skills learned through this program are invaluable to the staff of non-profit organizations and can be reapplied to other projects the organization is working on: such as creating and implementing new volunteer training programs. These are just two examples of programs that you can download from the foundation’s website and use to begin to build your own programs. If you choose to mimic any of the information you see that other chapter’s have created, please let the chapter know your intent and properly acknowledge that chapter’s brilliance and hard work.
  • The Philadelphia High School Project Management Program was accomplished by a partnership that included The School District of Philadelphia, The PMI Delaware Valley Chapter, DeVry University and the Foundation. The program was targeted toward inner city youth and the curriculum included project management and 21 st century skills. The students received both college and high school credit. The Foundation plans to support the continuation of this program, plus the expansion of the program and other similar programs throughout the United States and other countries.
  • Mentors play a key role in the success of this program. The PMI Delaware Valley Chapter provided the mentors. These mentors volunteered their time and were required to participate in a rigorous screening, interview, and training process as well as pass all child abuse registry and criminal history clearances. The Foundation is creating a mentor handbook which will help chapters through the process of recruiting and training mentors for future project learning programs. Pictured above, are a some of the mentors from the last graduating class. This quote from David Glaze, a former Edison High School graduate and current mentor at Edison High School where one of the pilots is being conducted (2 nd person from the left), “I saw leadership in development, as well as maturity and great teamwork.”
  • And even the students who participate see the value. When we asked recent graduates what they thought they learned: One student stated, “We learned a lot in 8 weeks … used Power Point for the first time and created a project charter. We used teamwork and learned how to manage time, and the importance of planning.” Another student said, “It's more than just learning project management. It is truly learning life skills that I can apply to other places. "
  • The humanitarian tab includes links to PM4NGOs Project Management Methodology for Post Disaster Reconstruction and A component initiative related to humanitarian activities.
  • The foundation has been working with leading international non-governmental organizations (also known as non-profit organizations) through a nonprofit organization called LINGOS (Learning for Non Governmental Organizations). The LINGOS project management initiative is called PM4NGOs. The prominent partners in this initiative include CARE – USA, Habitat for Humanity International, Mercy Corps, Oxfam Great Britain, World Vision International, Catholic Relief Services, and others. To date, through some financial and organizational support from the PMI Educational Foundation and others, this initiative has developed disaster-related project management training material for local NGO front-line relief personnel based on the PMBOK ® Guide , has conducted training in the Philippines, Uganda, and Myanmar for front-line relief personnel from those countries and several nearby and distant countries in classroom setting and through an online course. To date, about 107 local disaster-related workers from 29 NGOs in 31 countries have received project management training through this initiative. In a separate independent initiative not related to LINGOs, the foundation is funding an investigation into the value of setting up a global network of research and education centers focused on project management disaster-related research.
  • In June 2008, the PM4NGO’s course was taught in Uganda to a number of front-line relief personnel from that country and other countries. This is feedback from the class participants.
  • Another person, who participated in the same training, shares his thoughts about the project management training he just received through the LINGOs PM4NGO’s initiative.
  • These are photos of the floods in Santa Catarina, Brazil 2008 which affected 1.5 million people and caused 128 deaths. The devastation caused by the floods prompted the PMI Santa Catarina Chapter to get involved and utilize their project management skills to help in the disaster reconstruction. They utilized the PMMPDR Project Management Methodology for Post Disaster Reconstruction that had been translated by the Sao Paulo Chapter, and facilitated a training session for local governments to help them in the recovery process.
  • The pilot workshop took place in December 2008 Participants evaluated the PMMPDR and UN Sphere Project Framework, and decided that both approaches were applicable and had value. The goal was to translate both guides into Brazilian Portuguese and make them available to local governments and NGOs. The UN Sphere Project Framework encompasses Food Security, Nutrition and Food Aid, divided into four sections: Food Security and Nutrition Assessment and Analysis standards, Food Security standards, Nutrition standards and Food Aid standards.
  • DPRESENTER #1 AS THE FACILITATOR: And, now we want to hear from you. Because you have a wealth of experience, we thought we could harness some of your genius.
