• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
2012 May SCPI Economic Diversification Plan Final
 

2012 May SCPI Economic Diversification Plan Final

on

  • 1,375 views

Capital EDC Economic Development Company was engaged to prepare a Community Diversification Plan against which the proceeds of Community based Forest Management would be allocated in a way which ...

Capital EDC Economic Development Company was engaged to prepare a Community Diversification Plan against which the proceeds of Community based Forest Management would be allocated in a way which supports a diversified and sustainable community.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,375
Views on SlideShare
1,375
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

CC Attribution License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    2012 May SCPI Economic Diversification Plan Final 2012 May SCPI Economic Diversification Plan Final Document Transcript

    • This is a +1 (604) Subm Seche Sun Eco This rep confirm Submitt Mr. Gle Chairma Sechelt  Sunshin 201 |20 Post Off Sechelt, CANADA   May 20   Submitt Patrick  Consult Capital E 4341 Sh Victoria CANADA www.ca T: +1 25 C: +1 25 www.pa In Assoc Sechelt C Glen Bon Peter Mo Tom Pinf final plan: No rep ) 885‐7809 - ve ission to th lt Commun nshin onom port is submitte ed by the Sech ted to:     n Bonderud  an of the Boar Community Pr e Coast Comm 04 ‐ 5606 Whar fice Box 215   British Colum A V0N 3A0  12  ted by:        Nelson Marsh ing Economic  EDC Economic  helbourne Stree , British Colum A V8N3G4  apitaledc.com  50 595‐8676  50 507‐4500  atrickmarshall. ciation with:  Community Proje nderud, Cortex C oonen, Canadian fold, Gardner Pi production or dis rsion dated – Ma he Chair an nity Projec ne Co mic Di ed in conforma helt Communit d of Directors  rojects Inc.  munity Forest  rf Avenue  bia  all  Developer  Development  et  mbia   tel   ects Inc. Econom Consultants Inc.  n Wood Council, nfold & Associat stribution without ay 28 th 2012 nd Board o cts Inc. | Su oast C iversi ance with the r ty Projects Inc.  Company  mic Diversificatio and Committee , and Committee tes, and Commit written permissi of Director unshine Co Comm ificat requirements s Economic Dive on Committee  Chair   e Member  ttee Member Sechelt Co ion from the Sec rs oast Comm munity tion P specified in the ersification Co ommunity Pro chelt Community unity Fore y For Plan 2 e Letter of Exp ommittee Janua   ojects Inc. 20 Projects Inc. Pag est rest 2012 ectation  ary 25th  2011  012 ge 1
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 2 This page left blank intentionally
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 3 Forward Looking Statements The following document is presented for informational purposes only. It is not intended to be, and is not, a  prospectus, offering memorandum or private placement memorandum. The information in this document  may not be complete and may be changed, modified or amended at any time by the owner, and is not  intended to, and does not, constitute representations and warranties of the proposed business.  The information in this document is also inherently forward‐looking information. Among other things, the  information:   (1) discusses the owner’s future expectations;   (2) contains projections of the owner’s future results of operations or of its financial condition; or  (3) states other “forward looking” information.   There may be events in the future that the owner cannot accurately predict or over which the owner has no  control, and the occurrence of such events may cause the owner’s actual results to differ materially from the  expectations described herein.  This document constitutes confidential and proprietary information and may not be copied, faxed,  reproduced or otherwise distributed by you, and the contents of this document may not be disclosed by you,  without the proponent’s express written consent.
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 4 Sechelt Community Projects Inc. Resolution  Chronological No.  May 28 th , 2012  File Reference No.  Economic Development  Committee      That the Board of Directors of the Sechelt Community Projects Inc.      Date of duly convened meeting    Y  2012  M  05  D  28  Province  British Columbia      Whereas the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. engaged in a request for proposals to invest the  proceeds from the harvest of wood from the Sunshine Coast Community Forest into valued  community projects in the Sunshine Coast Regional District in 2011 and received a limited  response;  Whereas the Board of Directors for the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. engaged Patrick Marshall,  Capital EDC Economic Development Company to assess and report on the most likely community  values and deliver a report on the prospects for economic diversification associated with the  investment of the proceeds of the sale of Sunshine Coast Community Forest wood;  Therefore be it resolved that the Board of Directors received the report entitled “Sunshine Coast  Community Forest Economic Diversification Plan 2012”; and;  Be it further resolved that the Board of Directors will take the recommendations under advisement  when the opportunity to invest the proceeds of the sale of wood harvested from the Sunshine  Community Forest arises.    For the Sechelt Community Projects Inc.  Board of Directors                  Glen Bonderud, Chair Board of Directors For the Sechelt Community Projects Inc.  Management Team          Dave Lasser RPF General Manager For Capital EDC  Economic Development Company        Patrick N. Marshall Consulting Economic Developer
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 5 Professional Resume Capital EDC Economic Development Company Patrick Nelson Marshall BES SURP | Economic Developer   Experience  Patrick has conducted over 300 business retention, expansion, recruitment, in‐bound investment and operations in two  Provinces in Canada. He has worked on the support of the development of hundreds of thousands of dollar’s worth of  industrial, commercial, residential and government investment, and more than 300 customers projects for local  government and industry associations. Patrick combines his understanding of urban and regional processes with the  pragmatic, and vision for detail required to ensure successful Growth, Planning and Sustainability [GPS] for both private  and public sector organizations.  Past Employment  Patrick’s past work experience includes: Chief Executive Officer, Ocean Industries British Columbia from 2007 to 2009,  Chief Executive Officer and Economic Developer for the Campbell River Economic Development Corporation from 2000 to  2007, Transition Manager, North Central Island Tourism Organization from 1999 to 2000, Manager, Property & Economic  Development for the City of Campbell River from 1989 to 2001, Director of Marketing, Bowman Boulevard Strategic Real  Estate Marketing Ltd. Toronto from 1987 to 1989, Urban Planner for the City of North York, Metropolitan Toronto from  1979 to 1987.  Education  Patrick completed a Bachelor of Environmental Studies Honours Degree from the School of Urban and Regional Planning  SURP at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada in 1983. He was engaged in the Internship Program at the  University and served four terms as an Engineering and Planning Intern with the City of North York, Metropolitan  Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Patrick also attended Year 1 and Year 2 of the University of Waterloo Economic Development  program sponsored by the Economic Developer’s Association of Canada and associated workshop’s. He was inducted as a  Member of the Canadian Institute of Planners MCIP in 1984 and a Member of the Ontario Professional Planners Institute  also in 1984.  Service  Patrick has a strong track record of volunteer service: He currently serves as the Consulting Economic Developer to Ocean  Initiatives British Columbia and the Coastal Community Network; He is the Chairman of the Board of Directors for Small  Business BC and the CANADA BC Business Service Centre Society since 2007; Vice President of the Economic Developer’s  Association of British Columbia 1996 to 1997; President of the Vancouver Island Economic Developers Association 1993‐ 1995; Director for the Economic Developers Association of Canada 1987‐1988; and was selected as the Economic  Developer of the Year 2007 by his peers at the Economic Development Association of British Columbia.  Business and Economic Development Services  Review of economic development  committee work | internal audit  Cluster, Supply Chain & Industrial Sector  Development Strategies  Web Site conversion, transition from  static to sales orientation  Local and Regional Economic Scan  Reports  Confidential Business Retention and  Expansion results  Sales Training for Economic  Developers  Recommendations for Economic  Diversification Program Re‐Start  In‐bound Investment and Business  Recruitment processes and training  Head Hunting and Professional  Searches for Public and Private  Review and Assessments of Boards  of Directors  Growth, Planning & Sustainability  Management Plans  Support to Economic Development  Officers  Relationship mending between Local  Government & Boards  Business Meeting Hosting Interest  Matching in Vancouver and Victoria  Retained monthly consulting  Economic Developer  Workforce Strategy Reports  Business Introductions to New Markets  Local Area Procurement Tools  Familiarization Tour Management  International Tour Coordination  Sister City Relationship Development   Capital EDC Economic Development Company 4341 Shelbourne Street  Canada’s Remembrance Road  Victoria, British Columbia  CANADA V8N3G4 Telephone: +1 250 595‐8676  Toll Free: + 1 877 595‐8676  eFacsimile: +1 866 827‐1524  Mailto: patrick.marshall@capitaledc.com  Mobile: www.patrickmarshall.tel  Web: www.capitaledc.com  LinkedIn:  ca.linkedin.com/in/patricknelsonmarshall  Search: patricknelsonmarshall      
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 6 Table of Contents iv. Briefing Note .................................................................................................................................................. 12  1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .................................................................................................................................. 13  1.1  Environmental Scan ............................................................................................................................. 13  1.2  Plan Objective ...................................................................................................................................... 14  1.3  Assessment of Opportunities ............................................................................................................... 14  Existing Strategies and Operations ............................................................................................................. 14  Stakeholder Interviews ............................................................................................................................... 15  Opportunities Most Relevant to the Sunshine Coast Community Forest .................................................. 15  1.4  Diversification Options ......................................................................................................................... 15  1.5  Recommendations ............................................................................................................................... 16  Short‐term Action ....................................................................................................................................... 16  Long‐term Action ........................................................................................................................................ 17  2.0 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................ 19  2.1 Purpose of the Project .............................................................................................................................. 19  2.2 Plan Statements include: .......................................................................................................................... 19  Overarching Plan Governance: ................................................................................................................... 19  Plan Vision: ................................................................................................................................................. 19  Our Plan Mission: ....................................................................................................................................... 19  Sunshine Coast Community Forest Market Position Objectives: ............................................................... 20  2.3 Approach and Methodology ..................................................................................................................... 20  Research Stage 1 ........................................................................................................................................ 21  Strategy Stage 2 ......................................................................................................................................... 21  Building Stage 3 .......................................................................................................................................... 21  Implementation Stage 4 ............................................................................................................................. 21  Assessment and Reposition Stage 5 ........................................................................................................... 21  2.4 Assumptions & Limiting Factors ............................................................................................................... 22  3.0 PROJECT CONTEXT ........................................................................................................................................ 23  3.1 Regional Economic Summary ................................................................................................................... 23  3.2 Wood Products and Services ................................................................................................................ 30  3.3 Forest Products and Services ................................................................................................................ 31  3.4 Comparison of Sunshine Coast to other Community Forests .................................................................. 32  3.4.1 Profile of Sunshine Coast Community Forest .................................................................................... 32  3.4.2 Other Community Forest Organizations ............................................................................................ 34  3.4.3 The Provincial Association ................................................................................................................. 34  3.5 Provincial Economic Development Context ......................................................................................... 35  3.6 Regional Economic Development Context ........................................................................................... 36  3.7 Local Sustainability Plan ....................................................................................................................... 37  4.0 ASSESSMENT OF DIVERSIFICATION OPPORTUNITIES ................................................................................... 38  4.1 Retention and Expansion .......................................................................................................................... 38  4.2 Recruitment .............................................................................................................................................. 38  4.3 Stakeholder Contact and Interviews ........................................................................................................ 39  4.4 Stakeholder Opinion ................................................................................................................................. 40  4.4.1 The Sunshine Coast Business Climate Survey Responses .................................................................. 40  4.4.2 Stakeholders Views and Attributes ................................................................................................... 40  4.4.3 The Top Ten List and need for Strategic Focus .................................................................................. 41  4.4.4 Business Activity 2011 Q3 ................................................................................................................. 41  4.4.5 Views on Regional Workforce ........................................................................................................... 42  4.4.6 Regional Change ................................................................................................................................ 43  4.4.7 Technology Talk ................................................................................................................................. 43  4.4.8 Management Team Dynamics ........................................................................................................... 43  4.5 The Sunshine Coast Focus Group Meeting Responses ............................................................................. 44  4.5.1 Physical Infrastructure ....................................................................................................................... 44  4.5.2 Human Capacity Infrastructure ......................................................................................................... 44 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 7 4.5.3 Community Capacity Infrastructure .................................................................................................. 44  4.5.4 Business Infrastructure | 90 day Actions .......................................................................................... 44  4.6 Wood User Stakeholders ...................................................................................................................... 44  4.7 Forest User Stakeholders ..................................................................................................................... 45  4.8 Opportunity Assessment Summary .......................................................................................................... 46  Strengths .................................................................................................................................................... 