Gold River Economic Diversification Progress Report May 2012
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Gold River Economic Diversification Progress Report May 2012

on

  • 3,443 views

Capital EDC Economic Development Company was engaged to conduct a no-fault assessment of work completed by the economic development committee of Council.

Capital EDC Economic Development Company was engaged to conduct a no-fault assessment of work completed by the economic development committee of Council.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
3,443
Views on SlideShare
3,443
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Gold River Economic Diversification Progress Report May 2012 Gold River Economic Diversification Progress Report May 2012 Document Transcript

    • Submission to the Chief Administrative Officer Village of Gold River Gold River Twenty Twelve Economic and Diversification Assessment This report is submitted in conformance with the requirements specified in the Letter of Expectation  confirmed by Village of Gold River August 18th  2011       Submitted to:     Mr. Larry Plourde  Chief Administrative Officer  Village of Gold River  99 Muchalat Drive ‐ PO Box 610  Gold River, British Columbia  Canada V0P1G0  Phone: 250‐283‐2202   Fax: 250‐283‐7500  villageofgoldriver@cablerocket.com    MAY 2012 VERSION 1.4    Submitted by:        Patrick Nelson Marshall  Consulting Economic Developer  Capital EDC Economic Development Company  4341 Shelbourne Street  Victoria, British Columbia   CANADA V8N3G4  www.capitaledc.com  T: +1 250 595‐8676    C: +1 250 507‐4500  www.patrickmarshall.tel  
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 2 This page left blank intentionally
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 3 Forward Looking Statements The following document is presented for informational purposes only. It is not intended to be, and is not, a  prospectus, offering memorandum or private placement memorandum. The information in this document  may not be complete and may be changed, modified or amended at any time by the owner, and is not  intended to, and does not, constitute representations and warranties of the proposed business.  The information in this document is also inherently forward‐looking information. Among other things, the  information:   (1) discusses the owner’s future expectations;   (2) contains projections of the owner’s future results of operations or of its financial condition; or  (3) states other “forward looking” information.   There may be events in the future that the owner cannot accurately predict or over which the owner has no  control, and the occurrence of such events may cause the owner’s actual results to differ materially from the  expectations described herein.  This document constitutes confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, faxed,  reproduced or otherwise distributed by you, and the contents of this document may not be disclosed by you,  without the proponent’s express written consent.   
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 4 i. Table of Contents Forward Looking Statements ............................................................................................................................... 3  ii. List of Tables ..................................................................................................................................................... 7  iii. Table of Figures................................................................................................................................................ 7  iii. Engagement Letter .......................................................................................................................................... 9  v. Report to Council ............................................................................................................................................ 13  Issue:........................................................................................................................................................... 13  Background: ................................................................................................................................................ 13  Discussion: .................................................................................................................................................. 13  Options: ...................................................................................................................................................... 17  Recommendation: ...................................................................................................................................... 17  v. Draft Briefing Note ......................................................................................................................................... 18  Topic: .......................................................................................................................................................... 18  Issue:........................................................................................................................................................... 18  Background: ................................................................................................................................................ 18  Discussion: .................................................................................................................................................. 19  Options: ...................................................................................................................................................... 20  Recommendation: ...................................................................................................................................... 20  1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .................................................................................................................................. 21  1.1  Recommendations ............................................................................................................................... 21  1.1.1 Tangible Results ................................................................................................................................. 21  1.1.2 Committee Operations ...................................................................................................................... 21  1.1.3 Village of Gold River Capacity ............................................................................................................ 21  1.1.4 Business Community Interest ............................................................................................................ 22  1.1.5 Options for Diversification ................................................................................................................. 22  1.1.6 Restart the Process ............................................................................................................................ 22  1.1.7 Short‐term Action .............................................................................................................................. 22  1.1.8 Long‐term Action ............................................................................................................................... 22  1.1.9 Advocate ............................................................................................................................................ 23  1.1.10 Next Steps ........................................................................................................................................ 23  1.2 Assessment Objective............................................................................................................................... 23  1.3 Assessment of Opportunities ................................................................................................................... 23  Existing Strategies and Operations ............................................................................................................. 24  Stakeholder Interviews ............................................................................................................................... 24  Opportunities Most Relevant to the Village of Gold River ......................................................................... 25  1.4 Assessment Contents ............................................................................................................................... 25  2.0 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................ 27  2.1 Purpose of the Assessment ...................................................................................................................... 27  2.2 Assessment Statements include ............................................................................................................... 27  Overarching Plan Governance: ................................................................................................................... 27  Plan Vision: ................................................................................................................................................. 27  Our Plan Mission: ....................................................................................................................................... 27  Village of Gold River Market Position Objectives: ...................................................................................... 27  Community Development .......................................................................................................................... 28  Community Economic Development .......................................................................................................... 28  Economic Development ............................................................................................................................. 29  2.3 Approach and Methodology ..................................................................................................................... 29  Research Stage 1 ........................................................................................................................................ 29 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 5 Assessment and Reposition Stage 2 ........................................................................................................... 29  Strategy Stage 3 .......................................................................................................................................... 30  Building Stage 4 .......................................................................................................................................... 30  Implementation Stage 5 ............................................................................................................................. 30  2.4 Assumptions & Limiting Factors ............................................................................................................... 30  3.0 ASSESSMENT CONTEXT ................................................................................................................................ 32  3.1 Current Environmental Scan .................................................................................................................... 32  January 4th  2012 Financial Services ............................................................................................................ 32  February 2nd  2012 Retail Store ................................................................................................................... 32  February 7th  2012 Regional Television News Segment .............................................................................. 32  Environmental Scan Summary ................................................................................................................... 33  Primary Resource Extraction Scan .............................................................................................................. 33  Secondary Manufacturing and Processing Scan ......................................................................................... 34  Retail and Service Commercial Scan ........................................................................................................... 34  Public Sector Services and Government Scan ............................................................................................ 34  Non‐Government Organizations ................................................................................................................ 34  3.2 Regional Economic Summary ................................................................................................................... 35  Figure 1 North Island Employment Foundations Society Economic Scan 2010 ......................................... 36  3.2.2 Resource Industry Opportunity [Synergy List 2005] .......................................................................... 36  3.2.3 Manufacturing and Processing Industry Opportunity [Synergy List 2005] ........................................ 37  3.2.4 Retail and Service Commercial Opportunity [Synergy List 2005] ...................................................... 37  3.2.5 Government and Institutional Opportunity [Synergy List 2005] ....................................................... 38  3.2.6 Non‐Government Opportunity [Synergy List 2005] .......................................................................... 38  3.3 Comparison of Gold River to peer group of BC Villages ........................................................................... 38  Table 1 British Columbia Village Administration 2012 ............................................................................... 38  3.3.1 Description of Gold River Diversification Efforts ............................................................................... 39  Table 2 Village of Gold River Official Community Plan 2003 ...................................................................... 39  3.3.2 Village of Gold River – Ranking of Issues 2008 .................................................................................. 40  3.3.3 Economic Development Committee Progress 2010‐2011................................................................. 41  3.4 Assessing an Economic Development Organization ............................................................................. 42  Table 3 Economic Development Value Requirements ............................................................................... 42  3.4.1 Other British Columbia Village Efforts ............................................................................................... 44  3.4.2 The Provincial Association ................................................................................................................. 44  Economic Developer of the Year ................................................................................................................ 45  Community Project Award ......................................................................................................................... 45  Economic Development Marketing Award ................................................................................................ 45  3.4.3 Economic Developers Association of Canada 2010 Marketing Canada Awards ............................... 45  3.4.4 Government of British Columbia Economic Development Context .................................................. 46  3.4.5 Regional Economic Development Context ........................................................................................ 46  3.6 Local Sustainability Plan ....................................................................................................................... 47  Figure 2 Triple Bottom Line Approach to Sustainability ............................................................................. 49  Figure 3 New Zealand Relationship between target dimensions and key indicators ................................. 50  4.0 ASSESSMENT OF DIVERSIFICATION OPPORTUNITIES ................................................................................... 51  4.1 Retention and Expansion .......................................................................................................................... 51  4.2 Recruitment .............................................................................................................................................. 51  4.3 Stakeholder Contact and Interviews ........................................................................................................ 52  4.4 Business Opinion ...................................................................................................................................... 53  4.4.1 Gold River Business Scan Survey Responses ..................................................................................... 53  4.4.2 Stakeholders Views and Attributes ................................................................................................... 53  4.4.3 The Top Ten List and need for Strategic Focus .................................................................................. 54 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 6 4.4.4 Recruitment 2011 Q4 ........................................................................................................................ 54  4.4.5 Business Activity 2011 Q4 ................................................................................................................. 55  4.4.6 Views on Regional Workforce ........................................................................................................... 55  4.4.7 Regional Change ................................................................................................................................ 56  4.4.8 Technology Talk ................................................................................................................................. 56  4.4.9 Management Team Dynamics ........................................................................................................... 56  4.4.10 Ranking of Services and Utilities ...................................................................................................... 56  4.5 Gold River Focus Group Meeting Responses ............................................................................................ 57  4.5.1 Business Infrastructure ...................................................................................................................... 57  4.5.2 Community Capacity Infrastructure .................................................................................................. 58  4.5.3 Human Capacity Infrastructure ......................................................................................................... 58  4.5.4 Physical Infrastructure ....................................................................................................................... 58  4.5.5 Gold River Economic Development Committee Recommendations ................................................. 59  Table 4 Economic Development Committee Recommendations 2010‐2011 for Council consideration  2012 ............................................................................................................................................................ 60  Table 5 Chief Administrative Office Revised and Assessed List for consideration 2012 ............................ 62  Table 6 Village of Gold River Economic Development Recommendations to a New Alliance for  consideration in 2012 ................................................................................................................................. 64  4.5.6 Gold River Council Strategic Plan 2008 ‐ 2011 .................................................................................. 66  Table 7 Village of Gold River Ranking of Issues 2008 Council Decision 2012 ............................................. 66  Table 8 Chief Administrative Officer Responsibilities Decision 2012 ......................................................... 66  4.6 Opportunity Assessment Summary .......................................................................................................... 68  Table 9 Organizational SWOT Analysis Framework .................................................................................... 69  Table 10 Village of Gold River Economic Development Organization | Current Position 2012 ................. 69  Table 11 Village of Gold River Economic Development Organizational | Desired Position ....................... 70  5.0 Assessing Gold River Economic and Diversification Options ........................................................................ 72  Merge ......................................................................................................................................................... 72  Acquire ....................................................................................................................................................... 72  Contract ...................................................................................................................................................... 72  Partner ........................................................................................................................................................ 72  5.1 Options to be implemented within the Organization .............................................................................. 73  5.2 Options to be contracted by the Organization ......................................................................................... 73  5.3 Alternatives to the Traditional Committee Format .................................................................................. 74  5.4 Options to be partnered with other Organizations .................................................................................. 74  6.0 Implementing the Diversification Recommendations .................................................................................. 75  6.1 Issues and Opportunities Long List Priorities ........................................................................................... 75  Table 12 Issues | Opportunities Long List .................................................................................................. 75  6.2 Issues | Opportunities Short List .............................................................................................................. 75  Table 13 Issues | Opportunities Short List Categories ............................................................................... 75  6.3 Focus Areas ............................................................................................................................................... 75  Table 14 Issues | Opportunities Focus Areas ............................................................................................. 75  6.4 Strategic Priority Work Program .............................................................................................................. 75  Table 15 Strategic Priority Work Program .................................................................................................. 75  6.5 Blueplanet Sustainability Check Up .......................................................................................................... 76  Table 16 Blueplanet Sustainability Check Up ............................................................................................. 76  6.5 Internal Strategic Priority Dashboard ....................................................................................................... 77 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 7 Table 17 Internal Strategic Priority Dashboard .......................................................................................... 77  6.6 External Strategic Priorities Dashboard .................................................................................................... 77  Table 18 External Strategic Priorities Dashboard ....................................................................................... 77  Appendix I ‐ Stakeholder Survey and Interviews ................................................................................................ 78  Appendix II – Discussion Paper ........................................................................................................................... 79  Appendix III – Village of Gold River – Ranking of Issues 2008 ............................................................................ 89  Table 19 Village of Gold River Ranking of Issues 2008 ............................................................................... 89  Appendix IV – Village of Gold River Economic Development Committee Progress from 2010‐2012 [Actions] . 91  Table 20 Village of Gold River Economic Development Committee Progress from 2010‐2012 [Actions] . 91  Appendix V – Survey Results .............................................................................................................................. 95  Appendix VI – Raw Log Exports Explanation .................................................................................................... 141  Vancouver, September 26, 2011 .............................................................................................................. 141  Submitted to the Province of British Columbia on behalf of the Truck Loggers Association (TLA)   September 15, 2011 ................................................................................................................................. 141  Log exports: The reality ............................................................................................................................ 141  How do we best apply the existing policy to meet current objectives? ................................................... 142  A Common Problem ................................................................................................................................. 142  Coastal Log Demand ................................................................................................................................. 143  Policy Vision .............................................................................................................................................. 143  To Contact the TLA: .................................................................................................................................. 144  Appendix VII – Independent Wood Processors ................................................................................................ 145    ii. List of Tables Table 1 British Columbia Village Administration 2012 ....................................................................................... 38  Table 2 Village of Gold River Official Community Plan 2003 .............................................................................. 39  Table 4 Economic Development Value Requirements ....................................................................................... 42  Table 5 Economic Development Committee Recommendations 2010‐2012 .................................................... 60  Table 6 Chief Administrative Office Revised and Assessed List 2012 ................................................................. 62  Table 7 Village of Gold River Economic Development Function Revised and Assessed List 2012 ..................... 64  Table 8 Village of Gold River Ranking of Issues 2008 Council Decision 2012 ..................................................... 66  Table 9 Chief Administrative Officer Responsibilities Decision 2012 ................................................................. 66  Table 10 Organizational SWOT Analysis Framework .......................................................................................... 69  Table 11 Village of Gold River Economic Development Organization | Current Position 2012 ......................... 69  Table 12 Village of Gold River Economic Development Organizational | Desired Position ............................... 70  Table 13 Issues | Opportunities Long List .......................................................................................................... 75  Table 14 Issues | Opportunities Short List Categories ....................................................................................... 75  Table 15 Issues | Opportunities Focus Areas ..................................................................................................... 75  Table 16 Strategic Priority Work Program .......................................................................................................... 75  Table 17 Blueplanet Sustainability Check Up ..................................................................................................... 76  Table 18 Internal Strategic Priority Dashboard .................................................................................................. 77  Table 19 External Strategic Priorities Dashboard ............................................................................................... 77  Table 20 Village of Gold River Ranking of Issues 2008 ....................................................................................... 89  Table 21 Village of Gold River Economic Development Committee Progress from 2010‐2012 [Actions] ......... 91    iii. Table of Figures Figure 1 North Island Employment Foundations Society Economic Scan 2010 ................................................. 36  Figure 2 Triple Bottom Line Approach to Sustainability ..................................................................................... 49  Figure 3 New Zealand Relationship between target dimensions and key indicators......................................... 50 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 8    
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 9 iii. Engagement Letter August 18th , 2011   Mr. Larry Plourde  Chief Administrative Officer  Village of Gold River  99 Muchalat Drive ‐ PO Box 610  Gold River, British Columbia  Canada V0P1G0  Phone: 250‐283‐2202 Fax: 250‐283‐7500  villageofgoldriver@cablerocket.com  Subject: Gold River Economic Diversification Program      Business Retention, Expansion and Recruitment  Dear Mr Plourde:  Thank you for the confirming the receipt of my proposal at Council on August 15th , 2011.  The following is my  understanding of what Council wishes to do.  My understanding of your needs with respect to economic development includes the following points:  Take the Committee work completed to‐date, all previous Strategies and the priorities of Council and prepare  a succinct work program for consideration by your office, grouped into Physical Infrastructure, Human  Capacity Infrastructure, Community Capacity Infrastructure and Business Infrastructure;  Take the proposed work program and meet with the employers, large and small, in a focus group setting in  Gold River and secure their input, feedback and support for the work program;  Present the revised work Program to the Village CAO for comments and feedback, along with a revised Terms  of Reference for a Task Force to govern the work program for Council;  Take the Work Program and all input and present it to Council for approval, along with reasonable financial  implications for the 2012 budget year in December 2011;  The first part of the plan must be completed on or before December 31st  2011 and include monthly reports on  progress from Capital EDC;  None of this commitment will be sub contracted to any other person or firm; and;  Patrick Marshall, acting as the Consulting Economic Developer will be responsible, accessible and accountable  to the Village Administrator throughout this process;  In support of this, Capital EDC Economic Development Company will deliver a Decision Paper entitled  “Economic Diversification | The Village of Gold River and Partners” in which 21 steps to achieve successful  diversification, business retention and expansion of investment are outlined. Our initial consultation and  subsequent conversations have made me aware that there are divergent expectations from a variety of  interests in your community and I will be sensitive to those expectations as we move through the process.   I am also aware of the need to ensure that technology and process built for this plan are constructed by  people who hold a business license in your jurisdiction and are located in the region in which the wood is  sourced. I will do my best to ensure that resident businesses and qualified suppliers are given every  opportunity to fulfil the requirements of this plan.  The purpose of this letter of engagement is to outline the details of the services to be provided by our  company in facilitating an in‐depth program from identifying prospective partners through to building the  pieces and resources required in each step. This can best be accomplished by the preparation of a  Management Plan that will detail the requirements of the Village of Gold River and others and the scope of  detail required for each stage.  I would also advise that when we have completed the plan, there will be assignments for a variety of  organizations and people. I will also identify which elements of the Plan I can deliver under a separate 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 10 agreement for implementation. My role at this point is to review resources, conduct interviews, shape the  framework and make recommendations to your office.   I have included a work plan that will cover off a six month period. My fees for the work identified in the  attached outline will be $10,000.00 plus HST, plus expenses anticipated to be $2,500.00 to be approved by  your office.  My understanding of Council’s expectation is that we proceed with the first part of the work outlined.  Consideration of further work may or may not be considered when Council convenes following the Municipal  Elections.   I expect that the majority of the work will be completed by remote communication and that any travel,  accommodation, or other expenses required will be submitted to your office for approval prior to making  purchases.  Please also find a copy of references for your use.  I would appreciate a signed copy of this communication  sent to my efacsimile at +1 866 827‐1524 at your earliest convenience. Thank you very much for the  opportunity.  Yours truly,  Capital EDC Economic Development Company  Original Signed P.N.Marshall   Patrick Nelson Marshall  Economic Developer  Capital EDC Economic Development Company    As to concurrence:    Original Signed L, Plourde  Larry Plourde  Chief Administrative Officer  Village of Gold River Date August 22nd , 2011       
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 11   Work Program | hours|rates  Patrick  Marshall    Admin   Project Initiation [September 2011]    Kick off Meeting to confirm approach and expectations by Phone Email to Council and Committee Members  Complete Survey of Business people, Council and Committee on‐line    Complete Final Work Plan Detail by email  Deliver Discussion Paper “21 Steps”  $5,000.00  Complete Build the Plan Document [September 2011]   Prepare a Plan Framework Document for review   Complete Interview Prospective Partners to determine scope of interest Focus Group meeting in Gold River    Complete Form the Diversification Team [October 2011]   Establish the Team and Letters of Expectation Between participants Deliver Draft Management Plan to Village CAO  $5,000.00  Hold Terms of Reference for Partnership between Village, Band and Business  Community    Hold Secure Feedback from Business, Advisory Committee, Taxpayers and Council and  deliver final Plan to Council for Approval December 2011    Hold Subtotal  $10,000.00  Professional Services    $10,000.00 Other Costs [Estimated Travel and disbursements]   $2,500.00 HST exclusive Total    $12,500.00      
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 12 This page left intentionally blank   
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 13 v. Report to Council File:    Village of Gold River  Date:    July 7th , 2011  To:    Mayor and Members of the Village of Gold River      Chair and Members of the Economic Development Committee of Council  From:    Patrick Nelson Marshall, Consulting Economic Developer  Subject:   Economic Development Assessment Village of Gold River  ISSUE: Councillor Lynn Unger, Chair of the Economic Development Advisory Committee of Council asked  Patrick Nelson Marshall, Consulting Economic Developer for the Capital EDC Economic Development  Company to provide the Committee with his thoughts on how to actively move forward with a new Economic  Development Agenda for the Village.  Patrick visited with Council on the evening of June 1st  to engage in a conversation regarding Members of  Council’s views on Economic Development. He presented to the Committee on June 2nd , 2011 and also  engaged in a conversation to better understand the progress made by the Committee to date. Before leaving  town, he took time to visit with the Chief Administrative Officer for the Mowachaht Muchalaht First Nation,  Ms Cynthia Rayner.  The objective was to prepare a response to several questions that arose from his conversations, with a view  to providing Council and the Committee with some simple next steps.  BACKGROUND: Mr. Marshall reviewed the following documents provided prior to meeting with Council and the Committee:   Annual Report Objectives – Progress Report for 2010 Articles 4 through 6[b]   Appendix One Ranking of Issues Village of Gold River    Committee Minutes January 28th  2010 to April 7th  2011   Economic Development [A statement by Kate undated]   Economic Development Strategy Update For the Village of Gold River July 30th  1999, Penfold, Dixon and  Pinel  My Vision of Gold River by Lynne Under [undated]  It should be noted that Mr. Marshall served as the Principle Economic Developer and General Manager of the  Campbell River EDC Economic Development Corporation from 200 to 2007, the Property and Economic  Development Manager for the City of Campbell River 1989 to 2000 and provided support to the Village of  Gold River, Gold River Chamber of Commerce and other community organizations on many occasions over  the past twenty years.  There was no commitment to further engagement of Capital EDC Economic Development Company by the  Municipality or the Committee and Mr. Marshall contributed his time in lieu of remuneration.  DISCUSSION: It is clear that the Penfold Strategy Update written for the Village in 1999 was for a different time and will not  work in the post 2008 recession. There are doubts that Canada’s economy let alone the Village of Gold River  will return to a place where this type of Strategy would be considered functional.  Also, it is the opinion of Patrick Marshall that “Economic Development” practices have changed dramatically  as well. Few organizations have the resources, the capacity or the skill set to sustain the strategic efforts for 5  and 10 year plans. Today, successful organizations attach issues and opportunities on shorter cycles, with  results, or they delete the strategic priority as unattainable.  In order to assist Council in its deliberation, I prepared the following most Frequently Asked Questions [FAQS]  for their consideration prior to making a decision on how best to proceed.  
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 14 Review different types of Economic Development (EDO) position options. What works best in a community  of Gold River’s size?  The Village of Gold River already has an Economic Development Officer. Most Municipal Chief Administrative  Officers serve as EDO’s by default. “Economic Development Officer” is a traditional job title that is a  throwback to the 1950’s and describes people that work inside Local Government. There are many titles that  are used in this context. Unfortunately, today, many EDO’s have been relegated to writing grant applications  and used to feed the sustainable revenue stream that keeps many organizations going. I doubt that an EDO  would be able to achieve much in the context of the Village of Gold River as they would be drawn into long  term grant making activities which take away from the core job of delivering business retention, expansion  and recruitment.  This is not to say that Economic Developers could not do the job, just not in the traditional “office‐bound”  way of the past.  There are many types of economic development. Here are three separate definitions that differ in scope and  scale:  Community Development: Community development seeks to empower individuals and groups of people by  providing these groups with the skills they need to affect change in their own communities. These skills are  often concentrated around building political power through the formation of large social groups working for a  common agenda. Community developers must understand both how to work with individuals and how to  affect communities' positions within the context of larger social institutions.  Community Economic Development: is the process by which local people build organizations and  partnerships that interconnect profitable business with other interests and values ‐ for example, skills and  education, health, housing, and the environment. In CED a lot more people get involved, describing how the  community should change. A lot more organizations look for ways to make their actions and investments  reinforce the wishes and intentions of the whole community. Business becomes a means to accumulate  wealth and to make the local way of life more creative, inclusive, and sustainable ‐ now and 20 or 30 years  from now.  At its most effective, CED is characterized by:   a multi‐functional, comprehensive strategy of on‐going activities, in contrast to individual economic development projects or other  isolated attempts at community betterment.   an integration or merging of economic and social goals to bring about more far‐reaching community revitalization.   a base of operating principles that enables a broad range of residents to assume responsibility in the governance of development  organizations and in the community as a whole.   a process guided by strategic planning and analysis, in contrast to opportunistic and unsystematic tactics.   a businesslike financial management approach that builds both ownership of assets and a diverse range of financial and other  partners and supporters.   an organizational format that is nonprofit, independent, and non‐governmental, even though for‐profit or governmental entities  are closely linked to its work. 1     Economic Development: These are most commonly described as the creation of jobs and wealth, and the  improvement of quality of life. Economic development can also be described as a process that influences  growth and restructuring of an economy to enhance the economic well‐being of a community. In the  broadest sense, economic development encompasses three major areas:   Policies that government undertakes to meet broad economic objectives including inflation control, high  employment, and sustainable growth.   Policies and programs to provide services including building highways, managing parks, and providing  medical access to the disadvantaged.   Policies and programs explicitly directed at improving the business climate through specific efforts,  business finance, marketing, neighborhood development, business retention and expansion, technology  transfer, real estate development and others.                                                                     1    http://www.cedworks.com/CEDdefinition.html 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 15 The main goal of economic development is improving the economic well‐being of a community through  efforts that entail job creation, job retention, tax base enhancements and quality of life. As there is no single  definition for economic development, there is no single strategy, policy, or program for achieving successful  economic development. Communities differ in their geographic and political strengths and weaknesses. Each  community, therefore, will have a unique set of challenges for economic development.2   It is also important to understand that there are five Economic Sectors. Not all business activities are  “Sectors”:   Economic Sector: A nation’s economy can be divided into various sectors to define the proportion of the population engaged in the  activity sector. This categorization is seen as a continuum of distance from the natural environment. The continuum starts with the  primary sector, which concerns itself with the utilization of raw materials from the earth such as agriculture and mining. From  there, the distance from the raw materials of the earth increases.   Primary Sector: The primary sector of the economy extracts or harvests products from the earth. The primary sector includes the  production of raw material and basic foods. Activities associated with the primary sector include agriculture (both subsistence and  commercial), mining, forestry, farming, grazing, hunting and gathering, fishing, and quarrying. The packaging and processing of the  raw material associated with this sector is also considered to be part of this sector. In developed and developing countries, a  decreasing proportion of workers are involved in the primary sector. About 3% of the U.S. labor force is engaged in primary sector  activity today, while more than two‐thirds of the labor forces were primary sector workers in the mid‐nineteenth century.   Secondary Sector: The secondary sector of the economy manufactures finished goods. All of manufacturing, processing, and  construction lies within the secondary sector. Activities associated with the secondary sector include metal working and smelting,  automobile production, textile production, chemical and engineering industries, aerospace manufacturing, energy utilities,  engineering, breweries and bottlers, construction, and shipbuilding.   Tertiary Sector: The tertiary sector of the economy is the service industry. This sector provides services to the general population  and to businesses. Activities associated with this sector include retail and wholesale sales, transportation and distribution,  entertainment (movies, television, radio, music, theater, etc.), restaurants, clerical services, media, tourism, insurance, banking,  healthcare, and law. In most developed and developing countries, a growing proportion of workers are devoted to the tertiary  sector. In the U.S., more than 80% of the labor force is tertiary workers.   Quaternary Sector: The quaternary sector of the economy consists of intellectual activities. Activities associated with this sector  include government, culture, libraries, scientific research, education, and information technology.   Quintenary Sector: Some consider there to be a branch of the quaternary sector called the quintenary sector, which includes the  highest levels of decision making in a society or economy. This sector would include the top executives or officials in such fields as  government, science, universities, nonprofit, healthcare, culture, and the media. An Australian source relates that the quintenary  sector in Australia refers to domestic activities such as those performed by stay‐at‐home parents or homemakers. These activities  are typically not measured by monetary amounts but it is important to recognize these activities in contribution to the economy. 3     If you have not asked your residential taxpayers, business or industrial taxpayers, what they need to retain  and expand existing business, there is no point in hiring a person to do the job. Some functions are best  suited to a Regional Economic Development Collaborative like Destination Management for Tourism,  Economic Diversification of the Forest Economy, and other regional subjects.   I would recommend that Gold River pursue a “Blended” approach to engaging in this activity. That means  wait and see what the Regional approach looks like, then hire someone to facilitate some exploratory focus  groups in the community, prepare a report to Council, have it validated, and then take another small step.  The days of behemoth “Strategies” have passed. Challenge a service provider to show results in 30, 60 and 90  day increments, before the decision is made to commit to a full time position.  Also, don’t be restricted to a full time person. Consider buying support services as and when you need them  on a retained basis. This would be to support the CAO and or their designated staff member to get elements  of foundation building completed before a line is placed in the Annual Budget.  Do community demographics make a difference to economic development approaches?  No. However, the location of the community in a cycle is important to understand. See the Matric at:  http://www.theciel.com/publications/currentmatrix_grid_v2.6.pdf   Can a half‐time EDO position be effective, especially when first establishing programs, awareness of the  office/service, etc.?  No. This only sets the position and the person up for failure.                                                                    2  http://www.iedconline.org/?p=Guide_Overview  3    http://geography.about.com/od/urbaneconomicgeography/a/sectorseconomy.htm 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 16 How should Gold River work with Regional economic development initiatives/programs?  Assess what is needed locally by speaking with your employers [public and private sector], develop a stepped  strategy, and then take it to the taxpayers for ratification before Council approves it.  When that work is being done, ask if the economic activity is exclusive to Gold River. Those activities that are  should be included in the “Local Economic Diversification Plan” that fits up into the Official Community Plan.  The Land Use Plan usually is five years. In the sub plan, make it a smaller profile like 36 months made up of  quarterly 90 day periods.  Help Council and the Committee identify “early win (low hanging fruit)” projects in Gold River.  A Review of the Strategic Plan developed by the Committee by someone that has economic development  experience will show what is achievable and what is not. Ask the reviewer to package the Plan for the  employers to review in a focus group, revise it, then arrange for public meetings in the community and have  that same person answer questions, then take it forward to Council for approval, in 30 days.  Don’t call it an “Economic Development Strategy” as taxpayers no longer trust the term.  The Mayor can establish a “Gold River Leaders Roundtable” comprised of the elected leaders of other  organizations exclusive to Gold River like the Chair of the School District, Chief of the Band Council and others  to collaborate and inform each other on progress. In fact, any of them could do that at any time.  The CAO probably has a group like this already for CEO’s General Managers and others that are responsible  for operations in the area.  Council could convene a “Community Forum” of local organizations with the expressed intent of taking the  pulse of where everyone is at, then finding the top 5 list of projects on the go. From this, the Task Force could  derive a top list of issues and opportunities so as to determine the skill set they might want to “Scope” the  issue or opportunity.  Do not overestimate the “Listening Function”. The Task Force could ask that staff or the Consulting Economic  Developer to arrange a series of focus groups in each of the five sectors to sound out interest levels in  addressing a small list of the top three issues and the top 3 opportunities.  The Task Force could ask staff to engage a small team to conduct a “Business Retention and Expansion”  Barriers to Business Assessment and bring the results back to the Task Force for recommended actions to  Council.  What reporting structure should the person responsible for economic diversification have?  There are two types of Economic Development Reporting structures. They both report to the CAO who is  responsible for overall operation of the Municipality on the direction of Council. One is when a full time  position is established. The second is when a Consulting Economic Developer is engaged on a project by  project basis.  How do you set goals and identify measures of success for an economic diversification plan or program?  Not goals and measure, but real numbers based on tangible things like property, people, and capital invested.  Conduct a governance session, define what you want to achieve, and then let someone qualified propose  how to get there, and then measure how far they take you towards the End Statement. Do not count the  number of people through the door. It’s the ones that purchase something that count.  What are realistic expectations of an economic diversification plan or program (in the first and subsequent  years)?  If you hire someone to work part time in the Village Office to conduct all the consultation before they start,  don’t look for results before 18 months.  You reduce the period of time if you hone in on what you want before you start, and then get someone that’s  good at it and has proven skills.  What type of an operational budget would be required? 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 17 $40,000 to $60,000 in salary and benefits for a candidate under 5 years’ experience. The new City of Nanaimo  Corporation is offering $150,000 for an Economic Development CEO.  An annual Contract with a Consulting Economic Developer might include a monthly retainer for a total  estimated cost of $30,000 plus HST, expenses and disbursements related to the plan.  It doesn’t matter where the persons chair and table are as long as there is someone providing administrative  support connected to the CAO’s office or the Director of Finance. Placing this person in any other Department  presents a problem.  It would be helpful to have a budget allocation of $40,000 with the qualifier that every effort to double the  expenditures by leveraging from other sources is made.  Another approach is the engagement of an Economic Developer on retainer. That would be $2500 to $5000 a  month that gets you two days support, and reduces the hourly rate on actual other work from $150 to $100  an hour with $65 hour for administrative support.  There are no barriers in front of taking steps now.   Without taking action locally on this file, there will be limitations to meeting future financial obligations as  out migration of youth and an aging population continue.  The business community is likely to support action on this file. Retired people represent a literal army of  support that can be taped to participate in the process, in spite of volunteer fatigue.  OPTIONS: 1. Engage a Consulting Economic Developer to help get the municipality to the starting point that would  require full time staff with a budget tied to an approved plan at $30,0000 plus HST, expenses and  disbursements; or;  2. Engage a contract Economic Developer Full Time in a term limited engagement, 3 to 5 year term at a cost  of $40,000 to $60,000 plus benefits, plus plan related disbursements and expenses.  RECOMMENDATION: I would recommend Option 1 in order to  complete the ground work to make ready for a full time solution  should the feedback from the community indicate the need for this approach. I would expect that the Plan  and the meetings required to get a Plan approved by the business community, interested taxpayers and  Council would cost $10,000, and I would recommend that Council engage the Consulting Economic Developer  to start the implementation process, through to the Inaugural Meeting and Strategic Planning session for the  new term of Council in January.  Yours truly,  Capital EDC Economic Development Company    Patrick Nelson Marshall  Economic Developer  Capital EDC Economic Development Company 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 18 v. Draft Briefing Note DATE:    May 2012  PREPARED FOR:   Larry Plourde, Chief Administrative Officer, Village Of Gold River  Topic:    Economic and Diversification Assessment Report  Capital EDC Economic Development Company was engaged to conduct a no‐fault assessment of the work of  the Village of Gold River, Economic Development Committee with respect to determining the relevance and  feasibility of engaging in continued and coordinated economic development and diversification. The following  report documents the findings of Capital EDC’s Economic Developer in the role of Assessor.  Issue: What should the Economic and Diversification efforts of the Village of Gold River look like?  The report demonstrates that coordinated and effective economic and diversification efforts are possible for  the Village of Gold River, with some refinements to the process, terms of reference, relationships and  resources at hand. The work completed to‐date is useful to some degree and can be brought forward into  more conventional economic development frameworks. Mayor and Council, elected in November of 2011 will  deliberate on the findings of this assessment and select the next course of action subject to a  recommendation by the Chief Administrative officer. Previous work by the Village and its volunteers in no  way precludes new ideas or paths from the new Council.  Background: The Village of Gold River Economic Development Committee delivered its work in the form of Minutes to  Council.  Council received the Minutes and in some cases took action, in others, remained silent on the subject.  Capital EDC was approached by a Member of Council and the Committee Chair to provide a proposal for the  Chief Administrative Officer as to how the context could be reviewed and assessed so that work could  proceed.  Capital EDC Economic Development, in the spirit of building a new working relationship that could result in  the training of volunteers to sustain community based economic development, invested extra hours to  provide a full and holistic view of the context for stimulating volunteer efforts to facilitate investment and  jobs in the community. The Community Economic Development Partnership Project involved the following  investments in hours illustrated as a cash equivalent:  Summary of Proposed Contributions Supporting this CEDP Project  Contribution Source  Financial In‐kind Total    Confirmed  Requested  Confirmed  Requested    Kick off Meeting to confirm  approach and expectations by  Phone CEDC      $2,500.00    $2,500.00  Email Preliminary Draft Assessment  to Council and Committee Members  CEDC      $1,000.00    $1,000.00  Complete Survey of Business  people, Council and Committee on‐ line CEDC      $10,000.00    $10,000.00  Deliver Discussion Paper “21 Steps”  CEDC      $5,000.00    $5,000.00  Interview Prospective Partners to  determine scope of interest  Focus Group meeting in Gold River  CEDC      $5,000.00    $5,000.00  Prepare a Plan Framework  Document for review CEDC      $15,000.00    $15,000.00  Final Work Plan Detail CEDC      $5,000.00    $5,000.00 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 19 Contribution Source  Financial In‐kind Total    Confirmed  Requested  Confirmed  Requested    Village of Gold River Contribution to  Planning Phase  $5,000.00        $5,000.00  Sub‐Totals  $5,000.00    $43,500.00    $48,500.00  Implementation and Execution  Stage from this point forward            Establish the Team and Letters of  Expectation Between participants  Deliver Draft Management Plan to  Village CAO      $10,000.00    $10,000.00  Build the Plan Document      $5,000.00    $5,000.00  Form the Diversification Team      $5,000.00    $5,000.00  Terms of Reference for Partnership  between Village, Band and Business  Community      $10,000.00    $10,000.00  Secure Feedback from Business,  Advisory Committee, Taxpayers and  Council and deliver final Plan to  Council for Approval      $15,000.00    $15,000.00  Community Economic Development  Orientation and Forum CEDC      $20,000.00    $20,000.00  Build Business Network CEDC      $5,000.00    $5,000.00  Blueplanet Sustainment Certification  CEDC      $15,000.00    $15,000.00  Village of Gold River Contribution to  Implementation Execution        $5,000.000  $5,000.00  Total financial | in‐kind  contributions  $5,000.00    $128,500.00  $5,000.000  $138,500.00  This work represented a considerable amount of time contributed by Capital EDC Economic Development  Company in the form of hours that would not be invoiced to the Village by the company as the Consulting  Economic Developer viewed this as an opportunity to demonstrate capabilities in a context where repeated  one‐off studies have not been successful. The total cash contribution for this work expected and agreed to by  the local government would have been $10,000 in cash plus the time contributed by Council, staff and  volunteers. The results of the Community Economic Development Partnership can be sustained as an ongoing  investment by all project partners to support ongoing development efforts on behalf of the community.   The decision to defer the final report until after the local government election was made between the CAO  and the company so as to allow more business people to complete the online survey, and so as not to provide  subjects that might inappropriately influence the elections held in November 2011.  The final report was deferred once again until such time as Council could complete its inaugural meeting, new  Councilors receive their training in local government by UBCM, and a delay caused by the consultant due to  other commitments made prior to the decision to defer.  Council decided in February to suspend the remainder of the work program.  Discussion: March is the month in which local governments finalize their corporate strategies and financial plans.   Capital EDC has presented a proposal to facilitate Council’s strategic plan in order to take advantage of new  information and familiarization of Capital EDC with the current state of policies and prospects for the Village.  This is covered under a separate communication and proposal for work.  Include factors to be considered in making the decision (e.g., financial, legislative, policy or communications  considerations) and any required consultations.  Council’s decision to suspend the completion of the work proposed by Capital EDC to allow a presentation by  the consultant was expected. Council needs to orient itself and understand the value of the information in  the report before its commits to next steps.  
