Introduction to PBL
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This is a resource for a day workshop to introduce teachers to project based learning. There is a wiki associated with this wallpaper, this is the guidebook - not a presentation

This is a resource for a day workshop to introduce teachers to project based learning. There is a wiki associated with this wallpaper, this is the guidebook - not a presentation

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Introduction to PBL Presentation Transcript

  • 1. An introduction to Project Based Learning Dean Groom, Summer 2010
  • 2. Teenagers.
  • 3. BIE - Buck Institute for Education Model Student Perspective
  • 4. About Me Learning anything Project Based Learning Cybergogy Technology
  • 5. About Me Learning anything ✤ Head of Educational Development at Macquarie University, Sydney. ✤ Previously High School Head of Department, learned to train/teach Project Based Learning PBL through New Technology Foundation, Napa. 2007. Cybergogy ✤ Author two books though Australian Council of Educational Research about classroom technology and virtual worlds 2009. Technology ✤ Always learning.
  • 6. Welcome to the workshop Morning Session Afternoon Session
  • 7. Welcome to the workshop Morning Session Afternoon Session ✤ Why Project Based Learning ✤ Faculty Approaches (new habits of mind) ✤ What students gain from engaging in research/enquiry ✤ Developing an ICT Plan/ Communication Strategy. ✤ The PBL Process explained ✤ The challenges (FUD) ✤ Designing Learning Outcomes ✤ Building a project ✤ Designing Assessment ✤ Presenting a project ✤ Addressing teaching and learning challenges ✤ Next steps?
  • 8. Why Project Based Learning The challenges that students and teachers will face in adoption Role Change Design Assessment Management Activities Comfort Social/Esteem Status
  • 9. Why Project Based Learning ✤ Problem-based learning (PBL) is an exciting The challenges that alternative to traditional classroom learning. students and teachers will face in adoption Role Change Design Assessment Management Activities Comfort Social/Esteem Status
  • 10. Why Project Based Learning ✤ Problem-based learning (PBL) is an exciting The challenges that alternative to traditional classroom learning. students and teachers ✤ With PBL, your teacher presents you with a will face in adoption problem, not lectures or assignments or Role Change exercises. Since you are not handed "content", Design your learning becomes active in the sense Assessment that you discover and work with content that Management you determine to be necessary to solve the Activities problem. Comfort Social/Esteem Status
  • 11. Why Project Based Learning ✤ Problem-based learning (PBL) is an exciting The challenges that alternative to traditional classroom learning. students and teachers ✤ With PBL, your teacher presents you with a will face in adoption problem, not lectures or assignments or Role Change exercises. Since you are not handed "content", Design your learning becomes active in the sense Assessment that you discover and work with content that Management you determine to be necessary to solve the Activities problem. Comfort Social/Esteem ✤ In PBL, your teacher acts as facilitator and mentor, rather than a source of "solutions." Status
  • 12. PBL Crossovers Project Based Learning provides a well researched approach to standards focused learning. A good PBL project will crossover many tangential approaches - but will follow a process of learning that students can learn to use consistently
  • 13. PBL Crossovers ✤ Project Based Learning Project Based Learning ✤ Game Based Learning provides a well researched approach to standards ✤ Challenge Based Learning focused learning. ✤ Problem Based Learning A good PBL project will ✤ Expeditionary Learning crossover many tangential ✤ Scenario Based Learning approaches - but will follow a process of ✤ Enquiry Based Learning learning that students can ✤ Research Based Learning learn to use consistently
  • 14. The traditional environment The traditional fail safe learning process teacher student Syllabus Content & Cognition Assessment Concepts “teaching”
  • 15. The PBL environment 30 students in 5 groups, no lecturing, no answer giving.
  • 16. What students gain.
  • 17. Why are we doing this?
  • 18. Why are we doing this? ✤ examine and try out what you need to know in a given context ✤ discover what you need to learn ✤ develop your people skills for achieving higher performance in teams and individually ✤ improve your communication skills ✤ state and defend positions with evidence and sound argument ✤ become more flexible in processing information and meeting obligations ✤ practice skills you will need - after leaving school
  • 19. An iterative cycle Students learn Learners progress Learning is GOAL through experience at different speeds not information and active and depths. orientated. participation.