46  Weaknesses ................................................................................................................................................ 46  Opportunities ............................................................................................................................................. 46  Threats ........................................................................................................................................................ 46  5.0 ASSESSING SUNSHINE COAST COMMUNITY FOREST DIVERSIFICATION OPTIONS ....................................... 48  5.1 Options to be implemented within the Organization .............................................................................. 48  5.2 Options to be contracted by the Organization ......................................................................................... 50  5.3 Options to be partnered with other Organizations .................................................................................. 50  6.0 DIVERSIFICATION STRATEGY ‐ REFINING THE SUNSHINE COAST COMMUNITY FOREST VALUE PROPOSITION  ............................................................................................................................................................................ 52  6.1 Diversification Objectives ......................................................................................................................... 52  6.2 Short Term Actions ................................................................................................................................... 52  6.3 Long Term Actions .................................................................................................................................... 53  7.0 IMPLEMENTING THE DIVERSIFICATION RECOMMENDATIONs .................................................................... 54  7.1 Economic Diversification Issues and Opportunities Long List Priorities by the Board of Directors and  Staff ............................................................................................................................................................ 54  7.2 Economic Diversification Issues | Opportunities Short List .................................................................. 54  7.3 Economic Diversification Focus Areas .................................................................................................. 55  7.4 Economic Diversification Strategic Priority Work Program .................................................................. 55  7.4 Blueplanet Sustainability Check Up ...................................................................................................... 57  7.5 Strategic Plan Dashboard for External Purposes .................................................................................. 58  8.0 FINANCIAL ALLOCATIONS FOR DIVERSIFICATION PLANNING  PURPOSES .................................................... 60  Appendix I ‐ Stakeholder Survey and Interviews ................................................................................................ 63  Appendix II ‐ Acknowledgments ......................................................................................................................... 67  Appendix III – Discussion Paper .......................................................................................................................... 68  Business Recruitment | Sunshine Coast Community Forest Focusing on Wood and Forest Value ........... 68  2 Market Position Statement ........................................................................................................................... 71  3 Identify Business Wish List ........................................................................................................................... 71  4 Create a Supportive Business Environment ................................................................................................ 73  5 Make the Environment Appealing ............................................................................................................... 73  6 Overcome Barriers to Business Investment in the Area ............................................................................ 74  7 Offer Incentives, not the kind you think ..................................................................................................... 74  8 Assemble the Creative .................................................................................................................................. 75  9 Deliver your story .......................................................................................................................................... 75  10 Assemble the Package ................................................................................................................................. 76  11 Being Site Specific ....................................................................................................................................... 76  12 Generate Leads ............................................................................................................................................ 76  13 Prospecting .................................................................................................................................................. 78  14 Personal Visits .............................................................................................................................................. 78  15 The FAM‐iliarization Tour or the “Quad Cab” ........................................................................................... 79  16 Make the Pitch ............................................................................................................................................. 79  17 Close the Deal .............................................................................................................................................. 79  18 The Move...................................................................................................................................................... 80  19 The Start ....................................................................................................................................................... 80  20 What to expect when you’re expecting .................................................................................................... 80  21 Repeat the Process ...................................................................................................................................... 80  Appendix IV – Survey Results ............................................................................................................................. 81  Appendix V – Focus Group Results ................................................................................................................... 120  Appendix VI – Raw Log Exports Explanation .................................................................................................... 123  Vancouver, September 26, 2011 .............................................................................................................. 123 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 8 Submitted to the Province of British Columbia on behalf of the Truck Loggers Association (TLA)   September 15, 2011 ................................................................................................................................. 123  Log exports: The reality ............................................................................................................................ 123  How do we best apply the existing policy to meet current objectives? ................................................... 124  A Common Problem ................................................................................................................................. 124  Coastal Log Demand ................................................................................................................................. 125  Policy Vision .............................................................................................................................................. 126  To Contact the TLA: .................................................................................................................................. 126  Appendix VII – Remarks by Executive Director  Russ Cameron ........................................................................ 127  Professional Resume ............................................................................................................................................ 5  Capital EDC Economic Development Company Patrick Nelson Marshall BES SURP | Economic Developer .... 5    ii. Table of Figures Figure 1 Triple Bottom Line Approach to Sustainability ..................................................................................... 24  Figure 2 New Zealand Relationship between target dimensions and key indicators......................................... 25  Figure 3 Economic Dependency Changes from 1991 to 2006 – Sunshine Coast ............................................... 28  Figure 4 District of Sechelt Strategic Plan 2012 ‐ 2014 ...................................................................................... 29  Figure 5 Blueplanet Value Management System Trademark ............................................................................. 57  iii. List of Tables Table 1 International Standard Industrial Classification of All Economic Activities (ISIC) .................................. 31  Table 2 Sechelt Draft Sustainability Plan Section 2 Thriving Economy ............................................................... 37  Table 3 Community Forest Economic Diversification Issues | Opportunities Long List ..................................... 54  Table 4 Community Forest Economic Diversification Issues | Opportunities Short List .................................... 55  Table 5 Community Forest Economic Diversification Focus Areas ..................................................................... 55  Table 6 Community Forest Economic Diversification Strategic Priority Work Program .................................... 56  Table 7 Blueplanet Sustainability Check Up Categories ..................................................................................... 57  Table 8 Community Forest Economic Diversification Strategic Dashboard ....................................................... 58  Table 9 Plan Implementation Draft Budget Estimates ....................................................................................... 60  Table 10 Plan Investments in Community Capacity and Infrastructure Estimated Budgets .............................. 62     
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 9 January 21st , 2011   Glen Bonderud  Chair, Economic Development Committee  Sechelt Community Projects Inc.  Sunshine Coast Community Forest  201 |204 ‐ 5606 Wharf Avenue PO Box 215  Sechelt, British Columbia  CANADA V0N 3A0  Via email  Subject: Sunshine Coast Community Forest Corporation Recruitment Management Plan  Dear Mr. Bonderud:  My understanding of the objectives of this investment program includes the following two  points:  ‐ The Community Forest Corporation has established a "Community Forest Economic  Opportunities Fund" to help foster and create economic development opportunities on the  Sunshine Coast;  ‐ These funds need to be leveraged by in‐kind and cash contributions by other organizations  to aid in achieving the overarching goal of encouraging the creation of new ventures which  will create economic benefits in the form of new property tax revenue, new employment  opportunities in terms of direct, indirect and induced jobs; and tangible secondary benefits  that are visible to the shareholder, the District of Sechelt and their constituents.  In support of this, Capital EDC Economic Development Company delivered a Decision Paper  entitled “Business Recruitment | Sunshine Coast Community Forest” in which 21 steps to  achieve successful recruitment of investment are outlined. Our initial consultation and  subsequent conversations have made me aware that there are divergent expectations  from a variety of interests in your community and I will be sensitive to those expectations  as we move through the process.   I am also aware of the need to ensure that technology and process built for this plan are  constructed by people who hold a business license in your jurisdiction and are located in  the region in which the wood is sourced. I will do my best to ensure that resident  businesses and qualified suppliers are given every opportunity to fulfill the requirements of  this plan.  The purpose of this letter of engagement is to outline the details of the services to be  provided by our company in facilitating an in‐depth program from identifying prospective  partners through to building the pieces and resources required in each step. This can best  be accomplished by the preparation of a Management Plan that will detail the  requirements of the Community Forest Corporation and others and the scope of detail  required for each stage.  I would also advise that when we have completed the plan, there will be assignments for a  variety of organizations and people. I will also identify which elements of the Plan I can  deliver under a separate agreement for implementation. My role at this point is to review 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 10 resources, conduct interviews, shape the framework and make recommendations to your  committee. Other roles and deliverables may arise as we move through the process.  I have included a work plan that will cover off a six month period. My fee for the attached  is $10,000.00 plus HST. I expect that the majority of the work will be completed by remote  communication and that any travel and accommodation to Sechelt required by the  Committee will be arranged by the Corporation, with the exception of mileage and per  diem expenses which will be submitted for approval. Please also find a copy of references  for your use.  I would appreciate a signed copy of this communication sent to my efacsimile  at +1 866 827‐1524 at your earliest convenience. Thank you very much for the opportunity.  Yours truly,  Capital EDC Economic Development Company    Patrick Nelson Marshall  Economic Developer  Capital EDC Economic Development Company    As to concurrence:      Accepted this date, January 25, 2011  Glen Bonderud  Chair  Sunshine Coast Community Forest Corporation  Economic Development Committee  Date January  25, 2011      
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 11 This page left intentionally blank     
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 12 iv. Briefing Note DATE:    May 2012  PREPARED FOR:   Dave Lasser RPF, General Manager  Topic:    Community Forest Economic Diversification Plan  Capital EDC Economic Development Company was engaged to develop an approach to economic development  for the Economic Development Committee of Sechelt Community Projects Inc. with respect to determining the  relevance and feasibility of engaging in continued and coordinated economic development and diversification.  The following report documents the findings of Capital EDC’s Economic Developer.  Issue:      What should the Economic Diversification efforts of the Sechelt Community Projects       Inc. look like?  The report demonstrates that coordinated and effective economic and diversification efforts are possible for  the Sunshine Coast Community Forest Corporation, with some refinements to the process, terms of reference,  relationships and resources at hand. The work completed to‐date is useful to bring forward into more  conventional economic development frameworks. The Board of Directors, elected in November of 2011 will  deliberate on the findings of this assessment and select the next course of action subject to a recommendation  by the President and General Manager.  Background:    The Economic Development Committee engaged Capital EDC Economic Development Company to develop an  economic development strategy at which revenues from Community Forest Operations were to be applied.  Patrick Marshall, Consulting Economic Developer visited the community on a number of occasions in the  spring and summer of 2011 to shop the communities, conduct primary research and to develop what has  become an economic diversification strategy for the Community Forest Corporation.  A decision to defer the delivery of the final plan after local government elections was made and the final  report and plan summary have been presented for review by the Committee and the staff of SCPI.  Discussion:  The financial resources available to the Corporation have been applied to sustaining the organization during a  low revenue period. Time is required to rebuild the financial resources to be deployed in this plan.    RECOMMENDATION:  The recommended option is to proceed with the first stage of the plan and develop the relationships and  communications required in order to proceed with the investment of revenues over time.  PREPARED BY:   Patrick N. Marshall  Economic Developer  Capital EDC Economic Development Company  DATE: May 2012      APPROVED/ENDORSED BY     DATE:     SIGNED BY: 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 13 1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1.1 Environmental Scan Sechelt Community Projects Inc. [SCPI] was established during a time when local governments were seeking,  as they still do, alternate means of revenue. Local Government proceeded through various stages of  considering Casino’s, Port Development, Airport Development, Economic Development and other means of  receiving revenue than property tax. Another factor in the establishment of a separate and autonomous  community owned corporation was to be able to enter into third‐party development opportunities that are  not considered core services in the local government context and to ensure that these investments would be  free of cronyism, responsible not transparent, and accountable for decisions in the public interest.  Most community Forest organizations in British Columbia are designed to reinvest in the Community Forest,  any proceeds from the sale of wood. Sechelt Community Projects Inc. has taken the step that they wish to  reinvest in the regions Forest based economy with a view to diversifying the region’s economy, in the long  term, from its dependency on transfer payments associated with the social supports from governments  associated with retirement. It is reported that the Sunshine Coast economic base is dependent on more than  93% of local government taxes derived from residential use which places this regional economy amongst the  highest dependent regional economies in Canada.  