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 20 Options: As of this date, Council may:  1. Suspend  Decide to receive and file the Report taking no further action;  2. New direction  Decide to use some of the elements in the report and seek other consultants for the implementation; or;  3. Completion  Decide to proceed with the completion of the work and engage Capital EDC for the facilitation of the  corporate strategy to ensure that the economic and diversification component is connected, responsible and  will produce results.  Recommendation: Option 3 will ensure that Council communicates to the taxpayers of Gold River in a clear, concise and visible  way. It will also ensure that the relationship between the all Members of Council and the CAO is documented  and can be reviewed at year end. This will document progress in a way that taxpayers expect and will show  that this Council is moving forward in a measurable and responsible manner.  Council has not communicated any decision to the Capital EDC Economic Development Company.  PREPARED BY:  Patrick N. Marshall, Business and Economic Developer      Capital EDC Economic Development Company  DATE:    May 23rd , 2012 
    •   1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1.1 Recommendations This report is essentially housekeeping from the 2008 to 2011 term of office for the Village of Gold River. It  brings together the corporate strategy built by Council and Staff, with municipal policy and the proposals  from an Economic Development Committee into one strategic document for review and assessment. The  purpose of which is to enable the incoming Council to assess where the Village is in the economic and  diversification process from a “no‐fault” perspective, account for previous directions so that duplication does  not occur and those paths that led to nowhere are not repeated, and those that demonstrated results, are  emulated in the new term.  Once Council understands where the local government has been in terms of strategic targets, policy and  proposals, it will be better positioned to determine the most appropriate targets for the next 36 month term.  This report does not confine the new Council or Administration, but demonstrates to the taxpayers of Gold  River that the local government is accountable and responsible for its decisions to act. It also demonstrates  that the Village of Gold River is not solely responsible for progress in the economic and diversification subject  area, but one of many participants that when working together, produce results.  Council has not reviewed the Report or the Strategy submitted by the Capital Economic Development  Company with the Consulting Economic Developer, Patrick N. Marshall, nor has it given any direction to Staff  with respect to moving forward or implementing the work.  The following are recommendations made to Council in March of 2012 and are based on the thorough  assessment of the Village of Gold River action to the fourth Quarter 2012:  1.1.1 Tangible Results The Official Community Plan and existing policy documents prepared by the Village of Gold River provide no  information to assess whether or not there are tangible results from the Economic Development Committee  process.  There are valuable recommendations from the Economic Development Committee that need to be  deliberated upon by Council [Table 6], reported on by the Chief Administrative Officer [Table 7] and referred  to a community wide effort to engage in what is defined as Community Economic Development [Table 8], a  process in which the Village of Gold River is an equal partner, but not the sole participant.  Council also needs to revisit priorities outlined by the previous term to determine if there any long term  targets that need to be brought forward into the new term [Table 9].  There are those subjects from the previous term that Council should request a Report from the Chief  Administrative Officer on their current validity [Table 10].  1.1.2 Committee Operations Council should not establish another Committee or Commission. The Community is too small. Council should  develop a Corporate Strategic Plan for their three year term using the formats identified in Tables 14 through  20 illustrated in Section 6.  Council should consider enabling the Chief Administrative Officer to hire support for short term planning and  development support on an as needed basis, and resource to engage a third‐party to prepare cost effective  business cases for major projects before making commitments. Business cases will provide Council with the  cost benefits of making large infrastructure investments.  1.1.3 Village of Gold River Capacity The Mayor and Chief Executive Officer have acted as a reception function for the Village. There are no reports  available that account for time or resources spent on this activity.  Council should give consideration to taking a leadership role in establishing an alliance with the Mowachaht  Muchalaht Administration and Major Employers. 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 22 Again, engaging short term assignments to support this role and alliance is the most cost effective means of  assuring results.  Taking revenues from resource investments and applying them directly to operations or special projects  makes no sense and is not sustainable. Council would be well advised to engage a third‐party to assist in  facilitating the community economic development process, building the 12 month and 36 month strategic  plan, then picking 1 to 3 tasks to complete each year, building confidence in the Village and Alliance while  reconstructing community esteem.  1.1.4 Business Community Interest Business owners and operators responses to requests by the assessor to meet and participate in the on‐line  survey were low.  Council, if the Mayor requested similar attention, would no doubt receive a more favorable response.  The focus group and online survey results provide solid background information which supports the  recommendation to lead in establishing a community alliance. The Village should suspend any development  expenses until such time as a Strategic Plan can be put in place, and only offer matching dollars to what major  employers, small and medium enterprise offer to contribute.  There are no grants.  1.1.5 Options for Diversification The three areas that arose as prospects for diversification included small and medium enterprise supporting  the Forest industry, ocean and marinespace enterprise and am integrated approach to outdoor recreation,  from education and training a workforce, through to developing more commercial operations in the region.  Here again, the Villager should not attempt action in isolation, but seek leadership in each of these areas to  lead the community wide effort. This involves sub‐plans for the retention or existing business and the  recruitment of new business.  1.1.6 Restart the Process Council needs to decide if it will maintain the status quo, which is predominantly being responsive to  enquiries if leading the way to establish a community economic development initiative around establishing a  realistic community alliance.  If the second approach is selected, the following short and long term actions would apply.  1.1.7 Short‐term Action Within 90 days of receiving and adopting this assessment, the Village of Gold River may:  1. Engage a professional to design, host and report out on the outcomes of a community economic and  diversification forum;  2. Provide a terms of reference for a new organization to manage the outcomes of the forum;  3. Update the framework provided in the assessment;  4. Assist the Chief Administrative Officer in preparing a report to the Mayor and Members of Council  regarding the Human Resource and Community Capacity required to fulfill the forum and strategic plan  outcomes; and;  5. Assist the Chief Administrative Officer in fulfilling the other components of the plan outlined in Section  6.0 of this Report.  1.1.8 Long‐term Action On or Before December 31st  2012, the Village may:  6. Revise and communicate its 5 Year Infrastructure Plan  7. Revise and Communicate its 3 Year Corporate Strategy  8. Publish its Communications Strategy  9. Publish and Communicate its Business Retention Strategy 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 23 1.1.9 Advocate Council should continue its lead role in monitoring and taking action on the following subjects:  10. Monitor and participate in supporting a positive Metro Vancouver Decision  11. Improve Western Forest Products Relations  12. Develop Grieg Seafood Ltd. Relations  13. Maintain and report out on Covanta Green Energy Relations  1.1.10 Next Steps Council halted the completion of this work in order to better understand the volume of information. The  timing is right to complete the last three steps of the assignment, once Council understands its position with  respect to corporate strategies, [policies and Committee recommendations.  The next steps in this assignment include:  14. Form the Diversification Team  Appoint a Councillor to work with the CAO and form a 90 Task Force to bring all of the partners together,  review this report and map out recommendations for Council to proceed.  15. Establish the Team and Letters of Expectation Between participants  This is a simple memorandum of understanding or letter of expectation which Capital EDC has templates  ready for use.  16. Deliver Draft Management Plan to Village CAO  This is a one page plan on how the Alliance will proceed.  17. Terms of Reference for Partnership between Village, Band and Business Community  This is a template that Capital EDC has that requires modification based on consultation with the parties  identified by Council and the Task Force.  18. Secure Feedback from Business, Advisory Committee, Taxpayers and Council and deliver final Plan to  Council for Approval  This represents the completion of the tables in Section 6 of this report, complete with financial implications  and expected results.  1.2 Assessment Objective The objectives for this assessment include:   A review of the Official Community {Plan and existing policy documents to determine if economic  development was being practiced in a way that demonstrates tangible results for the local government  funding it;   A review of the Economic Development Committee operations to determine if there were ways to  improve the outcomes of the Committee work;   An assessment of the capacity and context of the Village of Gold River administration in the context of  facilitating economic development for the community;   An assessment of the business community’s interest in participating in economic development;   An evaluation of options for diversification of the local economic condition; and the provision of;   Some recommended options on how to proceed in restarting the process of addressing economic and  diversification subjects at the Village of Gold River.  1.3 Assessment of Opportunities The following areas were explored as part of the assessment. 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 24 Existing Strategies and Operations Gold River was the subject of many strategic plans, meetings and reports throughout the 1990’s. In many  ways, the Village of Gold River and its residents were pathfinders and first responders to industry change  heralded late in the decade. No one person could have foreseen the scope of Pulp Mill closures across North  America and Gold River was one of the first communities to survive this process.  As part of mapping out a response to this catastrophic event, the Village of Gold River engaged Penfold,  Dixon and Pinel to deliver an economic development strategy update for the Village of Gold River, a process  completed in 1999. The summary report contributed to the definition and revision of the goals for economic  development in the official community plan.   The Official Community Plan for the Village of Gold River cites the following goals:  “Economic Development   “To promote a diversified local economy;   “Natural resource industries will remain integral to Gold Rivers’ future and it is the goal of the Village to  develop both secondary and value added sectors of the local forest industry;   “To provide for development of the port and access to Muchalat Inlet while maintaining unfettered  public access to the Gold and Heber Rivers and the marine environment;   “To support aquaculture and mariculture industries within Nootka Sound and the West Coast of  Vancouver Island;   “To emphasize tourism as integral to the diversification of Gold River and a high priority for the Village;   “To allow for the development of a mixed‐use industrial site to allow for a variety of types of industry  and industrial services; and   “Protection and preservation of accessible and affordable mineral aggregate resources for the Village  and surrounding communities.”4   The economic development goals for the Village of Gold River are reasonable, if the community was not  struggling to sustain volunteer efforts, with no full time staff, in the face of an aging population, with rapidly  growing consumer expectations.  The actual strategy rendered by Penfold, Dixon and Pinel [1999] has more than 73 short, medium and long  terms actions, and required an estimated allocation of $370,000. While the report is very thorough, it did not  estimate the person hours of work to complete the proposed work to fulfill the intended results.  The Village of Gold River is now faced with the task of building a small scale, responsive series of actions to  build an alliance of people that can engage in small scale steps to build on the existing foundation of  community. This needs to be presented to the constituents for affirmation and validation, and needs to be in  plain street English so that it is understandable and people can remember what they agree is the message  they want to repeat when asked, “How id Gold River doing?”.  Stakeholder Interviews A series of interviews of resident business owners and major employers was undertaken to secure a  perspective on economic development from their perspectives. A lot of work had been completed by an  Economic Development Committee of Council; however, it appears that the work, the relationship with  Council and staff and the business community become disconnected in the process.  The subsequent on‐line survey, conversations with both observers and participants indicates that while  volunteers and staff may be fatigued, refinements in policy, process and resources can set the job of engaging  in economic development and diversification efforts on a course that will continue to produce tangible  results.                                                                    4  Village of Gold River Official Community Plan Bylaw 636 Schedule ‘A’ pp. 7 adopted 2003  
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 25 Opportunities Most Relevant to the Village of Gold River The Forest and access to the Ocean and Marinespace continue to be the fundamental underlying factors in  the continued existence of the Village of Gold River. That said the pursuit of a more direct relationship with  the resource industry will provide the community with more realistic expectations for growth and  development of the local economy.  Results of conversations and surveys indicated that while there is a large interest in facilitating manufacturing  and processing of available harvests and resources, the barriers to realizing these expectations remain large.  That does not discount the continued efforts to illustrate that this community is ready to facilitate this type of  investment, but rather, limited resources may show better diversification results by focusing on a number of  other areas.  Clearly, the facilitation and continued exploration of education and training, small and medium enterprise  development related to the needs and interest of the retiree market and outdoor recreation demonstrate the  longest list of opportunities worth pursuing.  1.4 Assessment Contents Section 2 holds all of the context setting, environmental scan and definition information required to  understand the context of economic development, business retention, recruitment and diversification.  Section 3 is an account of information, circumstances, current environmental can, existing policy, and  assessment tools. I have shaped what I believe to be actionable recommendations from the Committee in  this section so that Council and Staff can see them in a new light.  Section 4 provides the framework for Council to better understand the sub‐components of economic and  diversifications actions. I have also illustrated the findings of the Focus Group, online survey and organized  recommendations from the 2010‐2011 Committee into this format for the benefit of Council’s review  process. This includes a current and desired opportunity threat analysis of the circumstances if Council takes  no action as compared to what a desirable condition would look like.  Section 5 is a discussion of the factors and options available to the Village of Gold River. This is where my  recommendations rationale is formed.  Section 6 is the framework in which Council can implement the recommendations that I have made. It is a  standard local government strategic plan framework developed by the Local Government Institute, a business  that has been engaged by the Village in previous years.  Appendix I is a list of the companies shortlisted by staff at the Village of Gold River for inclusion in the ion‐line  survey.  Appendix II I have included my “21 Steps” decision paper in Appendix II so that Council can better understand  the process of retaining existing business and recruiting new business to the community. It can be done at  the Village level, not by the Village in isolation, but with the Village as one of many participants.  Appendix III contains the original table illustrating the Village of Gold River – Ranking of Issues 2008   Appendix IV contains the original table illustrating the Village of Gold River Economic Development  Committee Progress from 2010‐2012 [Actions] as reported in Minutes.  Appendix V contains the graphic results of the online survey.  Appendix VI is a discussion on raw log exports which influences the Villages ability to recruit new business, as  are the comments for the manufacturers association illustrated in Appendix VII.     
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 26   This page left intentionally blank   
    •   2.0 INTRODUCTION 2.1 Purpose of the Assessment There have been at least 4 special Task Forces, 6 Committee’s, two and a half full time economic developers,  8 strategic planning documents,  and any number of business organizations addressing the need for a  coordinated economic development strategy for Gold River since 1983.  The primary purpose of assessment is to improve residents understanding of business and economic  diversification and to assist the Village of Gold River in implementing a strategy. The following factors must  apply to the methodology in conducting this assessment:   Assessment practices must be fair and equitable for all parties.   Communication about assessment is ongoing, clear and meaningful.   Professional development and collaboration support assessment.   Mayor and Council, the CAO and taxpayers are involved in the assessment process.   Assessment practices are regularly reviewed and refined.  2.2 Assessment Statements include The following are a set of simple statements that govern the context of this assessment.  Overarching Plan Governance: The Village of Gold River Economic and Diversification Assessment exists so that the Mayor, Council, staff,  and taxpayers have a terms o4 reference and starting point from which to commence economic and  diversification efforts in a coordinated manner that provides tangible benefits.  Plan Vision: The vision for this assessment is to provide a framework for an economic and diversification plan than is  operable in 36 month increments that reports out quarterly; that is easily understood by taxpayers and;  partners of the Village of Gold River.  Our Plan Mission: The Mission for this Plan is to provide coordinated efforts to create the environment for retaining existing  jobs and investment and facilitating the creation of new jobs and investment for the Village of Gold River, its  taxpayers and its partners.  Village of Gold River Market Position Objectives: The Market Position must contain strategy to translate the business image and competitive advantages into  tangible evidence in the marketplace and to Village taxpayers. The final strategy must concentrate  development on the following specific areas:   Innovative product design, supported by superior information and communication processes.  Products  and services developed to implement the Plan must meet the needs of the target market as determined  through research.   Delivery system processes that combine human and technical service distribution methods that provide  the ultimate in convenience and access.   Create an environment where human resources are motivated through opportunities, compensation,  training and recognition to provide the level of service and attain the required sales to gain competitive  advantage.   Explore and use technology wherever possible to gain operating efficiency and expand traditional  services to the customers.   Policy and procedures should manage risk, yet always consider the final user when developed.   Determine, define and target a profitable and suitable niche market.   Establish reliable research processes that identify consumer needs, wants and perception of the Village  of Gold River. 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 28  Use innovative communication and advertising methods that are specifically targeted to the prospective  users.   Use effective communication to promote, train, and educate products and services to staff to ensure  buy‐in.  The outcomes of the final Plan must include:   Support and increase local jobs There must be tracking of existing and new jobs created by the efforts of implementing the plan. With 30 to  35 resident businesses and major employers existing in the Village, this should not be a difficult task.   Community Involvement The Plan must be presented to the business community in a context where they can ask questions without  retribution. The same must take place in the community at‐large and should be considered a learning  process. Quarterly and annual forums to report out the status of work must take place, even if people do not  show up.   Promote community participation Tasks identified in the Plan must provide people with the ability to participate in ways as simple as sending  prepared emails to their networks, or sharing web posting on Facebook. The only way this works is if  everyone has a role to play.   Educate community about business retention, recruitment and diversification These are foreign subjects to most taxpayers and residents as most people are employees and employers.  The challenge is to find people that can translate these business processes into plain English.   Communications program The success of the Plan and Strategies will only be as good as the reporting. There are so many social  networks and platforms available for free and the community is smaller than many urban high schools, that a  shared responsibility for communicating should not be an issue. Refinements to the existing Gold River Buzz  were one existing tool that many people expressed an interest in investing and upgrading.  Economic Development There are several types of economic development:  Community Development Community development seeks to empower individuals and groups of people by providing these groups with  the skills they need to affect change in their own communities. These skills are often concentrated around  building  political  power  through  the  formation  of  large  social  groups  working  for  a  common  agenda.  Community developers must understand both how to work with individuals and how to affect communities'  positions within the context of larger social institutions.  Community Economic Development   Is  the  process  by  which  local  people  build  organizations  and  partnerships  that  interconnect  profitable  business  with  other  interests  and  values  ‐  for  example,  skills  and  education,  health,  housing,  and  the  environment. In CED a lot more people get involved, describing how the community should change. A lot  more organizations look for ways to make their actions and investments reinforce the wishes and intentions  of the whole community. Business becomes a means to accumulate wealth and to make the local way of life  more creative, inclusive, and sustainable ‐ now and 20 or 30 years from now.  At its most effective, CED is characterized by   a  multi‐functional,  comprehensive  strategy  of  on‐going  activities,  in  contrast  to  individual  economic  development projects or other isolated attempts at community betterment.   an  integration  or  merging  of  economic  and  social  goals  to  bring  about  more  far‐reaching  community  revitalization. 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 29  a  base  of  operating  principles  that  enable  a  broad  range  of  residents  to  assume  responsibility  in  the  governance of development organizations and in the community as a whole.   a process guided by strategic planning and analysis, in contrast to opportunistic and unsystematic tactics.   a businesslike financial management approach that builds both ownership of assets and a diverse range  of financial and other partners and supporters.   an organizational format that is nonprofit, independent, and non‐governmental, even though for‐profit  or governmental entities are closely linked to its work.5     Economic Development This is most commonly described as the creation of jobs and wealth, and the improvement of quality of life.  Economic development can also be described as a process that influences growth and restructuring of an  economy  to  enhance  the  economic  well‐being  of  a  community.  In  the  broadest  sense,  economic  development encompasses three major areas:   Policies that government undertakes to meet broad economic objectives including inflation control, high  employment, and sustainable growth.   Policies and programs to provide services including building highways, managing parks, and providing  medical access to the disadvantaged.   Policies  and  programs  explicitly  directed  at  improving  the  business  climate  through  specific  efforts,  business finance, marketing, neighborhood development, business retention and expansion, technology  transfer, real estate development and others.   The  main  goal  of  economic  development  is  improving  the  economic  well‐being  of  a  community  through  efforts that entail job creation, job retention, tax base enhancements and quality of life. As there is no single  definition for economic development, there is no single strategy, policy, or program for achieving successful  economic development. Communities differ in their geographic and political strengths and weaknesses. Each  community, therefore, will have a unique set of challenges for economic development. 6   Promote Resource and Manufacturing capacity While there are many challenges to actively pursuing this subject, the Village must have a complete package  on hand that clearly demonstrates its ability to host land development and expansion to accommodate these  forms of development. Establishing protocols with the aboriginal government is the only way to ensure that  these areas can stand as opportunities in the long term.  Support non‐resource activities This will only happen if both residents and business take ownership in implementing the Plan and Strategies.  The Village of Gold River has not the capacity or skill sets to engage in this alone.  2.3 Approach and Methodology Research Stage 1 Stage 1 involved the surveying of people to inform the strategy. Surveys of a number of small groups took place before  the Assessment could be reported out. The results of these conversations inform the report and aid Council in being  certain about the course of work.  Assessment and Reposition Stage 2 Each interview and survey provided a unique insight into what is and what is not possible. The review of policies, actions  and results generated by the Advisory Committee to Council can be used to reposition efforts by the Village. The bulk of  the report consists of statements designed to help educate participants with essential elements of the process and  choices available.                                                                    5  http://www.cedworks.com/CEDdefinition.html  6  http://www.iedconline.org/?p=Guide_Overview 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 30 Strategy Stage 3 The Village administration engaged in a strategic planning process in 2008. This report uses the same format  so that there will be consistency when the Chief Administrator takes Council through its new three year  Corporate Strategy. The economic and diversification component of this corporate document should be  synchronized to the milestones of the municipal process.  Building Stage 4 This stage may be started prior to the completion of the previous stage. Each stage may be concurrent as opposed to  sequential. Web Sites, communications plans, engagements strategies and other functional tools get deployed from the  day that the Plan hits the Council table.  Narratives, testimonials and referrals are all a part of stages 1 and 2, but their real usefulness is in Building the look and  feel of the Plan. The qualities that make up the Gold River Brand are derived from the conversations taking place at all  levels. By engaging someone from outside the community, the implementing organization stands a better chance of  hearing the unique features of the Forest, Ocean and Marinespace and Outdoor Recreation and the people that value  access to them.  Implementation Stage 5 For this Plan, implementation will be concurrent and mapped out along with budgets and resource requirements. Some  elements may not be implemented for lack of resources. Others will move ahead due to the availability of volunteered  and in‐kind contributions.  The Plan is designed to be assessed quarterly and metrics will need to be designated so that the Plan is SMARTER:  Letter   Major Term   Minor Terms  S   Specific     Significant, Stretching, Simple  M   Measurable   Meaningful, Motivational, Manageable  A   Attainable   Appropriate, Achievable, Agreed, Assignable, Actionable, Action‐ oriented,           Ambitious, Aligned  R   Relevant    Realistic, Results/Results‐focused/Results‐oriented, Resourced, Rewarding  T   Time‐bound   Time‐oriented, Time framed, Timed, Time‐based, Time boxed, Timely, Time‐Specific,         Timetabled, Time limited, Track able, Tangible  E   Evaluate     Ethical, Excitable, Enjoyable, Engaging, Ecological  R   Re‐evaluate   Rewarded, Reassess, Revisit, Recordable, Rewarding, Reaching    To identify appropriate targets for repositioning of the plan (social, economic, environmental & governance) for this  community, the area municipality needs to first analyze deficits (or opportunities) by specific category. Those categories  that make market sense are then analyzed to make sure they fit into the niche, space utilization (specifically clustering)  and marketing (specifically target market). The implementing organization will use the following criteria in finalizing the  prospect list:   Is there appropriate space in the area for this type of activity?   Will it complement existing activities?   Will it serve targeted segments of the community?   Does it fill an important gap in the social, economic, environmental and governance mix?   Will the activity strengthen an existing cluster of community interests?   Was this activity category identified as important in local and sub area research?   Does demand and supply data support the need for this type of activity?   Does the activity fit it with the market position and vision statements?  A short term assessment will be required prior to setting terms for the Strategic Plan  2.4 Assumptions & Limiting Factors There are many physical, legal, public and market constraints that govern the Village of Gold River Economic  and Diversification Assessment and impact the recommendations. As the development of the next term of  office for Mayor and Council proceeds, the impact of these constraints should shape and influence the  effectiveness of the plan tactics. Changes in development tactics should be expected over the longer term. 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 31 Development and land use at the Village of Gold River is impacted by federal, provincial and local  government legislation, regulations and bylaws, but not limited to:  a. Federal: Canadian Environmental Assessment Act.  b. Provincial: Agricultural Land Commission, Environmental Management Act, Land Title Act,  Local Government Act.  c. Local: Village of Gold River Official Community Plan and the Strathcona Regional District  Official Community Plan.  This report does not contain a financial analysis describing the impact of the plan on the cost of Village of  Gold River operations, or taxpayer service levels. Rather, the intent of the plan is directional in nature.  It puts  forward specific measures that could be taken should policy makers decide to pursue various tactics for  increasing diversification activity and further development. An assessment of the benefits of implementing  any of the plan measures will need to be balanced with the willingness and ability of beneficiaries to share in  costs that may be associated with development, or improvements. It is also important to note that financial  resources available to apply to the plan will change over time. Thus, the Village of Gold River will need to be  mindful of such changes before initiating any plan efforts.  The report needs to be considered in its entirety; information in individual sections should be considered in  the context of the scope of work and the purpose of this plan. The information contained in the various  sections may or may not be suitable for reproduction as a stand‐alone document. If, for any reason, should  major changes occur, the findings and recommendations contained in the report team’s analysis should be  reviewed.     
