What are stories

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This presentation describes what a User Story is and what they look like. It differentiates between user stories and technical tasks helping people learn how to write better stories minus the "how" they are implemented. It includes several exercises.

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  • Let’s practice…

    We’ll work first as individuals and then at your table select the best example to share with everyone.

    DEBRIEF point, Ask: is it normal to do this individually?
    Answer: no, this is generally a conversation with customers or end users, or their proxy.


  • Let’s practice…

    We’ll work first as individuals and then at your table select the best example to share with everyone.

    DEBRIEF point, Ask: is it normal to do this individually?
    Answer: no, this is generally a conversation with customers or end users, or their proxy.
  • What are stories

    1. 1. Your Bard: Paul Boos The basics of story writing
    2. 2. It’s a tale of 3 purposes… Requirement Test Cases WBS
    3. 3. I’ll grant you three C’s Card Conversation Confirmation
    4. 4. A User Story can be managed on a Card 3 x 5 4 x 6
    5. 5. A Card is a P R O M I SE to have a Conversation
    6. 6. With whom do we converse? the Product Owner Behold! (representing the busine
    7. 7. A Story has a way to Confirm it was fulfilled
    8. 8. & “Analyzed” just-in-time A Story is Broken Down
    9. 9. What does a Story look like?
    10. 10. WHO + WHAT + WHY Elemental Form:
    11. 11. Doctor + Get patient’s vitals & notes + View health changes
    12. 12. A more powerful potion: Role|Persona + Function + Value
    13. 13. Doctor + Retrieve patient’s vitals & notes + View patient health changes: better, worse, same?
    14. 14. Advanced Story Wizardry
    15. 15. As a ____, I want to ____, So I can _____. Let’s see an example…
    16. 16. As a Doctor, I want to retrieve my patient’s vitals & notes, So I can assess if her/his health is improving, degrading, or stabilizing.
    17. 17. As a Doctor, I want to retrieve my patient’s vitals & notes, So I can assess if her/his health is improving, degrading, or stabilizing. NOTE: biz function, not a UI element
    18. 18. How can we Acceptance Criteria? foreshadow
    19. 19. Acceptance Criteria • Provide the details on what the story needs to do and is understandable by everyone -- clarity. • Can be used as the basis for coding business rules. • Are the conditions to fulfill that can often become (automated) tests. • Are unique to each story. • They are how to confirm that the story is completed to satisfaction. 19
    20. 20. Creating Acceptance Criteria Acceptance Criteria: – Back of card – Define test scenarios – Used for Product Owner confirmation – Clarified through Q&A – Often negotiated Given an operating sensor, When the temperature ≥ 300°F, Then display “High Temp” warning light. Acceptance Criteria User Story As an operator, I want a visual alert on the operator display when the coolant temperature is too high, so that I can avoid overheating the engine.. 20
    21. 21. Elemental Form: Bullet points of cases
    22. 22. • Show heart rate, temperature, white blood cell count, and % oxygen in blood • Observation notes in chronological order Patient Summary
    23. 23. A more powerful potion: Bullet points with specifics
    24. 24. • Show heart rate in bpm, temperature in degrees Farenheit, white blood cell count (integer #), and % oxygen in blood to tenths of a percent • Observation notes in chronological order with date/time nurse’s last name (“nothing siginificant” can be observed, but no blanks should be shown) Patient Summary
    25. 25. Advanced Criteria Wizardry
    26. 26. Scenario: ________ Given ____, When ____, Then _____. Let’s see an example…
    27. 27. Scenario: Imacik Pashunt Patient Summary Given Doctor Will Heal has Imacik Pashunt assigned to him, When the Imacik Pashunt is entered to retrieve the patient summary, Then the Imacik Pashunt summary is shown with the following data: Nurse Notes shown 7 Aug @ 1815, Helpa, Patient complained of thirst, given water 7 Aug @ 1005, Helpa, Patient sleeping, but restless 8 Aug @ 0210, Aiden, Nothing significant noted AND Last Vitals shown 7 Aug @ 1800, Helpa: HR: 110 bpm T: 98.7°F WBC: 5 O2: 33.2%
    28. 28. Scenario: Imacik Pashunt Patient Summary Given Doctor Will Heal has Imacik Pashunt assigned to him, When the Imacik Pashunt is entered to retrieve the patient summary, Then the Imacik Pashunt summary is shown with the following data: Nurse Notes shown 7 Aug @ 1815, Helpa, Patient complained of thirst, given water & 7 Aug @ 1005, Helpa, Patient sleeping, but restless 8 Aug @ 0210, Aiden, Nothing significant noted AND Last Vitals shown 7 Aug @ 1800, Helpa: HR: 110 bpm T: 98.7°F WBC: 5 O2: 33.2% NOTE: biz action(s), not a UI element(s)
    29. 29. Cool Reason to do Advanced Wizardry: We can automate our requirements as tests! Using tools like – Cucumber Lettuce JBehave Fitness Spock
    30. 30. So how far should you take a Story… …on this Magical Journey?
    31. 31. What is the best path? It Depends