Public perception of Community Forests gets commandeered by political and partisan interests associated  with the Major Tenure holders in British Columbia, with a focus on the export of raw logs. Industrial and  Trade Union perceptions are changing to recognize that the export of raw logs supports long term  employment objectives for the Forest Sector. This notion, combined with the fundamentals of Community  Forest management revolving around “local” control of provincially held resources, creates great  expectations for locally owned and operated organizations.  In a recent address to delegates at the Union of BC Municipalities, Russ Cameron, CEO of the Independent  Wood Processors Association of British Columbia shared the following view of his organizations current  standing:  “Update on the state of BC’s family owned, non‐tenured wood processors.  “Forty years ago, formed the Independent Wood Processors Association, or IWPA (formerly ILRA)   “We are all family owned, none of us have been given the renewable right to harvest the public’s timber, and  we all buy our wood fibre on the open market at prevailing market prices.  “We are currently working with the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada, Natural  Resources Canada, and the Government of British Columbia on the implementation of the European  Economic Union’s Legal Harvest legislation, similar pending legislation in Australia and China, possible  changes to the United States of America’s Lacey Act, the current Australian anti‐dumping investigation, log  export policy, consultations on the CETA, British Columbia Timber Sales, Category 2, Soft Wood Lumber  Agreement extension or expiry, and the British Columbia Interior Softwood Lumber Agreement Arbitration to  name a few of the issues.    “So how are we doing?  “I am sure that you are all aware that we are in serious trouble and no doubt some of you have lost some  family owned businesses in your communities.  “Prior to the Soft Wood Lumber Agreement 2006 with the United States, our association had 120 members  employing over 4000 British Columbians.  “We have now lost 37 companies to bankruptcy or voluntary closure and most of the remaining members are  running between 40% and 50% capacity and are presently hanging on by their finger nails.1                                                                     1  Russ Cameron, CEO Independent Wood Processors Association of British Columbia September 27 th , 2011 Vancouver, British Columbia 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 14 This is not to say that the Forest Industry in British Columbia is dead, just that the expectation that wood  processors are in fact ready to expand their operations in the foreseeable future is not a reasonable  expectation for any regional diversification plan. There are many other constituent myths that blur the  realities of a locally managed resource that are fed by partisan political dogma, however, SCPI continues to  rise above the uninformed and manages to fulfill its relevant mandate for its shareholder, the District of  Sechelt.   In fact, the previous SCPI Manager Mr. Kevin Davies and the Chair of the Board of Directors did visit with a  Vancouver Island based manufacturer and pitched the prospects of opening a second operation in the Hillside  precinct of the Regional District in 2009 at exactly the right time. Unfortunately, the conditions changed and  that opportunity evaporated. This demonstrates that SCPI is exactly the right organization to be prospecting  for new wood and forest related business.  So what does that leave SCPI in terms of demonstrating Value for Money derived from the harvest of local  wood? Essentially, the Corporation can influence the reputation of the region for both Wood use and Forest  Use. Each has a distinct impact on the long term process of reducing the dependency on residential tax base  by growing both the Wood Use and Forest Use sectors of the regional economy.  1.2 Plan Objective The objective of this plan is to review the current state of the Community Forest values, products and  services, identify key factors influencing related wood and forest use business opportunities and identify the  typical land use and infrastructure required for such businesses. The results of the plan will be used to guide  the further development and strengthen the regional economy.  The Overarching Plan Governance statements for both the organization and the forest are:  Sechelt Community Projects Inc. exists to optimize the value of locally and regionally owned resources, for  taxpayers, residents and constituents of the Sunshine Coast.  The Sunshine Coast Community Forest exists for people who value forests, trees, non‐timber values, woods  and the culture associated with resource management.  1.3 Assessment of Opportunities The analytical phase of the plan was completed in two parts; initially a review and analysis of existing  economic, demographic, and regional data and plans to identify important characteristics and trends,  including economic development and associated opportunities for wood and forest use business  development; and secondly the Consulting Economic Developer completed a series of stakeholder interviews.   The findings are summarized in the following paragraphs.  Existing Strategies and Operations Several factors were found to be influencing the ability of SCPI to deliver on its Wood and Forest use  mandates. These include:  1. The public expectation that all wood harvested by SCPI is to be purchased by businesses located in the  region;  2. The reality that the local Community Forest Corporation, SCPI can and does work with purchasers located  in the region to meet their solid wood needs;   3. There are studies, upon studies, of the subject of economic development, value added investment, and  foreign direct investment for the Sunshine Coast. Unfortunately, none of these studies are scalable to be  of relevance to the rapid and instant changes in the economic condition that enables business retention,  expansion or recruitment in diversification opportunities related to wood and forest use;  4. Sechelt Community Projects Inc. does not have the financial or governance capacity to engage their  existing volunteers or staff in full‐time economic diversification activity. In addition, the four principal  local and aboriginal governments have not decided on how to engage in full‐time economic  development.  
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 15 Therefore, implementation of the plan will be restricted to Board direction and Executive fulfillment of  decisions implemented by means of either a direct financial investment in leveraged efforts by third‐ parties under Letters of Expectation, or third‐party fulfillment by consultants under the supervision of  the General Manager of the Corporation.  Stakeholder Interviews Stakeholder interviews indicated that the following topics were the most frequently mentioned factors in  influencing the investment of Economic Diversification fund dollars by SCPI in a targeted manner:  1. A strong desire by the Board of Directors and staff to work with existing local organizations such as the  local and aboriginal governments, Chambers of Commerce, Community Futures, and other initiatives that  promote the Sunshine Coast;  2. The existence of an economic development task force that would be a good place for SCPI to partner in  wood and forest use promotion;  3. Prospects for developing a higher level of wood and forest use awareness through direct partnerships  and  investments  with  individual  community  organizations  such  as  the  Sechelt  Groves  Society  and  Sunshine Coast Bed and Breakfast, Cottage Owners Association, the Greater Vancouver Real Estate Board  Local Brokers, the Sunshine Coast Trails Society, and the Mountain Bike Program at Capilano University  Sechelt Campus;  Opportunities Most Relevant to the Sunshine Coast Community Forest The results of the analytical analysis and stakeholder interviews indicated that the following opportunities  represented the most promising Initiatives for the SCPI economic diversification mandate:  1. An independent wood and forest use web portal designed to tell the stories of the people that value  wood and forest use to be developed on a contract basis providing access and controls to the individual  groups that SCPI partners with;  2. Small matching capital investment in the Sechelt Groves Society, in addition to upgrading the collateral  materials and tools required for fundraising for the Groves trails and communication efforts;  3. Small matching capital investment in the Sunshine Coast Trails Society initiative to establish a sustainable  operating framework for the development of the outdoor recreation industry opportunities associated  with a regional Trail system, including the addition of the influence iof the Board of Directors of SCPI in  inviting corporate interests to participate in the completion of the regional trail system;   4. Participation  in  the  business  retention  and  expansion  operations  specifically  focused  on  the  wood  industry resident in the region to focus on the “sell local” approach to building the market for Sun Coast  Wood products, services and intellectual property, but not as an isolated effort, only as a partner in a  bigger regional effort;   5. Participation in the foreign direct investment and recruitment of new business to the Sunshine Coast  with  a  focus  on  solid  wood  use  and  access  to  public  forest  lands  as  a  contribution  to  the  regional  Manufacturing and Processing capacity and the Hospitality Industry that exists in the region. Again, as a  partner and not a sole initiator; and;  6. Participation  in  a  region  wide  effort  with  peer  group  community  forest  organizations  in  an  effort  to  create  a  regional  community  forest  portrait  suitable  for  inclusion  in  the  British  Columbia  Community  Forests “Bridges” initiative.  1.4 Diversification Options The 2012 Sun Coast Wood Economic Diversification Plan acknowledges that at the present time the  community forest corporation does not have the necessary infrastructure (sustaining revenue, staff capacity,  or skill sets) in place to implement this plan or any economic diversification strategy outside its forest  management mandate. The result of the stakeholder interviews conducted for this study validated the  importance of partnership and leadership.  
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 16 However, constituents and residents of the Sunshine Coasts vast and diverse groups of neighbuorhood’s need  to be understand that the mere existence of a community forest tenure does not lead to instant investment  in the form of wood manufacturers and processors in the short‐run.  The provision of limited dollars  generated by the sale of local wood to retention and recruitment efforts alone is insufficient to attract new  business to the community because the forest and solid wood sector is still recovering from the full effects of  the waves of economic recession. The Sunshine Coast is competing with existing manufacturing‐processing  and hospitality infrastructure where existing capacity can be used more intensely, expanded more quickly, or  at a cheaper cost than providing new services on the Sunshine Cast.    Two main areas were identified regarding ways to address diversification risks. They involve consideration of  the following factors:  1. How much the Community Forest organization can implement on its own;  2. How much the Community Forest Corporation can initiate with the participation of other organizations.  The results of the review of existing operations and consultation with stakeholders clearly indicate that a  broader range of partnered initiatives would improve the success of diversification efforts. The uses to  consider include ‘wood use manufacturing and processing’ and ‘forest use’ businesses.   1.5 Recommendations To address the opportunities profiled in this time and space, this plan makes recommendations in the  following areas:  1. Short‐term  actions  include  (a)  new  communications  tools  to  define  wood  and  forest  use  awareness  created by the Community Forest, (b) the broadcast of stories by residents and newcomers that share  the  same  values,  (c)  establishing  Letters  of  Understanding  with  the  Sechelt  Groves  Society  and  the  Sunshine Coast Trails Society; and;  2. Long‐term actions include the negotiation of Memoranda of Understanding with each of the four local  and  aboriginal  governments,  economic  development  task  force,  community  organizations  and  independent businesses with respect to wood and forest use strategies designed to diversify the regional  economy.  Short‐term Action (a) New communications tools to define wood and forest use awareness created by the Community Forest through the creation of a stand‐alone web site for the Sun Coast Wood and Forest Initiative ‐ Complete  a  branding  strategy.  Suitable  organizations  would  include  the  local  and  regional  societies  surveyed,  Capilano  University  and  an  open  call  to  residents  and  business  owners  in  the  region.  The  maintenance of the web site will be sustained by low cost subscription fees whereby, the users are given  full managed access to the resource section, blogs and most wanted sections with current information  and contact details for opportunities relevant to the wood and forest use in the region.  ‐ Work with the other Community Forests in the Eco Region to build the profile for the BC Community  Forest Association Bridges project.  ‐ Work with local and regional partners to identify 1 quarterly event to coat tail efforts to inform, educate  and train the residents of the coast in the value of wood and community forests.  (b) The broadcast of stories by residents and newcomers that share the same values ‐ Work with existing community media and interest groups to provide opportunities to enumerate stories  related to wood culture and forest use.    ‐ Determine who the local champions are for each subject area and determine who the subject matter  experts are.  ‐ Develop  broadcast  media  including  digital  video,  audio,  print  for  unique  distribution  using  local  producers.  
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 17 ‐ Partner with all regional media outlets to determine how best to grow the product.  ‐ Train the trainers in understanding the vocabulary and culture of solid wood use and forest uses.  (c) Establishing Letters of Understanding with the Sechelt Groves Society and the Sunshine Coast Trails Society ‐ Develop  separate  Letters  of  Understanding  that  address  the  values  of  partnering  with  both  local  organizations  ‐ Both  organizations  speak  to  forest  use  values.  Use  this  experience  to  build  the  wood  use  value  experience.  Long‐term Action ‐   Bring forward the longer term subjects upon the completion of the short term in 2012.   
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 18   This page left intentionally blank   
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 19 2.0 INTRODUCTION 2.1 Purpose of the Project The  Sechelt  Community  Projects  Inc.  [SCPI]  Economic  Diversification  Committee  is  undertaking  work  to  establish an economic diversification plan for the Sunshine Coast Community Forest as part of its objectives  for community fulfillment.   This will examine the factors that drive the community values associated with the  forest,  the  trees,  the  harvest,  non‐timber values  and  ultimately,  the  values  derived from  wood harvested  sustainably in the forests. We will also define how values are derived in order to assist the public and private  sectors in better understanding the value of Community Forests.  This plan will review the current state of the Community Forest values, products and services identify key  factors influencing related business market opportunities and identify the typical land use and infrastructure  required  for  such  businesses.  The  results  of  the  plan  will  be  used  to  guide  the  further  development  and  strengthen the regional economy.  The success of this project will depend on the input and participation of the many residents, stakeholders,  government  representatives  and  aboriginal  government  representatives  affected  by  this  community  and  region wide opportunity.  Your cooperation in helping us carry out this work will enable us to make this plan a  success.   2.2 Plan Statements include: Overarching Plan Governance: Plans have a direct relationship to the Board of Directors and senior staff person that adopt them. In order for  people outside the process to understand what a plan is about, they are expressed as statements. In this  case, there is a plan statement for the organization and one for the Community Forest:  “Sechelt Community Projects Inc. exists to optimize the value of locally and regionally owned  forest and wood resources, for taxpayers, residents and constituents of the Sunshine Coast.”    “The Sunshine Coast Community Forest exists for people who value forests, trees, non‐timber  values, woods and the culture associated with resource management.”  Plan Vision: The vision for this plan is to work on a regional level to amplify all community forest efforts for the benefit of  all.  Suitable plan vision to describe the value of this plan would be:  “In the next thirty six months, The Sunshine Coast will be recognized nationally for redefining how  people  see  and  use  wood  from  Community  Forests,  will  have  a  partnership  consisting  of  3  of  4  prospective Community Forest Corporations from the same coastal eco‐zone profile and will and  hold supplier, producer and buyer events twice annually.”  Our Plan Mission: The Plan only has one mission. However, to understand the Plan mission, the organization and community  forest mission’s must be stated so that third‐party’s can see how they link:  “The economic diversification plan exists to optimize the value of trees and wood harvested from  Community Forests on the Sunshine Coast, increasing the return on investment, value for money  and will benefit tax payers and shareholders by demonstrating the value of community.”   “Sechelt Community Projects Inc. was founded to help people understand the value of Community  owned and operated resource management.”  “The core business of this community corporation is to profitably manage public tenures, exceeding  Government of British Columbia objectives and standards, and to provide harvested wood products  and services to the market.”  