    •   3.0 ASSESSMENT CONTEXT 3.1 Current Environmental Scan The purpose of this assessment is to bring together a number of diverse elements of information from which  the Mayor and Members of Council, the Chief Administrative Officer for the Village of Gold River and their  taxpayers, partners, employers and constituents, can form an opinion on how best to proceed with business  retention and expansion, business recruitment and development of the fundamentals of their local economy.  In spite of best efforts to locate a current report, there is no environmental scan that covers the Village of  Gold River. The following are current events that have underlined the need to maintain a current  environmental scan of the economic activity that supports the community at any given time.  January 4th 2012 Financial Services “As 2011 draws to a close and the New Year is upon us, I would like to thank the Gold River community for  welcoming us to help and assist you with your Banking needs.  “We would like to remind the Gold River community that RBC is open for business. We have a representative  in Gold River on Tuesdays (road conditions permitting) to meet with customers to discuss any of your  financial needs. Our services and advice range from Everyday Bank accounts, Business Services, Investment  and Retirement Planning as well as assistance with purchasing your new home.  “Please feel free to contact the local Campbell River Branch at 1‐250‐286‐5510 to set up a time for a  representative to meet with you on a Tuesday in Gold River or to schedule a time to meet at the Branch in  Campbell River. Thank you again for your warm welcome and support, we look forward to working with you  in 2012!”  Also on January 4th , 2012 a Mr. Michael Alexander was identified as the winner of the Gold River Minor  Hockey Association draw for the $2,000 gift certificate to Home Depot, located an hour from the community  in Campbell River.   February 2nd 2012 Retail Store “After careful consideration, Hudson’s Bay Company has announced we will wind down our Fields store  operations.  In December we announced the closure of 26 Ontario Fields store locations, which will close in  February 2012.  We will wind down the remaining 141 store locations across the country in phases, with  closures complete by Fall 2012.   This is a strategic decision by Hudson’s Bay Company to focus on growing  our other banners: The Bay, Lord & Taylor and Home Outfitters.  “Fields was proud to serve the many communities across Canada where our stores were located and would  like to thank of all our customers for their loyalty.  “Hudson’s Bay Company would like thank all Fields Associates for their dedicated service.  “Tiffany Bourré  External Communications Manager  Hudson’s Bay Company”  February 7th 2012 Regional Television News Segment CTV Island News Broadcast from the studio in Victoria featured the following points:   News Anchor Hudson Mack paints a dismal picture of the circumstances underpinning the Village of Gold  River including assertions that the community is shrinking, there are no jobs, families are leaving town,  but don’t count Gold River out. The Village is working on a plan to change a bust to a boom.   China House Restaurant burns and closes a number of businesses;   Fields Department store closure – cut to unidentified woman suggesting that the only result will be the  other businesses [pumping prices up;   TD Bank closure – cut to crowd shouting “We need a Bank”;   Mayor Craig Anderson enumerates that the community has a healthy lifestyle, outdoors close to town,  logging is booming, and a decision on the renewed use of the old mill site would create 100 jobs. 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 33 Environmental Scan Summary Hudson Mack’s job is to create a story that his team can follow up. He creates drama by describing the  current state of the community as he sees it.   What this broadcast doesn’t tell you is that:    The Census 2011 information for Gold River shows a slight decrease in population since 2006 which may  be attributed to an ageing population and makes no mention of a mass exodus of families as was inferred  by the report. Gold River is holding its own and reflects the same trends as its peer group of villages in  British Columbia;   Efforts to repair and rebuild the business premise that burned down on the weekend have already  started and decisions are being made to refresh and replace existing businesses;   The efforts to find a replacement financial services business initiated by the family that owns and runs  the local grocery store SuperValu, have been successful and that the Royal Bank of Canada [RBC] has  started offering new services to the community;   There is a business that offers as many products as Home Depot located in Gold River and they expanded  last year to include a “Garden Centre”. Unfortunately, the Minor Hockey Association did not take this  into consideration when planning their fund raiser;   The decision to close a small regional department store was a companywide decision, not a decision  specific to Gold River as was implied in the report. The onus for the property owner in which Fields Store  was located to find a new tenant, possibly an expansion of an existing business, becomes a top priority  for whoever leads the business development for the community. Clearly a new business opportunity;   The woman who provided the gratuitous comment about businesses jacking prices up in the absence of  the small department store makes no sense whatsoever. People buy where they are welcome. There is  no other store with the same compliment of products to jack up prices; and finally;   The Village of Gold River has invested in writing a new script that will be used when future opportunities  to broadcast their message arise.  Primary Resource Extraction Scan Western Forest Products continues to base its area operations in Gold River and play a significant role in  providing employment. The next four years will be a challenge as the demand from Asian buyers will drop  due to high inventories of product. This is a momentary lull in harvest levels. There continues to be  opportunities for the resource industry in the Nootka and Kyuquot Sound areas worthy of exploration.  Other primary harvest initiatives include the Grieg Seafood Ltd. Hatchery, a company based in Norway that  boasts of its relationship with Gold River. This company is worth investigating further as they invest in much  more than fish farms and are a diversified company with roots in rural settings.  Offshore Oil and Gas exploration off Vancouver Islands west coast is no longer a government priority. The  public perception of this industrial activity was heightened in 2010 with the Deepwater Horizon Oil spill which  ran for three months commencing in April of 2012.  NYRSTAR, owners and operators of NVI Mining Company located near Myra Falls [known locally as Myra Falls  Mine] are joined by Quinsam Coal mine which operates 20 kilometres outside of Campbell River on the east  coast of Vancouver Island. Prospects for changes in how these mines ship their aggregate product warrant  Gold River leaders inviting representatives of these companies to town for updates on an annual basis. There  are other plots and exploration taking place around the Gold River area, however, none have reached pre‐ feasibility stage and there are no plans for development on deposit with the province.  Another prospective investment is suspiciously silent in this area. Certainly the Covanta Energy project is  number one on the minds of most residents in Gold River. The project will produce modern electricity‐ generating Energy‐from‐Waste facility to convert up to 750,000 tonnes per year of post‐recycled municipal  solid waste produced by Metro Vancouver and other regions into 100 megawatts of clean, renewable energy.  It will receive waste delivered to a new transfer facility located adjacent to the Fraser River which will first  process the waste and recover recyclables. Residual waste will then be transported in sealed containers by  ocean‐going barge from the Lower Mainland to the Gold River site. The fate of this investment lies in the  hands of other governments outside the area. Clean energy and renewable energy investment have not 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 34 appeared in public which does not mean to say that there are no prospects, just no reporting on activity at  the moment.  Secondary Manufacturing and Processing Scan Activity in this area has been limited to small and medium enterprise efforts. Opportunities to develop  existing business and recruit new business are limited in this subject area due to circumstances beyond Gold  River’s control. An explanation of both the demands for solid wood fibre and the challenges facing British  Columbia’s processing sectors are located in Appendices VI and VII.  In other subject areas such as ocean and marinespace products, both harvested and grown, there continues  to be opportunities to explore processing of landed product in a small scale fashion.  There are a number of limiting conditions related to the availability of vacant and development ready land  which would need to be addressed to develop this file further.  Retail and Service Commercial Scan There are a number of cornerstone services that communities need to remain as viable entities. Otherwise,  their status changes from a formally governed local government to a rural area or settlement. Gold River  continues to support financial services, medical services, educational services, environmental services and  protection services. The challenge here is the way in which these services are delivered have changed and will  continue to change.  There is no business retention and expansion strategy operating currently. In the roll out of a focused effort  by both the Village and its business community, this is an area that requires some attention. In addition, the  tools and products expected to be used when engaging newcomers or prospective new interests in the  community are minimal.  The function of “tourism” in smaller communities continues to be a default subject of conversation when  discussing “local” initiatives. However, the real subject area is foodservice and accommodation. Currently,  there was no coordinated effort found which makes it difficult to plan investments to grow this segment of  the local economy. Gold River has identified “outdoor” recreation as one of its featured assets but has yet to  demonstrate results of attempts to expand activity in this area.  During the fall of 29011, the Chamber of Commerce was not functioning. Efforts to revive this organization  have begun and will be a welcome group in fulfilling business and economic development and diversification  activities.  Public Sector Services and Government Scan The Village of Gold River is joined by the Mowachaht Muchalaht aboriginal government and School District 84  as the three primary government organizations resident in the area. The Strathcona Regional District, Nuu‐ chah‐nulth Tribal Council, Vancouver Island Health Authority, North Island College, Strathcona Regional  District, Province of British Columbia and the Government of Canada all have interests in the area, but only  the Government of Canada maintains a small Fisheries and Oceans Canada office in the Village. In fact, this  was one of the latest building permits issued in the community.  Future investment in infrastructure by all level of governments should not be expected as financial and global  challenges dominate agendas. However, that is not to say that small, meaningful investments in  infrastructure and local authorities are not possible, however they will require full approval by allying local  and aboriginal government objectives, and ensuring that labour, corporate and small business support as an  integral part of the initiative.  Non‐Government Organizations As in the case with all communities, the sustainability of nonprofit organizations fuelled by volunteers is  changing. Gold River faces the same challenges that any Village or settlement has associated with an aging  population, the historical out‐migration of youth and the limitations of attracting newcomers from other  cultures. 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 35 However, Gold River does maintain small religious community, strong sporting community, and surprisingly, a  diverse ethnic community. This combined with the rapidly growing influence of a young and energetic  aboriginal population signals the opportunity to harness energy and look at conducting traditional economic  development in a new way.  3.2 Regional Economic Summary The Synergy Management Group Ltd. Nanaimo Report 2 of 5 for the Comox Strathcona Regional District  dated March 2005 entitled Inventory and Assessment of Regional Economic Development Reports and  Studies: Annotated Review enumerated all of the studies and research poured into the region.  Further, the results of this exercise were utilized to carry out the next stage of the economic development  modeling process, namely, to identify how ‘implementation ready’ the opportunities may be, and where the  gaps may represent roadblocks towards bringing economic initiatives to fruition.  During review of the reports, where opportunities were identified in older reports and subsequently  discovered to have been completed due to reference in more recent reports or general knowledge (i.e.  completion of the four lane highway in Campbell River), these opportunities have been left out of this review  due to them no longer being relevant. There still may be opportunities listed that have been completed but  were not made apparent to the reviewer.  A total of 74 studies and reports (primarily 1998 and up until present) that address economic development  and opportunities were identified and reviewed. For purposed of this analysis, the studies have been grouped  into the following sections:    General (covers more than one economic sector)   Agriculture   Aquaculture and Fisheries   Energy (including ‘Oil and Gas’) and Mining   Forestry (including Value‐added)   Tourism and Recreation   Transportation  General cross‐sector studies and Forestry dominated, with 23 and 23 reports each, followed by Tourism with  11 studies, Transportation with 7 and Aquaculture and Fishing with 6 studies. Energy / Mining and Agriculture  had 2 studies each. For cross‐referencing purposes, studies have been numbered, 1 to 73 (a later added  report is numbered 2a, thus the discrepancy in number of reports versus numbering). Analysis work  throughout has been referenced using these study identification numbers, so that the reader can readily  access additional study details.  This report documents the hundreds of thousands of dollars in investigative research conductive throughout  the nineteen nineties. There was a dearth of information on the Strathcona Region and Gold River  specifically. However, statistics are fleeting. There is a profile of Gold River located at http://www.city‐ data.com/canada/Gold‐River‐Village.html however; there is no current tracking on change in the short term.  The Strathcona Regional District is a relatively new government organization established by the Government  of British Columbia in 2008 and there have been few growth profiles assembled for the Village specifically.  The most recent labour market assessment released in January of 2011 states:  “A Community in Transition – A Timeline of Events since 2008  With an industry as widespread and far‐reaching as forestry on the North Island, the effects of closures and  curtailments within the local Campbell River economy has a cascading effect on other services and tertiary  industries which support the forestry industry. A timeline of large scale closures and curtailments is noted  below.       
    • This is a +1 250 5 Figure “By the  and clos announ “Follow infrastru municip and reta workers “Throug insuranc April 20 Campbe 750 peo “Associa service a and add investm onset of While th environ 3.2.2 R The follo Industry this fund                7  Forest Labour M draft plan and is 07-4500 - draft v 1 North Islan last quarter of sures. Supply a ced the perma ing this second ucture (munici pal tax revenue ail stores, car d s were no long ghout these ph ce (EI) benefits 09, the numbe ell River saw an ople on the No ated with this i agencies to su diction and cou ment revenues a f the 2008 rece his doesn’t refl ment in which esource Indu owing represe y. This was pro damental indu                           ry in Transition Market Inform confidential: No version dated - T nd Employme f 2008, Campb and service ind anent closure o d wave of dow pal governmen es and declining dealerships, res er circulating i hases of econom s and provincia er of EI benefic n increase of 20 rth Island thro increase was a pport increase unseling service and grants dec ession. (NIEFS,  lect the enviro  economic dev ustry Opportu nt a shopping  vided by Syner ustry group.                             n | Fall 2010, P mation Specialis reproduction or hursday, June-0 ent Foundatio ell River began ustries experie of their Campb nsizing, a third nt, school distr g school popul staurants) wer n the commun mic downsizing al employment ciaries tripled i 02%. (Statistic ugh the Skills D  corresponding ed usage of foo es. At the same cline as a result Summer 2009 nmental scan f velopment and unity [Synerg list of industria rgy for referen Prepared by: N st  CAPITAL distribution witho 7-12     ons Society E n to experience enced slowdow ell River shop  d layer of impa ricts) was nega lations. Small a re negatively im nity. (NIEFS, Su g and job loss,  t assistance pro n Campbell Riv s Canada, June Development E g jump in the n od banks, hous e time, many o t of falling retu 9).”7   for the Village  d diversification gy List 2005] al and econom nce purposes so IEFS Doug Pres EDC Econom out written perm Economic Sca e the secondar wns and layoffs resulting in 10 ct was inevitab atively impacte and medium si mpacted when mmer 2009)  more people  ograms. For ex ver, Kelowna a e 2009) As a re Employment B need for and u ing support, em of those volunt urn on investm of Gold River,  n is taking plac mic activities th o that the aud ston, Executive mic Develop ission from Patri an 2010 ry effects of th s. For example 0‐15 people be ble. Core comm ed by declining ized businesse n the wages of  used federal e xample, betwe and Cranbrook. esult, NIEFS ass Benefit (SDEB).  use of voluntee mployee assist teer based org ments that occu it does charac ce.  at comprise th ience understa e Director & Sh ment Compa ck Nelson Marsh Page e restructuring e, Wajax  ing laid off.  munity  g industry base s (e.g. grocery  displaced  mployment  en April 2008 a . EI claims in  sisted a record    ers and social  tance program ganizations saw urred with the  cterize the  he Resource  ands the scope hannon Baikie, any hall e 36   g  d  and  ms  w  e of  , 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 37 “Green Power” (including wind, solar, fuel cells)  Agriculture  Agro‐forestry  Aquaculture and Fisheries  Coalbed Methane and Coal Fired Power  Community Forest License  Energy and Mining  Finfish Aquaculture  Forestry  Land‐based Aquaculture  Limited Commercial Fleet expansion  Log Yard/Handling/Storage  Offshore Exploration  Shellfish Farming including First Nations ventures  Small‐scale Hydro Power  The feasibility of expanding existing activities in this category is strong. The feasibility of recruiting new  investment in these highly desired investments are long term and subject to strong process and reviews.  3.2.3 Manufacturing and Processing Industry Opportunity [Synergy List 2005] For the purpose of this assessment, a copy of the current condition of both the Logging Industry and the  manufacturing industry can be located in:   Appendix VI – Raw Log Exports Explanation by the Truck Loggers Association Dave Lewis, Executive  Director and former Mayor of the Village of Gold River; and;   Appendix VII – Remarks by Executive Director, Russ Cameron Independent Wood Processors Association  of British Columbia address to the Mayors at UBCM 2011.  General activity categories identified by Synergy in this classification include the following:  Botanical Forest Products and value – added processing,  including First Nations involvement in this sector  Bottled Water  Crafts and salvage / driftwood accessories production  Dimension Stone  Fabricated Metal Manufacturing  Flooring – solid wood strip and plank  Food Manufacturing  Furniture – solid wood, ready‐to‐assemble  Landfill Gas, Refuse, Wood‐waste Power Generation,  Ethanol Production Plant  Log and Timber Frame Houses  Niche Market Foods  Prefab home, stair and handrails manufacturing  Relocation of secondary manufacturing to develop  industrial colony  Shake and Shingle  Small scale harvesting, value – added manufacturing and  custom sawmilling  Specialty Products  Specialty Wood Drying  Value‐added Seafood Processing  Value‐added Village/Co‐operative  Veneer slicing plant  Woodlot Co‐operative  Again, the prospects for this high employment form of investment are limited due to costs associated with  the transportation of product to market and the availability of free hold land for purchase by the operator.  3.2.4 Retail and Service Commercial Opportunity [Synergy List 2005] This is the most popular category of business operation from the perspective of residents. But also the  poorest understood. Of the more than 75 business licenses purchased annually by law abiding owners and  operators, less than 30 are resident and operating in Gold River. Before planning to recruit new business from  this category, it is important to consult with the existing businesses to determine the impact of these actions.  There is the responsibility ion smaller communities to ensure that efforts to retain existing business and not  extinguished by efforts to recruit new business. That’s why this is a specific component to any strategic plan.  Accommodations and Restaurants  Agri‐tourism  Air Cargo  Amusement, Gambling, Urbanized recreation  Commercial and recreation supplies and services  Cruise Ship Visits and Tourism Events, Pocket Cruise  Industry  Deep Water Moorage Facility  Development of Industrial Lands Adjacent to Airport  Enhanced Marine Activities;‐ scuba diving, wind surfing,  guided fishing, cruising  Equipment Rental and Land and Water Shuttle Services  Forestry Contracting  Ground Transportation  Guided Wildlife Viewing, Ecotourism  Heritage and Cultural Tourism ‐ to appeal to European  and Asian client base, including events, interpretive tours  and craft development  High Technology  Information and Data Processing Services  Joint Ventures with First Nations  Land Activities  Land and Marine Hut‐to‐Hut  Lodges – sportsfishing, high‐end  Motion Picture and Sound Recording  Motorized Adventures  Nursing and Residential care  Ocean and Whitewater Kayaking 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 38 Recreation Fishing  Related Services to Air Transportation  Related Warehousing  Retail and Wholesale  Retirement Living  Retreats, Holistic Experiences and Spas  Services  Staging Areas  Technology  Tourism and Recreation  Trail Development – continuation of the West Coast Trail,  Nootka Island  Transportation  Visitor Information Centres and Kiosks 3.2.5 Government and Institutional Opportunity [Synergy List 2005] Senior Government and Intuitional investment in infrastructure has been limited to “Stimulus” programs  which have concluded. Both senior governments face major challenges in managing their financial conditions.  That is not to say that infrastructure dollars will not be sourced for development in this sector, just that it will  be challenging to do so.  Boat Moorage, Public Docks and Marina  3.2.6 Non‐Government Opportunity [Synergy List 2005] This may be a category of importance to Gold River as there may need to be resources invested to create new  non‐government entities to host the work behind facilitating new economic and diversification activities.  None Listed  3.3 Comparison of Gold River to peer group of BC Villages The following table was derived from Stats Canada Information released in January 2012. It provides the  context with respect to the position of the Village of Gold River amongst its peer group of Villages based on  population only. The geographic context of being located on an island and the location of a major industrial  plant closure would reduce the peer group significantly.  Table 1 British Columbia Village Administration 2012 British Columbia Village Administration 2012   Name  Type  2011 Population 2011 Occupied Private Dwelling  2011 Area Sq. Km.  Population in 2006   Canal Flats  VL  715 297 10.8639  700   Pouce Coupe  VL  738 301 2.0584  739   Radium Hot Springs  VL  777 343 6.3405  735   Port Alice**  VL  805 412 7.038  821   Masset**  VL  884 400 20.6121  940   Queen Charlotte**  VL  944 435 35.621  948   Valemount  VL  1020 474 5.1679  1018   Kaslo  VL  1026 464 2.4806  1072   Montrose  VL  1030 431 1.4618  1012   Cache Creek  VL  1040 473 10.2496  1037   Salmo  VL  1139 519 2.4432  1007   Fraser Lake  VL  1167 482 4.0672  1113   Gold River**  VL  1267 560 10.7798  1362   Lions Bay**  VL  1318 507 2.5338  1328   Keremeos  VL  1330 663 2.0933  1289   Telkwa  VL  1350 497 7.0359  1295   Harrison Hot Springs  VL  1468 666 5.5718  1573   Nakusp  VL  1569 706 8.0527  1524   Ashcroft  VL  1628 758 50.8988  1664   Warfield  VL  1700 767 1.8875  1729   Lumby  VL  1731 716 5.7392  1634   Fruitvale  VL  2016 810 2.7051  1952   Burns Lake  VL  2029 766 6.5945  2107   Anmore  VL  2092 628 28.2371  1785   Pemberton  VL  2369 979 10.892  2192   Chase  VL  2495 1128 3.7662  2409 Note:   (*) 2006 Census population counts are adjusted as necessary to enable direct comparisons between 2006 and 2011 ** denotes a community located on or near the coast  Source: 2011 + 2006 Census, Statistics Canada, Ottawa Prepared by: BC Stats, Ministry of Labour, Citizens' Services and Open 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 39 British Columbia Village Administration 2012   Name  Type  2011 Population 2011 Occupied Private Dwelling  2011 Area Sq. Km.  Population in 2006 Government  3.3.1 Description of Gold River Diversification Efforts In previous years, the area municipality employed a full time economic development practitioner. Over time,  practitioners came and served the community choosing eventually to move on. Previous Mayors and Councils  elected to engage the local Chamber of Commerce and a variety of non‐government organizations to conduct  business and economic development activities. In the previous term 2008 to 2011, Council established an  economic development committee comprised of volunteers with little or no experience.  As with most advisory committee structures, participants become disengaged as it appears that the local  government organization is not doing “what they are told”. In fact, it is difficult for any small organization to  implement recommendations when there is little first‐hand experience in the subject matter. Local  Government staff must focus on their core functions in order to avoid risk management situations and ensure  that Council’s direction is fulfilled.  The following policy statement is from the existing Official Community Plan Bylaw 636 for the Village of Gold  River enacted in 2003 following the completion of the Strategy completed in 1999. The status reported is an  opinion from the assessor, Consulting Economic Developer Patrick Marshall, Capital EDC Economic  Development Company as at December 2011.  Table 2 Village of Gold River Official Community Plan 2003 Village of Gold River Official Community Plan 2003 4.1 Economic Strategy 2003  Status at 2011 The Official Community Plan seeks to outline an economic development strategy focused upon Gold River’s strengths.  Village Council  and its Economic Development Committee in 2001 established two fundamental goals related to economic development, namely:  4.1.1 To increase job opportunities; and,  None Measured Valid  4.1.2 To balance the Village’s revenues and expenditures by 2005 – non‐tax revenues at risk Fulfilled Internal  To assist Gold River in its goals and to provide for expansion and diversification of the local economy, the Village is encouraged to create  and consult working groups to assist in prioritizing and advising on various aspects of Gold River’s economic development.   The following are five key strategies that will propel the Village towards its economic development goals: 4.1.3 Diversify the local economic base to reduce the community’s dependency on forest  resources and on primary forestry industries such as logging, lumber milling, or pulp or paper  production.  Anecdotal improvements Valid Hatchery  4.1.4 Develop a secondary wood manufacturing sector that exploits the community’s competitive  advantages – the nearby supply of quality raw material, a supply of labour, and sufficient land in  the Village suitable for light industrial use.  Anecdotal improvements Valid  [2] independent producers  4.1.5 Support aquaculture and mariculture industries within Nootka Sound and the West Coast of  Vancouver Island consistent with good land use planning, recognizing the importance of  integrating this industry into the area in an environmentally responsible way while preserving the  safety of wild stocks and protecting the opportunities for other industries sharing the Nootka  Sound such as sport fishing and tourism.   Fulfilled Valid  Hatchery  4.1.6 Expand the tourism industry by developing and marketing unique visitor destination experiences that:  4.1.6.1 Differentiate the Nootka area from its many competitors, with particular emphasis on the  area’s scenery and wilderness and its rich and colourful natural history and Nuu‐chah‐Nulth culture  and heritage;  None Measured Valid  4.1.6.2 Promote the development of a working relationship with the Mowachaht/Muchalaht First  Nation.  In‐Progress Valid  Community to Community Forum  4.1.6.3 Integrate visitor facilities and amenities offered across the Nootka area, not just in Gold  River;  None Measured Valid  4.1.6.4 Target off‐season visitors;  None Measured Valid  4.1.6.5 Take advantage of the provincial government’s desire to increase development on Crown  land, guided by the recently developed Nootka Coastal Land Use Plan’s designation of key areas for  commercial recreational development;   In‐Progress Valid  Golf Course, 22 ha. Fly ash Site,  dock and monitoring MMC  4.1.6.6 Complement other tourism products on Vancouver Island, so as to attract and leverage  marketing support from regional tourism marketing agencies (Tourism Vancouver Island, Tourism  None Measured Valid 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 40 Village of Gold River Official Community Plan 2003 4.1 Economic Strategy 2003  Status at 2011 Comox Valley, Tourism North Central Island);  4.1.6.7 Respond to market demand – i.e. customer‐driven product development, with compelling  business cases to attract investment in tourism infrastructure; and,  None Measured Valid  4.1.6.8 Are guided by a long‐term, area‐wide vision, supported by a practical but comprehensive  Tourism Development and Marketing Plan.  The following have been identified as key drivers to the  development of these plans:   A Nootka‐wide focus and plan   Current market research data (the plan must be customer‐driven)   Inbound investment   Interest and time commitment from local businesses    People skills  None Measured Valid  4.1.7 Produce a Gold River Harbourfront Renewal Plan that will ensure an attractive, functional,  economically viable set of facilities at the Harbourfront to serve industrial, commercial and  recreational use.   In‐Valid by private foreshore leases  Dock and River only  4.1.7.1 Determine the full scope of functional requirements of current and future commercial and  recreational users of Harbourfront transportation and recreation facilities;  None Measured Valid  4.1.7.2 Identify the new or enhanced facilities that would need to be developed to meet the  identified functional requirements;  None Measured Valid  4.1.7.3 Assess the feasibility – financial, operational, and technical – of each component that  needs to be developed or enhanced;  None Measured Valid  4.1.7.4 Identify the social, cultural and environmental impacts of each of these new or enhanced  facilities;  None Measured Valid  4.1.7.5 Identify potential sources of investment and financing to construct and operate the new or  enhanced facilities; and;  None Measured Valid  4.1.7.6 Consolidate the above analysis into a documented set of optional levels of development of  the Harbourfront that will enable Gold River Village Council to decide which level they are able and  willing to support.  None Measured Valid  There are many parts of this policy which make sense. Injecting them into an Official Community Plan is  incorrect. The Official Community Plan should focus on the scope and context of how economic development  is fulfilled and the boundaries between each participant’s responsibilities. It is not a major effort required to  revise this so that it compliments and enables strategic economic development and diversification on a 36  month cycle.  3.3.2 Village of Gold River – Ranking of Issues 2008 The Chief Administrative Office engaged a facilitator to capture the onions of both elected Council and  municipals staff regarding opportunities that needed to be addressed in the previous term. The format  provided to Capital EDC was entitled “Appendix One – Ranking of Issues”. For the purposes of this  assessment, it is important to look back and determine if these issues are still relevant to the municipality and  require the attention of the new Council for the 2011‐2014 term of office.  For the purposes of this analysis, the assessor has added the four groups used to define whether this is  something that can be brought forward in a diversification strategy.  The Type of issues shown was defined by the previous facilitator. It appears that the strategic role of Council  decision making has been rolled into the operational decisions that the Chief Administrative Officer is  responsible for. The purpose in including this list here is to assess whether there are issues that need to be  brought forward and where they might be assigned.  See Appendix III Table 20 for the original list of subjects illustrating the Council Plan for 2008.  “Who” is responsible for the work?  1. Council  2. CAO/Staff  3. Both  4. Third‐Party  What “Group” does this initiative belong to as it relates to diversification?  1. Business Infrastructure  2. Community Capacity Infrastructure 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 41 3. Human Capacity Infrastructure  4. Physical Infrastructure  What “Type” of issues was this defined as being in 2008 by the Facilitator?  1. Economic Development  2. Infrastructure  3. Staff/Capacity  4. Communications  5. Internal Operations  6. Community & Public Safety  7. Special Projects  *  Asterisk indicates subjects worth bringing forward to the Village of Gold River Corporate Strategy for the  2011‐2014 Term of Office.  3.3.3 Economic Development Committee Progress 2010‐2011 The Gold River Economic Development Committee was convened by a Councillor in January of 2010. Over a  period of 18 months, the Committee deliberated on prospects, priorities and approaches for economic  development. The following are concepts and recommendations derived from the Minutes of the Committee,  organized into the same categories as Council so that the effort is not lost and those concepts that make  sense and area transferable into an integrated plan can be accounted for.  “Who” is responsible for the work?  1. Council  2. Committee  3. CAO/Staff  4. Third‐Party  What “Group” does this initiative belong to as it relates to diversification?  1. Business Infrastructure  2. Community Capacity Infrastructure  3. Human Capacity Infrastructure  4. Physical Infrastructure  What “Type” of issues was this defined as being in 2008 by the Facilitator?  1. Fundamentals and Foundation for Operations  2. Retain Existing Business  3. New Infrastructure that will leverage Growth  4. Communications  5. Recruit New Business and Visitors resulting in Diversification  *  Asterisk indicates subjects worth bringing forward to the Village of Gold River Diversification Strategy for  the 2011‐2014 Term of Office.  The following table has been sorted by “Who” is responsible first, then by what “Group”, then by Type of  Issue and finally by status. Strike Through indicates completion. There are some recommendations to Council  that can be addressed in one report from the Chief Administrative Officer, some outstanding ideas and  concepts from the Committee that can brought forward into the strategic plan, and other concepts that the  Village is in no position to fulfill as they are the property of third‐parties.  See Appendix IV Table 21 for the Original Table of Recommendations from the Committee to Council.  The review of the Minutes of the Economic Development Committee reveal that it was in fact, operating as  an Economic Development Commission, without a succinct terms of reference which would have delineated  the lines between the Committee, Council, Staff and third parties.  The majority of concepts and ideas generated by the Committee are valid. However, stated in isolation of a  priority system where required resources and the likelihood of fulfillment are assessed before commitments  are made, created an untenable situation for all concerned. 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 42 This, combined with the fact that the Official Community Plan Bylaw 636 [2004] has a commitment from  Council with respect to economic development that should have provided direction to the Committee, made  the situation worse. Both Section 4 Economic Development and Section 8 Energy and Climate Change should  be revised to set out principles and governance frameworks for these two subjects. Then, when Council  adopts its 36 month strategic plan, the details are embodied in that plan which has a public review  component to the process before any financial or policy commitments are made. This will ensure that  volunteer efforts and well‐intended actions do not countermand the relationship between Mayor and Council  and their Chief Administrative Officer and Staff.  3.4 Assessing an Economic Development Organization The following is an assessment tool created by the International Economic Development Council as part of a  certification process designed to evaluate and assess the operable value of an economic development  organization. The Accredited Economic Development Organization program includes a review of required  documentation and a site visit, including interviews for the Board and practitioner.  For the purposes of this assessment, the following table is provided for reference. It was copied from a  Sustainability Program developed by Capital EDC Economic Development Company entitled “Blueplanet  Value Management”. The value of having a report card such as a revised version of this table, is so that  Mayor, Council and the CAO have some form of measuring stick with which to rate progress made by its  partners and associates conducting diversification efforts on the community’s behalf.  In the case of the Village of Gold River, the Economic Development Committee was acting as an “Economic  Development Organization” or “EDO”. It was more of an “Economic Development Commission” as it was  operational, without a clear term of reference from Council or the CAO.  In the case where there is no full time staff person responsible for economic development, the Chief  Administrative Officer becomes the de‐facto, Economic Developer. In the case of the Village of Gold River,  because the Committee was operating without a license, the relationship between Council, the CAO and the  Committee was not clear which created gaps in the approval and implementation process.  The following benchmark should serve as a guideline for what needs to be set in place prior to commencing  the process in future.  