  • Turn to the person beside you and talk about ideas. This could include – Listing programs that you are aware of that a component is doing or something new Ways to reach out to the PMI community to share what PMIEF is doing and to help secure the help of others – build a network of foundation friends. We are still the best kept secret. You could note what you are personally willing to help us do. Who should be partnering w/us that doesn’t know about us OR who should we be reaching out to? How would you plan to use these resources – with the “Greater than yourself” theme in mind. Tell us about other examples of community programs Write them down on the note cards that we’re sending around now. We will collect them in five to seven minutes Based on time remaining, ask all groups or a few groups to share one or two of their best ideas.
  • Making an impact on education or helping the world’s vulnerable people are huge goals. The Foundation, PMI and PMI’s members cannot do this all ourselves. We need to partner with organizations who have a similar vision, for instance Junior Achievement, Youthbuild or the Women’s Society for Engineers. Together we can make a bigger impact. We need your help to get there. You can help to by: Spreading the word about the PMIEF Reaching out to your local primary or secondary school Working with your component to develop programs Helping identify component programs for posting on the PMIEF website Mentoring a local non-profit
  • Mentoring a project learning/project management student competition Volunteering for PMIEF programs Helping build partnerships Donating to the foundation to help us sustain and build our programs
  • You to can help build a better future through project management. If you want to help or want to know more about the plans and progress of the PMI Educational Foundation, please feel free to contact Diane Fromm. Thank you!!

Transcript

  • 1. Leading The Way… Bringing the Power of Project Management to Communities throughout the World www.pmief.org
  • 2. PMI Educational Foundation
    • PMI Strategic Plan:
    • Strategic Principle #9
      • PMI shall encourage individuals/groups to participate in and support social good causes.
  • 3. PMI Educational Foundation (cont’d)
    • PMIEF’s goal is to leverage project management for social good
    • PMI Educational Foundation is the philanthropic arm of PMI
    • 501 (c) 3 charitable organization
  • 4. Leading the Way: Improving Society Through Project Management Improving responses to tragedies Helping college students realize their dreams through education Giving youth and communities a better chance of success
  • 5. Thanks to our Partners
  • 6.
    • • PMI Arabian Gulf Chapter
    • • PMI Baltimore Chapter
    • • PMI Central Illinois Chapter
    • • PMI Central Iowa Chapter
    • • PMI Central Ohio Chapter
    • • PMI Chicagoland Chapter
    • • PMI Clear Lake/Galveston Chapter
    • • PMI Coastal Bend Chapter
    • • PMI College of Performance Management
    • • PMI Dallas Chapter
    • • PMI Delaware Valley Chapter
    • • PMI Great Lakes Chapter
    • • PMI Hospitality SIG
    • • PMI Information Systems SIG
    • • PMI KC-Mid America Chapter
    • • PMI Madison/South Central Wisconsin Chapter
    • • PMI Mile-Hi Chapter Educational Foundation
    • • PMI Milwaukee/SE Wisconsin Chapter
    • • PMI Minnesota Chapter
    • • PMI North Carolina Chapter
    • • PMI Northeast Ohio Chapter
    • • PMI Nova Scotia Chapter
    • • PMI Orange County Chapter
    • • PMI Phoenix Chapter
    • • PMI Sacramento Valley Chapter
    • • PMI San Diego Chapter
    • • PMI Sao Paulo Chapter
    • • PMI South Florida Chapter
    • • PMI Southwest Ohio Chapter
    • • PMI Washington DC Chapter
    • • PMI Web SIG
    Thanks to our PMI Component Donors
  • 7. Accomplishments Careers in Project Management PMI Project Management Post-Disaster Recovery Methodology Project Management Skills for Life Academic Scholarships and Awards PMI Component Initiatives
  • 8. A Better Prepared Workforce of the Future
    • The PMI Educational Foundation will help support the development of the workforce of the future through:
    • Academic Scholarships and Fellowships
    • Sponsored Internships and Apprenticeships
    • Endowed Visiting Professorships
  • 9.
    • Last year conferred $80,000+ Scholarships and $10,000 in Awards
    • This year will award $150,000+ in Scholarships and Awards
    A Better Prepared Workforce of the Future
  • 10. A Better Prepared Society for Future Success
  • 11. Giving Youth a Better Chance of Success
    • Learning of 21 st Century Skills
    • Educating Students Through Projects
    • Project Management as a Competency for Teachers and Administrators
  • 12. A Better Prepared Response in Future Times of Need
    • The PMI Educational Foundation will help humanitarian and development organizations provide a better response in future times of need through:
    • Local Training Opportunities
    • Tools and Methodologies
    • Project Management Maturity Resources
  • 13. A Better Prepared Response in Future Times of Need
    • Funded grant to investigate the value and potential of establishing a global network of centers for disaster-related project management research and education
      • Advancing the body of knowledge
      • Developing tools and techniques
      • Learning best practices
      • Disseminating knowledge and training people
  • 14.