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 20 Sunshine Coast Community Forest Market Position Objectives: The following are objectives derived from the list of Sunshine Coast Community Forest Objectives that the  economic diversification plan will address. They include:  Support and increase local jobs This plan approaches job retention, expansion and recruitment in all five industrial sectors. It will also link and  demonstrate how these five categories work in tandem at any given time. This Plan does not pick winning  sectors, but rather, assists the Corporation and community in moving forward in tandem.  Community Involvement Community Involvement at this level is interpreted to mean community organizations that choose to partner  with SCPI in developing an economic diversification plan.  Promote community participation The economic diversification plan will track and report out on all units of values measured in the Plan from  Forest, Timber, Non‐Timber Value to Wood uses.  Promote recreation within the Community Forest The Plan will communicate, market and advocate recreational uses in the Forest, as well as connections to a  regional system of trails, botanical inventories and recorded animal sightings.   Educate community about forest resources The  education  program  at  this  level  requires  connecting  public  schools  to  post‐secondary  programs  and  designing a system where residents have opportunities to receive training and education in Forest work force  occupations and retain the opportunity to work in the region.  Communications program The economic diversification plan communications program will focus on real people through testimonials  and story‐telling.  Economic Development In this context, tactics from community development, community economic development and pure economic  development will be deployed on a number of levels to optimize and energize the economic diversification  plan.  Promote value‐added manufacturing The day for value added manufacturing in the commodity market based huge planer mills and mega lumber  mills has passed. The volume of wood required to support such an investment is more than 500,000 m3,  when the local available is pegged currently at 20,000 m3. However, this economic diversification plan will  demonstrate wood use on multiple levels, driven by industry and commercial examples.  Support non‐timber product activities Taking  a  page  from  the  Botanical  Gardens  Society  recent  success  in  building  community  support,  the  economic diversification plan will engage a variety of organizations, some resident, and others regional, to  build a wider community of people that value the non‐timber opportunities offered by Community Forests.  2.3 Approach and Methodology The Plan is divided into 5 basic stages which commenced in July 2011: 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 21 Research Stage 1 Stage 1 involved the surveying of people to inform the strategy. Surveys of a number of small groups took place before  the Plan could be set. The results of these conversations inform the Plan and aid the Committee in being certain about  the course of work.  Strategy Stage 2 Each interview and survey provided a unique insight into what is and what is not possible. Members of the Committee  have initiated this process by inviting the owner of one of the companies they do business with to Sechelt from  Vancouver to take a look at a number of opportunities and provide his insight to the Committee.  Each of the functions defined in the Glossary of Terms requires evaluation as to the feasibility of application in Sechelt.  This is done by process of elimination in discussion with the people interviewed in stage 1. The purpose of this stage is to  focus on 3 or 4 key functions that will become targets for the Plan. The list is maintained in its entirety in the Appendix so  that as the plan rolls forward and targets are fulfilled, they can be replaced with other functions from the list in an orderly  fashion.  Building Stage 3 This stage may be started prior to the completion of the previous stage. Each stage may be concurrent as opposed to  sequential. Web Sites, communications plans, engagements strategies and other functional tools get deployed from the  day that the Plan hits the Committee table.  Narratives, testimonials and referrals are all a part of stages 1 and 2, but their real usefulness is in Building the look and  feel of the Plan. The qualities that make up the Sechelt Brand are derived from the conversations taking place at all levels.  By engaging someone from outside the community, the Committee stands a better chance of hearing the unique features  of the Forest, the Wood and the people that value both.  Implementation Stage 4 For this Plan, implementation will be concurrent and mapped out along with budgets and resource requirements. Some  elements may not be implemented for lack of resources. Others will move ahead due to the availability of volunteered  and in‐kind contributions.  Assessment and Reposition Stage 5 The Plan is designed to be assessed quarterly and metrics will need to be designated so that the Plan is SMARTER:  Letter   Major Term   Minor Terms  S   Specific     Significant, Stretching, Simple  M   Measurable   Meaningful, Motivational, Manageable  A   Attainable   Appropriate, Achievable, Agreed, Assignable, Actionable, Action‐ oriented,           Ambitious, Aligned  R   Relevant    Realistic, Results/Results‐focused/Results‐oriented, Resourced, Rewarding  T   Time‐bound   Time‐oriented, Time framed, Timed, Time‐based, Time boxed, Timely, Time‐Specific,         Timetabled, Time limited, Track able, Tangible  E   Evaluate     Ethical, Excitable, Enjoyable, Engaging, Ecological  R   Re‐evaluate   Rewarded, Reassess, Revisit, Recordable, Rewarding, Reaching    To identify appropriate targets for repositioning of the plan (social, economic, environmental & governance) for this  community, the Committee needs to first analyze deficits (or opportunities) by specific category. Those categories that  make market sense are then analyzed to make sure they fit into the niche, space utilization (specifically clustering) and  marketing (specifically target market). The Network will use the following criteria in finalizing our wish list:   Is there appropriate space in the area for this type of activity?   Will it complement existing activities?   Will it serve targeted segments of the community?   Does it fill an important gap in the social, economic, environmental and governance mix?   Will the activity strengthen an existing cluster of community interests?   Was this activity category identified as important in local and sub area research?   Does demand and supply data support the need for this type of activity? 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 22  Does the activity fit it with the market position and vision statements?  A short term assessment will be required prior to setting terms for the Value Management Plan  2.4 Assumptions & Limiting Factors There are many physical, legal, public and market constraints that govern the Sun Coast Wood Economic  Diversification Plan and impact the plan recommendations. As the development of the community forest  proceeds, the impact of these constraints should shape and influence the effectiveness of the plan tactics.  Changes in development tactics should be expected over the longer term.  Development and land use at the community forest is impacted by federal, provincial and local government  legislation, regulations and bylaws, but not limited to:  a. Federal: Canadian Environmental Assessment Act.  b. Provincial: Agricultural Land Commission, Environmental Management Act, Land Title Act,  Local Government Act.  c. Local: District of Sechelt Official Community Plan and the Sunshine Coast Regional District  Official Community Plan.  This report does not contain a financial analysis describing the impact of the plan on the cost of Community  Forest operations, or customer service levels. Rather, the intent of the plan is directional in nature.  It puts  forward specific measures that could be taken should policy makers decide to pursue various tactics for  increasing diversification activity and further Wood and Forest use development. An assessment of the  benefits of implementing any of the plan measures will need to be balanced with the willingness and ability  of Wood and Forest beneficiaries to share in costs that may be associated with development, or  improvements. It is also important to note that financial resources available to apply to the plan will change  over time. Thus, the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. Board of Directors will need to be mindful of such  changes before initiating any plan efforts.  The report needs to be considered in its entirety; information in individual sections should be considered in  the context of the scope of work and the purpose of this plan. The information contained in the various  sections may or may not be suitable for reproduction as a stand‐alone document. If, for any reason, should  major changes occur, the findings and recommendations contained in the plan team’s analysis should be  reviewed.     
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 23 3.0 PROJECT CONTEXT 3.1 Regional Economic Summary When this work was commissioned in January of 2011, there was an expectation that the result would take  the form of an economic development plan or strategy. Through extensive consultation it was decided by the  Economic Development Committee that a focus plan be prepared that incorporates interests in wood and  forest values.  A review of documents predating this work revealed a number of interests in pursing the diversification of  the wood and forest uses in the region.  “Diversification  Diversification  has  become  a  critical  objective  as  the  traditional  resource  base  of  the  economy  changes. Residents of the Sunshine Coast desire an economy that is stable, sustainable, competitive  and provides opportunities for all. Importantly, diversification  can occur  within as well as  across  sectors.  Opportunities  are  available  in  growing  sectors  such  as  tourism  and  high‐tech,  but  diversification can also occur in traditional sectors like forestry.    “Sustainable Development  The Sunshine Coast recognizes the value of the natural environment as an asset in the continued  sustainable  development  of  the  community.  Sustainable  development  will  attach  limits  to  production  and  consumption  so  that  the  choices  of  the  next  generation  are  not  impaired.  If  we  overharvest or over‐pollute, we are eroding the foundation of our future economic opportunities.  Sustainable  development  can  also  include  community  heritage,  local  arts  and  cultural  resources,  indigenous crafts and skills, and folklore, all of which contribute to the quality of life gained from  social and cultural diversity.” 2   For the purposes of this plan, the following graphic will represent the definition of sustainability:                                                                        2   Community Economic Development Strategic Plan Lower Sunshine Coast, Lions Gate Consulting Inc., Vancouver, British Columbia,  CANADA September 2002 pp. 10 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 24 Figure 1 Triple Bottom Line Approach to Sustainability    3   Unfortunately, this graphic excludes the fourth pillar known as “Governance”. This is a key element in the  fundamental advantage of a local Community Forest Corporation: Local Control of Resources. The  opportunity to influence decision making on growth, harvest and the investment of proceeds locally is one of  the key advantages to Community Forests to any local or regional community. Understanding the scope of  sustainability in this context is also important.  In 2008, the Government of New Zealand revisited some of its definitions and produced the following graph.                                                                        3  http://www.gcbl.org/economy 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 25 Figure 2 New Zealand Relationship between target dimensions and key indicators   4   The details identified in the 2002 Regional Strategy included:   Supporting a proposed Wood Innovation Centre   Investigate opportunities associated with International Forests operations; and;   Develop a value added land use zone and provide supportive infrastructure.  By 2011, the outlook for value added manufacturing and development has declined to the state described by  Russ Cameron, Executive Director of the Independent Wood Processors Association of British Columbia  address to the Mayors at UBCM 2011. This means that short term expectations for investment in wood  manufacturing and business infrastructure on the Sunshine Coast should be positioned as a long term goal.  Defining the regional economic scan for this region was facilitated by recent presentations.  There was a transfer of responsibility from the Government of Canada to the Government of British Columbia  in 2009 which resulted in a gap in workforce and human resource development information for many areas in  British Columbia. Fortunately, local organizations such as the Sunshine Coast Credit Union and the Sunshine  Coast Community Foundation steeped up to ensure that business case information is available in the interim.  Vital Signs is a review of socio‐economic factors released October 4th  2011 by the Sunshine Coast Community  Foundation. It reports on the key areas defined by the Community Foundation for its key areas of interest. It  is part of a National Strategy which is highly collaborative inside the community. It is important to note that  the report makes no assertions as to the negative or positive nature of the information. It is not a critical  review of core information required to make business decisions regarding investment in the region.  Highlights from this report pertinent to this plan include5 :                                                                    4  http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/environment/sustainable_development/key‐findings/further‐discussion‐on‐sustainable‐ development.aspx  
