Learning in a changing world
Beyond Integration, into infusion                     • The ‘computer’ lab is less relevant, less                       in...
Shifting the habit of lifetime = behaviour changeOutcome Based Learning Instructionist (Tolman, 1932)content --- task-rule...
Shifting the habit of lifetime = behaviour changeOutcome Based Learning Instructionist (Tolman, 1932)content --- task-rule...
Where to digital-kids go to learn?                                         Teacher                                  Text B...
The flipped classroom                       Which elements can be                        put online, which are             ...
How many characters do you recognise?
How many characters do you recognise?
The five freedoms in digital culture.            School                          Life             Work                     ...
Teachers as learners• Did you learn better when you worked  together or when you studied alone?• Did you find that reciting...
What drives good enquiry projects?• Ownership. The enquiry is driven by the students following teacher prompt.• Creativity...
1:1 Means mobility and rich media in society                   • Wireless broadband subscriptions in 2010 -               ...
Open space means less controlled space• A classroom with neat rows desks embodies pedagogies or "tacit curricula"  of disc...
The challenges• Thinking about space as ‘place’ not classroom, where students can be highly  collaborative and autonomous....
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Flipping Classrooms, Spaces and Methods

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A supporting slidedeck to support discussion on social, cultural and pedagogical imperatives for adopting enquirey, mobility and differentiation in Senior High School

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  • Flipping Classrooms, Spaces and Methods

    1. 1. Learning in a changing world
    2. 2. Beyond Integration, into infusion • The ‘computer’ lab is less relevant, less interesting, less viable than even 5 years ago. 1:1, mobile and ‘always’ on access. • The key issues in eLearning: Access, motivation, experience. There is a gap between how students ‘know’ technology and teachers ‘know-how’ on using it to teach them effectively. • The is no agreed definition of ‘digital literacy’ as technology changes so fast and used differently by different ages and cultures for vastly different purposes.
    3. 3. Shifting the habit of lifetime = behaviour changeOutcome Based Learning Instructionist (Tolman, 1932)content --- task-rules --- task activity --- outcome Student as consumer, focus on content, throughput, quality of student on exit yet we talk more about pedagogy/technology change.
    4. 4. Shifting the habit of lifetime = behaviour changeOutcome Based Learning Instructionist (Tolman, 1932)content --- task-rules --- task activity --- outcome Student as consumer, focus on content, throughput, quality of student on exitProject Based Learning Revelatory (Bruner, 1973) enquiry --- discovery --- experience --- product students as explorer, team worker, focus on discovery yet we talk more about pedagogy/technology change.
    5. 5. Where to digital-kids go to learn? Teacher Text Book/Websites Online Video Video Tutorials Facebook/Forums Social Media and GamingKids spend 17.5hrs online per week.
    6. 6. The flipped classroom Which elements can be put online, which are best done in class? Benefits? Loses? Unknowns? Knowns?
    7. 7. How many characters do you recognise?
    8. 8. How many characters do you recognise?
    9. 9. The five freedoms in digital culture. School Life Work Work• Fear of failing • Freedom to fail• Lack of time to experiment • Freedom to experiment• School/Academic identity • Freedom to fashion identity• Pressure to maintain effort • Freedom of effort• Limited interpretation • Freedom of interpretation Assessment Self-Efficacy
    10. 10. Teachers as learners• Did you learn better when you worked together or when you studied alone?• Did you find that reciting and hearing the information helped you to learn the information better?• Did you seek information from book, notes, and each other when you had a question?• Did you take control of learning the necessary information so that you could teach it to others when asked?
    11. 11. What drives good enquiry projects?• Ownership. The enquiry is driven by the students following teacher prompt.• Creativity. Students need to find innovation in their work, builds ownership.• Relevance. Enquiry has to have real world links and be ‘discoverable’• Critical Thinking. Students work on ‘problematising’ possible solutions, not finding answers. They have to make decisions and defend their choices.• Resonance. The issue being explored must resonate with their age/stage. Driving questions force sense-making of ill-structured problems• Choice. Students need to make decisions and take responsibility.
    12. 12. 1:1 Means mobility and rich media in society • Wireless broadband subscriptions in 2010 - 10.5 million (50% population) • Fixed line broadband subscriptions in 2010 - 5.2 million (25% of people have BOTH). • People are TWICE as likely to want Internet access though mobile devices. • 90% of Internet traffic is now video. • 1:1 does not mean sitting at the same desk to access the Internet, but expect to access it from any - and increasingly different places.
    13. 13. Open space means less controlled space• A classroom with neat rows desks embodies pedagogies or "tacit curricula" of discipline and conformity, whereas spaces personifying flexible properties can be said to embody pedagogies of freedom and self-discovery.• Fluidity represents the design of space for flows of individuals• Versatility indicates the property of space that allows for multiple uses.• Convertibility designates adapting educational space for many uses• Scaleability describes a property of space for expansion or contraction.• Modifiability is the spatial property which invites active manipulation.
    14. 14. The challenges• Thinking about space as ‘place’ not classroom, where students can be highly collaborative and autonomous. Less teacher control of movement.• Technology infused learning - Flipped Classroom - Sourcing/Making resources such as video, notes and readings to be accessed outside the lesson and classroom. Less teacher control of consumption.• Adopting new pedagogical innovation. Less teacher belief.• New leaders and experts emerge. Disturbs power-cultures.• Kids who are academic (most successful) whine if the model narrows the gap between them and ‘us’ - as soloists can’t monopolise. Parents!
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