Table 3 Economic Development Value Requirements Economic Development Value Requirements | http://www.iedconline.org/  Code  Requirements  Consideration Comments  5.7.1  Leadership  ‐ EDO board has reasonable expectations of  the staff and the organization  ‐ Community leadership is supportive of  economic development  ‐ EDO board regularly evaluates outcomes  according to annual objectives  Commitment Policy  Program  Program Evaluation &  Measurement  Stakeholder Involvement  Accountability |  Transparency |  Disclosure  5.7.2  Human Resources  ‐ Staff keep board informed on important  operational issues  ‐ Staff are provided with effective  orientation and training  ‐ Staff are supported in their pursuit of  professional development  Commitment Policy  Program  Program Evaluation &  Measurement  Stakeholder Involvement  Accountability |  Transparency |  Disclosure  5.7.3  Strategic Planning  ‐ EDO monitors and tracks progress in  implementing the strategic plan, and  Commitment Policy  Program 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 43 Economic Development Value Requirements | http://www.iedconline.org/  Code  Requirements  Consideration Comments  updates it accordingly  ‐ Strategic plan adequately addresses  marketing and recruitment needs  ‐ EDO guided by well‐conceived, up‐to date  strategic plan  Program Evaluation &  Measurement  Stakeholder Involvement  Accountability |  Transparency |  Disclosure  5.7.4  Customer and Market Focus  ‐ Office is easy to find and is centrally  located  ‐ EDO understands and addresses needs of  prospects  ‐ Office provides privacy for conferences  Commitment Policy  Program  Program Evaluation &  Measurement  Stakeholder Involvement  Accountability |  Transparency |  Disclosure  5.7.5  Use of Technology  ‐ EDO effectively utilizes electronic or Web‐ based research services  ‐ Online services provided through Web site  or other mechanism  ‐ EDO has adequate communications tools  for staff connectivity  Commitment Policy  Program  Program Evaluation &  Measurement  Stakeholder Involvement  Accountability |  Transparency |  Disclosure  5.7.6  Performance Tracking System  ‐ Board and staff receive all information  needed to work effectively  ‐ EDO utilizes an effective performance  tracking system  ‐ Performance tracking system provides all  information needed to measure EDO’s work  Commitment Policy  Program  Program Evaluation &  Measurement  Stakeholder Involvement  Accountability |  Transparency |  Disclosure  5.7.7  Communications System  ‐ EDO regularly issues electronic and/or  print news materials  ‐ Web site is easy to navigate   ‐ Web site is regularly updated with all key  information  Commitment Policy  Program  Program Evaluation &  Measurement  Stakeholder Involvement  Accountability |  Transparency |  Disclosure  5.7.8  Process Management  ‐ EDO response to customers and  stakeholders is timely and effective  ‐ EDO has effective referral system with  state, regional, and other partners  ‐ Executive director has adequate control  over work processes  Commitment Policy  Program  Program Evaluation &  Measurement  Stakeholder Involvement  Accountability |  Transparency |Disclosure  5.7.9  Partners & Relationships  ‐ EDO has effective relationship with state  wide and regional economic development  Commitment Policy  Program 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 44 Economic Development Value Requirements | http://www.iedconline.org/  Code  Requirements  Consideration Comments  partners  ‐ EDO has effective relationship with local  government  ‐ Board members are actively involved in  other community organizations  Program Evaluation &  Measurement  Stakeholder Involvement  Accountability |  Transparency |  Disclosure  5.7.10  Results  ‐ EDO obeys laws and regulations   ‐ EDO demonstrates high standards and  ethics  ‐ EDO has had a positive impact on the  community’s economic development  Commitment Policy  Program  Program Evaluation &  Measurement  Stakeholder Involvement  Accountability |  Transparency |  Disclosure  5.7.11  Innovation  ‐ EDO effectively utilizes internal knowledge  sources to improve its work processes  ‐ EDO shares and receives ideas with and  from other EDOs  ‐ EDO is innovative  Commitment Policy  Program  Program Evaluation &  Measurement  Stakeholder Involvement  Accountability |  Transparency |  Disclosure    Other Values not Selected by Classifiers   None    Corporate Sustainability Values Expressed  by Assessment Subject    None  3.4.1 Other British Columbia Village Efforts Having reviewed the web sites and documents from the peer group of local governments identified in Section  3.2 of this report, it is recommended that the Chief Administrative Officer confer with his colleagues at the  District of Sechelt, the Town of Gibsons and the Sunshine Coast Regional District to learn of the progress  being made in the establishment of their Regional Economic Development Function. There are lessons there  that will assist the Village in Gold River in building its custom approach to this function. There was a report  released by the four local and aboriginal government principle appointed officers in September of 2011.  Otherwise the UBCM Report on Municipal Economic Development practice released April 2011 is a good  basic guide to how municipalities engage in this activity.  Capital EDC Economic Development Company is in the process of completing a strategic diversification plan  for the Sunshine Coast Community Forest, Sechelt Community Projects Inc. The results of which would serve  as an inspiration for the Nootka Sound Economic Development Corporation.  3.4.2 The Provincial Association The Economic Developers Association of British Columbia provides practitioners with a community in which  to communicate. Every year, Members select a number of Best of Categories in an adjudicated process. The  list of the most recent award winners serves as a great reference for successful economic development and  diversification efforts.  BC ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AWARDS Previous Years’ Winners 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 45 Economic Developer of the Year 2009 Kevin Poole, Economic Development Officer, City of Vernon  2008 Diane Hewlett, Manager, Development Information & Investor Services, District of Kitimat/Port of Kitimat  2007 Patrick Marshall, General Manager, Campbell River EDC Rivercorp  2006 Gerry Offet, President, Initiatives Prince George  2005 John Watson, Ec.D. – Comox Valley Economic Development Society  2004 Mari‐Jane Cousins – Venture Kamloops  2003 Brian Krieger – Linx BC  2002 Wayne Tebbutt Ec.D. – Penticton & Wine Country Chamber of Commerce  2001 Robert McKay – Salmon Arm Economic Development Commission  2000 Dale Wheeldon – Chilliwack Economic Development Corporation  Community Project Award 2009 “China Business Trade Mission”, Venture Kamloops  2008 “Skills Recruitment, Foreign Attraction Program,” Economic Development Commission, Regional District of the  Central Okanagan  2007 “Move to Kamloops”, Venture Kamloops  2006 “BizMapbc – market area profiles”, Vancouver Economic Development Commission  2005 Symphony Orchestra of the Pacific, Powell River  2004 Kelowna Manufacturers Alliance  2003 Southern Exposure Giftware Initiative, CFDC Sun Country  2002 Parksville Civic & Technology Centre  2001 Terrace Integrated Economic Development Information System Platform  1999 Gibson Landing Harbour Improvement Project  1999 Driftwood Landing Residential Sales Project ‐ Massett  Economic Development Marketing Award 2009 The City of Langley – “Downtown Master Plan”  2008 The City of Langley – “The Place to Be”  2007 “Fraser Valley Circle Farm Tour”, Abbotsford, Agassiz, Chilliwack, Langley, Maple Ridge, Mission, Pitt Meadows  2006 “More Money in Your Jeans”, Salmon Arm Economic Development Society  2005 Dawson Creek E‐Card  2004 Cowichan Regional Branding & Marketing Initiative  2003 Richmond Awareness Marketing Campaign  2002 “Wine Capital of Canada Campaign” – Oliver  2001 BC Call Centre Team Project  2000 Surrey High Tech Sector Marketing Initiative  1999 Alberni Valley Marketing Campaign  3.4.3 Economic Developers Association of Canada 2010 Marketing Canada Awards The National Association also provides excellent examples of successful programs that can be used as starting  points for the Village of Gold River.  Advertising – Single Advertisement District of Lillooet Dirty Girl  Branding – Brand Identity / Application District of Lillooet Lillooet – Guaranteed Rugged  Digital Media – Niche / Specialty Microsite Invest in Cheese www.investincheese.ca  Digital Media – Tourism Website Elora Fergus Tourism www.recipestoexperience.com  Digital Media – Website District of Lillooet www.lillooetbc.ca  Newsletter – Printed Newsletter Waterloo Region Small Business Centre Your Business Newsletter  Other Promotions – Events Town of Torbay Small Business Awards  Other Promotions – Items Rocky View County Bragg About the Creek  Other Promotions – Video District of Lillooet www.lillooetbc.ca/Business/Invest‐in‐Lillooet.aspx  Printed Collateral – Single Publication less than 4 pages Grand River Country Trails Take Flight Brochure  Printed Collateral – Single Publication greater than 4 pages Town of Torbay Community Profile 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 46 3.4.4 Government of British Columbia Economic Development Context On Thursday, September 22, 2011, British Columbia Premier Christy Clark launched the regions latest  Economic Development Strategy entitled “Canada Starts Here”. Features of the plan that may influence and  support the economic diversification plan include Goals:  “6. Enhance business access and productivity:   Work with communities and business to create Investment Attraction Strategies for each region of the province.   Work with communities to build their capacity to respond to and act on investment inquiries.  “10. Create partnerships to ensure training spaces are matched with regional employment needs. This will include:     Create  Regional  Workforce  Tables  as  a  new  platform  for  educators,  industry,  employers,  local  chambers  of  commerce, First Nations, labour and others to come together to plan how best to align training programs to meet  regional  needs.  Their  input  will  inform  how  the  Province  delivers  regionally  based  skills  development  programs,  including $15 million to further support regional post‐secondary institutions in addressing local labour needs.   Providing up to $6 million a year to industry sector partnerships to help them identify their skill and workforce needs,  with additional funding for upgrading skills so workers can benefit from these opportunities.   Hosting a trades training conference by the end of 2011, bringing all partners together to identify ways to enhance  the province’s trades training programs.”  8   There are no financial resources, programs or grants available to assist in any of these initiatives.  3.4.5 Regional Economic Development Context There are four levels of Regional Development in which the Village of Gold River may choose to participate.  Each level has its own unique costs associated with participation. They include, but are not limited to:  Village of Gold River Mowachaht Muchalaht Community to Community Protocol Agreement  This is a new relationship being developed by the Village. Protocol agreements are now the mainstay of local  and aboriginal government collaboration on subjects of common interest.  Nootka Sound organizations  There have been several Nootka Sound groups formed and unformed in the past that brings together local  and aboriginal government interests for the Gold River, Tahsis, Mowachaht Muchalaht, Yuquot and Zeballos  communities.  Nuuchahnulth Tribal Council  While the Village would not qualify as a Member of this Tribal Council, there are no barriers to entering into a  protocol agreement with this local government. The implications of the Malnulth Treaty have yet to be  resolved at the Alberni Clayoquot Regional District. The Village should monitor these arrangements as they  may present new opportunities to align Vancouver Island West Coast interests.  West Coast Aquatics – The Tsawalk Partnership  This non‐government organization is focused on ocean planning and a relationship between local and  aboriginal governments as it relates to ocean and marinespace planning for Vancouver Island West Coast  communities. There may be financial support requested of the Village of Gold River in the near term.  Campbell River Economic Development Corporation RIVERCORP  While this organization is not a typical “Regional” body, it does manage interests for the regional tourism  management for the North Central Island Tourism Region. There is nothing to prevent the Village from coat  tailing on this Corporations initiative when there are common interests.  Strathcona Regional District SRD                                                                    8 Canada Starts Here, The BC Jobs Plan, Vancouver, British Columbia, CANADA September 2011, pp.15‐16 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 47 This Regional Government is relatively new. There is nothing preventing the Village from establishing a  “Regional Function” for economic development. This may require the facilitation of a staff person hired by  the Regional District, accountable to a sub Committee, but operating from Gold River.  Island North Film Commission  Promotes our region to the international film industry as a prime location for film, television and commercial  productions by:   Attending numerous trade shows, international cineposiums and federal trade missions.   Developing and maintaining an online location library database accessible to production companies  world‐wide which will contain a huge collection of photographs of locations from all of Northern  Vancouver Island.   Provides information to producers on local crew, equipment and services.   Attracts production companies to our region.   Represents the interests of our communities by:   Trouble‐shooting concerns with local officials   Conducting background checks on production companies in order to protect locations and businesses   Keeping the public informed, and film friendly by developing and maintaining effective media relations  Tourism Vancouver Island TAVI  Gold River’s interests in this organization are managed through the Campbell River Economic Development  Corporation in Campbell River. It will be important to link any new initiatives with the Tourism Manager at  Rivercorp.  Vancouver Island Economic Alliance VIEA  “The Vancouver Island Economic Alliance (VIEA) is a collaborative partnership spearheading regional  economic development for the Vancouver Island region. It provides the means for a multitude of  communities, First Nations, businesses, and other key stakeholders to collaborate on broad‐based economic  development programs that improve the region’s overall capacity for growth.  “The regional alliance includes all Vancouver Island communities from Victoria to Port Hardy as well as the  Northern and Southern Gulf Islands.  “VIEA is a nonprofit alliance society whose purposes are:   To promote a sustainable and diversified economy for all residents of Vancouver Island economic region   To promote strong communities, and First Nations, and careful stewardship of our natural resources   To provide regional leadership for regional business attraction, retention and expansion   To promote regional initiatives that strengthens economic capacity”9   The Village is not currently a Member of this initiative, however, there are resources developed here that will  be of use to the Village as it moves forward.  Coastal Community Network  This is an alliance of 158 local and aboriginal government leaders. There will be advantages to participation in  this regional organization as it repositions in the next year.  3.6 Local Sustainability Plan Many newcomers expect communities to have completed Sustainability Plans. They are an important tool to  evaluate how organized a community is with respect to its long term viability. Most economic and  diversification strategic plans form an integral part of a sustainability plan.                                                                    9  http://www.viea.ca/index.php?page=7 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 48 In Gold River’s case, there is no Sustainability Plan, nor are there the resources, skill set or the financial  resources to design one to its fullest extent.  There is a reference to Energy and Climate Action found in Section 8 of the Village of Gold River Official  Community Plan outlines. This Section was written by the Chief Administrative Officer in response to a  requirement by the Province of British Columbia.   The pending Community to Community conversation planned for the Villages of Gold River and Tsa’Xanna will  provide an excellent platform to outline how both communities might collaborate on opportunities in the  social, economic, environmental and shared governance categories. These agreements have become more  popular since 2005. Both communities are too small by population and financial capacity to fulfill many  aspects of plans.  The most recent plan produced by the District of Sechelt is an excellent example of an approach which can be  copied by the Village of Gold River in a handmade policy document created by the next business or economic  development organizational approach selected by Council.  Sample Statement from Sunshine Coast.  “Diversification  Diversification has become a critical objective as the traditional resource base of the economy changes. Residents of the  Sunshine Coast desire an economy that is stable, sustainable, competitive and provides opportunities for all. Importantly,  diversification can occur within as well as across sectors. Opportunities are available in growing sectors such as tourism  and high‐tech, but diversification can also occur in traditional sectors like forestry.  “Sustainable Development  The Sunshine Coast recognizes the value of the natural environment as an asset in the continued sustainable development  of the community. Sustainable development will attach limits to production and consumption so that the choices of the  next generation are not impaired. If we overharvest or over‐pollute, we are eroding the foundation of our future economic  opportunities. Sustainable development can also include community heritage, local arts and cultural resources, indigenous  crafts and skills, and folklore, all of which contribute to the quality of life gained from social and cultural diversity.”  10                                                                         10   Community Economic Development Strategic Plan Lower Sunshine Coast, Lions Gate Consulting Inc., Vancouver, British Columbia,  CANADA September 2002 pp. 10 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 49 For the purposes of this assessment, the following graphic will represent the definition of sustainability:  Figure 2 Triple Bottom Line Approach to Sustainability   11   Unfortunately, this graphic excludes the fourth pillar known as “Governance”. This is a key element in the  fundamental advantage of a local Community Forest Corporation: Local Control of Resources. The  opportunity to influence decision making on growth, harvest and the investment of proceeds locally is one of  the key advantages to Community Forests to any local or regional community. Understanding the scope of  sustainability in this context is also important.                                                                        11  http://www.gcbl.org/economy 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 50   In 2008, the Government of New Zealand revisited some of its definitions and produced the following graph.  Figure 3 New Zealand Relationship between target dimensions and key indicators  12   It is in the interest of relations between the Village of Gold River and the Mowachaht Muchalaht people to  complete a sustainability plan that both communities can agree upon. There are matching dollars to create  such plans found at the Union of BC Municipalities.                                                                      12  http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/environment/sustainable_development/key‐findings/further‐discussion‐on‐sustainable‐ development.aspx  
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 51 4.0 ASSESSMENT OF DIVERSIFICATION OPPORTUNITIES The fulfillment of the Village of Gold Rivers commitment to making a positive impact for its constituent’s  economic development terms can be described in terms of the retention and expansion of existing business  and the recruitment of new business to the Village. Diversification comes from the pursuit of new  transactions in areas that have not previously been pursued.  4.1 Retention and Expansion It may appear that focusing on existing business is counterintuitive to the goal of diversification. However, in  moral terms organizations have an obligation to work with existing business first, before recruiting new  business to accomplish diversification. The Government of Ontario defines this part of the plan as follows:  “BR+E is “An ongoing cooperative effort between business, local government, agencies, other organizations and people in  the community with the purpose of identifying opportunities and actions to assist local businesses in expansion, the  retention and creation of jobs and the diversification of the local economic base, as well as the implementation of defined  actions to improve the local business climate.”  “Short‐Term Objectives   Build relationships with existing businesses   Demonstrate and provide community support for local business   Address urgent business concerns and issues   Improve communication between the community and local businesses   Retention of businesses and jobs where there is a risk of closure  “Long‐Term Objectives   Increase the competitiveness of local businesses   Job creation and new business development   Establish and implement strategic actions for local economic development   Strong viable local economy.”  13   In order to address the concerns of existing businesses, Capital EDC conducted a survey of participants in  current and past efforts of the Community Forest Corporation which will be illustrated in following sections.  It is also important to define the baseline of what businesses the Corporation should engage with. A list of  existing businesses that have been contacted is illustrated in Appendix I ‐ Stakeholder Survey and Interviews.  4.2 Recruitment Economic developers have different definitions for a variety of functions within this category. Foreign direct  investment is one arena and business attraction and recruitment is another. The degree to which an  organization gets involved in any of these functions depends on the resources at hand and the circumstance  or position of the local and regional economy.  “Foreign direct investment, in its classic definition, is defined as a company from one country making a physical  investment into building a factory in another country.  The direct investment in buildings, machinery and equipment is in  contrast with making a portfolio investment, which is considered an indirect investment.”  14   The following definition comes from the International Economic Development Council:  “Business Recruitment and Attraction  “Business attraction and recruitment was once considered the main approach to economic development. Because of the  high costs of economic development marketing, attraction is often the most expensive approach to economic  development. The attraction of new businesses into an economy may quickly increase the tax base, jobs and the diversity  of the local economy. Business attraction is the most publicized and visible economic development tool because it creates  many jobs at one time and because of the use of incentives and marketing.                                                                    13  http://www.reddi.gov.on.ca/bre_what.htm  14  http://www.going‐global.com/articles/understanding_foreign_direct_investment.htm 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 52 “Targets of attraction efforts include advanced manufacturers, high technology firms, retail and service sector employers,  corporate headquarters, sports teams and entertainment venues.  “Business attraction programs use marketing to promote an area’s, favorable business climate, and other location factors  important to specific businesses.  “Trends in Business Recruitment and Attraction   “Site selection is the process by which businesses seeking to invest a large amount of resources seek out a new location  for their facilities   “A 1999 survey of corporate executives with site selection responsibilities cites that the Internet’s importance as a tool  increased two‐fold from 1996.   “Financial incentives almost always influence the site selection process for medium and large sized businesses.   “Communities seeking to target their spending on attraction use cluster analysis to focus their marketing and  recruitment efforts to specific kinds of businesses.   “Workforce development incentives have become an important business attraction tool.   “Quality of life attracts businesses and workers because a business wants most of its workers to move with it.”  15   4.3 Stakeholder Contact and Interviews The intent of contacting stakeholders was to discern levels of interest, a scan of the current business climate  in the area and to develop a better understanding of what the key issues and opportunities are from the  perspective of those people resident in the area with vested interests in the positive outcomes of  investments made by the Village of Gold River.   Firstly, a list of prospective respondents was derived from the Village Business License Roster, Council and  Committee Members. A list of the pool of respondents is illustrated in Appendix I.  Secondly, everyone on the list was invited to participate in an on‐line survey which included 86 questions  covering the following subject areas:  1. Stakeholders Views and Attributes;  2. The Top Ten List and need for Strategic Focus;  3. Business Activity 2011 Q3;  4. Views on Regional Workforce;  5. Regional Change;  6. Technology Talk; and;  7. Management Team Dynamics.  Unexpected challenges in this approach included the length of time required to secure responses, the lack of  interest in responding and from some respondents, their inability to answer basic business questions. The  later due in part to the fact that the person replying on behalf of a business was not the person responsible or  in fact, may have represented a non‐government or government organization. This underpins the critical  nature of having discussions with the business community before pronouncing strategic directions or change.  Thirdly, everyone was invited to attend focus group meetings conducted at the School District Board room  over a two day period. The sessions were scheduled so that business people could actually attend before, at  noon or after regular business hours. The turnout was very low. There is no point in speculating as to why this  was the case. The people that did attend provided valuable insight into the context and climate for business  development.  In order to complete this consultation process, it is recommended that the report be circulated to key  organizations in the community, including major employers, wood and forest users for additional comment  and that the findings be presented at a public meeting once the document has been released. This will ensure  that the direction taken by the Village of Gold River comes as no surprise to any constituents. This is a key  factor in ensuring responsible representation of public assets.                                                                    15  http://www.iedconline.org/index.php?p=Guide_Attraction 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 53 4.4 Business Opinion 4.4.1 Gold River Business Scan Survey Responses The following are highlights from the online survey completed in November 2011 by Capital EDC Economic  Development Company. By no means are these results presented in a scientific defensible format. They are  merely an indication of views of the respondents at a given point in time. The area referred to is defined as  the “Village of Gold River”.  4.4.2 Stakeholders Views and Attributes A majority of respondents see the area in a positive manner.  A majority of respondents believe that non‐residents perceive the Region in a positive way. However, some  indicated that the region had a negative or no image. An issue worth following up.  Effective Local and Regional Economic Development means:   More jobs in the region;   Existing businesses are3 stable or expanding; and;   New businesses open in the region.   New visitors did not play a role in their responses.  The majority of respondents perceive issues and opportunities with remote and resource lens. Rural rated  somewhat less. Urban and Sub Urban lenses barely rated at all.  A majority of respondents indicated that they would like to see a focus on the expansion or recruitment of  manufacturing operations.   The three greatest strengths that make the region a viable place to run a business identified by the  respondents included:   Affordability of Housing;   Close proximity of Recreational Opportunities; and;   Access to Transportation.  The biggest challenges to improving jobs and opportunity include:   Availability of well‐paid jobs;   Citizen attitude; and;   Keeping Young Workers.  The top three subjects that economic development in the region should focus on include:   Support to existing business retention;   Recruitment on non‐retail and service commercial business; and;   Growth of the small business community and revitalization of commercial areas.  Local Governments should spend more time on:   Growing employment opportunities;   Natural spaces, parks and recreation; and;   Community, health and social services.  The majority of respondents are from the Retail and Service Commercial community, followed by Harvest and  Resource Extraction industrial classifications.  The respondents are well balanced in terms of their length of service to their employers from new hires to  more than 30 years’ service.   The majority of respondents were from owners and operators of businesses as opposed to volunteers, hourly  employees, Managers or Senior Executives. 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 54 There was a blend of newcomers and people that were born in the community as part of the respondent  profile.  Of those responding, the largest part of the group came to the community from other Island locations,  followed by other British Columbia, with rather few from outside the Province.  The majority of respondents were born in the Vancouver Island Coast region, followed by communities in the  rest of Canada.  The majority of respondents were owners of small businesses with 2‐20 employees, followed closely by  independent sole owner, home based businesses.  The majority of respondents greatest educational achievement was Grade 12, with an even split among post‐ secondary degrees.  Skill sets of the respondents, key to participating in economic development were:  Strong in the Company Finance, Facility Management, and Consulting areas; and;  Noticeably weak in the Legal Services, Large Corporation Management and Government applicant areas.  Strong representation from the 36‐65 age cohort and weak from the under 36 and over 65 age cohorts.  Strong representation from those with experience management under $5 million in operations. Limited  experience above $10 million.  Predominantly English speaking with small representation from French and Italian. Other pacific languages  not noted.  4.4.3 The Top Ten List and need for Strategic Focus Highest business risk priorities that shape the current economic picture in this area include:   Pricing Pressures;   Consumer Demand Shifts;   Emerging Technologies; and;   Maintaining Infrastructure.  Lowest business risks identified by the respondents include:   Executing Alliances and Transactions;   Access to Credit; and;   Intermediary Power.  An in depth comparison of the results with the global report prepared by Ernst Young would reveal that  issues that are critical in a global context include regulation and compliance,, Access to Credit, and Slow  Recovery, double dip recession.  In terms of ranking Compliance, Financial, Operational, and Strategic Issues as they relate to businesses  operating in this region, it is clear that Financial and Operational Issues are highest, followed by Compliance  and Strategic Issues.  4.4.4 Recruitment 2011 Q4 Respondents rely on the Local Government for most, if not all of their information about the community.  Experiences moving into the community were predominantly good.  There appears to be an issue with the community’s web presence. An area that needs attention.  There is an expectation that the Office of the Mayor should receive newcomers. There is no program in place  currently. There is also little understanding of the role of “Ambassadors” or a “Reception Team” and that this  is a shared responsibility.  Personal involvement in reception and recruitment was not evident in the responses.  Good indication that businesses would cross promote each other on‐line. 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 55 Good indication that business people would participate in recruitment efforts.  4.4.5 Business Activity 2011 Q4 Respondents indicated that their product mix has not changed significantly in the past 3 years.   They don’t expect significant change in the next 18 months.  The majority of respondents indicated that they don’t own a specific product niche in the market place.  Most of the respondents characterized their business as standard margins, followed by a second group that  indicated low margin with high volume of sales.  The majority defined their trade areas as being 5‐30 kilometres with a significant number of respondents  identifying their trade area as global.  The majority of respondents indicated that their customers visited weekly, followed by daily.  They identified that the majority of businesses reporting stable or decreasing sales, with almost half of the  respondents citing an increase in sales.  Average sales are reported to be predominantly stable, with less business people reporting decreases.  Customer client groups are focused on:   Individuals;   Corporations; and;    Families in that order.  The average age cohorts of customers indicated the 45‐54 age group as being dominant and the under 18  group barely registering. 55‐64 and the 65+ age cohorts were a small consideration in this profile.  Respondents indicated that they high response from a combination of referral | word of mouth, walk‐in |  call‐in sales, and advertising. Less business built on internet, direct mail, trade shows or social media.  A large percentage of the respondents indicated that they have no plans to  renovate or expand in the next  three years.  The majority of respondents have no plans to leave their current premise.  4.4.6 Views on Regional Workforce Respondents rated the regional workforce in the following terms:  On the availability of workers in the area somewhat low;  On the quality of the workforce in the area as moderate;  On the stability of the workforce in the area somewhat low; and;  On the productivity of the workforce as moderate.  A majority of the respondents indicated that they had more than 61% of employees are head of households.  This means that there is a high percentage of the workforce that are individuals indicating that any change to  employment has significant repercussions.  There is an indication that demand for labour is increasing to warrant a detailed workforce strategy for the  region.  The number of unfilled positions is stable to increasing indicating that there are a number of jobs that are  going without fulfillment.   Respondents indicated that they do not import their workforce.  A majority of the respondents indicated that they do not expect changes in the workforce. This may be  indicative of a poorly informed business community as provincial efforts indicate otherwise anticipating very  large deficits of skilled people.  They indicated that space for training is provided in the workplace, with a smaller emphasis off‐site followed  by sponsored placement at an institution. 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 56 The majority indicated that investment in training was stable with 30% indicating that their financial  commitment was increasing.  Respondents indicated that their top contributions to workforce initiatives include:   Employee Recruitment;   Employee Retention; and;   Aboriginal Programs.  4.4.7 Regional Change There is limited expectation for changes in the regional or local picture in the near term.  To a larger degree, there has been no change in how the respondents view doing business in the region. But  for the most part, their view is that it has not changed.  They reported that they have had problems securing some business services in the region.  The majority of respondents indicated that they do not anticipate any global, federal, provincial, regional or  local legislation changes that will adversely affect their business in the next three years. However, 23%  did  expect negative legislation in the next three years.  The majority responded that they had the expectation of benefits from changes in legislation.  4.4.8 Technology Talk The opinion with respect to new technology emerging that will change their businesses was no expectations.  There was limited expectation that technology based opportunities arising for their businesses. However the  majority expressed no expectation.  They ranked technological impact highest in terms of:   Sales and Inventory Management;   Operations and Production; and;   Internal Office Communications.  They ranked technological impact lowest in terms of:   Social Media;   Corporate Social Responsibility; and;   Community relations.  4.4.9 Management Team Dynamics The majority of respondents indicated that there has been no change in ownership or senior management of  their businesses.  There is a strong indication that owners are involved in the day to day operation of the business.  Budget allocations for advertising, promotion and non‐core spending are stable, with some indications of no  increase.  There is a strong indication of business contributions in‐cash and in‐kind to the community.  There is an indication that businesses people invest time and money into cooperative marketing efforts with  other regional businesses, but the majority does not.  There have not been many changes to supplier relationships with the respondents in the past 2 years.  4.4.10 Ranking of Services and Utilities The highest ranking services included:   Ambulance and paramedics;   Police Protection; and;   Fire Protection. 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 57 The moderate ranked services include:   Regulatory Enforcement;   Spousal Employment; and;   Community Planning.  The lowest rankings belong to:   Public Transportation;   Airline Cargo Service; and;   Relocation Package.  Highest satisfaction for Utility Services include:   Sewer, Water, and Solid Waste Removal.  Lowest satisfaction for Utility Service includes:   Cellular, Recycling and Internet Speed.  4.5 Gold River Focus Group Meeting Responses Capital EDC Economic Development Company Consulting Economic Developer Patrick Marshall hosted focus  group meetings at the School District Boardroom. These hours were specified so as to allow business owners  and operators to participate without impacting their busy schedules.  The intent of a focus group is to engage in direct conversation with respect to the form and function of the  state of economic development activity as it relates to business retention, expansion and recruitment of new  business. Participants were invited from the same list exhibited in Appendix I. Notes from these sessions are  as follows:  4.5.1 Business Infrastructure Are there other things that Gold River can done to intercept the product being shipped to Walcan Seafood  Ltd. http://www.walcan.com/ on Quadra Island so that It could be processed in Gold River?  Business and customers need to tell their stories frequently.  People appreciate the new interest and investment made by Grieg Seafood Ltd  http://www.griegseafood.no/english.aspx?pageId=20 . They also include the new jobs and spending that the  company has done.  People want to know how to replicate the “Grieg” experience and do it again with other companies.  Radio campaign to draw visitors based on a day trip was proposed and has been an active file by Council and  staff for two years.  There are lessons to be learned from the Gold River Hockey Academy experience that should be brought  forward when anyone proposes local government involvement in investment propositions.  There is a clear opportunity to expand the School District assets by building the Nootka Sound Outdoor  Education Academy in Gold River.  There is a small business operating a sawmill that employs 12‐13 people. They require business support to  restart operations. This demonstrates there is capacity with Western Forest Products to host secondary  manufacturing.  There needs to be a focus on recruiting retirees here so that their families will follow. Although, it is well  known that people go home to die, however, you will get the visits while they are still active.  There needs to be an “Ask Me First” campaign by resident businesses to prompt residents to ask if the local  business can deliver what the residents are leaving town to purchase. Not all residents are aware of how  pricing and delivery from buying groups work. Sometimes you can get a product for less from a local supplier,  minus the time and gas money. 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 58 There needs to be some thought to what makes Gold River different, not the same from other communities.  Everyone knows that you go to Port Alberni to buy a car.  Western Forest Products Ltd. Is a positive company and continues to hire people form the area.  4.5.2 Community Capacity Infrastructure Campbell River faces the same negative self‐talk as is experienced in Gold River.  Elected officials and their staff don’t have enough time to do all the things taxpayers expect.  People are waiting for something to happen.  4.5.3 Human Capacity Infrastructure 443 full time enrolled students. There is room for boarding students in some form of Academy or  International student program. Also, fostering is a part of the aboriginal culture.  People of tired of hearing “We can’t” do things for whatever reasons. They are asking how we can make  visible change in Gold River.  The owners of Kaizen Ventures have purchased the Gold River Deli and are working to renew the charter for  the Gold River Chamber of Commerce.  There is an Outdoor Education program hosting 10‐12 students, linked to post‐secondary paths at North  Island College in Campbell River. This can be developed further as a priority for the community.  There is concern for merger of the School District into a large North island format.  Volunteers and resident small business people are fatigued.  4.5.4 Physical Infrastructure A banking service has been the subject of private recruitment by some of the business people.  Local Government using proceeds from wharf and lease revenues to sustain the Arena, Community Centre  and Aquatic Centre facilities. Also considering the provision of free access for residents. It costs a lot of  money for limited use.  The area needs better cellphone coverage.  The waterfront is dominated and controlled by private industry. There needs to be a balance to preserve  access for the public. Local and Aboriginal Government need to collaborate on how this works.  There are proposals to stratify rental properties to introduce affordable housing and ownership. This would  eliminate absentee owners and improve the self‐image of neighbourhoods. This includes the Gold Crest  Apartments [Louie] and the Garden Apartments [Carpenter].  There needs to be a care facility recruited to Gold River. Some kind of service is required in order to extend  expected stay and residency.   