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 26  “Most pervasive theme is the aging of the population impacts life on the coast;   Demographics impact on the choices available to deal with challenges in the region;   Steady growth in population not by birth, but by immigration of 55‐65 increasing 20% in ten  years;   Trend is greater on the Sunshine Coast than in the lower mainland and in Canada;   Decline in the number of students in the school system;   Capilano University is the destination of choice for local graduates;   Higher rate of alcohol and drug use in school students than the provincial average;   Challenges for young adults in their twenties and out migration of young adults;   VOICE survey indicates lack of entertainment and education facilities causes of migration;   Living wage the same as metro Vancouver and slightly higher than metro Victoria;   Affordable and special needs housing is a concern.”6   One of the many local initiatives facilitated by the Community Foundation was the establishment of a Task  Group focused on the plight of young adults on the Coast, one of those challenges identified in the Vital Signs  Report 2011.   “On May 14, 2010, the Foundation organized a workshop with over 50 participants representing all  segments of our community. The workshop expressed significant support for moving forward with a  community plan and partnership model  to  address the  problem. A task force was identified  and  appointed to work on the plan and partnerships, and to deliver this community plan as a result.”7   The Task Group is working on several actions which may coincide with some of the actions identified in the  Sun Coast Wood plan. The VOICE actions include8 :  1.   Develop  a  young  adult  branding  strategy  to  be  broadly  accepted  and  integrated  within  an  overall Coast‐wide brand, including:   High community potential and interest for post‐secondary expansion*;   Sustainability/outdoor lifestyle*;   Alternative educational options for children, including early years;   Home‐based/ Information Technology/ telecommunications innovation;   Labour market development for employment opportunities*;   Inclusion/welcome of young adults and families in local strategic plans*;   Entertainment and activities for young adults/”nightlife.”  2.   Establish  a  user‐generated  Sunshine  Coast  social  media  website  to  engage  residents,  attract  non‐residents, and to act as an interactive and influential branding platform*.  3.   Develop  VOICE  (focus  group  of  young  people  for  this  initiative)  into  an  Advisory  Council  for  sustained leadership, and “leadership pool” for further community input and engagement.  4.   Listen and learn about the strengths and opportunities of young adults living on the Coast*.  5.  Promote and encourage a vibrant nightlife for the younger generation.  6.   Promote and expand succession planning that is occurring on the coast*.  7.   Endorse a regional (Coast‐wide) economic development function.  8.   Support employment clusters “of excellence” such as Intelligence Services*.  9.   Form an integrated‐community Apprenticeships program*.  * Subjects of intersection                                                                                                                                                                                                        5   http://sccfoundation.com/vitalsigns/  6  Katherine Esson remarks at Sunshine Coast Credit Union breifing  7  http://www.voiceonthecoast.com/#b0f/custom_plain  8  http://dl.dropbox.com/u/2399326/Community%20Plan%20July%2015%202011.pdf 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 27 Central 1 Credit Union was engaged by the Sunshine Coast Credit Union to prepare a report on “The Future  Business Environment of the Sunshine Coast: A 10‐Year Forecast.” Mr. Helmut Pasterick, Chief Economist for  this organization that leads Credit Unions in both British Columbia and Ontario, reported his findings on  October 21st , 2011 to an audience hosted and sponsored by the Sunshine Coast Credit Union9 . The Credit  Union identifies the role of educating the public about factors influencing their local and regional economy as  being a key responsibility of the organization.  Key messages from this presentation included:  “Economic summary:   Economy less dependent on natural resources, more service industry‐oriented economic base   Businesses are smaller sized, reflecting a smaller market    Long‐term decline in primary industry jobs; mainly forestry, fishing;   Port Mellon mill largest employer   A significant number of workers commute or have no fixed workplace address   Some concentration in primary resources, mining, construction   Services industry concentration limited to retail trade and arts, entertainment, and recreation   Economy  largely  dependent  on  external  factors  for  growth  with  some  lift  from  local  growth  conditions   Construction and real estate at cyclical high in 2006; accounts for much of measured regional  shift or local growth advantage   Large local growth advantage in retail trade   Local growth conditions positive for IC (information and cultural), ASW (administrative / support  / waste management), and PST (professional/technical/scientific) industries   Accommodation‐food  services  a  growth  laggard  –  measurement  issues  or  underlying  shortcomings?   Relatively high dependence on non‐employment income (pensions, dividends/interest, annuities,  etc.) and transfer payments (CPP, OAS, GIS, EI, etc.)   Higher growth phases associated with higher in‐migration, expansion in real estate activity, and  more construction to meet higher residential and non‐residential space demands   Local economy currently in low‐growth phase”  This economic dependency slide from Mr. Pasterick’s presentation illustrates one of the single most  important messages to residents who may or may not be owners of small businesses on the coast, or, for the  most part, are, or have been employees and may not understand how the local economy works. It shows that  the Forest economy is as important to the sustainability of the region as Financial Transfers from  Governments to constituents in the form of EI and other social supports, and those transfer related to  retirement, pensions and other incomes.  This is not a positive indication for the future in that Government Transfers and Pension transfers do no  generate dollars for the region, they consume dollars. The only sector generating incom3 by means of exports  is the Forest Sector. Do not confuse this with the concerns over the export of raw logs. The ability of residents  to generate income for the future is restricted to a declining number of individuals carrying the burden of  supporting the rest of the citizens. This is not sustainable in the near future.                                                                                9  https://www.sunshineccu.com/Personal/AboutUs/WhatsNew/News/FutureBusinessEnvironment/ 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 28 Figure 3 Economic Dependency Changes from 1991 to 2006 – Sunshine Coast   10   It was also significant that Tourism or the Food Service and Hospitality segment of the retail economy does  not support the region economically. This is not to say that this segment cannot be grown over time,  however, significant infrastructure investments will be required to establish this segment as a supporter of  the region.  “Residential summary:   Housing sales and construction activity highly cyclical Large non‐local ownership of residential  properties;   Generates large seasonal increase in population   Majority of non‐local owners from lower mainland   Non‐local ownership highest (80%) in SCRD   Within incorporated areas, non‐local ownership highest in District of Sechelt   Current housing market conditions ‐ sales sliding lower, large number of listings on the market,  price weakness, low construction volume”  It was startling to hear that fifty percent of the ownership of single family homes is by absentee owners. The  percent is higher in rural electoral areas of the regional district. This typically results in a biased perception of  a vision for the community that conflicts with what the resident owners desire. This may account for some of  the rural urban differences in expectations for industrial versus no industrial maintenance or growth that  have been experiences in the region, such as the perceived anti‐forest harvest and anti‐fish framing lobby  from a few of the rural residents.                                                                    10   The Future Business Environment of the Sunshine Coast, Central 1 Credit Union in association with the Sunshine Coast Credit Union  October 21st, 2011 power point presentation H. Pasterick 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 29 “Forecast Summary to 2021:   Higher growth largely depends on stronger economy and housing markets in Metro Vancouver  and B.C. leading to more in‐migration and non‐local ownership activity   U.S. economy in sub‐par growth phase for another two or more years;    intensifying sovereign debt problems in Europe;   External  growth  outlook  improves  in  medium  and  longer  term  but  business  cycle  timing  uncertain;   Economy improves in second half of ten‐year forecast;   Local economy faces weak to modest growth in 2011 and 2012;   improves later in forecast period;   Higher  in‐migration  and  population  growth  drives  real  estate,  construction,  and  retail  employment.”  Mr. Pasterick recommends a number of economic development initiatives for the region:  1. Grow your Exports;  2. Encourage import substitution; and;  3. Promote and market the region.  Figure 4 District of Sechelt Strategic Plan 2012 ‐ 2014    The local government strategy is supported by this diversification plan as it works for the Vision, Mission and  the following Very Short Term Goals:  7. Contributes to the development of a business development process; and  11. Encourages the increased use of all venues such as the Hidden Grove and Trails.  High Impact – Short Term Goals: 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 30 1. Fostering Partnerships;  4. Supports outdoor recreational amenities | venues;  6. Promotes the Vision for Sechelt; and;  7. Fosters productive, accountable, effective and efficient local government.  3.2 Wood Products and Services The recent report authored by Central 1 Credit Union acknowledged that there is sufficient business to  support a solid wood segment of the Forest industry in the region.  “According to the Ministry of Forest and Range, seven mills operated in the SCRD in 2010 producing  pulp and paper, wood chips, and log homes. Since the 2002 permanent closure of the Bayside  Sawmills Ltd. in Port Mellon, the number of mills operating in the SCRD has remained constant.”11   In a report commission by Sechelt Community Partners Inc. in 2008, a researcher concluded that the wood  industry was comprised of a significant number of businesses which would attract the definition of a wood  cluster.  “The numbers of wood‐related business on the Sunshine Coast are estimated at 38 value‐recovery  businesses (including giftware, furniture, cabinetry, recyclers and others); 27 contractors (includes  new  home  builders  and  renovators);  5  lumber  wholesale/retailers;  and  12  architectural  and  engineering firms.  All are currently extremely busy.  Many contractors have building commitments  that extend for from one to several years.”12   The report further concluded that the 100 mile market is in effect in this region. Like the 100 mile diet, the  market analogy describes the relationship between harvesters and manufacturers located in the region.  “Most  purchase  their  wood  supply  dry  and  often  milled.    They  also  purchase  locally  whenever  possible.  With the production from the SCCF and from the log sorts located in Howe Sound, we have  available the raw logs necessary to meet all of their softwood and local hardwood needs.  However,  we currently do not have production scaled sawmills, kilns and milling machinery to produce the  materials they require.”13   The report fell short of realistic fulfillment of prospects. It was a platform to make the case for the Sechelt  Community Projects Inc. to spend more money on more consulting with no guarantee of a result. The report  speculated at manufacturing opportunities related to proximity to the resource.  “Short and long term phases for the development and enhancement of our value‐recovery wood  businesses are presented.  Businesses must consider larger markets than here.  Quality, pricing and  delivery  must  be  competitive  with  off‐coast  businesses.    A  feasibility  assessment  for  this  phase,  accompanied by the development of a business case is recommended.  The following should comprise the 2‐year short term phase    Supplying logs, Particularly cedar and fir, to sawyers;    establishing commercial scale dry kilns;   a truss plant;   a planer mill with related capabilities                                                                    11    The Future Business Environment of the Sunshine Coast, Central 1 Credit Union in association with the Sunshine Coast Credit Union  Vancouver, British Columbia, CANADA, October 21st, 2011 page 15  12     Pre‐feasibility Study for Value Recovery Business Opportunities on the Sunshine Coast, D.J. Gillis, Roberts Creek, British Columbia,  CANADA, March 2008 pp. 27  13   Pre‐feasibility Study for Value Recovery Business Opportunities on the Sunshine Coast, D.J. Gillis, Roberts Creek, British Columbia,  CANADA, March 2008 pp. 27 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 31  and the stocking of locally produced lumber.” 14    The D.J. Gillis report went further to acknowledge that the Sechelt Community {Project Inc. organization does  not have the capacity, the financial means or the full time employment to be the prospector for new business  in the region. The author may have meant that a consortium of organizations such as the Home and Away  Teams proposed in this plan be used to prospect for investors and operators.  “A consortium approach is recommended for the longer term from year 2 to year 7.  A dedicated  feasibility study should be undertaken at the end of year 2.  Co‐location of several related businesses  on a 10 to 15 acre lot in or near Sechelt is recommended.  Each business will be separately owned  and will be responsible for their finances, management and profit.  This structure will function to  decrease production costs through transportation savings and other synergistic effects.” 15   All of these expectations and goals require full‐time staff, annual financial investment in business  retention|expansion and recruitment operations that have yet to be established in the region.  3.3 Forest Products and Services Clearly, managed forestry will be a contributor to the regional economy of the Sunshine Coast for at least  another 250 years based on the supply estimates from the Government of British Columbia.  “The results of Forest Ministry timber supply analysis concluded the current Annual Allowable Cut  (AAC) of 1,140,000 cubic metres per year can be maintained for 250 years. As well, the analysis  shows that a harvest level of 1,233,000 cubic metres per year (8% higher than the current AAC) can  also be maintained for 250 years (maximum even‐flow). With either approach, a harvest level of  95,000 cubic metres per year can be maintained for 40 years in forests dominated by alder.” 16   The community benefits associated with the primary harvest result in high incomes for a few people that live  in the region. The primary harvest and resource extraction jobs are the most sought after in any region. It is  important to note that in spite of single interest groups misinformation and poorly informed media that use  terms like “Sunset Industry”, Forest sector work is still fundamental to the region.  What is needed in the context of a community forest is a new definition that focuses on “Non‐Timber” values.  For the purposes of this plan, the definition offered by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United  Nations 1995 will be used as follows:  "Non‐wood forest products include all goods of biological origin, as well as services, derived from  forest or any land under similar use, and exclude wood in all its forms" 17   Economic activities by definition associated with this definition include the following codes:  Table 1 International Standard Industrial Classification of All Economic Activities (ISIC)  ISIC Code Activity Description 0111   Growing of cereals and other crops n.e.c.; 0112   Growing of vegetables, horticultural specialities and nursery products; 0113   Growing of fruits, nuts, beverage and spice crops; 0122   Other animal farming; production of animal products, n.e.c.; 0150   Hunting, trapping and game propagation, including related service activities;  0200   Forestry, logging and related service activities; 1511   Production, processing and preserving of meat and meat products; 1513   Processing and preserving of fruits and vegetables; 1514   Manufacture of vegetables and animal oils and fats; 1549   Manufacture of other food products, n.e.c.;                                                                   14    Pre‐feasibility Study for Value Recovery Business Opportunities on the Sunshine Coast, D.J. Gillis, Roberts Creek, British Columbia,  CANADA, March 2008 pp.1‐2  15   Pre‐feasibility Study for Value Recovery Business Opportunities on the Sunshine Coast, D.J. Gillis, Roberts Creek, British Columbia,  CANADA, March 2008 pp.1‐2  16    The Future Business Environment of the Sunshine Coast, Central 1 Credit Union in association with the Sunshine Coast Credit Union  October 21 st , 2011 page 15  17    http://www.fao.org/docrep/v7540e/V7540e28.htm 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 32 ISIC Code Activity Description 1820   Dressing and dying of fur; manufacture of articles of fur; 1911   Tanning and dressing of leather; All classes under division 20  Manufacture of wood and of products of wood and cork; manufacture of articles of straw and plaiting  materials;  All classes under division 21   Manufacture of paper and paper products; 2423   Manufacture of pharmaceuticals, medicinal chemicals and botanical products;  2429   Manufacture of other chemical products, n.e.c.; 2519   Manufacture of other rubber products; 3699   Other manufacturing, n.e.c.; 9249   Other recreational activities; 9309   Other service activities, n.e.c. Source: http://www.fao.org/docrep/v7540e/V7540e28.htm   This does not mean that the growing of cereals is being recommended as a non‐timber value, but rather, the  starting point for discussing other “Forest” values that can be developed.  