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  • 1. E-Maturity and School Development[When the Tail Wants to Wag the Dog]
    23.07.2009
    1
    Peter Micheuz
    Peter MicheuzGymnasium Völkermarkt and University Klagenfurtpeter.micheuz@uni-klu.ac.at
  • 2. Peter Micheuz, Plymouth, April 2009
    2
    ~ 8 Millionsinhabitants
    ~ 1.200.000 pupils, aged 7 – 19~ 120.000 Teachers~ 6000 Schools atprimary/secondarylevelFocus: Secondarylevel I (10 – 14 years)
    AUSTRIA,THE HEART OF EUROPE
  • 3. 3
  • 4. Peter Micheuz, Plymouth, April 2009
    4
    Gymnasium Völkermarkt, Carinthia, Austria
  • 5. Peter Micheuz, Plymouth, April 2009
    5
  • 6. 17. April 2009
    6
  • 7. Outline
    Introduction
    StructuringandBenchmarkingICT Integration at Schools
    The Austrian Project eLSA
    eLSAand School Development
    Recognizing e-MatureeLSA-Schools
    FindingsandConcludingRemarks
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    7
  • 8. Introduction
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    8
    ICT Integration at Schools is still drivenbyenthusiasticteachers
    Lack of sustainable guiding strategiesfor the roll out of the technology
    Twoapproaches:
    Digital technologiescanbeseenas …
    catalystforreform/development/evolution
    leverforreform/development/evolution
  • 9. Introduction
    No miracles derive from the mere presence of ICT in a school
    The lever pattern implies that ICT is not used as an agent but as a tool
    These different models are critical for a national policy in case of large-scale national investments in IT infrastructure
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  • 10. Structuring and Benchmarking ICT integration in Schools
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    Peter Micheuz
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    Despite many - technologically - fairly well-equipped schools in Austria, there is evidence that many schools are in a state betweene-ready and e-mature.
    BECTA (British Educational Communications and Technology Agency): Institutional e-maturity is the capacity and capability of a college or learning institution to make strategic and effective use of technology to improve educational outcomes.
  • 11. Recognizing e-mature eLSA-Schools
    23.07.2009
    Peter Micheuz
    11
    • The inherent nature of organizations can be considered conservative…
    • 12. Necessary transition from an “I-culture” to a “We-culture.”
    • 13. Roger’s Theory of Diffusion of Innovation
    • 14. “Schools change slower than churches” [American school researcher Richard Gross]
    • 15. ICT Integration cannot be seen independently from school quality and development!
  • Structuring and Benchmarking ICT integration in Schools I
    Treshold Standards for the ICT-Mark (BECTA, UK)
    1. Leadership and Management – ICT vision and strategy
    2. ICT in the curriculum
    3. Learning and Teaching with ICT
    4. Assessment of and with ICT
    5. Professional Development
    6. Extending opportunities for learning
    7. Resources - provision, access and management
    8. Impact on pupil outcomes
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    Peter Micheuz
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  • 16. Structuring and Benchmarking ICT integration in Schools II
    European Framework for the Evaluation of ICT in Education
    Conditions
    C1. Leadership
    C2. Infrastructure and access
    C3. Curriculum planning
    C4. Quality assurance and improvement
    Use
    U1. Pupil use
    U2. Teaching process
    U3. Administrative use
    Outcomes
    O1. Impact on learning and standards
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    Peter Micheuz
    13
    INPUT
    PROCESS
    OUTPUT
  • 17. Structuring and Benchmarking ICT integration in Schools IÌI
    Belgian model drawing on the EFQM excellence model
    The vision for ICT use in school (a strategy to achieve the ICT vision)
    Secondary processes (school organization and management, ICT co-ordinators)
    Resources (ICT infrastructure, government regulations, funding programmes)
    Primary processes (curriculum development, Integration of ICT)
    Desired results (results for the learner, teacher, parents, society and government)
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  • 18. 23.07.2009
    Peter Micheuz
    15
    An Austrian Top Down Approach “eLSA” for Secondary Level I (10-14 years)
  • 19. 23.07.2009
    Peter Micheuz
    16
    Goal driven Austrian Project “eLSA”(“e-Learning imSchulalltag”)since 2002
    • Full? Coverageof ICT-Use (pupils, teachers)
    • 20. Communicationamongteachers
    • 21. EvaluationandCooperation
    • 22. Strategy (School program)
    • 23. Leadership
    • 24. Controlling (steeringgroup)
    • 25. Offerof an ICT Certificate
  • Aims of the Austrian Project eLSA(“e-Learning imSchulalltag”)
    Each student has to get in touch with e-Learning and has to try out “e-Learning sequences” in lower secondary education.
    Each teacher has to experience e-Learning sequences in his/her own subjects (in at least one subject) and has to share his/her experience with all members of the teaching teams involved in these subjects and the participating classes.
    Within their subject area, teachers have to discuss the potential and limits of e-Learning.
    eLSAschools develop concrete models for evaluating e-Learning. They cooperate and share their experiences with other schools.
    The school program should explicitly contain (revised) e-Learning aspects.
    e-Learningmust be an important concern of the school administration. The project has high priority in the school routine.
    A steering group coordinates and harmonizes the “e-Learning” content developments, ensures their practical application and the progress of the project.
    The school offers its students the possibility to obtain at least one IT or e-Learning certificate (on a voluntary basis).
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  • 26. OneExemplary Goal
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    2. Each teacher has to experience e-learning sequences in his/her own subjects (in at least one subject) and has to share this experience with all members of the teaching teams involved in these subjects and the participating classes.
  • 27. Indicatorsand positive evidence
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  • 28. Peter Micheuz
    Proving E-Maturity of eLSA-SchoolsThe Certification Process
    Theschoolsdeterminswhenthegoalsseem to bereached
    Theschoolsubmits an applicationforcertificationat the regional coordinator
    School visithospitations, conference, talks withtheheadmaster, schoolcoordinator,steeringgroup
    Report fromthe regional coordinator
    eLSACertificate
    Improvementsat theschool
    20
  • 29. 23.07.2009
    Peter Micheuz
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  • 30. Findings I
    eLSA-certified schools have already fairly good preconditions in terms of good IT infrastructure and engaged ICT teachers before the eLSA project.
    eLSA-certified schools are led by extraordinary supportive headmasters with (clear) visions and a sense of accountability.
    The IT-infrastructure in eLSA schools is maintained by very engaged system administrators who complain about the lack of a sufficient IT infrastructure and low budgets.
    Cooperation among teachers is still underdeveloped.
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  • 31. Findings II
    Many teachers use computers in their lessons, but often only to show and distribute digital material.
    The dominating learning platform, with a fairly well usage is Moodle. However, most courses lack interactive and collaborative activities.
    Many special ICT related activities in various subjects could be observed.
    Almost all pupils explicitly expressed their joy with e-Learning. They liked working with computer because “one learns differently”, “it is a nice variety in view of everyday school”, “it is practical because we have less paper”, “you get quick feedback”, “you can choose exercises individually”.
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  • 32. ConcludingRemarks
    PreconditionsforE-Maturity
    SuccessfulICT-Integrationshould/must bepartof (strategic) School Development
    Strong Leadership
    ExcellentIT-Infrastructure
    CooperationamongTeachers
    ClimateofInnovationandOpen-Mindedness
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  • 33. Last slide …
    Eachprogressis due tounsatisfiedpeople. Satisfiedpeople do not likechange …
    [Salvatore Quasimodo (1901-1968)]
    ThankYouforYour Attention.
    23.07.2009
    Peter Micheuz
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