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 59 4.5.5 Gold River Economic Development Committee Recommendations The Economic Development Committee perceived its role as an ideas group, not one with the capacity to  implement or fulfill the economic development function. If the process is to be rekindled, a term of reference  for whatever configuration of entities that emerge can address some of the concepts developed during its  term.  The following table illustrates those recommendations that should be brought forward into a plan format  with a brief comment on the prospects for addressing the issue or opportunity. There are only a small  number of actions required for each of these recommendations:   Consider the final recommendations of this assessment as fulfillment of this recommendation:  By reorganizing recommendations and identifying which ones need to be brought forward, this report will  have fulfilled the intent of the Committee;   Incorporate into a business recruitment operational plan and weigh against other less costly  alternatives:  This report does not outline the preferred tactics or actions that Capital EDC Economic Development  Committee would recommend to achieve results. It is merely an assessment of what the Committee  identified. That is why it is recommended that the next steps would be to vet the ideas by an Alliance of  organizations operating in Gold River. The Village as local government will not be successful if it seeks to  undertake all of what is proposed without partners. No hiring of an individual to serve as a full‐time  economic developer will be successful either;   Subject to C2C meeting and protocol agreement with the Mowachaht Muchalaht Leadership:  These strategic topics are best discussed jointly with the Mowachaht Muchalaht community as they will  not proceed without their participation or approval.   Create a Task Force of community organizations, with a term of reference, by Council Resolution, led by  a Councillor Responsible;  This is the best way to transition from a former Economic Development Committee into a collaborative  alliance. These subjects should be vetted with the prospective participants in the alliance as to their  relevance.   Refer to CAO for Decision Briefing Note; or;  These subjects are clearly operational and are the sole responsibility of the Chief Administrative Officer  for evaluation and a report back to Council.   CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  These subjects should form part of the Infrastructure Plan that coincides wit5h the 5 year financial plan  required by legislation.     
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 60 The following are the definitions are categories of “Types” of issues and they are ranked in terms of highest  priority 1 to lowest priority 5.  What “Type” of issues was this defined as being in 2008 by the Facilitator?  1. Fundamentals and Foundation for Operations  2. Retain Existing Business  3. New Infrastructure that will leverage Growth  4. Communications  5. Recruit New Business and Visitors resulting in Diversification  Table 4 Economic Development Committee Recommendations 2010‐2011 for Council consideration 2012  Village of Gold River Mayor and Council Revised and Assessed List 2012 Economic Development Committee Recommendations 2010‐2012 [Actions Long List]  Type  Description  Status  2012    Business Infrastructure  1  Fundamentals and Foundation for Organizations 1  Recommendation: Complete Community Needs and Desire Assessment  ‐ Should be referred to the next economic development function as a subject of an on‐line survey. Could be  commissioned by the CAO on an annual basis.  02/11/2010 1  Recommendation: Invest in creative advertising ‐ The Village of Gold River organization does not require re‐branding, but the image of the community requires  work. This can be a costly process if the terms of reference are unclear. Do not put this out to an RFP without prior  consultation between the CAO and an economic development marketing professional. Beware of designers with  good intentions and no ideas about metrics. This is not about one logo or a campaign, but asking existing  residents for their stories, images, video about the experience of living, working, playing and investing in the  community and finding someone that can pull the pieces together at a reasonable cost. This should not be done  without the participation of every business in the community. It must be authentic.  02/28/2010 1  Recommendation: Reposition Committee into a Task Force Group. Alan Gregory recommended listing projects  and call for volunteers. Committee requires better communications.  ‐ Consider the final recommendations of this assessment as fulfillment of this recommendation.  10/07/2010 1  Recommendation: Create an Economic Development Plan – Larry Plourde  ‐ Consider the final recommendations of this assessment as fulfillment of this recommendation. Hire a consultant  11/04/2010 1  Recommendation: Committee requires Communications Plan and the approval to represent Village interests to  major employers. Presented to Council   ‐ Consider the final recommendations of this assessment as fulfillment of this recommendation.  11/15/2010 1  Recommendation: Alliance Major Employer and Partners to be invited  ‐ Consider the final recommendations of this assessment as fulfillment of this recommendation.  01/06/2011 4  Communications  4  Recommendation: Re‐Brand Gold River ‐ Kent   ‐ See above item regarding creative advertising  05/13/2010 4  Recommendation: Tourism Campbell River & Region Alberta Campaign – Kent to price Airport Signage  ‐ Incorporate into a business recruitment operational plan and weigh against other less costly alternatives.  04/07/2011 5  Recruit New Business and Visitors resulting in Diversification 5  Recommendation: Expand Visitor Information Centre from May thru September  ‐ Incorporate into a business recruitment operational plan and weigh against other less costly alternatives.  01/29/2010 5  Recommendation: Village to provide Bonds, Tax Incentives and deferrals to business to invest  ‐ Request report on the status of financial and other prospective incentives from CAO  02/11/2010   Community Capacity Infrastructure  1  Fundamentals and Foundation for Organizations 1  Recommendation: Create a joint local and aboriginal government Port Development Plan needs to be funded  ‐ Subject to C2C meeting and protocol agreement with the Mowachaht Muchalaht Leadership  04/07/2011 1  Recommendation: Create a hub for Shellfish Licensing and development jointly with the Mowachaht Muchalaht  people  ‐ This was evaluated and estimated at a cost of $1.2 million per site. No investor has stepped forward. Set aside  04/07/2011 1  Recommendation: Create a joint local and aboriginal government Community Forest Corporation ‐ Subject to C2C meeting and protocol agreement with the Mowachaht Muchalaht Leadership  04/07/2011 2  Retain Existing Business  2  Recommendation: Tourist in your own town program similar to Victoria ‐ Subject to C2C meeting and protocol agreement with the Mowachaht Muchalaht Leadership. This is not a Village  function. Find a business alliance to undertake. Most suitably by the accommodation property owners and  operators.  02/28/2010 3  New Infrastructure that will leverage Growth 3  Recommendation: Create Civic Pride  ‐ Subject to C2C meeting and protocol agreement with the Mowachaht Muchalaht Leadership  02/11/2010
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 61  Village of Gold River Mayor and Council Revised and Assessed List 2012 Economic Development Committee Recommendations 2010‐2012 [Actions Long List]  Type  Description  Status  2012  4  Recruit New Business and Visitors resulting in Diversification 4  Recommendation: Marketing short term expenditures, 2015 is the Gold Anniversary of the Village, Strategic  Marketing Plan  ‐ Create a Task Force of community organizations led by a Councillor Responsible.  04/29/2010 4  Recommendation: Marketing Plan to facilitate increased visitors, recruitment of new residents, business and  industry and investment in Nootka Sound Outdoor Program  ‐ Consider the final recommendations of this assessment as fulfillment of this recommendation.  04/07/2011   Human Capacity Infrastructure  1  Fundamentals and Foundation for Organizations 1  Recommendation: Create Volunteer Participation  ‐ Consider the final recommendations of this assessment as fulfillment of this recommendation.  02/11/2010 1  Recommendation: Create Tourism Sub Committee Group  ‐ Consider the final recommendations of this assessment as fulfillment of this recommendation. Not a function of  the Village. Best suited to business community.  05/13/2010 1  Recommendation: Support for joint venture between local and aboriginal government, cost share in economic  development.  ‐ Subject to C2C meeting and protocol agreement with the Mowachaht Muchalaht Leadership  04/07/2011   Physical Infrastructure  3  New Infrastructure that will leverage Growth 3  Recommendation: Sustainability – Recover old dump site to eliminate leaching ‐Refer to CAO for Report   02/28/2010 3  Recommendation: Invest in new road directional signage that includes aboriginal names ‐ Subject to C2C meeting and protocol agreement with the Mowachaht Muchalaht Leadership  02/28/2010 3  Recommendation: Construct Public Meeting space with washrooms as part of the Village Square – Alan Gregory   ‐ Refer to CAO for Report  12/02/2010      
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 62 The Chief Administrative Officer has limited time and staff capacity to apply for long term planning and short  term responses to emergent issues. The maintenance of an annual operating plan and the 18 month  Corporate Priority Plan will eliminate the piling on of low priority issues and will enable the requisite amount  of time to respond to emergent and qualified opportunities.  The following are the definitions are categories of “Types” of issues and they are ranked in terms of highest  priority 1 to lowest priority 5.  What “Type” of issues was this defined as being in 2008 by the Facilitator?  1. Fundamentals and Foundation for Operations  2. Retain Existing Business  3. New Infrastructure that will leverage Growth  4. Communications  5. Recruit New Business and Visitors resulting in Diversification  Table 5 Chief Administrative Office Revised and Assessed List for consideration 2012 Chief Administrative Office Revised and Assessed List 2012 Economic Development Committee Recommendations 2010‐2012 [Actions Long List]  Type  Description  Status  2012    Business Infrastructure  1  Fundamentals and Foundation for Operations 1  New Brochures for visitors and community events  ‐ Consider the final recommendations of this assessment as fulfillment of this recommendation.  01/28/2010 1  Review the Penfold, Dixon, Pinel Study 1999 for relevant tactics  ‐ Consider the final recommendations of this assessment as fulfillment of this recommendation.  02/11/2010 1  Western Forest Products & Muchalat Industries Access to Land Major Theme  ‐ Consider the final recommendations of this assessment as fulfillment of this recommendation.  04/01/2010 1  Committee terms of reference – Investigate the cost of a full time economic developer cost shared by an Alliance  of a local and aboriginal government and the business community. Invite Capital EDC to assist  ‐ Consider the final recommendations of this assessment as fulfillment of this recommendation.  05/05/2011   Community Capacity Infrastructure  4  Communications  4  Contact Chemainus or Tofino Chambers for examples  ‐ Consider the final recommendations of this assessment as fulfillment of this recommendation.  01/11/2010 5  Recruit New Business and Visitors resulting in Diversification 5  Take Back the Town – Control Assets and make investments in new infrastructure, Hire Agents – Major Theme   ‐ Consider the final recommendations of this assessment as fulfillment of this recommendation.  04/01/2010   Human Capacity Infrastructure  1  Fundamentals and Foundation for Operations 1  Overview of Gold River Economic Development and support to hire full time economic developer to Council  ‐ Consider the final recommendations of this assessment as fulfillment of this recommendation.  04/07/2011 4  Communications  4  Investigate Community Bridge Grant, unique programs, P3 partnerships, parents  ‐ Requires more information to proceed.  04/29/2010   Physical Infrastructure  3  New Infrastructure that will leverage Growth 3  Review and identify land acquisition around the Village – Larry Plourde  ‐ Updated Staff Report with mapping in conjunction with Western Forest Products and Muchalaht Industries.  04/18/2010 3  Full Service Camp Ground – Major Project Priority  ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  04/01/2010 3  Trail mapping, building land acquisition – Major Project Priority  ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  04/01/2010 3  Trail Project – wait for transfer to complete  ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  04/29/2010 3  Antler and Scout Lake Trail Project – Antler and Scout Lake Projects  ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually. In‐Progress  05/13/2010 3  Antler and Scout Lake Land Transfers Incomplete  ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually. In‐progress  10/07/2010 3  Campgrounds – discussions and actions in progress  ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  01/06/2011 3  Assess future water security for the Village in conjunction with mapping prospective boundary expansion for  future development  ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  04/07/2011 3  Joint Venture cadastral mapping for the area with Western Forest Products and make accessible online  04/07/2011
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 63 Chief Administrative Office Revised and Assessed List 2012 Economic Development Committee Recommendations 2010‐2012 [Actions Long List]  Type  Description  Status  2012  ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually. 5.  Recruit New Business and Visitors resulting in Diversification 5  Contact owners and operators of the Trailer Park, Golf Course and determine grants  ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  04/29/2010      
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 64 The following recommendations should be referred to the next organization of an economic development  function for consideration.  The following are the definitions are categories of “Types” of issues and they are ranked in terms of highest  priority 1 to lowest priority 5.  What “Type” of issues was this defined as being in 2008 by the Facilitator?  1. Fundamentals and Foundation for Operations  2. Retain Existing Business  3. New Infrastructure that will leverage Growth  4. Communications  5. Recruit New Business and Visitors resulting in Diversification  Table 6 Village of Gold River Economic Development Recommendations to a New Alliance for consideration in 2012 Village of Gold River Economic Development Function Revised and Assessed List 2012  Economic Development Committee Recommendations 2010‐2012 [Actions Long List]  Type  Description  Status  2012    Business Infrastructure  1  Fundamentals and Foundation for Operations 1  Establish private/public partnership with Village and senior governments to work with business  ‐ There are no senior governments to partner with other than the local and regional aboriginal governments.  02/11/2010 1  Marketing Gold River – Major Theme   ‐ Incorporate into a Recruitment Strategy. This means ensuring that the local government story meshes with the  business and aboriginal stories. This can be constructed and sustained by people in Gold River with the right web  infrastructure.  04/01/2010 1  Committee to act as the Chamber as small business owners do not have time to support a Chamber.  ‐ Consider the final recommendations of this assessment as fulfillment of this recommendation.  05/05/2011 1  Economic Developer – want a dynamic person, living in the community, who has the time and the contacts to  move projects forward  ‐ Consider the final recommendations of this assessment as fulfillment of this recommendation.  05/05/2011 1  Need someone to be proactive for existing small business ‐ Consider the final recommendations of this assessment as fulfillment of this recommendation.  05/05/2011 2  Retain Existing Business  2  Contact Strathcona Park Lodge to investigate prospective joint ventures.  ‐ Incorporate into the Business Retention Strategy.  05/27/2010 2  Bank Closure Unger Family volunteer initiative to find a replacement ‐ Acknowledge the people that facilitated the resolution of this issue.  05/05/2011 4  New Infrastructure that will leverage Growth 4  Gold River DVD Production – Alan Gregory  ‐ Incorporate into a Recruitment Strategy.  06/17/2010 5  Recruit New Business and Visitors resulting in Diversification 5  Explore Salmon production wild and farmed – Major Theme  ‐ Incorporate into a Recruitment Strategy.  04/01/2010 5  Island Scallops, Bruce Evans expressed an interest in investing. This was so that proponent could sell seeds.   ‐ Incorporate into a Recruitment Strategy. Requires $1.2 million per site or more than $12 million start up.  12/02/2010 5  Investigate other Mari culture and hydroponic ventures – Alan Gregory  ‐ Incorporate into a Recruitment Strategy.  12/02/2010 5  Scallop Farm Prospect presented by Bruce Evans ‐ Incorporate into a Recruitment Strategy.  02/03/2011   Community Capacity Infrastructure  1  Fundamentals and Foundation for Operations 1  New Website coordinated social media with Gold River Buzz  ‐ Incorporate into Communications Strategy  01/28/2010 4  New Infrastructure that will leverage Growth 4  Challenges including slow change, late adopters, volunteer burn out, lack of focus for economic development  ‐ Incorporate into Communications Strategy  04/07/2011 5  Recruit New Business and Visitors resulting in Diversification 5  Investigate http://vispine.ca to include Gold River  ‐ Incorporate into a Recruitment Strategy.  12/02/2010   Physical Infrastructure  3  New Infrastructure that will leverage Growth 3  Trailer Park expansion Pater Aelbers   ‐ Incorporate into a Recruitment Strategy.  10/07/2010
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 65 Village of Gold River Economic Development Function Revised and Assessed List 2012  Economic Development Committee Recommendations 2010‐2012 [Actions Long List]  Type  Description  Status  2012  3  Resolve Golf Course Servicing Issues   ‐ Incorporate into a Recruitment Strategy.  10/07/2010 5  Recruit New Business and Visitors resulting in Diversification 5  Shellfish Hatchery Priority – Nootka Sound Watershed Society – Kent speaking with Alexandra Morton,  Campaigner and Mia Parker, Grieg Seafood   ‐ Incorporate into a Recruitment Strategy.  05/13/2010  
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 66 4.5.6 Gold River Council Strategic Plan 2008 ‐ 2011 It is important at the beginning of every term of office to provide Council and the Community with a status  report on the work or priorities of the previous term. As such, it was deemed important by the current CAO  to incorporate those thoughts and concepts raised at the beginning of the previous term. Unfortunately, the  “Long List of Issues and Opportunities” was not refined into a plan format useful to the CAO.  In keeping with the format selected for this assessment, the subjects have been reorganized into subjects for  the review of Council and those that should be assessed by the Chief Administrative Officer.  What “Type” of issues was this defined as being in 2008 by the Facilitator?  1. Economic Development  2. Infrastructure  3. Staff/Capacity  4. Communications  5. Internal Operations  6. Community & Public Safety  7. Special Projects  The assessor’s comments are presented after the subject title in italics.  Table 7 Village of Gold River Ranking of Issues 2008 Council Decision 2012 Village of Gold River Ranking of Issues 2008 Council Decision 2012 Type  Rank  Description  Status 2012     Business Infrastructure  4    Communications  4  41  Improve relations with First Nations ‐ Subject to C2C meeting and protocol agreement with the Mowachaht Muchalaht  Leadership  On‐going 4  42  Improve communications with neighbouring communities ‐ Incorporate into a Communications Strategy   On‐going     Community Capacity Infrastructure 4    Communications  4  29  Balancing taxpayer expectations with financial and human resources ‐ Incorporate into a Communications Strategy  On‐going     Physical Infrastructure  6    Community and Public Safety 6  35  Road improvements to Woss Lake Settlement ‐ Was presented at UBCM. Province declined  Complete 7    Special Projects  7  28  Year Round Pool Operations Budget challenges ‐ Was reviewed at budget. Proposal declined  Complete The Chief Administrative Officer has plans to host a facilitated strategic planning session for the Mayor and  Members of Council. Many of the subjects identified on this list will be addressed and resolved at that time.  Table 8 Chief Administrative Officer Responsibilities Decision 2012 Chief Administrative Officer Responsibilities Decision 2012 Type  Rank  Description  Status 2012     Business Infrastructure  4    Communications  4  10  Website Village Information  ‐ Incorporate into a Communications Strategy. Basic web site completed. Requires  optimization and upgrade  On‐going 7    Special Projects  7  13  Alternative Energy Supplies – Issue is unclear, requires revisit ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  On Hold     Community Capacity Infrastructure 1    Economic Development  1  26  Complete Economic Development Plan with Committee and Fund ‐ Consider the final recommendations of this assessment as fulfillment of this  recommendation.  In‐Progress 1  14  Nootka Sound Economic Development Corporation ‐ Requires more information to assess validity  Requires Decision 2    Infrastructure 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 67 Chief Administrative Officer Responsibilities Decision 2012 Type  Rank  Description  Status 2012 2  36  Increase volunteer participation ‐ Incorporate into a Communications Strategy  Incomplete 3    Staff/Capacity  3  24  Employ Emergency Preparedness Program Co‐ordinator ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  In‐Progress 3  32  Wildfire Interface Plan  ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  In‐Progress 4    Communications  4  12  Town Hall Meetings – requires Council initiative ‐ Incorporate into a Communications Strategy  Requires Decision     Human Capacity Infrastructure 2    Infrastructure  2  9  Facilities Upgrades TFT PSB w/r ICC ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  On‐going Requires  Council Decision  3    Staff/Capacity  3  2  Employ a Utility Manager  ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  On Hold 3  25  Ensure Life Guards are trained ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  Ongoing 4    Communications  4  16  Internal Reporting i.e. Progress Reports ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  In‐Progress 4  15  Village Documentation i.e. Quarterly Reports ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  Complete 5    Internal Operations  5  23  Day‐to‐day Operations  ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  In‐Progress 5  7  Reduce Staff Work Load – requires better definition for CAO to process ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  On Hold 5  22  Safe Working Environment  ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  In‐Progress     Physical Infrastructure  1    Economic Development  1  1  Recruit Independent Power Producer, Green island Energy, The Covanta Proposal ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  Decision Pending 2    Infrastructure  2  27  Community Upgrades Muchalat Streetscape Program ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  Decision Pending 2  31  Electronic Sign installation for messaging ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  Subject to Grant 2  30  Golf Course Expansion for Driving Range ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  In‐Progress 2  40  Skateboard Park feasibility Requires matching funds. ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  Declined 2  38  Water Park subject to budget ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  Subject to Budget 2  20  Wooden Stair Replacement Muchalaht to Community Centre ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  On Hold 4    Communications  4  3  Organizational Guide/Documentation – Water System Complete ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  Complete 6    Community and Public Safety 6  34  Handicapped Washroom renovation for accessibility CC Complete – TSB to be resolved  ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.  In‐Progress 7    Special Projects  7  5  Bio Solids Proposal – Pre‐Feasibility Study Complete – Pending ‐ CAO Report to Council on Capital Priorities, Costs, and Status Annually.   In‐Progress  
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 68 4.6 Opportunity Assessment Summary Based on the assessment of information in the previous sections and the results of the stakeholder  consultations, the list below contains the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats (SWOT) analysis of  circumstance under which economic development is practiced in the Village of Gold River. Questions asked  that form this assessment includes:   Strengths:  1. What are the assets available for economic development and diversification?  2. Which asset is strongest?  3. What differentiates the Village of Gold River from its neighbours and peer group of Villages?  4. Do you have immensely talented people on staff and in the community?  5. Is the Village of Gold River debt free or have a better debt structure than other communities in the area?  6. Does Gold River and Nootka Region have a broad customer base?  7. What unique resources do Gold River and the Nootka Region have access to?  8. Has the Village of Gold River defined its sustainable competitive advantage?  9. Does the Village of Gold River or its taxpayers have specific sales or marketing expertise?  Weaknesses:  1. What areas does the Village of Gold River economic development function need to improve on?  2. What necessary expertise, skill sets, and people power does the Village of Gold River organization  currently lack?  3. In what areas do other communities in the region have an edge?  4. Are Gold River based businesses and employers relying on one customer too much?  5. Does Gold River business and employers have adequate cash flow to sustain an economic development  function?  6. Does Gold River have a well of new ideas on how to pay for all the wants and desires expressed, or at  least a process by which these are assessed on an ongoing basis?  7. Is the Village of Gold River, businesses, employers and other public sector organizations over leveraged  (too much debt)?  Opportunities:  1. What external changes present interesting opportunities?  2. What trends might impact local government?  3. Is there talent located elsewhere that you might be able to acquire?  4. Are other local governments failing to adequately service the market?  5. Is there an unmet need or want that you can fulfill?  6. Are there trends emerging that you can take advantage of?  7. If you package your community differently, can you expect a higher response for it?  8. Can you take advantage of the historically low interest rates to refinance your debt?  Threats:  1. Is there a better equipped (funding, talent, mobility, visibility) service provider in the North island  market?  2. Is there an organization who may not be a competitor today which could possibly become one  tomorrow?  3. Are staff satisfied in their work? Could they be poached by a competitor?  4. Is the economic development intellectual property properly secured (trademarks, copyrights, firewalls,  data security plans) against theft & loss (both from internal & external sources)?  5. Do you have to rely on third parties for critical steps in your development process that could possibly  derail your delivery schedule?  6. What if your service provider runs out of time and resources and you experience an extended delay or  shortage?  7. What if there is a natural disaster?  8. What if businesses and employers go bankrupt?  9. What if the website is dysfunctional? 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 69 10. What if the Village is sued?  The Framework  Ask the tough questions during a SWOT Analysis to best understand the nature of the environment your  economic development and diversification approach faces. Then, take action on your findings.  Table 9 Organizational SWOT Analysis Framework Organizational SWOT Analysis Framework    Internal  Strengths  Weaknesses  External  Opportunities  Internal strengths matched with external  opportunities  Internal weaknesses relative to external  opportunities  Threats  Internal strengths matched with external  threats  Internal weaknesses relative to external  threats  The Current Condition  This assessment would generally find the following SWOT analysis in place at the Village of Gold River today.  The third table illustrates the potential if action is taken to correct the current condition.  Table 10 Village of Gold River Economic Development Organization | Current Position 2012 Village of Gold River Economic Development Organization | Current Position 2012    Internal  Strengths  Weaknesses  External  Opportunities   The Village has talented staff that can  connect with other business and  employers to fulfill some of the  economic diversification process.   The business community appears to be  interested in working with the Village  Administration on a new approach to  economic development and  diversification.   There are still people enquiring about  the prospects of relocating to the  Village.   A business has expanded its operation  in that last year.     There is no dedicated staff person with  time to spend on fulfilling all economic  development processes.   There is no term of reference in place  to guide Council, Staff or Taxpayer  expectations for economic  development and diversification.   There are expenditures being made  with no metrics to measure impact.   Community leaders are fatigued and  confused as to why their ideas are not  fulfilled.   Some taxpayers expect a large  corporation to make a large investment  which will save everyone.  Threats   Staff is approaching retirement age as  is the rest of the market and  newcomers have higher expectations.   The business community continues to  be challenged by neighbours and  friends that make purchases of  competitive products outside the  community.   There are many other small towns  offering higher quality product at the  same price.   Some businesses may not expand due  to a lack of local confidence and  esteem.   The Village may not afford the price of  a full time dedicated staff person,  which if hired on a part‐time basis, will  fail due to extreme expectations.   Council may get distracted from  investing in economic development  support as it has other priorities  brought to the fore by a recent  election.   Maintenance of infrastructure may rise  to emergency standing taking any and  all financial resources available to apply  to diversification.   Volunteers get more satisfaction from  contributing to smaller scale efforts.   There are no large corporations to  make a large investment which will  save everyone.       