Other Forest uses include First Nation experience which was not assessed for this report and should be  brought forward in the near term when the SIB Shíshálh First Nation is ready to participate.   Another Forest value is the facilitation of direct and in—direct uses of the Forest associated with Tourism, or  Food Service and Hospitality. The Central 1 Credit Union report illuminated this sector as follows:  “Tourism is not a specific industry classification but rather a combination of several industries such  as  accommodation,  food,  transportation,  retail,  arts,  culture,  and  recreation.  The  Local  Area  Economic Dependency study identified tourism generating about 3% of the income in the Sunshine  Coast, down from 4 to 5% in previous Censuses. An estimated 600 to 800 persons were employed in  tourism in the SCRD using place of work data. Other than retail trade, the main industries in tourism  did not record local growth between 2001 and 2006 with accommodation and food coming in the  most negative. The majority of workers in retail serve the domestic market.” 18   Another use of the Forest is for education and training. The evaluation of outdoor education, applied science  and learning uses needs to be completed. This means more than the occasional field trip by elementary  students. Other regions are pursing resource management academies within the context of the public school  system tied to both regional post‐secondary and non‐resident post‐secondary partners.  Heritage and recreation Forest uses have also been identified for the region. While these uses may not  produce the income levels associated with growing, harvesting, processing and manufacturing solid wood,  they play an integral role in the livability of the region.  3.4 Comparison of Sunshine Coast to other Community Forests 3.4.1 Profile of Sunshine Coast Community Forest The Sechelt Community Projects Inc. organization was established in 2005 to facilitate the acquisition and  development of the Sunshine Coast Community Forest. The business model used was developed during a  period in British Columbia when arm’s length community owned and operated corporations were being  established to manage local infrastructure and resources. While there may have been some expectation by  the founders that this business model could manage multiple assets, the reality is that the revenue and risk  management profile provides for the management of a local harvest and no other core activities.  Who are we?  “The Sunshine Coast Community Forest (SCCF) is operated by Sechelt Community Projects Inc. (SCPI)  with the District of Sechelt being the sole shareholder of the Corporation.  SCPI holds and manages  the license as a BC company, incorporated on March 8, 2005. The volunteer Board of Directors is  made up of Sunshine Coast residents and come from a wide range of interests and skills required to                                                                    18    The Future Business Environment of the Sunshine Coast, Central 1 Credit Union in association with the Sunshine Coast Credit Union  October 21st, 2011 page 15 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 33 guide  the  Corporation.    The  SCCF  is  a  member  of  the  British  Columbia  Community  Forest  Association.  “The Beginning  Several attempts, including Community Futures and the SCRD, were made to apply for a Community  Forest under a Pilot Project process.   In 2003, The District of Sechelt reviewed the reasons why these other initiatives failed and embarked  on a different approach to the problem.  This action was instrumental in initiating the new Direct  Award Probationary process that has resulted in invitations to 28 other communities.  This effort was rewarded in not only successfully getting an application approved under the new  process,  but  they  were  one  of  the  first  in  the  Province  to  have  their  application  approved  and  granted a Community Forest Tenure license.  “What is a Community Forest?  It is an area based tenure issued by the Ministry of Forests under the Forest Act to a community or  Society.  The SCCF is a 25 year permanent tenure.  A Community Forest is an opportunity to manage a specified forest area, called "area based", and  sustainably harvest the timber in a way that benefits the community.  A  Community  Forest  is  managed  based  on  community  values.    The  challenge  in  managing  a  community forest is balancing all values and stakeholders needs in the community.  This includes  recreation, the environment, business, education and providing employment.” 19   On May 31st  of 2011, The Board of Directors of the Sunshine Coast Community Forest and the District of  Sechelt were pleased to announce that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations  approved a 25 year renewable Community Forest Agreement (CFA) tenure. The Tenure was effective  immediately and replaces the 5 year Probationary Community Forest Agreement (PCFA) tenure granted to  the District of Sechelt in 2006.  “The District of Sechelt saw the need for and benefits of having a community forest; an  economic endeavor that is now proving its economic as well as its recreational value to the  community.   “We would like to thank all those who have contributed greatly to the creation  and success of this operation: Mayor Inkster and council, past mayors and councils of  Sechelt; past chairs Mr. Len Pakulak and Mr. John Henderson; and past Operations Manager  Mr. Kevin Davie,” said Glen Bonderud, Chairperson of the Board of Sechelt Community  Projects Incorporated (SCPI), the company that operates the Sunshine Coast CFA on behalf  of the District of Sechelt.  “As we look to the future, we will be working with the community to build relationships and  a better understanding of all positions and opinions related to the management of the Community  Forest.  “Our aim is to foster a better understanding of the economic, social, environmental and recreational  benefits created, and the jobs our Community Forest can create and sustain on the Sunshine Coast,”  said Glen Bonderud, Chairman of the Board of Directors.” 20   The April 2011 Annual Report for the Corporation included the following highlights pertaining to economic  development:   “Economic development initiatives are a key part of the SCCF strategy.    We consider helping to encourage the creation of new economic ventures to be the best legacy  the SCCF can provide to the community.    In 2010, the SCCF created the Economic Opportunities Fund, with an initial allocation of  $200,000, to help foster economic development opportunities on the Coast. The Board has                                                                    19  http://www.sccf.ca/AboutUs.aspx  20  SCPI Press Release May 31 st  2011, Sechelt, British Columbia, CANADA, pp.1 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 34 determined that the focus of such efforts will be in forest‐related industries – meaning anything  that involves or relates to the forest. Obvious examples include wood‐based value added  initiatives.    However, we also consider tourism, sports and recreational initiatives related to the forest to be  within our sphere of interest.   Late in 2010, we engaged an independent economic development advisor to conduct a  comprehensive assessment of the numerous options and strategies available to us. We  anticipate receiving and dealing with his recommendations about the best ways for us to move  forward by mid‐2011. It is our hope that, with these recommendations in hand, we will be better  able to assist entrepreneurs and business interests both from off‐Coast as well as those already  here to invest in their community, thereby creating more jobs and helping keep wood fibre here  on the Coast.    The SCCF also participated in the BCCFA’s province wide Value Added Bridges Project which is  both a study and initiative to assist local wood sales by encouraging loggers and wood users to  create business relationships to further the use of more wood in the community. The main  outcome of the study will be an interactive website where log and lumber sales may be made  between small tenure holders and value added users of wood.    We are cognizance of other initiatives on the Sunshine Coast which have a broader, more  general economic development focus. We have worked with many of these groups in 2010 and  look forward to continued cooperation in 2011.” 21   3.4.2 Other Community Forest Organizations The following organizations and operations exist on the Sunshine Coast and Area:  Cheakamus Community Forest (Whistler, Resort Municipality of, Squamish Nation and Lilwat Nation)  20,000 AAC 30,284 Hectares Issued 4/9/2009 ............................. http://www.cheakamuscommunityforest.com/  Klahoose Forestry Limited Partnership First Nation Community Forest – Powell River  102,293 AAC 160,212 Hectares Issued 10/6/2009 ...................................................................................................    .......................................................... http://www.klahoose.com/go29a/Klahoose_converts_Tree_Farm_License   Powell River Community Forest Ltd.  25,000 AAC 7,109 Hectares Issued 7/7/2011 ................................................. http://www.prcommunityforest.ca/  TLA’AMIN Timber Products Ltd. – Sliammin First Nation Powell River  28,000 AAC 9,340 Hectares Issued 12/4/2007 Preliminary Status ..........................................................................    ............................................................................................. http://www.sliammondevcorp.com/SDC/Home.html   Tsain‐Ko Forestry Development Corporation – Sechelt First Nation Non Replaceable Forest License for 32,025 m 3 .................................................................................http://www.secheltnation.ca/ Sechelt Community Projects Inc. – Sunshine Coast Community Forest  20,000 AAC 10,790 Hectares Issued 5/31/2011 ...................................................................... http://www.sccf.ca/  3.4.3 The Provincial Association The British Columbia Community Forest Association Conference and Annual General Meeting 2010 Report  cites a number of areas that Community Forests are considering as part of their core mandate:   Bridges Part 1 – Community Forest Products: Development of Value‐Added Fibre Supply Strategies   Bridges Part 2 – Community Forest Management: Development of Planning Tools   Bridges Part 3 – Community Forest Governance: Development of Educational Resources   First Nations Dialogue                                                                    21  Sechelt Community Projects Inc. Annual Report to the Shareholders, May 2011, Sechelt, British Columbia, Canada, pp.2 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 35  Community Forests and BC Carbon Sequestration Policy   Community Forests and Carbon Credit Policy   Biomass Energy   Feedstock Supply Logistics: Challenges for Biofuels   Community Forest Marketing and Branding   Challenges facing Newcomer Communities  “In 2009, members of the BC Community Forest Association (BCCFA) identified the need for small  tenure owners such as community forests and woodlots to connect log sales with local saw millers.  BCCFA recognized that getting the right log, to the right place at the right time would benefit wood  workers and the economy of our communities.  “The BCCFA is excited about the potential of this project and how it will help our forest workers and  local economies recover and grow.” says Robin Hood, President of the Association.  Quick and easy access to market information, whether it is what a seller has to offer or what a  buyer is looking for, will facilitate the flow of fibre into the marketplace. We hope to see raw fibre  reach a mill or manufacturer where it will be used for its highest value, creating the highest number  of jobs for the highest profit.  A buyer/seller website will help bring businesses together creating relationships that will stimulate  new opportunities to develop durable and sustainable economic activities. With better exchange of  information they can get the right log, to the right place, at the right time.” 22   Separating a Community Forest diversification plan into wood and forest values is not evident in Members  plans. Doing so will create a new level of responsibility and accountability for the Sechelt Community Projects  Inc. that sets it above other organizations.  3.5 Provincial Economic Development Context On Thursday, September 22, 2011, British Columbia Premier Christy Clark launched the regions latest  Economic Development Strategy entitled “Canada Starts Here .” Features of the plan that may influence and  support the Sun Coast Wood economic diversification plan include Goals:  “6. Enhance business access and productivity:   Work with communities and business to create Investment Attraction Strategies for each region  of the province.   Work with communities to build their capacity to respond to and act on investment inquiries.  “10. Create partnerships to ensure training spaces are matched with regional employment needs.  This will include:     Create Regional Workforce Tables as a new platform for educators, industry, employers, local  chambers of commerce, First Nations, labour and others to come together to plan how best to  align  training  programs  to  meet  regional  needs.  Their  input  will  inform  how  the  Province  delivers regionally based skills development programs, including $15 million to further support  regional post‐secondary institutions in addressing local labour needs.   Providing up to $6 million a year to industry sector partnerships to help them identify their skill  and workforce needs, with additional funding for upgrading skills so workers can benefit from  these opportunities.   Hosting  a  trades  training  conference  by  the  end  of  2011,  bringing  all  partners  together  to  identify ways to enhance the province’s trades training programs.” 23                                                                     22  British Columbia Community Forest Association Press Release September 2011, Kaslo, British Columbia CANADA  23 Canada Starts Here, The BC Jobs Plan, Vancouver, British Columbia, CANADA September 2011, pp.15‐16 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 36 There are no financial resources, programs or grants available to assist in any of these initiatives.  3.6 Regional Economic Development Context The subject of Regional Economic Development is under consideration by a Task Force of administrators  representing local and aboriginal government. The Administrators Report dated July 20th  2011 made two  recommendations:  “Step one:   function before form – create a memorandum of understanding between the local    governments in the region for the “sunshine coast economic development alliance;   Step two:   executive committee nominates the board of directors;  Step three:   hire an economic development officer;  Step four:   the executive committee develops a request for proposal (rfp) for the co‐location    of the office;  Step five:   develop the larger strategy through input from a community advisory     board/roundtable;  Step six:   get to work and measure your progress; and;  Step seven:   build your ambassador program.” 