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To G or not to G
 

To G or not to G

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My first presentation at WhereCamp EU, relating to the work we're doing with Ubisense myWorld. In the title G=Google and the question has two meanings ... if you're a traditional GIS user, should you ...

My first presentation at WhereCamp EU, relating to the work we're doing with Ubisense myWorld. In the title G=Google and the question has two meanings ... if you're a traditional GIS user, should you be using Google Maps or something similar (answer=yes), and given that, should you be using Google specifically (answer is it depends ... we no longer use Google App Engine, we do use Google Maps but have been testing OpenLayers for offline applications).

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  • “GIS” has been around for 25-30 yearsFor most of that time, has been a specialized niche outside mainstream ITThis is changing, due to various factors:Support of spatial data in mainstream databasesEntry of Google and Microsoft into geospatialGreater commercial availability of spatial data\n
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  • Ray Ozzie retired in October 2010\n
  • Ray Ozzie retired in October 2010\n
  • Ray Ozzie retired in October 2010\n
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  • Note that evernote is a nice example of something that runs on multiple clients, can run offline, auto syncs when connected, does some more complex processing (text recognition) in the cloud\nDropbox lets you share files seamlessly between machines on different platforms - including Windows, Mac, iPad, iPhone\n
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  • Mention example of field systems – how are these currently secured?\nGrowth in customer web portals – need to work out internet security\nMore complex network security challenges in smart grid\n
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  • Mention change from enterprise driven innovation to consumer driven innovation\n
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  • This is a typical utility basemap in Smallworld – fairly sparse. But you can see with the raster tiled approach that the data looks exactly like it does in Smallworld\n
  • Adding in a Google Street Map gives a lot more context. Maintaining base maps is not a core activity for utilities, and is very expensive. It really makes sense to use basemaps maintained by somebody else. There are ways that you can add updates where necessary, for example adding a new subdivision which isn’t on the basemap yet.\n
  • And Google satellite imagery is good for many applications. I hear a lot of people say that Google imagery is out of date but I think they are updating it more and more frequently.\n
  • What if your data doesn’t match the Google landbase? Many utilities have an old and inaccurate landbase and want to transform or conflate their network data to a new and more accurate landbase, for multiple reasons – sharing data with other entities, using GPS, and working with external data like Google Maps, or imagery from other sources. This is an example of some data from PNG, who went through such a conflation exercise. You can see here how much better their pipes align with a Google map background after the conflation progress. That’s not the main focus of my talk today, but \n
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  • Google street view can give you valuable extra information about facilities. Often you can see details on pole configuration and so on that may not be stored in the database. We’ve integrated tightly with this, so that when you click on a facility you automatically get the right street view displayed. In cases where the data doesn’t line up exactly it’s easy to adjust the view and save that for next time.\n
  • A very powerful feature is that you can display icons in the street view itself and mouse over or click them for more information.\n
  • In this example we can see several poles further away as we look along the street.\n
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To G or not to G To G or not to G Presentation Transcript