  • 20. The messy classroom Students do not sit in rows, or stay in one place - and they talk. The teacher controls the learning schedule but does not overtly control the class itself. Learning to let go.
  • 21. The messy classroom ✤ PBL acknowledges students as key players Students do not sit in in their own learning and capable of thinking for themselves. rows, or stay in one place - and they talk. ✤ This philosophy of recognizing students’ ability in independent thinking and active The teacher controls learning fosters trust and respect in the the learning schedule learning environment. but does not overtly control the class itself. ✤ As PBL classrooms often appear chaotic to the traditionalist, trust and respect plays an Learning to let go. important role in classroom management.
  • 22. Critical thinking. A definition of critical thinking “purposeful self-regulatory judgment by giving reasoned consideration to the evidence, context, standards, methods, and conceptual structures within which a decision is made about what to believe or what to do” (Facione & Facione, 1997)
  • 23. Critical thinking. ✤ Students are not used to A definition of critical thinking finding and critically thinking independently in “purposeful self-regulatory traditional classrooms. judgment by giving reasoned consideration to the evidence, ✤ They will be unsure where context, standards, methods, and the ‘end’ is, and will ask conceptual structures within questions such as “is this which a decision is made about what I need to do?” or “is what to believe or what to do” this what you want?”. (Facione & Facione, 1997) ✤ They like to ‘get’ answers.
  • 24. Prepare for the ‘push-back’. Warning: Kids play school. You will want to give the answer, and they will demand it - often saying ‘this is stupid, I don’t get it, what is the point?’ or ‘You haven’t explained it’ The pain of critical thinking is kicking in.
  • 25. Prepare for the ‘push-back’. ✤ As novice learners, they may have Warning: Kids play school. difficulty clustering relevant cues and discarding irrelevant ones. You will want to give the answer, and they will ✤ With practice and guidance they demand it - often saying become more proficient in the ‘this is stupid, I don’t get problem-solving process it, what is the point?’ or encountered. Repoint them. ‘You haven’t explained it’ ✤ Students can be helped to The pain of critical thoughtfully consider alternative thinking is kicking in. points of views, challenge assumptions, and evaluate different options. Extend them.
  • 26. TAXONOMY
  • 27. TAXONOMY • John Biggs describes his SOLO Taxonomy.
  • 28. TAXONOMY • John Biggs describes his SOLO Taxonomy. • Structure of Observed Learning Outcomes
  • 29. TAXONOMY • John Biggs describes his SOLO Taxonomy. • Structure of Observed Learning Outcomes •A method of incremental learning through 5 stages
  • 30. TAXONOMY • John Biggs describes his SOLO Taxonomy. • Structure of Observed Learning Outcomes •A method of incremental learning through 5 stages • This can be observed in the way games ‘teach’ players
  • 31. TAXONOMY • John Biggs describes his SOLO Taxonomy. • Structure of Observed Learning Outcomes •A method of incremental learning through 5 stages • This can be observed in the way games ‘teach’ players • Recognised foundational principle in the design of learning
  • 32. SOLO TAXONOMY
  • 33. SOLO TAXONOMY • Pre-structural: students are simply acquiring bits of unconnected information, which have no organisation and make no sense.
  • 34. SOLO TAXONOMY • Pre-structural: students are simply acquiring bits of unconnected information, which have no organisation and make no sense. • Unistructural: simple and obvious connections are made, but their significance is not grasped
  • 35. SOLO TAXONOMY • Pre-structural: students are simply acquiring bits of unconnected information, which have no organisation and make no sense. • Unistructural: simple and obvious connections are made, but their significance is not grasped • Multistructural: a number of connections may be made, but the meta-connections between them are missed, as is their significance for the whole.
  • 36. SOLO TAXONOMY
  • 37. SOLO TAXONOMY • Relational level: student is now able to appreciate the significance of the parts in relation to the whole.
  • 38. SOLO TAXONOMY • Relational level: student is now able to appreciate the significance of the parts in relation to the whole. • Abstract level: student is making connections not only within the given subject area, but also beyond it, able to generalise and transfer the principles and ideas underlying the specific instance.