24   Experience indicates that appointing local and aboriginal elected representatives to any economic  development may result in competition for primacy and financial resources. Decisions may be challenged due  to the appearance of cronyism and conflict of interest. Also, uninformed observers will accuse the operation  of duplication of other organizations work in the community.  Forming Boards and Executive based on sectoral representations encourages similar results. Successful  Boards of Directors adopt hands off Policy Governance approach that makes the Executive Manager  responsible for plans, outcomes and results. In addition, the recruitment of volunteers based on personal and  professional experience and skill sets inoculates Boards from the conditions stated in the previous paragraph.  In the case of this diversification plan, a comparable strategy was deployed as follows:  Step one:   Consult the local and regional business community to determine business retention  and expansion needs;  Step two:   Conduct focus groups and interviews of key people to test the results of the survey of  needs;  Step three:   Consult with local government senior staff to determine barriers to progress and past  history;  Step four:  Provide an informed assessment of the current economic scan against needs and  expectations;  Step five:  Test draft actions with Executive Management Group of the Sechelt Community  Projects Inc.;  Step Six:  Circulate draft to prospective partners for input. Present to the Board of Directors,   then to the Shareholders Representatives post 2011 election, then host a public  information session designed to educate the tax payers on decisions leading to the  plan.  Step seven:  Assign financial resources to the plan and secure the best possible people to  implement the plan ion behalf of the Corporation and ensure that Regional actions  feed into the “regional economic development organization”, and local initiatives are  fulfilled by the Corporations community of interest.  There are no financial resources, programs or grants available to assist in any of these initiatives.                                                                    24  Sunshine Coast Regional Economic Development “CAO” Report – July 2011 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 37 3.7 Local Sustainability Plan At its Committee of the Whole meeting held on October 12th , 2011, the District of Sechelt recommended the  adoption of a draft Sustainability Action Plan 2011. The following section may influence some of the  implementation of this diversification plan. It is also important to note that economic diversification was not  identified as a priority within the context of sustainable development.    The maintenance of local control over local resources figures prominently in the sustainability movement.  The ownership of a community forest is held in high regard as a contributor to self‐determinism and long  term viability of communities.  The premise for the diversification plan is based on the fundamentals of building a “Smarter” Community  Forest:  Letter   Major Term   Minor Terms  S   Specific     Significant, Stretching, Simple  M   Measurable   Meaningful, Motivational, Manageable  A   Attainable   Appropriate, Achievable, Agreed, Assignable, Actionable, Action‐ oriented,           Ambitious, Aligned  R   Relevant    Realistic, Results/Results‐focused/Results‐oriented, Resourced, Rewarding  T   Time‐bound   Time‐oriented, Time framed, Timed, Time‐based, Time boxed, Timely, Time‐Specific,         Timetabled, Time limited, Track able, Tangible  E   Evaluate     Ethical, Excitable, Enjoyable, Engaging, Ecological  R   Re‐evaluate   Rewarded, Reassess, Revisit, Recordable, Rewarding, Reaching    The second set of targets proposed for the Sustainability Plan include those shown in table   Table 2 Sechelt Draft Sustainability Plan Section 2 Thriving Economy  Indicator  Baseline*  Where are we now?  Target  Our Desired Future  Are we meeting our  goal  Jobs  Ratio of jobs to population  3940:8455 [47%]  Increase % of jobs relative top  population growth      Percent of population employed  locally  47% [2006 census]  50% by 2012   Incomes  % of income from employment  47% [2006 census]  Move closer to provincial  average 64%      Average income [reflecting pay rates] $37,842 [2008]  Move closer to provincial  average 64%    Businesses  Urban Renewal of Downtown [Wharf  & Cowrie Street Priorities]  1 new site application  Wharf Rd. 2011  Increase in transition from  single storey to multi storey  mixed use buildings by 2015      Ratio of commercial industrial  assessment to residential  7:93 Percent [2008]  Increase commercial industrial  assessment to 20% by 2020      Total number of business license  931 [2011]  Increase with rate of population  increase      Commercial Industrial Land Base  212 ha designated in OCP  Increase area of land in active  commercial & industrial use    Land Use  Percent of total housing units located  downtown  To be determined 20% increase by 2020     Percent of new building permits  located in Priority Growth Area  To be determined     Percent of new development as  compact or higher density units  [clustered, multifamily]  11% of total housing stock [2006]  15% by 2012 25% by 2020      Area ha actively farmed  No data for Sechelt Increase   Note: some of the boxes are blank as further review or data collection is required to establish baseline conditions.  Some of these targets could include those identified by the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. embedded in this  plan and should be considered by the SCPI Board of Directors.   
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 38 4.0 ASSESSMENT OF DIVERSIFICATION OPPORTUNITIES The fulfillment of the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. commitment to making a positive impact on the  communities in which is operates in economic developments terms can be described in terms of the  retention and expansion of existing business and the recruitment of new business to the region.  Diversification comes from the pursuit of new transactions in areas that have not previously been pursued.  4.1 Retention and Expansion It may appear that focusing on existing business is counterintuitive to the goal of diversification. However, in  moral terms organizations have an obligation to work with existing business first, before recruiting new  business to accomplish diversification. The Government of Ontario defines this part of the plan as follows:  “BR+E is “An ongoing cooperative effort between business, local government, agencies, other  organizations and people in the community with the purpose of identifying opportunities and  actions to assist local businesses in expansion, the retention and creation of jobs and the  diversification of the local economic base, as well as the implementation of defined actions to  improve the local business climate.”  “Short‐Term Objectives   Build relationships with existing businesses   Demonstrate and provide community support for local business   Address urgent business concerns and issues   Improve communication between the community and local businesses   Retention of businesses and jobs where there is a risk of closure  “Long‐Term Objectives   Increase the competitiveness of local businesses   Job creation and new business development   Establish and implement strategic actions for local economic development   Strong viable local economy.” 25   In order to address the concerns of existing businesses, Capital EDC conducted a survey of participants in  current and past efforts of the Community Forest Corporation which will be illustrated in following sections.  It is also important to define the baseline of what businesses the Corporation should engage with. A list of  existing businesses that have been contacted by SCPI is illustrated in Appendix I ‐ Stakeholder Survey and  Interviews.  4.2 Recruitment Economic developers have different definitions for a variety of functions within this category. Foreign direct  investment is one arena and business attraction and recruitment is another. The degree to which an  organization gets involved in any of these functions depends on the resources at hand and the circumstance  or position of the local and regional economy.  “Foreign direct investment, in its classic definition, is defined as a company from one country  making a physical investment into building a factory in another country.  The direct investment in  buildings, machinery and equipment is in contrast with making a portfolio investment, which is  considered an indirect investment.” 26   The following definition comes from the International Economic Development Council:                                                                    25  http://www.reddi.gov.on.ca/bre_what.htm  26  http://www.going‐global.com/articles/understanding_foreign_direct_investment.htm 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 39 “Business Recruitment and Attraction  “Business attraction and recruitment was once considered the main approach to economic  development. Because of the high costs of economic development marketing, attraction is often the  most expensive approach to economic development. The attraction of new businesses into an  economy may quickly increase the tax base, jobs and the diversity of the local economy. Business  attraction is the most publicized and visible economic development tool because it creates many  jobs at one time and because of the use of incentives and marketing.  “Targets of attraction efforts include advanced manufacturers, high technology firms, retail and  service sector employers, corporate headquarters, sports teams and entertainment venues.  “Business attraction programs use marketing to promote an area’s, favorable business climate, and  other location factors important to specific businesses.  “Trends in Business Recruitment and Attraction   “Site selection is the process by which businesses seeking to invest a large amount of resources  seek out a new location for their facilities   “A 1999 survey of corporate executives with site selection responsibilities cites that the  Internet’s importance as a tool increased two‐fold from 1996.   “Financial incentives almost always influence the site selection process for medium and large  sized businesses.   “Communities seeking to target their spending on attraction use cluster analysis to focus their  marketing and recruitment efforts to specific kinds of businesses.   “Workforce development incentives have become an important business attraction tool.   “Quality of life attracts businesses and workers because a business wants most of its workers to  move with it.” 27   4.3 Stakeholder Contact and Interviews The intent of contacting stakeholders in both the solid wood and forest use was to discern levels of interest, a  scan of the current business climate in the area and to develop a better understanding of what the key issues  and opportunities are from the perspective of those people resident in the area with vested interests in the  positive outcomes of investments made by the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. organization.   Firstly, a list of prospective respondents was derived from Chamber of Commerce Members, Economic  Development Task Force Members and participants in a Community Forest Forum held in 2008. The people  that participated in the D.J. Gillis and Associates Pre‐Feasibility study for Value Recovery Business  Opportunities on the Sunshine Coast were also included. A list of the pool of responde3nts is illustrated in  Appendix I.  Secondly, Everyone on the list was invited to participate in an on‐line survey which included 86 questions  covering the following subject areas:  1. Stakeholders Views and Attributes;  2. The Top Ten List and need for Strategic Focus;  3. Business Activity 2011 Q3;  4. Views on Regional Workforce;  5. Regional Change;  6. Technology Talk; and;  7. Management Team Dynamics.  Unexpected challenges in this approach included the length of time required to secure responses, the lack of  interest in responding and from some respondents, their inability to answer basic business questions. The                                                                    27  http://www.iedconline.org/index.php?p=Guide_Attraction 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 40 later due in part to the fact that the person replying on behalf of a business was not the person responsible or  in fact, may have represented a non‐government or government organization. This underpins the critical  nature of having discussions with the business community before pronouncing strategic directions or change.  Thirdly, everyone was invited to attend focus group meetings conducted at the District of Sechelt Municipal  Hall Committee room over a three day period. The sessions were scheduled so that business people could  actually attend before, at noon or after regular business hours. The turnout was very low. There is no point in  speculating as to why this was the case. The people that did attend provided valuable insight into the context  and climate for business development.  In order to complete this consultation process, it is recommended that the report be circulated to key  organizations in the community, including major employers, wood and forest users for additional comment  and that the findings be presented at a public meeting once the document has been released. This will ensure  that the direction taken by Sechelt Community Projects Inc. comes as no surprise to any constituents. This is a  key factor in ensuring responsible representation of public assets, a traditional that SCPI has maintained since  its inception.  4.4 Stakeholder Opinion 4.4.1 The Sunshine Coast Business Climate Survey Responses The following are highlights from the online survey completed in September 2011 by Capital EDC Economic  Development Company. By no means are these results presented in a scientific defensible format. They are  merely an indication of views of the respondents at a given point in time. The Region referred to is defined as  the “Lower Sunshine Coast” comprised of Sechelt, Gibson’s, the Regional District and the First Nation  administration.  4.4.2 Stakeholders Views and Attributes A majority of respondents see the Sunshine Coast Region in a positive manner.  A majority of respondents believe that non‐residents perceive the Region in a positive way.  Effective Local and Regional Economic Development means:   Existing Business are stable and expanding in the region [24.5%]   More jobs in the region [20.4%]   Higher standard of life [16.3%]  Other possible indicators of effective economic development did not rate as high as the previously  mentioned outcomes. This includes Improved reputation of the region, more visitors to the region, better  amenities afforded by the region, or better educational opportunities offered in the region.  The majority of respondents perceive issues and opportunities with a rural lens. Resource and Suburban  lenses rated somewhat less. Urban and Remote lenses barely rated at all.  A majority of respondents indicated that they would like to see a focus on the recruitment of manufacturing  and Processing, Retail and Service Commercial investment.  The three greatest strengths that make the region a viable place to run a business identified by the  respondents included:   Proximity to Vancouver;   Close proximity to recreational sites; and;   Entrepreneurial Talent and Affordable Housing.  The Sun Coasts Biggest Challenges include:   Availability of well‐paid jobs;   Keeping young workers; and;   Local Government leadership and citizen attitude.  The top three subjects that economic development in the region should focus on include: 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 41  Support to existing business retention;   Growth of the small business community; and;   Recruitment of non‐retail and service commercial business.  Local Governments should spend more time on:   Creating local employment opportunities;   Learning and leading;   Providing affordable housing, natural spaces, parks and recreation.  