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 70 The Desired Condition  The following SWOT Analysis has some elements that are desirable and others that are problematic, but  highly likely.  Table 11 Village of Gold River Economic Development Organizational | Desired Position Village of Gold River Economic Development Organizational | Desired Position    Internal  Strengths  Weaknesses  External  Opportunities   The Village staff has the support they  need to fulfill some of the economic  diversification process.   The business community is working  with the Village Administration on a  new approach to economic  development and diversification.   People are getting the information they  need to retain their business, expand  their employment and relocate to the  Village.   No businesses have closed in the past  year.   2 businesses have expanded their  operation in that last year.   3 new businesses have relocated to the  Village.   The Village is working in tandem with  the Muchalaht Mowachaht people on  diversification opportunities.     Staff and support people have  completed all economic development  processes and are looking for more  opportunities.   The term of reference for economic  development and diversification is no  longer required.   There are no more partners available to  share in the cost of high performing  actions creating impact.   All community leaders and citizens are  exhausted by this process and other  interests are failing.   There are no larger corporations to  invest in the community.  Threats   There are three candidates to replace  staff that are coming back from post‐ secondary education and professional  certification and their remuneration  expectations are higher than the Village  alone can fulfill.   The business community cannot keep  up with the demand of neighbours and  friends.   There are many other small towns  copying Gold River’s approach  confusing prospective newcomers.   Local confidence and esteem thrives  creating new projects that the Village  cannot afford to contribute to.   There is no one to answer the phone of  fulfill enquiries.   Council spends all its time focused on  maintain whatever infrastructure  remains and has no time for  prospecting for new business or  business retention.   There are no more Volunteers.   There are no large corporations to  make a large investment which will  save everyone.  In conclusion, this Analysis may point the way back to a reference in the appendix of the Westland Resource  Group Report to Council in 1999, which stated:  “…proactive residents of Forks in Washington [small forest base community of 3,000 residents located 40  miles inland on the Olympic Peninsula] provide the Community Economic Development example of  maintaining a community survival ethic through holistic planning process that identified:16   1. Short‐term goals to address immediate family and business needs;  2. Short‐term “quick fix” projects to rebuild community esteem; and;  3. Long –term projects to diversify the economy.                                                                    16  GS Gislaison, September 16 th  2998, with reference to Oregon State University Extension Service 1996 video and study guide. 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 71 “As a result, the Forks approach diversified and modernized the role of forestry in the community [research  facility, timber museum, new high tech equipment for selective cutting, and a Japanese specialty mill]. These  types of “new beginnings” recognized and accepted that there is rarely a “magic smokestack” conventional  industry solution, and that “moving [to the next resource town] is no longer an option [for traditional  resource workers] as resource extraction dependent communities are folding all over Canada.”17    The idea that resource communities would fold “all over Canada” is somewhat of a political concept ties back  to the days when the Government of Canada granted rights and corporations built towns to meet a short  term 25 year need. This is not the case in Gold River where residents have made a significant effort to sustain  their community and chart several paths to maintaining it in the face of external challenges and an unstable  global economy.  The fact remains is that the community decides its fate, not government, interests groups, media or  companies. The part in the quote above which is applicable to the current state of Gold River is the need to  address the three points in a timely fashion.                                                                    17  Porulx, Ray, Christine Callihoo and Jenny Biem. April 1999. Article “Tumbler Ridge: the Community of the Future. The Planning Institute  of British Columbia Newsletter Volume 41 [2] 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 72 5.0 Assessing Gold River Economic and Diversification Options The following characterize options for the Village of Gold River with respect to conducting economic and  diversification activities that will produce tangible results:  Merge Enter into an agreement with a private company, local aboriginal administration or regional district and  merge interests with the organization to fulfill the interests of the Village. This is currently the case for the  Villages of Tofino and Ucluelet whose administrations make a small cash contribution to the full‐time  economic developer resident at the City of Port Alberni.   The prospective partners available in the context of the Village of Gold River might include:   Western Forest Products and Grieg Seafood Partnership. Grieg employs a former economic developer in  their office in Campbell River and their Vice President Timberlands is very well versed in economic  development operations;   The Mowachaht Muchalaht Aboriginal Government;   The West Coast Aquatics Society based in Port Alberni   The Campbell River Economic Development Corporation; and;   The Strathcona Regional District.  The most current example of this approach is unfolding on the Sunshine Coast.  Acquire There are several options open to the Chief Administrative Officer including:   Run a group of volunteers that work as a group and are paid an honorarium by the Village  Administration;   Hire a full‐time staff person and assign them half‐time economic and diversification duties on an as  needed basis under the direction of the Chief Administrative Officer;   Train the group of full‐time staff to each take on an element of the responsibilities that cumulatively  implement the economic and diversification strategy;   Hire a full‐time “Community Economic Developer” to work with community organizations that all have a  role in achieving the common goals expressed in the Strategic Plan; or;   Hire a full‐time economic developer, limit the list of functions to a small number,  Contract There are three options in this context:   Conduct as request for proposals to engage a large firm to handle small assignments on a contract basis.  Use the recently completed request for qualifications completed by the Government of British Columbia  as a guide;   Engage someone locally to undertake small tasks in support of the Strategic Plan; or;   Engage an independent economic developer to work with and for the Chief Administrative Officer on a  monthly basis to fulfill milestones of the Strategic Plan with other organizations.  Partner This approach would require the Village of Gold River to refine its expectations into some simple deliverables  in partnership with other organizations.   Create an alliance that includes all business licensees and every other non‐government organization and  major employers in the community, determine a simplified Strategic Plan, divide the costs equally  amongst participants along with the responsibilities for implementation;   Partner with a modified Chamber of Commerce where every business licensee is a Member of the  Chamber and contract the work to the Chamber to figure out how to deliver on the Strategic Plan. 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 73  Establish an in‐house Economic Development Commission that has a strict term of reference to act as a  “Task Force” to complete a number of specific assignments to get the Village of Gold River to the stage  where it can reconsider its options and approach.  5.1 Options to be implemented within the Organization The conversations with former Economic Development Committee Members, Mayor and Council, staff and  third parties in the community make it clear that continuing on as a “Committee” makes no sense at all. In  fact, the requirement for a local government strategy in which economic and diversification was a sub‐set  was a common response.  Discussion with the Chief Administrator reveals that previous efforts conducted by a full‐time economic  developer where often tough to validate and results were not evident. Also, there is a reluctance to hire  another person that will have to deal with unreasonable expectations on a half‐time basis. It was expressed  stated that the completion of this assessment would aid in understanding the scope of economic and  diversification in a Village context.  There are three distinct options within the Village of Gold River:  A. Establish an Economic and Diversification Task Force to undertake a limited number of assignments before  the end of the year and reassess the status of work before making a commitment. This would allow the  inaugural Council to determine its priorities, while acting on a number of achievable tasks to move the  function forward; or;  B. Establish a Task Force to review the Assessment and advise Council on the best approach; or;  C. Establish an Economic and Diversification Commission with a strict term of reference under a bylaw to  implement the findings of the Assessment, refine the Official Community Plan and create the new format for  the function at the Village.  5.2 Options to be contracted by the Organization There are a number of cautions with respect to contracting the implementation of an economic and  diversification strategy to a third‐party. The expectation by residents is that unless one lives in the subject  community, it is impossible to represent that same community. That may be the case when the contractor is  expected to fulfill a complete and substantive function similar to what a metro centre might engage in, but  for a smaller Village, Electoral Area or Band, this makes no sense. This is the primary difference between  community economic development and economic development.  Community Economic Development as a profession involves the investment of time and scarce resource in  educating non‐government associations as to how to use their own limited resources more effectively and  bring like‐minded organizations together on specific projects. The cumulative effect may be the achievement  of economic and diversification.  The most visible form of this was dubbed “Economic Gardening” and was founded in the city of Littleton in  Colorado, USA. It takes a significant commitment by all governments and associations in the community to  engage in this practice, however, the results have been well documented.18    The effort of conducting a Request for Proposals to engage a firm to provide the necessary support on‐site  will involve 6 to 8 months of preparation of the terms, the actual process to select a group, and the  development of the agreement.  Purchasing services on a project or assignment basis is worth investigating. As was indicated in a previous  section, the Government of British Columbia Jobs, Tourism and Innovation Ministry recently concluded a  Request for Qualifications and determined suitable consultants. They may share the list with the Village of  Gold River in confidence.                                                                    18  http://www.littletongov.org/bia/economicgardening/ 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 74 5.3 Alternatives to the Traditional Committee Format Advisory Committees to Council are notoriously dissatisfactory for both volunteers and Councils. Inevitably  recommendations are made and not acted upon. Task Forces have long been the vehicle that delivers what a  Council seeks subject to a precise term of reference.  The three options presented include:  A. Establish an Economic and Diversification Task Force to undertake a limited number of assignments before  the end of the year and reassess the status of work before making a commitment. This would allow the  inaugural Council to determine its priorities, while acting on a number of achievable tasks to move the  function forward; or;  B. Establish a Task Force to review the Assessment and advise Council on the best approach; or;  C. Establish an Economic and Diversification Commission with a strict term of reference under a bylaw to  implement the findings of the Assessment, refine the Official Community Plan and create the new format for  the function at the Village.  If Council chooses a Task Force, they should expect to secure a term of reference which renders a result in 60  to 90 days. Any longer and the Task Force becomes a Committee. The main Task for this group to determine  would be to conduct a public forum, solicit input from the business licensee and taxpayers, fill in the Strategic  Plan format and recommend the best approach to achieve the Forum outcomes to Council for action. This  allows Mayor and Council to participate in the solution while retaining their responsibility for core local  government services.  5.4 Options to be partnered with other Organizations The options for partnering identified include:   Create an alliance that includes all business licensees and every other non‐government organization and  major employers in the community, determine a simplified Strategic Plan, divide the costs equally  amongst participants along with the responsibilities for implementation;   Partner with a modified Chamber of Commerce where every business licensee is a Member of the  Chamber and contract the work to the Chamber to figure out how to deliver on the Strategic Plan.   Establish an in‐house Economic Development Commission that has a strict term of reference to act as a  “Task Force” to complete a number of specific assignments to get the Village of Gold River to the stage  where it can reconsider its options and approach.  The Chamber of Commerce is reported to be in the early stages of establishing itself in Gold River. Contact  with existing businesses and residents indicate that the previous edition of the Chamber lapsed due to  disinterest and a lack of direction. It could very well be that the new Chamber requires an event to chart its  role in the community.  On the face of it, the establishment of a 60‐90 day Task Force to conduct the work required to set the stage  for validating the current Strategic Needs of the community, seems the best choice. However, with the  Village of Gold River entering into a Community‐to‐Community engagement with the Mowachaht Muchalaht  Aboriginal Government, the opportunity to establish the basis for an economic and diversification alliance  may be more strategic. Or at least establishing a Task Force comprised of representatives from both  organizations.   
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 75 6.0 Implementing the Diversification Recommendations The following are tables formatted to be used in establishing the economic and diversification strategic plan.  They represent a system developed by the Local Government Institute led by Mr. Gordon McIntosh.  6.1 Issues and Opportunities Long List Priorities Issues and Opportunities from the previous lists generated by Council and the Committee need to be  assessed in public to determine if they are worthy of migrating over to the current list. This would be  validated at a public forum.  Table 12 Issues | Opportunities Long List Issues | Opportunities Long List Subject  Council Delegates  Total Subject Name 1    Subject Name 2    6.2 Issues | Opportunities Short List The lists confirmed by Council are then incorporated into the following Short List Categories.  Table 13 Issues | Opportunities Short List Categories Issues | Opportunities Short List Categories Subject  Council Delegates  Total 1. Business Infrastructure    2. Community Capacity Infrastructure    3. Human Capacity Infrastructure    4. Physical Infrastructure   UNDERLINED CAPITALS = top items for Council & Staff; CAPITAL = Council Led; Regular Font = Staff Led  6.3 Focus Areas There are five areas of focus within the strategic plan and they are prioritized.  Table 14 Issues | Opportunities Focus Areas Issues | Opportunities Focus Areas Subject  Council Delegates  Total 1. Fundamentals and Foundation for Operations   2. Retain Existing Business    3. New Infrastructure that will leverage Growth   4. Communications    5. Recruit New Business and Visitors resulting in Diversification   6.4 Strategic Priority Work Program Based on the information from the assessment, the following structure is recommended for the Village of  Gold River.  Table 15 Strategic Priority Work Program PRIORITY | Desired Outcomes  OPTIONS | Strategy ACTION | Responsible  Now  1. Economic & Diversification Task Force  Village, Major Employers, Band, Chamber  VILLAGE | CAO  2. C2C Forum Mowachaht Muchalaht  Village and Band leadership VILLAGE & BAND | CAO and Manager 3. Economic & Diversification Forum  All Interests VILLAGE & BAND | CAO and Manager 4. Establish New Organization  All Interests VILLAGE & BAND | CAO and Manager Next  5. 5 Year Infrastructure Plan  Village and Band VILLAGE & BAND | CAO and Manager 6. 3 Year Corporate Strategy  Village COUNCIL | CAO and Organization 7. Communications Strategy  Village COUNCIL | CAO and Organization 8. Business Retention Strategy  Village COUNCIL | CAO and Organization Advocacy 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 76 PRIORITY | Desired Outcomes  OPTIONS | Strategy ACTION | Responsible  9. Metro Vancouver Decision  All Interests VILLAGE | Council and CAO  10. Western Forest Products Relations  Village Mayor and CAO  11. Grieg Seafood Ltd. Relations  Village Mayor and CAO  12. Covanta Green Energy Relations  Village Mayor and CAO  Organizational  13. Organization Terms of Reference  CAO CAO 14. Internal Communications Strategy  CAO CAO 15. External Communications Strategy  CAO CAO 16. Work Plan  CAO CAO 6.5 Blueplanet Sustainability Check Up Capital EDC Economic Development has founded a sustainability value management system called  Blueplanet. It will be a valuable tool for the Village of Gold River in communicating its sustainability priorities  and will replace Section 8.0 of the current Official Community Plan Bylaw 623.  Table 16 Blueplanet Sustainability Check Up Blueplanet Sustainability Check Up Success Indicators  Compliant Non‐Compliant  Governance  Achievement of Community Economic & Diversification Objectives  Achievement of Plan Objectives  End Statements  Operational Compliance  Relationship among Councilors  Relationship with Citizens  Relationship with CAO  Relationship with Constituents  Relationship with Licensors  Relationship with other Community Organizations  Relationship with Sole Shareholder  Relationship with staff  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Social  Active and Healthy Lifestyle  Arts and Culture  Caring Community  Community Safety  Education  Recreational Uses  Sense of Heritage  Workforce Opportunities  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Towards Compliance  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Environmental  Designated Natural Areas  Discourage Air and Water Pollution  Environmental Public Education  Planned Growth  Preservation of Agricultural Land  Preservation of Environment  Preservation of Lakes and Streams  Promote Water Quality & Conservation  Protection of View Scopes  Responsible Land Use  Use of Alternate Utilities  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Economic  Affordable Land Prices  Business Expansion  Business Owner Engagement  Business Recruitment  Business Retention  Competitive Mixed Tax Rates  Economic Stability  Employment Participation Rates  New Construction  Population Diversification  Positive Clout  Skilled Workforce Opportunities  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Towards Compliance  Towards Compliance  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 77 Blueplanet Sustainability Check Up Success Indicators  Compliant Non‐Compliant  Sustainable Land and Property  Assessment Values Non‐Compliant for economic and diversification  6.5 Internal Strategic Priority Dashboard This Dash Board is used by the Chief Administrative Officer to communicate progress with the Mayor,  Members of Council and Staff. It is an internal document that gets attached to agendas on a monthly basis.  Table 17 Internal Strategic Priority Dashboard Village of Gold River Strategy Dashboard COUNCIL PRIORITIES [Council | CAO] Now  1. 5 Year Financial Plan  2. Annual Corporate Strategy  3. Neighbourhood Meetings Quarterly  4. Economic & Diversification Strategy  Next  ‐ Community Capacity Infrastructure  ‐ Human Resource Capacity Infrastructure  Advocacy ‐ First Nation Relations  ‐ Regional and Area Government Relations and Partnerships  ‐ Community Organization Relations  ‐ Small and Medium Enterprise Relations  ORGANIZATIONAL PRIORITIES [Mayor | CAO] ‐ Terms of Reference for Internal and External Organizations ‐   ‐  ‐  OPERATIONAL PRIORITIES [CAO | Staff] Chief Administrative Officer  ‐   Corporate and Financial Serviced ‐   Public Works and Safety Services  ‐   Protective Services ‐   Information and Reception Service  ‐   Planning and Enforcement Services ‐  Recreation and Outdoor Services  ‐   6.6 External Strategic Priorities Dashboard This is the same information reformatted for public consumption and should be accompanied by a brief  paragraph on each item on a quarterly basis.  Table 18 External Strategic Priorities Dashboard Village of Gold River Strategy Dashboard PRIORITIES NOW 5 YEAR FINANCIAL PLAN  Update, confirm, publish and communicate the plan  ANNUAL CORPORATE STRATEGY  Create, confirm, publish and communicate the plan  NEIGHBOURHOOD MEETINGS QUARTERLY  Conduct 3 evening or weekend open houses a quarter  ECONOMIC & DIVERSIFICATION STRATEGY  Conduct Forum, affirm targets, choose organization, implement PRIORITIES NEXT COMMUNITY CAPACITY INFRASTRUCTURE  Identify from forum, agree to plan format, begin process in year 2 HUMAN RESOURCE CAPACITY INFRASTRUCTURE  Identify from forum, agree to plan format, begin process in year 2 ADVOCACY FIRST NATION RELATIONS  Establish Protocol Agreement and timeline for Alliances REGIONAL AND AREA GOVERNMENT RELATIONS AND  PARTNERSHIPS  Determine what functions can be partnered outside the area COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION RELATIONS  Determine what functions can be partnered inside the area SMALL AND MEDIUM ENTERPRISE RELATIONS  Conduct 2 evening or weekend business open houses a year ORGANIZATIONAL PRIORITIES         End of Report 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 78 Appendix I ‐ Stakeholder Survey and Interviews Capital EDC Economic Development Company wishes to acknowledge the following businesses for their  assistance in securing information on the current state of the community.    287 Taxi  Air Nootka  Castaway Developments Ltd.  Clayworks Café & Gallery  Conuma Cable Systems Ltd.  Critter Cove  Gold River – Century 21 Realty  Gold River Auto Parts Ltd.  Gold River Builders Supplies Ltd.  Gold River Chalet  Gold River Golf Course  Kings Peak Coffee  Lightle Management Group  LRS Contracting Ltd.  Manila Grill  Maquinna Crescent (Garden) Apartments  Mixx Enterprises – Liquor Express  Nootka Sound Services Ltd.  Payless (Gold River General Store – Shell)  Pendragon Forest Products Ltd.  Peoples Pharmacy  Pipers on the Ridge Neighbourhood Pub  Straight Grain Inc.  Super Value  The Lodge at Gold River  The Treasure Chest  Tomic Lures  Village Video  Western Forest Products Inc.   
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 79 Appendix II – Discussion Paper 21 Steps to Recruiting Business to the Village of Gold River, British Columbia, CANADA 2012  It takes a Village1  Market Position Statement 2  Identify Business Wish List 3  Create a Supportive Business Environment 4  Make the Environment Appealing 5  Overcome Barriers to Business Investment 6  Offer Incentives, not the kind you think 7  Assemble the Creative 8  Deliver the Story 9  Assemble the Package 10  Being Site Specific 11  Generate Leads 12  Prospecting 13  Personal Visits 14  The Familiarization Tour 15  Make the Pitch 16  Close the Deal 17  The Move 18  The Start 19  What to expect when you’re expecting 20  Repeat the Process 21    The following paper outlines a proscribed strategy created by Capital EDC Economic Development Company  for the Village of Gold River based on six months of investigative work completed through site visits,  interviews and attendance at public meetings. This document is not a study or a report, but rather, a strategic  needs assessment for the Village of Gold River Chief Administrative Officer to help move forward on an  integrated economic diversification program designed to reconvene the economic development and  diversification process. This approach excludes the business retention and expansion strategy, the Village  communications plan and other business, community, human and physical infrastructure needs.  There are two main recommendations:  A. Conduct a Focus Group with business owners and operators in two groups:  The “Major Employers Group” comprised of resource extraction and harvest business, manufacturing and  processing business, and government organizations.  The “Small and Medium Enterprise Group” comprised of contractors serving the resource industry,  manufacturers and processors, retail and service commercial operators, government and non‐government  organizations.  If possible, it would be better to have one group, less administration.  The outcomes from both conversations will be fed into the:   Business Infrastructure Strategy;   Community Capacity Infrastructure Strategy;   Human Resource Capacity Infrastructure Strategy   Physical Infrastructure Strategy;   Internal Communications Strategy; and the;   External Marketing Strategy.     
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 80 B. Pick Teams  From the participants in the focus groups, establish an Away Team to present the Gold River opportunities  and a Home Team to build on business retention, expansion and to host prospects on familiarization tours,  events and eventual relocation.  Home Team – Is responsible for coordinating activities inside the region with respect to facilitating new  activities designed to raise the profile of the values associated with the community. This means developing  the narrative, tools, products and opportunities to host people interested in using the resources and  celebrating the role that Gold River plays in this activity.  Away Team – is responsible for coordinating activities with respect to presenting offers to invest in Gold River  and to communicate the value of the community for recreational and outdoor adventures. This will ultimately  address deficiencies in hospitality and accommodation services associated with larger groups of people and  feathering activities on the shoulders of the traditional 90 day summer season.  C. Establish Metrics  In order to report progress to the community every 90 days, the focus groups and teams need to establish a  simple set of measures to demonstrate tangible and intangible results of this effort.  1 It Takes a Village  Establish Your Business Recruitment Team. But what you really want is every taxpayer and every citizen  telling the same story to their extended family and associates so that you get the full six degrees of  separation working for you.  To begin the recruitment process, a proactive business recruitment team needs to be assembled. This team  should bring a clear and realistic understanding of the market analysis, have skills in economic development  and real estate, and have an ability to sell and follow through. Training for the team may be necessary. A  team of five to seven participants could include:   Established (and retired) business owners;   Local and regional real estate professionals;   Current building owners who are interested in exploring various uses for their property;   Regional Bankers and financial service providers;   Local development organization representatives;   The Mayor, Regional Chair, Chief Councillor, Elected officials, CAO’s ; and   Chamber of Commerce and visitor information centre staff.  The team will help serve as a management entity for recruitment efforts, focusing on those properties and  areas that are critical for the economic success of the area. Through the process, the team will coordinate  efforts with the local and regional real estate professionals.  On the North Island, there are two processes at work:  The Public Sector – Recently the Village of Gold River commissioned an Assessment of Diversification options.  The results of which will be used to guide the local governments efforts to sustain the economic development  and diversification process.  Also, the Mowachaht Muchalaht Community of Tsa Xana has expressed an interest in exploring a  “Community to Community Protocol relationship with the Village of Gold River. This approach is sanctioned  by the Union of BC Municipalities and the First nation Summit.  The Private Sector – Efforts have commenced to revive the Gold River Chamber of Commerce.  In order for the Village of Gold River to complete its assessment the interest in a community approach to  business recruitment, the Corporation, with assistance from these business groups in identifying likely  participants, needs to go back to the community and hoist a an annual community forum where progress is  reported and plans are resourced.  