    • Getting Involved
  • 15. Resources Available www.pmief.org
  • 16.  
  • 17. Community Outreach Resources
  • 18. Community Outreach
    • PMI KC Mid-America Chapter: Project Management for Kids
    • PMI Minnesota Chapter:
    • Community Mentor Coaching Program
  • 19. Philadelphia High School Project Management Program
    • Program target is inner city high school students
    • Curriculum includes 21 st century and PM Skills
    • Delivered through interactive projects and lecture
    • Dual high school and college credit
    • Expansion of the program
    Partnering for Success
  • 20. Project Team Mentors Are the Key
    • PMI Delaware Valley Chapter Members
    • Volunteered Time
    • Supported by Their Employers
    • Passed Clearances
    • Worked in the Classroom
    “ I saw leadership in development, as well as maturity and great teamwork.” - David Glaze, former student and now mentor
  • 21. Students “ We learned a lot in 8 weeks…used PowerPoint for the first time and created a project charter. We used teamwork and learned how to manage time, and the importance of planning .” “ It's more than just learning project management. It is truly learning life skills that I can apply to other places.”
  • 22. A Better Prepared Response in Future Times of Need
  • 23. PM4NGOs
    • Funded PM4NGOs
      • Project Management Training for “Local” Disaster Relief/Recovery Workers
      • Provided training for 107 people in 31 countries including: Myanmar, Uganda, Cameroon and UK
      • Provided 29 NGO agencies with training including: Care, Mercy Corps and Catholic Relief Services
      • Helped LINGOS recruit subject matter experts, volunteers to facilitate webinars, evaluate materials and mentor PM4NGO class participants
  • 24. PM4NGOs Training in Kampala “ 80% of all diseases are spread from contaminated water; our training here will help us prevent this and save lives in the future .” - "Chief," Save the Children
    • “ The project management skills we are learning will help us improve the lives of the vulnerable people we are serving.”
    • Businge Richard,
    • CARE Uganda
  • 25. PM4NGOs Training in Kampala “ Project management training is like defensive driving training. Having done both for a long time, you do not think you can learn anything new, but then you realize how much better you can be through such training.”
  • 26. Floods of Santa Catarina, Brazil
  • 27. PMI Santa Catarina Chapter
    • Pilot workshop that took place 10 December 2008
    • Participants evaluated PMMPDR and UN Sphere Project Framework
    • Both guides will be translated into Brazilian Portuguese and distributed to local governments most affected by the disaster
    Train the Trainers
  • 28. Discussion ? ?
  • 29. Leading The Way
    • Turn to the person beside you to share:
      • Similar types of programs (community, component)
      • Ways to reach out to the PMI community to share what PMIEF is doing
      • People/groups with whom the PMIEF should network or partner
      • What you are willing to do or how you would plan to act “Greater Than Yourself”
    • Write them on the note cards
  • 30. You CAN lead the way and bring the power of project management to your local community!
  • 31.
    • What Can You Do To Help?
    • Spread the word
    • Reach out to your local primary or secondary school
    • Work with your component
    • Help identify component programs for posting on the PMIEF website
    • Mentor a local non-profit
  • 32. What Else Can You Do To Help
    • Mentor a project learning/project management student competition
    • Volunteer for PMIEF programs
    • Help build partnerships
    • Donate to the foundation to help us sustain and build our programs
  • 33. PMIEF Contact Information Debra Miersma 2009 Chair, PMIEF Board of Directors +1-413-329-9264 [email_address] Kathy Shawver, PMP 2009 Treasurer, PMIEF Board of Directors +1-419-610-7335 [email_address] Diane Fromm Administrator, PMI Educational Foundation +1-610-356-4600 ext. 1128 [email_address]
  • 34. PMI Educational Foundation Leadership Board of Directors Debra Miersma, Chair Kathy Shawver, Treasurer Kay Fleischer, Secretary Ken Atwater Bob Cook Jo Ferguson Ken Hartley Pedro Ribeiro Hugh Woodward