    32. 32. Consider need: repeatability complication sizing
    33. 33. Some stories seem too large…
    34. 34. They’re EPIC
    35. 35. We need to shrink them
    36. 36. A Good Story adheres to the… …principles of INVEST
    37. 37. ndependent egotiable aluable stimatable mall estable I N V E S T
    38. 38. Independent minimize dependencies (preferably to zero)
    39. 39. Negotiable ability for Product Owners and Delivery members to make trade-offs
    40. 40. Valuable fulfills customer or end user needs
    41. 41. Small comfortably short cycle-time
    42. 42. Testable ability to be verified that it works
    43. 43. How far out do we plan these story details
    44. 44. Planning Horizons (your Kanban view) Product Roadmap Start of Elaboration End of Elaboration Daily Work Epics EpicsFeatures Stories Tasks Acceptance Criteria are fleshed out here
    45. 45. So how do we evolve Stories? Do we use lycanthropy?
    46. 46. Splitting Grooming Conversation Acceptance Criteria yields
    47. 47. As a Doctor, I want to retrieve my patient’s vitals & notes, So I can assess if her/his health is improving, degrading, or stabilizing.
    48. 48. As a Doctor, I want to retrieve my patient’s notes, So I can assess if her/his health is displaying any evidence of health change.
    49. 49. As a Doctor, I want to retrieve my patient’s vitals, So I can assess if these give evidence for improvement, degradation, or stabilization.
    50. 50. Confirmation Acceptance Criteria yields
    51. 51. Scenario: Imacik Pashunt Patient Summary Given Doctor Will Heal has Imacik Pashunt assigned to him, When the Imacik Pashunt is entered to retrieve the patient summary, Then the Imacik Pashunt nurse summary is shown with the following data: Nurse Notes shown 7 Aug @ 1815, Helpa, Patient complained of thirst, given water & 7 Aug @ 1005, Helpa, Patient sleeping, but restless 8 Aug @ 0210, Aiden, Nothing significant noted
    52. 52. There’s a spell for that… IKIWISI
    53. 53. So the changes are continually Story Elaboration Ad-hoc when pulled for work From feedback during development and refined…
    54. 54. Let’s Practice
    55. 55. Back Story We’re developing Release 2 of an application to support the potion ingredient inventory at Hogwarts College of Wizardry.
    56. 56. Exercise No.1 Divide into 2 teams. The application needs to allow teachers and students the ability to find what potions or brews an ingredient may be used within and display these alphabetically. Potions or brews used in dark magic need to be restricted to only teachers. Wizards are impatient, better show the results in 2 seconds or less. Elect a product owner and work with her/him to create a set of user stories; we’re looking for a minimum of who+what+why for each story.
    57. 57. Exercise No.1 Debrief How many stories did you get out of that short description? Let’s read a few.
    58. 58. Take 2 individual stories from your last exercise. Write these onto a a couple of flip charts. Teams swap flipcharts. For 3 min on each flip chart, write questions onto stickies about how you to confirm that the story is done. 59 Exercise No.2, Part 1
    59. 59. Swap the flipcharts back. Now have the original team take 5 minutes to write as many acceptance criteria in bullet format as possible for that story. Replace the stickies as the Q is answered. 60 Exercise No.2, Part 2
    60. 60. Exercise No.1 Debrief Let’s look at an example of your acceptance criteria. What roles play into creating acceptance? Why?
    61. 61. Exercise No.3 Take the 2 stories from the ones you generated; take 5 min for them and apply the INVEST criteria. • How you know it is Independent or if it isn’t, what dependencies does it have to other potential stories? • What parts are Negotiable about it or if it isn’t, what makes the constraints rigid; could we make improvements to improve this? • What tells you it is Valuable to the user, or if it isn’t how could it be given value? • Could you Estimate its complexity, or if you cannot then what would you want to know to get more understanding? • What gives you confidence it is Small; and able to be completed it in an iteration you might typically have, or if not, what would give you more confidence? • And what makes it Testable, or if not, how could you improve that? Record this information onto a flip chart to share
    62. 62. Exercise No.3 Debrief For the stories you generated, what are your comments on size? Small? Large? What brought you to that conclusion? How do you think size effects cycle-time and throughput?
    63. 63. Exercise No.4 Take one of the requirements provided. At your table, turn this into a story with acceptance criteria. Once you have done so, apply the INVEST criteria.
    64. 64. Exercise No.4 Debrief Let’s share our stories… Could we identify a role or persona? What about the value statement? How well did what we have map to our acceptance criteria? How did we do in making the stories small enough?
    65. 65. And the team lived… …with greater knowledge of story-writing. Yet…
    66. 66. You have now finished basic story writing The Sleeper Has Awaken!

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