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 81 In addition, and armed with current community contact, the Official Community Plan Bylaw 638 requires  updating, an economic diversification strategy requires affirmation by the constituents of the Village and the  Business community needs to step up and organize itself to make significant contributions.  2 Market Position Statement  For a recruitment program to be successful, the team must be ready to articulate a clear market position  statement for the area.  A market position statement should characterize the type of business mix, the sales and service environment,  and the target customer market. The statement distinguishes your area from surrounding areas. Often, a  community’s market position statement will serve as background for identifying the types of businesses that  could be recruited.  The position statement for Gold River must be derived from the discussion at the focus groups if it is to have  any authenticity. An example of a statement might say:  “The people of the Gold River value people who live for, work and play outside”.  Once established, the focus group would determine what the achievement of this End Statement or position  statement would look like when accomplished. From that, metrics are established to measure the stapes  towards achievement of this statement.  3 Identify Business Wish List  A wish list of potential businesses should be developed by the focus group. These potential businesses should  complement and strengthen the existing businesses and reflect the market position and vision statements.  Realistic annual recruitment goals (number of businesses on the wish list) should be set.  To identify appropriate business candidates (micro sawmills, custom specialty wood, veneer mill) for your  community, first analyze your business deficits (or opportunities) by specific category. Those categories that  make market sense are then analyzed to make sure they fit into the niche, space utilization (specifically  clustering) and marketing (specifically target market). Use the following criteria in finalizing your wish list:  Is there appropriate space in the area for this type of business?  Yes, there is. The Village of Gold River requires property profiles from land users and licensees so that the  prospects are clearly identified.  Will it complement existing businesses?  Each property must be identified for its highest and best use, including what is considered to be  complimentary. Each of the property owners and licensees must be requested to provide the GIS material on  one page area profiles with an overview location map, fit to the Letter sized stationery in a pdf format.  Will it serve targeted market segments?  There will be distinct business uses derived from the major employer and small business discussion that  relate to harvesting, manufacturing and more retail, commercial, non‐government uses related to outdoor  values. Target markets will be identified at the focus group sessions. Economic Developers can proscribe the  target markets; however, this top down approach often alienates and disconnects the focus group  participants when the Village of Gold River requires their ownership of the outcome.  Does it fill an important gap in the business mix?  Today, there are few, if any business clusters that have been assembled or pursued for Gold River. Many have  been identified, but few have been actually developed around an implementation plan as if processed in this  document.  Will the business strengthen an existing cluster of businesses?  The dominant sector in this economic region is the effect of transfer payments in terms of old age security,  retirement and social service payments pegged at 60%. Introducing the outdoor cluster will have a direct  impact in terms of sustaining the diversification of retail and service commercial jobs to balance out the  resource seasonal cycles in the region. The value discussion is bound to influence users of outdoor 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 82 recreational, cultural and sport activities which helps build the destination tourism component of the  economy. Although it is noted that there is a lack of large accommodation and hospitality properties located  in the region at this time.  Was this business category identified as important in local consumer research?  The outdoor, solid wood and ocean marinespace clusters have long been identified as targets for  development.  Does market demand and supply data support the need for these types of business?  In the case of forest activity, 96% of the wood harvested is shipped away from the region, lacking the  required breakdown and utilization businesses. For the small and medium sized business, there are no  activity metrics in order to make an informed decision.  Does the business fit it with the market position and vision statements?  This question will be answered having hosted the focus groups. And can only be answered then.  Additional Investments can be pursued once the focus groups have been started on a regular basis so that  existing businesses can identify what they need in terms of support to be retained and expand in the existing  market. In order to engage in recruitment of new investment, the existing business community needs to  commit to the process of identifying priorities and participating in the offer.  4 Create a Supportive Business Environment  Before actual recruitment can begin, the people that step forward from the focus groups to work on these  files need to make sure that the area presents itself as an inviting place to do business. The region must  present a quality business environment in order to attract viable businesses and ensure the successful  operation of businesses within the business clusters identified. It must appeal to the rational investor who is  seeking to minimize risk and maximize financial return. Often, this supportive business environment will  include incentives to help “level the playing field” with other centers including those developed on the edge  of the region.  In this regions case, there are nine distinct jurisdictions with separate rules of engagement. These are to be  clearly illustrated in a simple package that forms a part of “The Offer”. This means more than generic printed  matter covering the community’s vision of itself, but rather, a third‐party validation of those values as  discerned by the focus groups.  As of this date, Capital EDC Economic Development Company could not locate a valid recruitment package or  offer package for Gold River. It needs to be constructed and coordinated with existing reception offices that  include the Village Office, Visitor Information Centre, transportation companies, Anne Fiddick Aquatic &  Sports Centre, real estate offices and Local Government and First Nation offices. Also in key locations in  Campbell River, Courtenay and Nanaimo.  The focus groups will identify the issues and opportunities associated with business retention, expansion and  recruitment.  5 Make the Environment Appealing  To grow existing business and recruit new businesses, a community must first make its business area visibly  active, attractive, convenient and safe. This is often more difficult for non‐shopping center locations including  downtowns as they typically do not operate under a central management. Before the recruitment process  begins, work with existing business operators and city officials to ensure:   An aesthetically pleasing commercial and industrial environment;   Safe, Secure and accessible industrial and commercial properties are available ;   Adequate and conveniently located parking and transportation services; and   High business operational standards and service which project a quality, unified and consistent image for  the area.  Using the focus group process: Help the area understand how it is viewed by outsiders. Also, refer to findings  from local consumer attitudes research. Capital EDC Economic Development Company has blind shopped the  area for the required resources, but will defer to the conversation within the focus groups. 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 83 6 Overcome Barriers to Business Investment in the Area   Village Center and other commercial and industrial areas need to recognize and overcome barriers to  business investment in their areas. Barriers often include:   Higher land costs;   More title problems (because of their history, properties often present complex title issues);   Permitting that is more complex and time‐consuming;   Zoning that may be more restrictive;   Site preparation (for new construction) that is more complex;   Construction and renovations that are more complex;   Building footprints that are typically smaller; and   Parking that is more restrictive.  These factors need to be assessed as part of the focus group process. The Village needs to ask its existing  businesses and associates to identify barriers and develop a coordinated response to issues and weaknesses.  The Village and the leadership group should understand these barriers, both perceived and real, and work  with business and community leaders to minimize them. Sometimes creative incentives can be developed to  make the area more competitive from a business investment perspective.  7 Offer Incentives, not the kind you think  It is also important that the Village fully understand what the community can to offer the prospective  business. Incentives might include:   Technical assistance including market and feasibility analysis, business plan development, governmental  regulations, advertising and physical design.  These resources are available from institutions and volunteers in the community. The Village needs a task  group arising from the Forum to provide lists of people prepared to provide support in these areas.   Negotiation and leasing of space if the prospect is not working with a broker or not familiar with the  area;  There needs to be an orientation to the Industrial, Commercial and Institutional real estate offerings so that  both practitioners and the public understand what is on offer and what uses are best suited to the available  land. Again, another task suited to a group coming out of the focus group sessions.   Financing of building improvements, facades, displays, fixtures, inventory and start‐up costs including a  low‐interest loan pool;  This is an area that should be discussed with the lending community and property owners to determine if this  approach is feasible.   Counseling with regional financial institutions and assistance in completing loan applications;  Another subject for which a team of volunteers need to be recruited or at least a referral process to the  people best suited to put packages together.   Financing options and incentives appealing to developers such as low‐interest loan;  The only option here is if local and aboriginal governments own land with which they can engage in non‐ conventional property acquisition processes or staged sale closing.   Gold River, Tsa Xana and the Nootka Sound image and marketing programs and advertising and  promotion assistance for individual firms;  There are at least five separate marketing messages being used currently. Clearly, the focus group strategies  will require an independent labeling program as a sub of an overarching regional positioning strategy. The  Village and its associates operating in the region are best suited to advise on what that positioning narrative  is comprised of.   An effective business to business networking system; 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 84 The focus groups bring together like minded individuals from the private sector to collaborate on short bursts  of activity designed to benefit the community. All Business licensees should be advised that they are  participating in this process, whether they are absent of not. They can be assigned to home and away teams  and put to work.   Private development partnerships made up of local investors who might develop, own and operate a  needed business;   Local property owners need to be asked, in confidence, if they wish to collaborate in the program.; and;   Business incubator(s) to help establish new businesses at a reasonable cost and provide them with space  and common services.  This is always a challenge in smaller communities as no one wants to compete with private property owners.  However, the focus groups may identify orphaned public property that is surplus to public needs. The Kitimat  Valley Institute and Campbell River’s Enterprise Centre are great examples of old infrastructure put to new  uses.   Using the focus group process: Identify locally valued business incentives.  8 Assemble the Creative  Attractive recruitment and marketing materials should be developed to convey the market potential of the  business area. Business recruitment materials must help convince a business operator that this region is  unique and that it offers a competitive edge over other locations.  Recent efforts to communicate unique values in the region are of a high quality. As the focus group conducts  its conversation, creative opportunities unique to conveying opportunities are expected to come out of the  focus group process.  Everyone that uses Facebook, captures video and digital images and writes have something to contribute to  this effort. An economic development marketer should be engaged to balance design, with search engine  optimization, and sales approaches. Anyone can design a web site, but are they actually producing  measurable results?  9 Deliver your story  There is no evidence of market analysis data available to help business operators evaluate the potential for  their venture. When developing marketing materials, provide only relevant information to avoid information  overload. Consider the following in the Gold River, Tsa Xana and Nootka Sound packages:   Letter of introduction including compelling reasons why the area  makes economic sense for them;   General information and photos of the community highlighting its assets;   Market position and vision statements;   Wish list of new businesses supported by market demand and supply data;   New developments demonstrating investment downtown;   Information on past openings and closings of businesses;   Trade area geographic definition and demographic and lifestyle data;   Trade area economic data including actual and potential sales data if available;   Nonresident consumer data (including daytime population and tourism visitation);   Descriptions of target market segments served;   Major employers and institutions;   Vehicle and pedestrian traffic volume;   Mix of existing retail, service, dining, housing, office and lodging in the area ;   Press coverage and testimonials highlighting success stories;   Promotional calendar; and   Summary of incentives and other business assistance available in the business area.  Using the focus group process: Summarize applicable data and recommendations from assembled.  10 Assemble the Package 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 85 Graphs and maps are particularly effective ways to describe the region, the local area, retail competition, and  development trends. For the business area and trade area, include:   Property schedules from the RD, the local and aboriginal government, plus anything Western Forest  cares to contribute;   Current area vacancy map;   Business mix and clustering map displaying information on all area  buildings;   Major employers, institutions and points of interest map of area;   Traffic volume map;   Trade area maps defined by customer origin and drive‐times; and   Consumer spending demand and supply maps.  When targeting prospects, remember that not all businesses have the same requirements. A portable saw  mill typically requires a different market than an Outdoor Guide. Communities should customize information  to fit the needs of the particular prospect and collaborate on what the common package for the Sunshine  Coast looks like. The “look and feel’ should not reflect government design standards, but should be  customized to suit the industry targeted for discussion.  11 Being Site Specific  In addition to market data, information on specific buildings is required. This information includes:   Maps and photos describing the location, building and it history;   Complementary businesses and business clusters nearby;   Sales and rent per square foot (with comparison market data);   Available commercial and residential space and floor plan;   Operating expenses including utility rates and taxes;   Current tenants and how the building could be optimally reused; and   Property owner or other contact for more information.   When completed, recruitment and marketing materials should be assembled in an attractive packet and  offered online. Quality content, graphics and formatting are required.   Using the Market Analysis: To help summarize building specific data.  The Vancouver Island Real Estate Board advises that this information is limited for the region, however, the  community of realtors should be approached by the Village to advice on the contents of this package.   12 Generate Leads  The Village’s next responsibility is to find appropriate businesses that might be interested in a site in the  market area or need new space to expand. Leads can be broken down into four general categories:   Existing Businesses within or near the business area  – Often the best leads are found near home. Leads  might include existing businesses seeking more space or a better location in the business region. The  focus groups outcomes and ongoing conversations and personal contacts of the recruitment team,  chamber of commerce and other economic development professionals can help identify these leads. The  Village should offer a non‐disclosure to provide certainty in these private discussions. It is in a unique  position to bridge the initial dialogue between the private operator and government institutions.   Emerging Entrepreneurs ‐ Downtowns and business area s are often attractive to independent  businesses. Accordingly, leads might include home‐based or garage‐based businesses seeking more  space and a convenient location for their customers. These leads might include managers of existing  businesses wishing to go into business on their own. Commercial lenders, business schools, Community  Futures counselors, Downtown BIA’s, Service Corps of Retired Executives (SCORE), Rotary Club  International (PROBUS), Chamber of Commerce and other public or private small business professionals  should be asked to help identify these leads and to engage in a common protocol agreement for being  accountable for fulfilling the needs of existing and prospective businesses.   Existing Local or Regional Businesses ‐ Local or regional businesses, particularly those that have multiple  locations and are ready to expand, are often excellent prospects. These business operators typically have  a good knowledge of the market area, and may already have multiple stores. They are often interested in 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 86 expansion as a way to improve their penetration of the market. These leads can be identified through the  focus group process knowledge of the business mix in other communities in the region and information  collected from local sources. In addition, realtors, commercial brokers, sales representatives and  suppliers that work within the region must be enlisted in the cause.    National Chains and Corporate Operations ‐ National chains and public|private corporations must be  canvassed. It is important to be realistic about the kinds of chains that might be interested in a small  community as their market, operations size and site requirements may preclude them from considering  the type of land governments and the market have available. The best source of Leads in this category is  derived from personal contacts. The Village has one of the best volunteer Boards for these activities as  their networks are extensive. In addition, leads will also come from commercial brokers, trade shows,  “deal making forums,” and conferences such as those already identified in the Lionsgate Strategy and the  Warner Investment Attraction Strategy.  Once leads have been identified, an industrial and commercial assessment checklist needs to be developed  by the Village to ensure quality standards for prospects and to make sure the business would fit the market.  The checklist could be completed by a Village volunteer alliance member on a reconnaissance visit to the  business. It might include:   Business category (type);   Target markets;   Businesses’ location requirements;   Image;   Inventory and selection;   Pricing;   Presentation;   Exterior appearance;   Interior décor, lighting and fixtures;   Service; and   Traffic generated.  The Village needs to establish a “Home Team” and an “Away Team”. The focus groups should be assessed for  appropriate volunteers to make up the Home Team whose sole purpose is to receive people into the  community.    The Away Team has a different sales oriented skill set. This experience is about low key, high quality people  that can tell the regions story using simple tools and personal professional candor to communicate the  opportunities.  The Village will coordinate the Home and Away Teams such that offers are coordinated to match the  resources available. Person to Person communications are far and away more productive than ad or  advertising placement. These structured marketing efforts are high cost producing low results. A Themed  web site combined with a simple narrative and coordinated volunteers often produces the biggest results.  13 Prospecting  The Village must now focus on a personalized sales effort that conveys a message that the area is a good  location for expansion or new business development. Efforts to personally communicate and then follow up  with potential business are essential to the success of a recruitment effort. Presented below is a sequence of  steps to reach potential business owners or developers.  Once the communications program has been set, including coordinated social media using a vast network of  citizens as correspondents, the Village can commence the task of following up leads and challenges derived  from the focus group, enlisting focus group participants as team members, and start the process of following  the step‐by‐step process of ground trothing challenges to business retention and expansion, while  communicating opportunities associated with both the Wood and Forest clusters of businesses and Non‐ government organizations. This will then inform government process related to business interface operations  like building inspection, planning and development processes, while at the same time provide the elected  people with a team of coordinated people to work with. 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 87 14 Personal Visits  After the initial contacts are made a letter of introduction should follow to set up an appointment for a  personal visit by someone from the Village or its volunteer Away Team. The purpose of the appointment is to  explain why your community is interested in their business. Explain why their business would be profitable  and what incentives might be available. Provide recruitment and marketing materials and any other  information to demonstrate the pro‐investment character of Region. Offer an invitation to the business  operator to visit your community.  Each quarter, there are community events around which business expansion and recruitment candidates can  be hosted in small, one‐to‐one and group environments. Consider buying two or three tables at the next fund  raiser as the means for establishing the personal relationships required to move files forward.  Coordination between the Away Team and the Home Team is critical. Here is where Mayors, Electoral Area  Directors, Chairs and Chief Councilors combine forces with Chamber and community organization Presidents,  to put the best and united face of the region forward. There is no room for local rivalry and continued  seemingly harmless rumors or innuendo is not appropriate.  15 The FAM‐iliarization Tour or the “Quad Cab” [Community Crummie]  It is the Home Team’s job to persuade the prospective business or developer that your region has a distinct  advantage over other locations. The site visit is a critical opportunity to persuade the business owner to  invest in your area. Prospects should be personally invited to tour the community. The tour (previewed and  rehearsed time and again ahead of time) should include stops at possible business sites, competitive business  areas, residential neighborhoods, and Government Offices.   Set up visits with key local merchants. Lunch or dinner should be included with selected business operators  and public officials.  In Campbell River, the “Quad Cab” tour was pioneered. The economic development receptionist would pick  up a brand new demonstration Dodge Quad Cab with a hemi and give the tour, dropping the prospect off at  the Mayor’s office for a visit. In Gold River, an available logging division crummie will do.  Throughout the prospect’s visit, the Home Team must be prepared to answer questions such as why similar  businesses have closed, the history of adjoining businesses next to prospective sites, and how to contact local  landlords. Local property owners, lenders, government officials, and other businesses can be part of this  welcoming and persuasive effort.  After the visit, it is important that thank you letters be sent from various community leaders including the  government leaders and selected business representatives. Mail or fax articles and publicity about  community events and businesses during the following weeks. Deliver a basket of merchandise unique to  your region. Finally, make sure the Away Team is prepared to promptly answer follow up information  requests in a prompt and professional manner.  16 Make the Pitch  A leader on the Away Team should close the deal by selling the merits of locating in the business area.  Remind the prospect that your area is looking for a business with their characteristics. Practice effective sales  presentation skills and focus on key selling points of interest to the prospect:   Key market data (such as a population density surrounding the area );   Findings from the analysis of demand and supply in the particular business category;   Expected sales per square foot and reasons why they would be successful there;    Examples of comparable businesses in the area  that have prospered; and   Why the area is a better place to do business.  17 Close the Deal  The Away Team continues to stay in contact with the prospect. If the prospect is interested, the Village will  follow‐up immediately with an action plan and necessary assistance (however, will not attempt to broker the  property, but rather, engage in an informed referral). If only marginally interested, the designated rep from  the Away Team will call the prospect again in six weeks. If not interested at this time, include the prospect on  your mailing list of correspondent businesses. 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 88 18 The Move  There will be some bumps and setbacks. Don’t forget, moving is one of those traumatic times in people’s  lives. The Home Team will need to script all elements required for those prospects that have been converted  into suspects and finally new business into the community.  It is the sole responsibility of the Home Team to develop the steps, coordinate resources and ensure that the  business expansion or entry into the region is well managed and appropriate. This process does not end with  a ribbon cutting. The Village must check in with its businesses a minimum of twice annually. Business GPS  [growth, planning and succession] must be included in this process.  19 The Start  Once the decision to expand or locate in the region has been made, they must be welcomed and supported  as are existing businesses. Marketing the new business and helping the owners network with others in the  area is especially important in its early months of operation. Ongoing advocacy and follow‐up will be  essential. Again, this is another task for the Home Team.  20 What to expect when you’re expecting  There is no Handbook or Guide to what you need to do to keep your business recruited. In fact, there will be  no warnings other than if the Founder or Owner has a less than perfect experience, you will be the last to  know so stay on top of the move and check in with them at exceedingly longer terms. Make sure that  everyone knows the safety brief and the exit strategy.  21 Repeat the Process  Patrick Nelson Marshall  Economic Developer  Capital EDC Economic Development Company    CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company  analysis, strategies, business, economic ecology and results  patrick.marshall@capitaledc.com     15 February 2012 | cellphone: +1 250 507‐4500 | mobile: www.patrickmarshall.tel     
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 89 Appendix III – Village of Gold River – Ranking of Issues 2008  “Who” is responsible for the work?  1. Council  2. CAO/Staff  3. Both  4. Third‐Party  What “Group” does this initiative belong to as it relates to diversification?  1. Business Infrastructure  2. Community Capacity Infrastructure  3. Human Capacity Infrastructure  4. Physical Infrastructure  What “Type” of issues was this defined as being in 2008 by the Facilitator?  1. Economic Development  2. Infrastructure  3. Staff/Capacity  4. Communications  5. Internal Operations  6. Community & Public Safety  7. Special Projects  *  Asterisk indicates subjects worth bringing forward to the Village of Gold River Corporate Strategy for the  2011‐2014 Term of Office.  Table 19 Village of Gold River Ranking of Issues 2008 Village of Gold River Ranking of Issues 2008 Who  Group  Type  Rank  Description Status 2012 Council Responsibilities  1  4  2  17  Advocate Highway Improvements Complete 1  4  7  28  Year Round Pool Operations Budget challenges Complete 1  2  4  29  * Balancing taxpayer expectations with financial and human  resources  On Hold 1  4  6  35  Road improvements to Woss Lake Settlement – Declined by BC  Complete 1  1  4  41  * Improve relations with First Nations In‐Progress 1  1  4  42  * Improve communications with neighbouring communities In‐Progress Both Council and CAO  3  3  4  3  Organizational Guide/Documentation – Water Complete In Progress 3  4  2  8  Island Coast Trust Dock Upgrade Cancelled 3  4  2  11  Ongoing Infrastructure Upgrades – completed more than planned  On‐going 3  2  4  12  Town Hall Meetings – requires Council initiative Decision Pending 3  2  1  14  Nootka Sound Economic Development Corporation Decision Pending 3  2  1  14  Forest Tenure Options for Renewal 2014 Decision Pending 3  1  1  26  * Complete Economic Development Plan with Committee and  Fund  In‐Progress 3  4  6  34  * Pool Washroom renovation for accessibility CC Plan – TSB to  resolve  In‐Progress 3  3  4  36  * Increase volunteer participation Incomplete 3  4  2  38  * Water Park subject to budget Subject to Budget Chief Administrative Officer and Staff Responsibilities 2  3  3  2  Employ a Utility Manager On Hold 2  3  3  4  Bylaw Enforcement Complete 2  4  7  5  * Bio Solids Proposal – Pre‐Feasibility Study Complete – Pending   In‐Progress 2  1  5  6  Computer Upgrades Complete 2  3  5  7  * Reduce Staff Work Load – requires better definition for CAO to  process  On Hold 2  3  2  9  * Facilities Upgrades TFT PSB w/r ICC On Hold 2  1  4  10  * Website Village Information On Hold 2  1  7  13  Alternative Energy Supplies – Issue is unclear, requires revisit On Hold 2  3  4  15  Village Documentation i.e. Quarterly Reports In‐Progress
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 90 Village of Gold River Ranking of Issues 2008 Who  Group  Type  Rank  Description Status 2012 2  3  4  16  Internal Reporting i.e. Progress Reports In‐Progress 2  2  5  18  Kids Summer Programs Complete 2  3  5  19  Relationship with CUPE and Agreements Complete 2  4  2  20  Wooden Stair Replacement Upana Caves On Hold 2  4  2  21  Transfer Station Maintenance and Access – New Contract Complete 2  3  5  22  * Safe Working Environment In‐Progress 2  3  5  23  *Day‐to‐day Operations In‐Progress 2  2  3  24  * Employ Emergency Preparedness Program, focus on Wildfire  Management Response  In‐Progress 2  3  3  25  Ensure Life Guards are trained Ongoing 2  4  2  27  * Community Upgrades Muchalat Streetscape Program Decision Pending 2  4  2  30  Golf Course Expansion Complete 2  4  2  31  Electronic Sign installation for messaging Subject to Grant 2  2  3  32  * Wildfire Interface Plan In‐Progress 2  1  5  33  PSAB TCA Complete – Asset Mapping & Financial Reporting  Complete  Complete 2  4  3  37  Complete new contracts with wharf users and lessee’s Complete 2  4  5  39  Purchase equipment to seal pavement subject to budget Approved 2  4  2  40  Skateboard Park feasibility Complete Third‐Party Responsibility  4  1  1  1  * Recruit Independent Power Producer, Green island Energy, The  Covanta Proposal  Decision Pending    
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 91 Appendix IV – Village of Gold River Economic Development Committee Progress from 2010‐2012 [Actions] The following Table illustrates recommendations as cited in the Committee Minutes. Capital EDC has  organized them into categories by what group of people are, or are not in a position to make decisions and  act on them.  “Who” is responsible for the work?  1. Council  2. Committee  3. CAO/Staff  4. Third‐Party  What “Group” does this initiative belong to as it relates to diversification?  1. Business Infrastructure  2. Community Capacity Infrastructure  3. Human Capacity Infrastructure  4. Physical Infrastructure  What “Type” of issues was this defined as being in 2008 by the Facilitator?  This is a hierarchy of actions from most important to least important and costly.  1. Fundamentals and Foundation for Operations  2. Retain Existing Business  3. New Infrastructure that will leverage Growth  4. Communications  5. Recruit New Business and Visitors resulting in Diversification  *  Asterisk indicates subjects worth bringing forward to the Village of Gold River Diversification Strategy for  the 2011‐2014 Term of Office.  The following table has been sorted by “Who” is responsible first, then by what “Group”, then by Type of  Issue and finally by status. Strike Through indicates completion. There are some recommendations to Council  that can be addressed in one report from the Chief Administrative Officer, some outstanding ideas and  concepts from the Committee that can brought forward into the strategic plan, and other concepts that the  Village is in no position to fulfill as they are the property of third‐parties.  Table 20 Village of Gold River Economic Development Committee Progress from 2010‐2012 [Actions] Village of Gold River Economic Development Committee Progress from 2010‐2012 [Actions]  Who  Group  Type  Rank  Description  Status 2012 Subjects recommended or fulfilled by Mayor and Members of Council 1  1  1    Engage SFU to make Community Development Plan $4K to $5K   02/11/2010 1  1  1    Decision to have Committee Implement plan  02/11/2010 1  1  1    Recommendation: Complete Community Needs and Desire Assessment   02/11/2010 1  1  1    Recommendation: Invest in creative advertising  02/28/2010 1  1  1    Vision Statement: To promote prosperity for the community by investing  in the future and creating opportunities for business. We will nurture and  promote economic growth while preserving our natural beauty and clean  environment. Excite:Energice:Enable.   04/18/2010 1  1  1    MOVED that Council adopt the Economic Development Committee Vision  Statement:  “Our Vision is to promote prosperity for the community by investing in the  future and creating opportunities for business.  We will nurture and  promote economic growth while preserving our natural beauty and clean  environment.  EXCITE, ENERGIZE, ENABLE”. CARRIED                                             MOVED that Council approve the continuation of the Economic  Development Committee as a Standing Committee of Council. CARRIED  MOVED that Village release an Expression of Interest for a full service  campsite. CARRIED                                                                                                         04/06/2010 1  1  1    Plan Adopted Priorities and Resolutions presented by the Committee  04/15/2010
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 92 Village of Gold River Economic Development Committee Progress from 2010‐2012 [Actions]  Who  Group  Type  Rank  Description  Status 2012 adopted by Council  1  1  1    Recommendation: Reposition Committee into a Task Force Group. Alan  Gregory recommended listing projects and call for volunteers. Committee  requires better communications.  10/07/2010 1  1  1    Recommendation: Create an Economic Development Plan – Larry Plourde   11/04/2010 1  1  1    Recommendation Committee requires Communications Plan and the  approval to represent Village interests to major employers. Presented to  Council   11/15/2010 1  1  1    Recommendation: Alliance Major Employer and Partners to be invited   01/06/2011 1  1  1    EDC Communications – Minutes circulated, meetings announced seeking  fund for web site  02/03/2011 1  1  4    Recommendation: Re‐Brand Gold River ‐ Kent   05/13/2010 1  1  4    Recommendation: Tourism Campbell River & Region Alberta Campaign –  Kent to price Airport Signage  04/07/2011 1  1  5    Recommendation: Expand Visitor Information Centre from May thru  September   01/29/2010 1  1  5    Recommendation: Village to provide Bonds, Tax Incentives and deferrals  to business to invest   02/11/2010 1  1  5    Citizens delegation met with Minister Bell with respect to Covanta Energy  proposal  05/05/2011 1  2  1    Community Partners Meeting and Dialogue joint Mowachaht Muchalaht  Gold River economic development function  04/07/2011 1  2  1    Recommendation: Create a joint local and aboriginal government Port  Development Plan needs to be funded – Limited by Private Sector Tenures  04/07/2011 1  2  1    Recommendation: Create a hub for Shellfish Licensing and development  jointly with the Mowachaht Muchalaht people  04/07/2011 1  2  1    Recommendation: Create a joint local and aboriginal government  Community Forest Corporation  04/07/2011 1  2  2    Recommendation: Tourist in your own town program similar to Victoria  fulfill by an organization besides the Village  02/28/2010 1  2  3    Recommendation: Create Civic Pride to be fulfill by an organization other  than the Village  02/11/2010 1  2  4    Recommendation: Marketing short term expenditures, 2015 is the Gold  Anniversary of the Village, Strategic Marketing Plan.   04/29/2010 1  2  4    Recommendation: Marketing Plan to facilitate increased visitors,  recruitment of new residents, business and industry and investment in  Nootka Sound Outdoor Program  04/07/2011 1  3  1    Recommendation: Create Volunteer Participation  02/11/2010 1  3  1    Recommendation: Create Tourism Sub Committee Group  05/13/2010 1  3  1    Recommendation: Gregory Report endorsed by Committee 04/07/2011 1  3  1    Recommendation: Support for joint venture between local and aboriginal  government, cost share in economic development.  04/07/2011 1  3  1    Mowachaht Muchalaht express interest in sharing economic development  function  05/05/2011 1  4      Recommendation: Sustainability – Recover old dump site to eliminate  leaching   02/28/2010 1  4  3    Recommendation: Invest in new road directional signage  02/28/2010 1  4  3    Recommendation: Construct Public Meeting space with washrooms as  part of the Village Square – Alan Gregory   12/02/2010 Subjects that the Economic Development Committee developed and fulfilled 2  1  1    Create Economic Development Plan tabled – Kent away  12/02/2010 2  1  1    Economic Development Plan tabled – Kent absent  01/06/2011 2  1  1    Establish private/public partnership with Village and senior governments  to work with business   02/11/2010 2  1  1    Complete a new Vision Development Exercise & SWOT analysis  03/04/2010 2  1  1    Review and upgrade Visitor Information Centre Maps and Brochures  04/18/2010 2  1  1    7 different Vision Statements created  04/18/2010 2  1  1    Assets and Challenges identified   04/18/2010 2  1  1    Marketing Gold River – Major Theme  04/01/2010 2  1  1    Responded to two business relocation prospects  05/13/2010 2  1  1    Rebranding Plan Complete. Requires Facilitation  10/07/2010 2  1  1    Strategic Economic Development Plan Sub Committee – Kent provided  simple terms of reference  02/03/2011 2  1  1    Committee to act as the Chamber as small business owners do not have  time to support a Chamber.  05/05/2011
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 93 Village of Gold River Economic Development Committee Progress from 2010‐2012 [Actions]  Who  Group  Type  Rank  Description  Status 2012 2  1  1    Economic Developer – want a dynamic person, living in the community,  who has the time and the contacts to move projects for5ward  05/05/2011 2  1  1    Need someone to be proactive for existing small business 05/05/2011 2  1  1    Capital EDC presented orientation to Economic Development to the Ec.D.  Committee and secured expectations from its Members pro‐bono.  06/02/2011 2  1  2    Contact Strathcona Park Lodge to investigate prospective joint ventures.   05/27/2010 2  1  2    Bank Closure Unger Family volunteer initiative to find a replacement 05/05/2011 2  1  4    Gold River DVD Production – Alan Gregory  06/17/2010 2  1  4    Kayak Manufacturing Business Prospect Contact  06/24/2010 2  1  4    Community Profile, Village web site upgraded, the Wheel updated at  Conuma   01/06/2011 2  1  5    Explore Salmon production wild and farmed – Major Theme  04/01/2010 2  1  5    Committee responding to prospective purchasers of Gold River Deli  04/01/2010 2  1  5    Island Scallops, Bruce Evans expressed an interest in investing  12/02/2010 2  1  5    Investigate other mariculture and hydroponic ventures – Alan Gregory   12/02/2010 2  1  5    Scallop Farm Prospect presented by Bruce Evans 02/03/2011 2  2  1    New Website coordinated social media with Gold River Buzz  01/28/2010 2  2  1    Use Nanaimo’s Circle of Prosperity approach – Kent O’Neill  02/11/2010 2  2  4    100 Years of BC Parks Program  10/07/2010 2  2  4    Challenges including slow change, late adopters, volunteer burn out, lack  of focus for economic development  04/07/2011 2  2  4    Communications Issue: No response to Kate Ney Article regarding public  perception that Economic Development is a Tourism only agenda  05/05/2011 2  2  5    Investigate http://vispine.ca to include Gold River  12/02/2010 2  4  3    Trailer Park expansion Pater Aelbers  10/07/2010 2  4  3    Resolve Golf Course Servicing Issues  10/07/2010 2  4  5    Alliance Hatchery Priority – Nootka Sound Watershed Society – Kent  speaking with Alexandra Morton, Campaigner and Mia Parker, Grieg  Seafood   05/13/2010 Subjects that the CAO and staff have either fulfilled or can provide one report as to the state of the subject  3  1  1    New Brochures for visitors and community events  01/28/2010 3  1  1    Review the Penfold,Dixon, Pinel Study 1999 for relevant tactics  02/11/2010 3  1  1    Western Forest Products & Muchalat Industries Access to Land Major  Theme   04/01/2010 3  1  1    Committee terms of reference – Investigate the cost of a full time  economic developer shared by Alliance. Invite Capital EDC to assist.  05/05/2011 3  1  1    Capital EDC presented orientation to Economic Development to the Mayor  and Members of Council and secured expectations from Council pro‐bono.  06/01/2011 3  1  1    Capital EDC met with small business owners to secure expectations of  economic development pro‐bono.  06/03/2011 3  1  1    Village of Gold River CAO reviews findings of Capital EDC and solicits a  letter of understanding to conduct an assessment  07/20/2011 3  1  1    Village of Gold River approves Letter of Expectation to conduct an  assessment  08/22/2011 3  1  1    Capital EDC prepares online survey of Gold River Business to determine  scope of interest. >100 licensees reduced to 29 resident business owners  and representatives  09/06/2011 3  1  1    Capital EDC invites business owners to provide opinions. 09/18/ 2011 3  1  1    Capital EDC prepares and invites more than 40 people to focus groups 09/30/2011 3  1  1    Capital EDC attends Gold River and conducts Focus Group Meetings 10/23/2011 3  1  1    Decision to defer report until after election and orientation of new  Councilors in January 2012  10/24/2011 3  1  1    Municipal Elections Held across British Columbia 11/19/2011 3  1  1    Capital EDC closes online survey 11/31/2011 3  1  1    Final Report deferred until Council oriented 01/27/2012 3  1  1    Final Report Draft to Chief Administrative Officer, then circulated to  Council, then presented for discussion.  02/2012 3  2  4    Contact Chemainus or Tofino Chambers for examples  01/11/2010 3  2  5    Take Back the Town – Control Assets and make investments in new  infrastructure, Hire Agents – Major Theme   04/01/2010 3  3  1    Overview of Gold River Economic Development and support to hire full  time economic developer to Council  04/07/2011 3  3  4    Investigate Community Bridge Grant, unique programs, P3 partnerships,  parents   04/29/2010 3  4  3    Review and identify land acquisition around the Village – Larry Plourde   04/18/2010
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 94 Village of Gold River Economic Development Committee Progress from 2010‐2012 [Actions]  Who  Group  Type  Rank  Description  Status 2012 3  4  3    Full Service Camp Ground – Major Project Priority  04/01/2010 3  4  3    Trail mapping, building land acquisition – Major Project Priority  04/01/2010 3  4  3    Trail Project – Antler and Scout Lake Projects wait for transfer to complete   04/29/2010 In‐Progress  3  4  3    Trail Project – Antler and Scout Lake Projects  05/13/2010 In‐Progress  3  4  3    Antler and Scout Lake Land Transfers Incomplete  10/07/2010 3  4  3    Campgrounds – discussions and actions in progress  01/06/2011 3  4  3    Assess future water security for the Village in conjunction with mapping  prospective boundary expansion for future development  04/07/2011 3  4  3    Joint Venture cadastral mapping for the area with Western Forest  Products and make accessible online  04/07/2011 3  4  5    Contact owners and operators of the Trailer Park, Golf Course and  determine grants   04/29/2010 Concepts that the Village of Gold River has limited influence or control 4  1      Coop Transportation system – car pooling  01/28/2010 4  1  1    Reactivate Kinsman and Chamber of Commerce  02/11/2010 4  1  1    Complete an Asset Map for the Village  03/04/2010 4  1  3    Extreme Wilderness Survival Camp Program  01/28/2010 4  1  3    Nootka Sound Outdoor Education Program 10‐12 60 Students for 2011   10/07/2010 Complete  4  1  5    Wilderness Adventure Equipment Outfitter – Prospect Recruitment  06/24/2010 4  1  5    Covanta and Green Island Energy reported commitment to the end of  2011 pending GVRD decision  01/06/2011 4  2  1    Position Village as a family place “63” things to do in the Village  01/28/2010 4  2  2    Education – Major Theme  04/01/4010 4  2  3    Recruit new Small and Medium Enterprise to use back haul opportunities   01/28/2010 4  2  5    Host Nootka Sound Challenge Race triathlon  01/28/2010 4  3  1    Coordinate Community Celebrations Canada Day, Fall Fair, Car Rally  01/28/2010 4  3  1    Seasonal Activities needs a new club to coordinate  01/28/2010 4  3  1    Use local skills and talents in the labour force to implement strategies  04.18/2010 4  3  3    Host new Education and Training Programs with School District  01/28/2010 4  3  5    Aboriginal Themed Arts Festival  01/28/2010 4  3  5    Work with School District to attract families to Gold River  02/11/2010 4  3  5    Investigate Immigration policies – Welcome Community Program  02/11/2010 4  3  5    Gold River Outdoor Education Program SD 84 VIU  06/24/2010 4  4  1    Upgrade Village Plaza and Commercial Signage – Suzanne Trevis  05/13/2010 4  4  2    Nimkish Centre Mall – no plans to upgrade signage, tenants to clean up  their own   01/06/2011 4  4  3    Trail System Mapping  01/28/2010 4  4  3    Build new feature Tree Canopy, Suspension Bridge, Zip Line  01/28/2010 4  4  3    Beautification Program  01/28/2010 4  4  3    Woss Lake Road Activation link with Telegraph Cove Circle Tour  01/28/2010 4  4  3    Forsite Ltd. Campbell River contracted to complete $250,000 upgrades to  Trails and other outdoor recreation assets by December 2012   06/27/2010 Complete  4  4  3    Museum Society Exhibit development  07/24/2010 4  4  3    Accessible Wilderness Society development proposed for south side of  Muchalaht Lake near Roberts Lake   10/07/2010 4  4  5    Expanded Serviced Camping – John Frame  01/28/2010 4  4  5    Build and Operate a Wild Salmon Hatchery – John Frame  01/28/2010 4  4  5    Establish in‐home care support services  01/28/2010 4  4  5    Extended Care Facility 01/28/2010 4  4  5    Accessible Wilderness Society AWS  07/08/2010    
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 95 Appendix V – Survey Results    
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 1 Village of Gold River November 2011 Business Scan Patrick Nelson Marshall BES SURP | Economic Developer Capital EDC Economic Development Company We are the only provider of economic development GPS Growth,  Planning and Sustainability services located in Victoria. Retain us on a  monthly basis and save money while growing your activity. Business and Economic Development Services | Demonstration Project Village of Gold River  Review of economic  development committee  work | internal audit  Cluster, Supply Chain & Industrial  Sector Development Strategies  Web Site conversion,  transition from static to sales  orientation  Local and Regional Economic  Scan Reports  Confidential Business Retention  and Expansion results  Sales Training for Economic  Developers  Recommendations for  Economic Diversification  Program Re‐Start  In‐bound Investment and  Business Recruitment processes  and training  Head Hunting and  Professional Searches for  Public and Private  Review and Assessments of  Boards of Directors  Growth, Planning &  Sustainability Management Plans  Support to Economic  Development Officers  Relationship mending  between Local Government  & Boards  Business Meeting Hosting Interest  Matching in Vancouver and  Victoria  Retained monthly consulting  Economic Developer  Workforce Strategy Reports  Business Introductions to New  Markets  Local Area Procurement Tools  Familiarization Tour  Management  International Tour Coordination  Sister City Relationship  Development
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 2 This Report illustrates the views of the Resident Business Licensees,  Council and Committee Members Fourth Quarter 2011 VIEWS AND ATTRIBUTES OF THE RESPONDENTS Stakeholder View of Regional Image Stakeholder views of their own community and region may differ. It is  generally seen as a positive image with some reservation.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 3 How Outsiders view the Region Their experience with outsiders perception of the Region may also be  different. No perception means that there is work to be done creating a  perception. Effective Economic Development Some confusion. More jobs means expansion of existing, topped up with  new business in a blend.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 4 Personal Lens on Subjects Stakeholders should have different lenses and sensitivities so that there  is balance. The Village is an “Urban” context. Expansion and Recruitment Targets Each Sector exponentially effects the local economy from lowest at  Government to highest in the Manufacturing segment.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 5 Gold River’s Three Greatest Strengths Affordability, Proximity to Recreational Opportunities, Access to  Transportation Gold River’s Biggest Challenges Availability of well paid jobs, Citizen Attitude, Keeping Young Workers.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 6 Top Three Economic Development Subjects Supporting Existing Business, Recruitment of non Retail, and Growth of  Small Business combined with Revitalization of Commercial Area. Local Government should spend Opinions are consistent across the profile. Strong Opinions lean towards  More Employment Opportunities. These subject titles all fit into a  Sustainability Charter which acts as a Guide for Development.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 7 Respondents Sectoral History Where you are employed influences your view of the subjects before the  Stakeholders. Respondents Length of Service How long you have been operating in any given position may indicate an  ability to change or not.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 8 Respondents Accountability at Work The level accountability you are used to may be an indicator of how  much risk you are willing to take. Respondents Gender Gender Balance is sometime a factor in decision making style and  management.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 9 Gold River Original v. Newcomers Sometimes, the length of residency influences your ability to see the  Forest. Respondents Origins In other cases, bringing fresh eyes to a community can provide the  benefit of a new view on old issues and challenges.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 10 Regionalism Sometimes, the place where you were born shapes your view of the  world. Respondents Business Class While we do live in a classless society, sometimes, your root experience  is an influencer. 