  • 39. SOLO TAXONOMY • Relational level: student is now able to appreciate the significance of the parts in relation to the whole. • Abstract level: student is making connections not only within the given subject area, but also beyond it, able to generalise and transfer the principles and ideas underlying the specific instance. • Not all learners reach these levels - deeper meaning, deeper learning and deeper engagement with the subject matter.
  • 40. The PBL Process
  • 41. 1. Begin with the end in mind ✤ Develop a project idea ✤ Decide the scope Detailed advice on this begins p13 in BIE ✤ Select the standards Handbook. ✤ Select 21st Century Skills ✤ Develop project design criteria ✤ Develop the learning environment
  • 42. Assessment Considerations ✤ Formative Assessment (20%) ✤ Summative Assessment (80%) ✤ Decide and plan with assessment in mind ✤ Avoid being seduced (too much) by imagination and ambition ✤ Ensure students/staff understand the priorities in the project
  • 43. Assessment Example ✤ Assessment - Formative (20%) ✤ Self Assessment - a weekly reflection report (BLOG) ✤ Peer Evaluation (Group or Teamwork) - (Blog Comments, Review) ✤ Feedback during reflection, discussion (teacher assigned x factor) ✤ Feedback from wider community - (quotes, comments) ✤ Work Ethic - (evidence of consistent effort and progress)
  • 44. Assessment Example ✤ Summative Assessment (80%) ✤ Learning Project (and Report) and Presentation 50% ✤ Test (series of quiz or periodic test for knowledge) 30% ✤ Essay (Critical Reflection) 10% ✤ Class discussion and presentation (10%) ✤ Break up and create the assessment rubric to ensure that any activities that you plan to do - have some alignment with end grades.
  • 45. Integrating Learning/Assessment Learning Demonstrating Research and Application Participation and Reward Formative (20%) Transfer Summative (80%)
  • 46. Learning in not linear. As students explore and being to know what the pieces are, they transfer them. Knowing is not simply a matter or moving A to B, but applying ... in pieces (some of which don’t yet fit).
  • 47. Granular transfer Learning Demonstrating Research, Application Interest, and Reward Effort ... Elements of Learning are transferred ... iteratively ... in pieces.
  • 48. The “End” must be a goal. ✤ The goal must allow for the flow of pieces of information from the learning domain to the knowing domain (firm decisions as to what matters and where it fits the assessment are needed). ✤ The goal must be open enough to allow a flow of understanding between the learning activities and the end product. ✤ The goal must be authentic and have a real world purpose ✤ If you do it well - you will see diversity in their work.
  • 49. Structuring your project Teacher/ Theme Method Notional Hours Date. Class discussions, Community 3 Miss Jones self study Researching the Library, Internet, 12 All topic elements Field Trip Literacy Skills Lecture 1 Mr Flynn Classroom Presentations 4 All presentations
  • 50. 2. The Driving Question Detailed advice on this begins p37 in BIE Handbook.
  • 51. 2. The Driving Question ✤ Open ended ✤ Achievable in the time frame Detailed advice on this begins p37 in BIE ✤ Must sustain student interest Handbook. ✤ Must be goal orientated ✤ Allow for unexpected exploration (extension) ✤ Allow for differential learning needs
  • 52. 2. The driving question ✤ Can the use of nuclear weapons be justified Examples on p41 in ✤ Can we create a utopian BIE Handbook. society though technology ✤ Does the internet develop or destroy teen-intelligence
  • 53. 3.Mapping the Project ✤ Mapping against one key learning area (English) ✤ Mapping against integrated learning areas (English, ICT, Science) ✤ Selecting the standards you need to embed in learning ✤ Adding the ‘soft’ skills aka 21C Learning (ISTE NETs) ✤ Drawing out pen and paper ‘plan’ of the project flow ✤ I use storyboards for this ... it forces minimal waffle.
  • 54. 4.Managing the Process ✤ Navigating a PBL process is like like going on ski trip ✤ How do you present it - varies in degrees of skill
  • 55. 5. Group Development ✤ Requires ‘Norm’ expectations and delivery from staff ✤ Requires multiple project ideas to be offered and developed ✤ Requires technology - used in strategic delivery ✤ Requires a party of workers to help develop and review ✤ Requires exploration with the wider PBL community ✤ Requires Parent communication and involvement. ✤ Requires imagination, tenacity, patience and rigor.