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 11 Respondents Achievement Balancing experiences is important to stakeholder dynamics. Respondents Skill Sets Determining where you are weakest and backfilling skills is important to  the recruiting process.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 12 Respondents Cohorts Balancing experience and generational perspectives is important. Respondents Financial Responsibility
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 13 Respondents Diversity Speaking other languages is a helpful skill set when engaged in business  development. THE TOP 10 LIST & NEED FOR STRATEGIC FOCUS This section is about what the Respondents see as Regional priorities in Q4
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 14 Ernst Young Top 10 Issues List What the world sees as Top priorities are not necessarily a factor locally. Our Region Needs Attention Sometimes these graphs speak for themselves.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 15 HOW DOES NEW BUSINESS HAPPEN This section is about what the Respondents Experience Where do you refer people to for information? Cross promotion of products and services is critical to residents  understanding that every business is not a Corporate Giant, they are  people who invested in a job for themselves and their families. Larry P Municipal Office Ourselves.  We provide information on real estate listings for businesses and  residential properties. Mayor and Council I do not refer people Municipal Hall I give them the information I have/know and then put them to who else I think  might help them in the community. Village Office I would have no idea where to send them. Village office Reality office Town office Village office have never referred
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 16 When did you move in and what was the experience  like? No capital 5 year plan! I am just in the process of purchasing a second residence in Gold River.   I live in Campbell River. I lived here in 1983‐84 as a teacher: town booming with the big industries at the wharf.  I  returned recently in January 2008.  Much different time. I bought a business here.  I did not move. Grew up here and then moved back in 2004 2005.  non‐eventful 5 years ago ‐ good 1985 as a young mother with a husband in a new job, my experience was positive. 2003, good experience Also grew up here from 1968‐1984 I moved to Gold River in 1959, and enjoyed growing up here and making this my home. Mid 2005 Loved it. Took a few years to get our business going in town. March 2011, positive. 1999  good 1996 I moved to Nootka, to gold river in 99. loved it What web site did you use and was it helpful? It was a very bad web site. www.goldriverrealty.ca www.goldriverbuzz.com www.island.net/~record/ www.goldriver.ca Is there such a website? Village of GR Gold River Buzz www.goldriver.ca The BUZZ. gold river buzz goldriver.ca Google Gold River
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 17 Who was on your “Reception Team”? No clue Do we have one? I do not know. Whoever is around at the time, as far as I could tell.  We need to have the  presence of our village advertised at trade shows, and promoted in a  much bigger way. Municipal staff and........ Village Office I have no idea. ?? Mayor? I do not know ‐ The Mayor? I Have no idea What role do you play in recruiting people and business  to the Village of Gold River? None None Fielding inquiries from the public with regard to real estate listings for  businesses NA None None Minimal We leave an impression of what  quality business can be in our  community. No idea. None Very little unless linked to our Business None
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 18 What web site did you use and was it helpful? It was a very bad web site. www.goldriverrealty.ca www.goldriverbuzz.com www.island.net/~record/ www.goldriver.ca Is there such a website? Village of GR Gold River Buzz www.goldriver.ca The BUZZ. gold river buzz goldriver.ca Google Gold River Web Promotion Cross promotion of products and services is critical to residents  understanding that every business is not a Corporate Giant, they are  people who invested in a job for themselves and their families..
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 19 Retention and Expansion These are the two basic functions of economic development. Would you be  surprised to know that everyone over the age of 13 has a responsibility to  contribute to success, hence the phrase, “it takes a village”. RESIDENT BUSINESS ACTIVITY Q4 This section is about the Resident Business Activity
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 20 Your Peers Product Mix Change This illustrates innovation and market dynamics. Your Peers Product Mix Change >18 Months In the next 18 months, a couple of businesses are introducing new  products which is a positive sign.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 21 Your Peers Special Niche There is not a high incidence of specialization amongst the group. Your Peers Business Sales Turnover This indicates an average group of businesses.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 22 Your Peers Business Trade Area Indicates a slight diversity in your peer group. Surprised to see global in  the group. Your Peers Customer Frequency This is a poor sample so no real information derived from this question.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 23 Your Peer Business Sales Q4 Indicates a sense of strong change and decreasing. May be seasonal. Your Peer Average Sales The perception is that sales are on average, stable, with one indication of  increases.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 24 Your Peer Type of Customer Dominance of one‐to‐one sales is higher risk of rapid change. Lack of  dependence on Government sales is a positive attribute. Your Peer Customer Age Cohorts Not enough data to give a clear picture. If there was, there are clear gaps  that would indicate lack of balance in perspectives.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 25 Your Peer Estimated Incomes Not enough data to give a clear indication. Your Peer Marketing Sales Tools Not a lot of diversity of tools here which is useful when planning for the  Sun Coast Wood Campaign.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 26 Your Peer Expansion Plans Not enough responses to determine a strong pattern here. Peer New Location Plans No movement here.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 27 STAKEHOLDER  VIEWS ON  REGIONAL WORKFORCE Q4 This section is about the views of the Workforce Quality of Workforce Views are moderate and non committal on this subject.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 28 Head of Household There are a variety of perceptions on this subject. Workforce Demand Contrary to public perception.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 29 Unfilled Employment Positions Not a big enough indication to warrant specific recruiting. Imported Workforce Not a big enough indication to warrant detailed study and response.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 30 Change in Workforce Would have expected a stronger indication of awareness of change due  to issues around succession and ageing workforce. Provision of Benefits Interesting spread of experience on this subject.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 31 Provision of Benefits Another interesting indicator of experience with benefits. Workforce Training Provisions Strong diversity of experience here.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 32 Investment in Training Not a strong indication for this subject. Workforce Initiatives Diversity of experience indicated here.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 33 REGIONAL CHANGE This section focuses on expectations of change Q4 Are Changes Expected Somewhat conflicting view of the near term.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 34 Attitude towards doing business No change here. Are there Businesses needed in the Region? Not so much.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 35 Regulatory Barriers Some indications identified, but not a major issue amongst the group. Regulatory Reprieve None anticipated here.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 36 TECHNOLOGY TALK This section is about the Influence of technology on the peer group. Emerging Technology None anticipated. Some would think of the passing of social media and  the beginning of the mobility era.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 37 Opportunities with Technology Not a strong enough indicator to warrant detailed study. Use of Technology Very diverse use of technology within the peer group.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 38 Regional Technology Infrastructure Adequate. MANAGEMENT TEAM DYNAMICS This section is about the Peer groups business management team in Q4
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 39 <18 Months Change in Leadership Not a strong indication of change. Ownership Involvement Not a strong enough response for analysis.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 40 Top Performers Not strong enough to indicate a pattern. Advertising Budget It would be difficult to ask this group to contribute to the Sun Coast  Wood Campaign.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 41 Community Engagement There is a likelihood that this group would contribute to the Sun Coast  Wood Campaign. Collaboration Tends to indicate that the group does not necessarily play well with  others.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 42 Supplier Relationships Not much opportunity to introduce new ideas as the relationships, while  stable, are not introducing new players who might be more inclined to  participate in a community driven campaign. YOUR VIEW OF  SERVICES AND UTILITIES End of Survey Results Fourth Quarter 2011
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 2/17/2012 Village of Gold River Assessment 2011 43 Quality of Service Utilities
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 141 Appendix VI – Raw Log Exports Explanation We should not be talking about banning log exports, we should be talking about how best to manage and  regulate them.   Vancouver, September 26, 2011—There has been a longstanding debate about log exports and many people  continue to insist that exporting logs means we are exporting B.C. jobs. This is simply not the case. Log  exports have a key role in the development of B.C.’s economy, particularly on the coast, by supporting jobs  and economic activity in the logging and transportation sectors.   “We can debate which logs we should export, what the export fees should be and what the process should be  to export, but what we should not do is talk about banning log exports and making claims that we are  exporting jobs,” says Dave Lewis, executive director of the Truck Loggers Association. “The forest industry is  running at full tilt right now – largely because of log exports. A ban on exports would have a net negative  impact on employment as harvesting jobs would not be replaced by manufacturing jobs.”   As Bob Matters of the United Steel Workers said at a recent forum, “Log exports that strategically support  jobs is something we can support and is a good place to start.”    Our inability to harvest our Allowable Annual Cut (AAC) since 2005 has resulted in an elimination of more  than 2,100 direct jobs in the timber harvesting sector each year. Even if log exports were banned, the timber  that is currently being exported would not be redirected to a local mill. It would stay in the forest because  local mills are not prepared to pay the cost to harvest it. This puts loggers, engineers, silviculture workers and  forest managers out of work.    “Of course the forestry sector should continue to diversify and, yes, timber should go to local mills first, but  at a fair price. Finding the right balance is the key to the long‐term success of B.C.’s forest harvesting and  sawmilling sectors,” explains Lewis.    ‐30‐  For all enquires please contact:  Jennifer Fowler  Director, Communications  Truck Loggers Association  Phone: (604) 684‐4291  Email: jennifer@tla.ca The Truck Loggers is pleased to have the opportunity to provide the following input  regarding the export of logs from BC.    Submitted to the Province of British Columbia on behalf of the Truck Loggers Association (TLA) September 15, 2011 Log exports: The reality The volume of logs being exported from our province to Asia has increased dramatically over the past two  years.  This has brought the issue of log exports to forefront of the political debate as it is politically charged.   Those within the harvesting and timber management sector are seeking a greater degree of freedom,  efficiency and certainty of export as foreign buyers have filled a void that has been created due to falling  domestic demand.  Those within the manufacturing sector are asking to maintain or increase controls on log  exports to facilitate their ability to secure logs at prices that they can afford to pay for logs.  These two  interests from the two sectors generally do not align with one another and create friction whenever changes  to the current system are proposed.  Historically the default position has been to leave the current system in  place, not because it is without warts, but simply because it is the most convenient path forward.   While labour, industry, and all levels of government have not found common ground with regard to specific  export policy criteria or objectives, they have all expressed an opposition to the industry’s ongoing erosion.   Given the historic difficulty in changing policy, perhaps the most benefit can be gained by applying the  existing policies in a manner that serves to increase the economic and social well‐being of all participants.  If a  way can be found to do this, we will eliminate some of the extreme polarization that exists around this issue  (ban log exports) and can proceed with the objective of “how to best manage and control the export of logs 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 142 from BC.”  As Bob Matters of the United Steel Workers said at a recent forum “Log exports that strategically  support jobs is something we can support and is a good place to start.”    The TLA feels that the current review of log export policy could be divided into the following three distinct  components in order to accommodate the diversity of stakeholder interests, while still meeting the  government’s social and economic policy objectives.    1. How do we best apply or target the existing policy to meet current objectives?  2. How do we change individual components of the existing policy in order to improve its efficiency,  certainty and cost to stakeholders in the short‐term?  3. What does a durable export policy that meets stakeholder’s long‐term objectives look like?        This submission speaks to the first component: “how best to apply the existing policy”, in the best interests of  the Province.  The single biggest issue that has plagued the coastal forest industry over the past two decades  has been the alarming and increasing negative trend of undercutting our coastal AAC.  This proposal seeks to  address that issue.   We have provided some background documentation as well that hopefully provides  useful information for politicians as they wrestle with this sensitive topic.  How do we best apply the existing policy to meet current objectives? While changing policy requires either consensus from stakeholders or courageous decision makers, applying  the existing policy in a differential manner is not only possible – it is the norm.  Presently an opportunity  exists to utilize current policy in a targeted fashion to address the undercut issue that has plagued the coast  for two decades. While there is interest in changing some of the current policy, not all aspects of current  export policy are bad or require change.  The government should continue to apply the existing policy in an  effective and efficient manner as it undertakes the current policy review.     The TLA proposes that current export policy could be targeted towards forest stands with characteristics that  make them uneconomic to harvest, so that they are provided greater certainty of access to higher value  international markets.  Despite widespread disagreement amongst stakeholders on how to change existing  export policy, there seems to be at least an initial universal acceptance towards this sort of application of the  existing policy.    A Common Problem The coastal Annual Allowable Cut (AAC) has not been harvested since 1992.  Since 2005, annual harvests have  fluctuated between 50% and 80% of our ACC and 46 million m3 of sustainable timber harvest has been  neglected.  The gap between our sustainable harvest level and our economically viable harvest level has been  widening for at least three market cycles.  Market prices do not seem to have enough impact to change the  trend towards an ever‐increasing undercut of typically lower grade timber in high cost operating areas; and  the current surplus test does not provide the certainty of access to export premiums that are required by  licensees to justify the millions of dollars that must be invested to plan, develop and harvest this timber.  As a  result, the majority of the timber stands that languish around the economic margin of profitability are left  harvested.    Stands of lower value old growth on Vancouver Island typically require an investment of $100/m³ before they  can be sold.  More isolated areas on the coast or those that require special management or aerial harvesting  can be upwards of $150/m³ of cost.  Typically the lower value timber that dominates these stands carries  domestic prices that are less than $70/m³.  In the past two years, foreign buyers were paying almost double  what domestic manufacturers were for some of this lower value timber.  The current system however, did  not provide guaranteed access to these prices, so often the timber went harvested as operators were not  prepared to take the risk.  This lack of certainty not only impacts sub‐marginal timber stands, but it also  impacts the timber stands that are within $10/m³ of the margin as the time that it takes to develop this  timber exposes it to market fluctuations. (Typically on a pro‐forma basis, stands with less than $10/m3  positive return are avoided.)   Most old growth stands contain a variety of species and grades of timber.  They are able to be harvested  without exports if the higher value timber can subsidize the cost of taking the low value timber.  Fewer and  fewer stands have enough higher value timber to offset the low value timber.  While each region has its own  specific challenges, this problem has largely been characterized as the Hemlock/Balsam issue on the coast.  
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 143 The cost of old growth log production on the BC coast is generally between $400 and $650/thousand board  feet.  The current market price for commodity lumber destined to China is $250/thousand board feet. The  average price paid for logs (to the same market) is roughly $630 per thousand board feet.  Coastal stands that  are largely comprised of low value timber are generally uneconomic to harvest (even when stumpage is  negligible) given commodity lumber prices, unless a significant component of export is allowed.  In the  absence of high value timber in the stand, export premiums act as a surrogate subsidy for lower value stands.  Over the past two years the mechanism that has been most successful in terms of adding value has been the  sale of logs on the export market.  Over time, the price of finished goods has not kept pace with the raw  material cost so while demand exists for finished goods, coastal manufacturers are economically challenged  in terms of acquiring fibre.  It would appear that Asian manufacturing facilities have significantly lower  production costs and tend to get more value out of low grade logs than our domestic coastal mills given the  fact that they pay significantly more for logs than lumber.  Interior mills seem to be able to supply a  commodity product at that market price due to their lower manufacturing costs and lower log cost.  To  improve the economics of the current coastal situation, we need to either reduce costs or increase revenues.  Cost cutting measures continue to be a focus; however, after reducing costs 20% over a ten year period from  1998 to 2008 (Russ Taylor), most of the low hanging fruit has been plucked, This would tend to indicate that  the solution lies on the revenue side of the equation.  Most log export critics espouse that exporting logs  leaves domestic mills short of fibre.  That is simply not the case.  Coastal Log Demand Summarized below is the log demand data over the past 6 years together with a forecast through 2028 and  charted it by type of consumer against the coastal AAC inclusive of private contributions to available log  supply.    When operating at historic capacity, BC coastal mills can consume approximately 16 million m3 of logs per  year. BC’s sustainable coastal harvest level is 24 million m3 (including private land). If every coastal mill got  every log that they needed, there would still be approximately 8 million m3 of timber left over for export.   While it is true that we are exporting more and more timber, it is also true that there is still considerable  timber that is in excess of demand, still left over.  Policy Vision Export policy should:  Coastal Log Demand Forecast 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 '000 cubicmetres Sawlog Demand Peeler Log Demand Shake and Shingle Demand Post and Pole Demand Pulp Log Demand Log Exports Crown AAC + Private
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 144  seek to ensure that BC manufacturers, who will pay a fair domestic market price for economically viable  crown timber, have access to it;     should be applied to facilitate the harvest of otherwise uneconomic timber and to entice the harvest of  the entire timber profile.  Logs that are surplus to BC manufacturer's needs should be made available for  export;     should seek to provide both timber buyers and sellers with a reasonably certain and efficient process to  sell or buy logs, while preserving accurate domestic pricing signals for MPS calculations;      should seek to maximize the total domestic economic activity within the forest sector, preserve forestry  infrastructure and optimize future timber supplies.  The TLA believes that if this policy is solely targeted towards the component of the AAC that is deemed  “uneconomic” there can be fewer objections to exports. Log exports is critical to the health of our coastal  logging economy. It is not our intent to suggest only patchwork solutions. Many people want to see log  exports reduced.  As shown, this is counterproductive to sound economic policy and good forest  management. The TLA looks forward to feedback on this submission and with the support of government will  continue with its analysis and the development of this policy proposal.  The TLA is also prepared to provide  subsequent input with regard to short term changes to the existing policy or the long‐term objectives of log  export policy should government choose to undertake those initiatives.    To Contact the TLA:  Dave Lewis: Executive Director  725 – 815 West Hastings Street  Vancouver, BC  V6C 1B4  Phone: 604‐684‐4291  Fax: 604‐684‐7134  Email: dlewis@tla.ca  Web: www.tla.ca     
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 145 Appendix VII – Independent Wood Processors Independent Wood Processors Association of British Columbia address to the Mayors at UBCM 2011  Remarks by Executive Director Russ Cameron  Introduction  Update on the state of BC’s family owned, non‐tenured wood processors.  Forty years ago, formed the Independent Wood Processors Association, or IWPA (formerly ILRA)   We are all family owned, none of us have been given the renewable right to harvest the public’s timber, and  we all buy our wood fibre on the open market at prevailing market prices.  We are currently working with DFAIT, NRCan, and the Government of BC on the implementation of the EU’s  Legal Harvest legislation, similar pending legislation in Australia and China, possible changes to the US Lacey  Act, the current Australian anti‐dumping investigation, log export policy, consultations on the CETA, BC  Timber Sales, Category 2, SLA extension or expiry, and the BC Interior SLA Arbitration to name a few of the  issues.    So how are we doing?  I am sure that you are all aware that we are in serious trouble and no doubt some of you have lost some  family owned businesses in your communities.  Prior to the SLA 2006 with the United States, the IWPA had 120 members employing over 4000 British  Columbians.  We have now lost 37 companies to bankruptcy or voluntary closure and most of the remaining members are  running between 40% and 50% capacity and are presently hanging on by their finger nails.  Why are we going broke?  We are going broke because we do not have fair access to the US market and we do not have fair access to  BC grown wood fibre.  We hear all this talk about China.  Well, China might be great for the major licensees, but as far as we are  concerned, they are a low cost competitor that BC is bending over backwards for to make sure that they are  supplied with the BC logs and lumber that we used to buy and process here.  We wish that the BC  Government was making the same effort on behalf of the British Columbian families that are employing  people in BC, paying taxes in BC, and processing BC wood fibre in BC.  When we asked our members, 2 years after the US market collapse, why they were going broke, the number  one reason was their inclusion in the Softwood Lumber Agreement and the number two reason was difficulty  obtaining wood fibre due to the Softwood lumber Agreement and due to the consolidation of the major  licensees.  Only 20% of them even mentioned the collapsed US housing market.  We are all aware that US housing starts are only a third of what they were 6 years ago but did you know that:   As of September 19, 2011, the US Residential BuildFax Remodeling Index rose 24% year‐over‐year and for the  twenty‐first straight month to the highest number in the index to date.  The major licensees traditionally supply 30 to 35% of the US commodity framing market, but we only supply  1% of the US specialty market.  For the, housing start dependent, major licensees to maintain a survivable US  market share is impossible, but for us it is not.  We can maintain market share because we can supply small  volumes of high quality specialty products and an exceptional degree of service to a nearby specialty market  that has not suffered to the same extent as housing starts.  When you can’t sell your house … or get credit to  buy a new one … you remodel.  We do acknowledge the negative effects of the US recession and the appreciation of the Canadian dollar  relative to the US dollar, but due to the specialty niche products and services that we provide, those are  problems that we can deal with.  
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 146 What we have been unable to deal with is the $75/mfbm tax on our products shipped to our primary market.  The tax was designed to make us unable to compete in the US market and in that respect it has worked very  well.  The problem for us is that in an effort to retain the tenure and administrative timber pricing systems for the  tenured sector, the GOC and GBC have imposed a border tax to the US market that also applies to the non‐ tenured sector.  This is in spite of the fact that we already pay market prices for our lumber in competition  with the Americans and others.  As the US Coalition for Fair Lumber Imports stated in their offer to Canada:  “The settlement accord should provide that a province’s adoption of fully open and competitive timber and  log markets would automatically result in lifting of interim measures for that province.  Absent fully open and  competitive markets, however, the nature of criteria on the basis of which interim measures would be  reduced or lifted remains in question.”  We understand the desire of the large public companies to retain their tenures and the systems of  administratively pricing the public timber under their control. We also understand their willingness to pay  duties and border taxes, or to be subject to quotas.  That is the price that they chose to pay to retain their  benefits and avoid having to buy their wood fibre on the open market as we do.  But the effect of applying  these penalties to the products of companies that have to compete for their wood fibre on the open market  in competition with the Americans and others, has been devastating.  Here is what the tax does to us:  As intended by the tax, our US competitors can undercut us by up to $75/mfbm.   We know that we must pay an extra $75/mfbm that the American and Chinese wood processors do not have  to pay, therefore we must buy our lumber $75/mfbm cheaper.  Good luck with that.  We know that we must pay an extra $75/mfbm that the American and Chinese wood processors do not have  to pay, therefore we must buy our logs $18 to $20 / m3 cheaper.  Good luck with that too.  In fact, it is  difficult for us to understand why BC doesn’t impose a border tax on logs equivalent to that the Americans  demand we apply to our “subsidized” lumber that is cut from the same logs.   The $75 tax helps to subsidize the shipment of our wood to China where they can take advantage of low  labour rates, and then ship it back to the US where it enters tax free.  BC has barred non‐tenured wood processors from bidding on BCTS public timber sales unless we agree to pay  additional border tax on the costs of adding value to BC wood fibre in BC.  Labour, heat, light, insurance,  property tax, leases, etc.  And now our remaining non‐tenured BC Interior members live in fear of being pushed over the edge by  becoming subject to any additional penalties that may be imposed by the Grade 4 Arbitration should it be  judged that the tenured companies paid insufficient stumpage.   What BC and Canada need to do is to recognize, as we do, that the tenured companies do not wish to  compete for their wood fibre but do wish to retain the administrative pricing systems that they currently  have. The proof is in the fact that they are willing to pay 15% to retain these benefits. The non‐tenured  companies that do compete for wood fibre have no problem with their decision but we do not wish to pay  part of the penalty on their behalf.  Given that the tenured companies are the only ones to receive the benefit, we need you to insist that  provincial and federal politicians have the tenured companies pay the entire cost of retaining their benefits  instead of having the family owned businesses in your communities pay part of the price for them.  The opportunity for you to do so may occur if we lose the Arbitration and Canada decides that non‐tenured  family owned businesses in the BC Interior should pay part of the penalty on behalf of the licensees.    The opportunity will occur during extension or expiry negotiations or during the next round of the softwood  lumber dispute, as we assume that the licensees will once again prefer to pay some kind of penalty to keep  their tenures and avoid having to compete for their fibre.  This problem is solvable if there is the political will to solve it. | End of Document 
    • CAPITAL EDC Economic Development Company This is a draft plan and is confidential: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from Patrick Nelson Marshall +1 250 507-4500 - draft version dated - Thursday, June-07-12 Page 147  
    • Per Capi Patr Inde Expe Patric Canad reside Patric succe Past Patric Execu Mana Camp 1987  Educ Patric Unive terms atten Assoc and a Serv Patric Britis CANA 1996  Assoc Deve Busin  R c  L R  R D  R o  R L  W  F * Qualifie rsonnel Pr ital EDC Ec rick Nelson ependent B erience ck has conduct da. He has wo ential  and  gov ck combines h essful Growth,  t Employme ck’s  past  work utive Officer an ager, North Ce pbell River fro to 1989, Urba cation ck completed a ersity of Wate s  as  an  Engine ded Year 1 an ciation of Cana a Member of th vice ck has a strong h Columbia an ADA BC Busine to 1997; Presi ciation of Cana lopment Assoc ness and Econ Review of econ committee wor Local and Regio Reports  Recommendati Diversification  Review and Ass of Directors  Relationship m Local Governm Workforce Stra Familiarization  Cap Dev 4341 Cana Victo CANA ed Supplier to Province  rofile conomic De Marshall* Business a ted over 300 b orked on the s vernment  inve his understand Planning and S nt k  experience  nd Economic D ntral Island To m 1989 to 200 n Planner for t a Bachelor of E rloo in Ontario eering  and  Pla d Year 2 of the ada and associa he Ontario Pro g track record o nd the Coastal  ss Service Cen dent of the Va ada 1987‐1988 ciation of Britis nomic Develo nomic developm rk | internal au onal Economic  ions for Econo Program Re‐St sessments of B ending betwee ent & Boards  ategy Reports  Tour Managem ital EDC Econo velopment Com 1 Shelbourne Stree ada’s Remembranc oria, British Colum ADA V8N3G4  of British Columbia 2010 evelopment BES SURP and Econom usiness retent upport of the  estment,  and  m ing of urban a Sustainability [ includes:  Chie Developer for t urism Organiza 01, Director o the City of Nor Environmental  o, Canada in 1 anning  Intern  e University of ated workshop fessional Plann of volunteer se Community N tre Society sin ancouver Island 8; and was se sh Columbia.  opment Servi ment  udit   Scan   mic  tart   Boards   en    ment   omic mpany et  ce Road  bia  0 – 2012 | Registered Su t Company mic Develo tion, expansion development  more  than  300 and regional p GPS] for both  ef  Executive  O he Campbell R ation from 199 f Marketing, B th York, Metro Studies Honou 1983. He was  with  the  City f Waterloo Eco p’s. He was ind ners Institute a ervice: He curr Network; He is  nce 2007; Vice  d Economic De elected as the  ices  Cluster, Suppl Development  Confidential B Expansion res In‐bound Inve Recruitment p Growth, Plann Management  Business Mee Matching in V Business Intro International T M upplier to Union of BC M y oper n, recruitment, of hundreds o 0  customers  p processes with  private and pu Officer,  Ocean  River Economic 99 to 2000, Ma Bowman Boule opolitan Toron urs Degree from engaged in th of  North  Yor onomic Develo ducted as a Me also in 1984.  rently serves as the Chairman President of t evelopers Asso Economic Dev y Chain & Indu Strategies  Business Reten ults  estment and Bu processes and t ning & Sustaina Plans  ting Hosting In Vancouver and  oductions to Ne Tour Coordina Mobile   T Toll Fre Fac Mailto: patrick.marsh   Patr Municipalities                     , in‐bound inve of thousands o projects  for loc  the pragmati ublic sector org Industries  Br c Development anager, Proper evard Strategic to from 1979 t m the School o he Internship P rk,  Metropolita opment progra ember of the C s the Consultin n of the Board  he Economic D ociation 1993‐1 veloper of the ustrial Sector  tion and  usiness  training  ability  nterest  Victoria  ew Markets tion e: +1 250‐ 507‐4500 Tel: +1 250 595‐8676 ee: + 1 877 595‐8676 cs: +1 866 827‐1524 hall@capitaledc.com rick.Nelson.Marshall                             | Memb estment and o of dollar’s wor cal  governmen c, and vision f ganizations.  ritish  Columbia t Corporation f rty & Economic c Real Estate M to 1987.  of Urban and R Program at th an  Toronto,  O am sponsored  Canadian Instit ng Economic D of Directors fo Developer’s As 1995; Director  e Year 2007 b  Web Sit static to  Sales Tr Develop  Head Hu Searche  Support Officers  Retaine Econom  Local Ar  Sister C Develop  Capit   ber                       | Memb operations in tw rth of industria nt  and  industr for detail requ a  from  2007  from 2000 to 2 c Developmen Marketing Ltd Regional Planni e University a Ontario,  Canad by the Econom ute of Planner Developer to O or Small Busin ssociation of B for the Econom by his peers at te conversion,  o sales orientat raining for Econ pers  unting and Pro es for Public an t to Economic  s  d monthly con mic Developer rea Procureme ity Relationshi pment  ww tal‐EDC‐Economic‐De ca.linkedin.com/in/p P  P ber                       |   Suppo wo Provinces i al, commercia ry  associations uired to ensur to  2009,  Chie 2007, Transitio t for the City o . Toronto from ing SURP at th nd served fou da.  Patrick  also mic Developer’ rs MCIP in 1984 Ocean Initiative ess BC and th ritish Columbi mic Developer t the Economi transition from tion  nomic  ofessional  nd Private  Development  nsulting  ent Tools p  ww.patrickmarshall.te www.capitaledc.com evelopment‐Compan patricknelsonmarsha @CapitalEDCcom PatrickNelsonMarsha PatrickNelsonMarsha orter    n  l,  s.  e  ef  n  of  m  e  r  o  s  4  s  e  a  rs  c  m  el  m  ny  all  m  all  all