The majority of respondents were independent business owners [soho28 ] and small enterprise owners with 2‐ 20 employees.  The majority of respondents reported that they were strong in corporate finance and consulting skill sets, but  not so much in governance, web commerce, and economic development.  The majority of respondents were from the U65 cohort with few to none in the U36 and U25 age cohorts.  4.4.3 The Top Ten List and need for Strategic Focus Highest business risk priorities that shape the current economic picture in ths region include:   Slow Recovery or double‐dip recession;   Managing Talent and the need to retain trained people;   Emerging Markets; and;   Radical Greening of the economy impacts on local business climate.  Lowest business risks identified by the respondents include:   Non‐traditional entrants into the local marketplace as competitors;   Social acceptance, risk and corporate social responsibility; and;   Access to credit and regulation and compliance challenges.  An in depth comparison of the Sun Coast Results with the global report prepared by Ernst Young would reveal  that issues that are critical in a global context are not necessarily important or not important to this business  community.29   In terms of ranking Compliance, Financial, Operational, and Strategic Issues as they relate to businesses  operating in this region, it is clear that Financial and Strategic are ranked higher than Compliance and  Operational challenges.  4.4.4 Business Activity 2011 Q3 Respondents indicated that they did no see a product‐service mix change in the past 3 years.  They don’t expect much of a change in the next 18 months.  The majority of respondents indicated that they serve a special niche market.  Most of the respondents characterized their business as standard profit margins, followed by a second group  that indicated high margin with low volumes of sales.  The majority defined their trade areas as being more than 30 kilometres with a significant number of  respondents identifying their trade area as global.  They identified that the majority of businesses reporting stable or increasing sales, with one‐quarter of the  respondents citing a decline in sales.  Average sales are reported to be predominantly stable or increasing, with less business [people reporting  decreases.                                                                    28  Sole Owner Home Office  29  http://www.ey.com/Publication/vwLUAssets/Business_risk_report_2010/$File/EY_Business_risk_report_2010.pdf 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 42 Customer client groups are focused on:   Individuals   Families and;   Other Small Businesses.  The average age cohorts of customers indicated the over 45 groups as being dominant and the U45 groups  barely registering. 64+ was a small consideration in this profile.  Respondents indicated that they derive sales from a combination of referral | word of mouth, walk‐in | call‐in  sales, and advertising. Less business built on internet, direct mail, trade shows or social media.  A large percentage of the respondents indicated that they have plans to expand or renovate in the next three  years.  The majority, by a large margin have no plans to leave their current premise.  4.4.5 Views on Regional Workforce Respondents rated the regional workforce in the following terms:   On the availability of workers in the area predominantly low;   On the quality of the workforce in the area as moderate;   On the stability of the workforce in the area trending higher;   On the productivity of the workforce as higher.  A majority of the respondents indicated that they had 41% to 100% of employees are head of households.  This means that there is a small percentage of the workforce that are individuals indicating that any change  to employment has significant repercussions.  There is not enough of an indication that demand for labour is increasing to warrant a detailed workforce  strategy for the region.  The number of unfilled positions is stable indicating that there are a number of jobs that are going without  fulfillment. There may be reasons for this linked to the candidates perception of the community with respect  to retaining home value or the ability to sell over time.  Respondents indicated that they generally no not import their workforce.  A majority of the respondents indicated that they expect no major changes in the workforce. This may be  indicative of a poorly informed business community as provincial efforts indicate otherwise anticipating very  large deficits of skilled people.  Respondents indicated that they either provide benefits or do not, equally. Of those benefits provided,  Health is followed by profit sharing and retirement pension.  They indicated that space for training is provided in the workplace, with a smaller emphasis off‐site followed  by sponsored placement at an institution.  70% indicated that investment in training was stable with 30% indicating that their financial commitment was  increasing.  Respondents indicated that their top contributions to workforce initiatives include:   A focus on employee retention;   Employee recruitment; and;   Industry retention programs, youth programs and women support programs.  To a lesser degree:   Industry recruitment programs;   Elder Programs;   Aboriginal Programs;   New immigrant programs; and;   No support for men’s programs. 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 43 4.4.6 Regional Change There is little expectation for changes in the regional or local picture in the near term.  To a larger degree, there has been some change in how the respondents view doing business in the region.  But for the most part, their view is that it has not changed.  They reported that they have no difficulty securing most business services in the region.  The majority of respondents indicated that they do not anticipate any global, federal, provincial, regional or  local legislation changes that will adversely affect their business in the next three years. However, 38% did  expect negative legislation in the next three years.  Even more responded negatively to the expectation of benefits from changes in legislation.  4.4.7 Technology Talk The opinion with respect to new technology merging that will change their businesses was evenly split  between yes and no expectations.  There was somewhat of a positive expectation that technology based opportunities arising for their  businesses. However the majority expressed no expectation.  They ranked technological impact highest in terms of:   Internal Office Communications;   Marketing; and;   Operations‐production.  They ranked technological impact lowest in terms of:   Social Media;   Corporate Social Responsibility; and;   Community relations.  Their investments in technology rank highest in terms of:   Equipment;   Employee training; and;   Owner training.  The lowest impact of technology investments indicated:   Employee retention; and;   Employee recruitment.  The majority of respondents indicated that the region’s technological infrastructure was adequate for their  growth plans.  4.4.8 Management Team Dynamics The majority of respondents indicated that there has been no change in ownership or senior management of  their businesses.  There is a strong indication that owners are involved in the day to day operation of the business.  The top 20% of their business customers represent more than 36% of all sales.  Budget allocations for advertising, promotion and non‐core spending are stable, with some indications of  increase.  There is a strong indication of business contributions in‐cash and in‐kind to the community.  There is an indication that businesses invest time and money into cooperative marketing efforts with other  regional businesses, but the majority does not.  There have not been many changes to supplier relationships with the respondents in the past 2 years. 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 44 4.5 The Sunshine Coast Focus Group Meeting Responses Capital EDC Economic Development Company Consulting Economic Developer Patrick Marshall hosted 6 of 9  scheduled focus group meetings on Friday September 16th  and Saturday September 17th  2011 at 0730 hrs.,  1130 hrs. and 1800 hrs. on both days. These hours were specified so as to allow business owners and  operators to participate without impacting their very busy schedules.  The intent of focus groups is to engage in direct conversation with respect to the form and function of the  Community Forest Program as it relates to business retention, expansion and recruitment of new business in  the context of the use of solid wood in the region and the use of community managed forests. Participants  were invited from the same list exhibited in Appendix I. Notes from these sessions are listed in Appendix V.  4.5.1 Physical Infrastructure Participation by SCPI in physical infrastructure was limited to indirect support to organizations such as the  Hidden Grove Society. SCPI has expertise and a few dollars that could be invested in the organization to aid in  demonstrating the context6 and value of community forestry.  4.5.2 Human Capacity Infrastructure Examples of prospects for CPI in this area included support to the SCTrails organization to build actual trails,  the business case for a specialty school within Capilano University, Sechelt Campus as well as focusing on  efforts to contribute to Forest Workforce initiatives designed to link the community forest to training and  education opportunities.  4.5.3 Community Capacity Infrastructure By investing in the previously mentioned opportunities, conversations indicated that SCPI would be well  served through partnerships in all aspects of investment in the community. This means that partnerships  should be sought on all initiatives as a condition of investment so as to leverage limited dollars and expertise .  4.5.4 Business Infrastructure | 90 day Actions There were no 90 day actions identified that SCPI could take. The regional economic development function  needs to materialize before SCPI can play a contributory role as a partner, while providing expertise in terms  of professionals and experts in the Forest Industry field. The   4.6 Wood User Stakeholders The following section briefly summarizes the results of the stakeholder consultations for participants from  the solid wood industry. Few wood users from the area chose to participate in the consultation. The two  types of solid wood users include industrial and artisan. Neither group is strongly represented in this initial  work.  Factors contributing to this lack of interest were speculated by focus group participants and included:   The state of the local and regional economies have forced people involved in the harvest of solid wood to  work further afield;   Many of the small and medium enterprises are facing succession and workforce issues that cannot be  resolved individually;   The conflict over the treatment of small business by neighbours and interest groups keeps people from  participating; and;   There is no focal point for people of common interest to come together.  The following categories of business were mentioned as drivers of solid wood business, both industrial and  artisan or the most probable market opportunities for the Sunshine Coast:   Existing Businesses within or near the business area  – Often the best leads are found near home. Leads  might include existing businesses seeking more space or a better location in the business area . The  area’s business owner’s survey as well as ongoing conversations and personal contacts of the 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 45 recruitment team, chamber of commerce and other economic development professionals can help  identify these leads.   Emerging Entrepreneurs ‐ Downtowns and business areas are often attractive to independent  businesses. Accordingly, leads might include home‐based or garage‐based businesses seeking more  fitting space and a convenient location for their customers. These leads might include managers of  existing businesses wishing to go into business on their own. Commercial lenders, business schools,  Community Futures, Downtown Improvement program business specialists, Service Corps of Retired  Executives (SCORE), Rotary Club International (PROBUS), chamber of commerce and other public or  private small business professionals should be asked to help identify these leads.   Small or Medium Enterprises ‐ Local or regional businesses, particularly those that have branch stores  between miles away and are ready to expand, are often excellent prospects. These business operators  typically have a good knowledge of the market area, and may already have multiple stores. They are  often interested in expansion as a way to improve their penetration of the market. These leads can be  identified through your team’s knowledge of the business mix in other communities in the region and  information collected from your local consumer research. In addition, realtors, commercial brokers, sales  representatives and supplies that work within the region can be helpful. Sometimes ads in regional  business, real estate and regional lifestyle periodicals can generate leads.   Corporations ‐ If local or regional businesses are not interested in expanding, corporations can be  contacted. It is important to be realistic about the kinds of corporations that might be interested in a  small community as their operating requirements may preclude them from considering the area. Leads  can be identified through directories and private databases listing corporate site selection criteria and  contacts. In addition, leads can also come from commercial brokers, trade shows, “deal making forums,”  and conferences such as those offered by International Franchise Association or the International Council  of Shopping Centers.  It is also important to note that a number of stakeholders supported that the Community Forest Corporation  support and allow the designated commercial forest to be used by other activities or industries to help share  the cost of communicating the value of having a community owned and operated forest.  The following items were mentioned as being primary challenges in attracting new business in the form of  expansion and recruitment:   Attracting corporate businesses to locate on the Sunshine Coast is likely to be difficult – these businesses  need to be closer to a larger cluster of manufacturing and processing activity.    To be successful, solid wood operations need to be based either at regional service centers or at the  point  of  international  trade  distribution.  The  Sunshine  Coast  is  characterized  by  its  residents  as  a  “bedroom  community”  to  Vancouver,  not  far  enough  away  to  generate  a  significant  investment  in  production infrastructure.   4.7 Forest User Stakeholders The following section will briefly summarize the results of the stakeholder consultations for Forest Users.    The majority of participants in the consultation process were either residents of the area of representatives  of Forest User groups. While a number of other industry associations or related real estate firms were  approached, the facilitator was unable to complete interviews due to unavailability of representatives from  the respective companies or their reluctance to participate.    Due to the higher level of expressed interest, Forest Users had more to contribute with respect to defining  ways to build the understanding of the values of a community owned and operated Forest.    Conservational   Educational   Historical   Recreational   
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 46 4.8 Opportunity Assessment Summary Based on the trends contained in the environmental scan contained in the previous sections and the results  of the stakeholder consultations, the list below contains the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats  (SWOT) analysis of the market opportunities for Woo and Forest Uses in the Sunshine Community Forest  Area. The summary information is presented in alphabetical order.  Strengths  Airport exists as a development opportunity for general aviation and airport compatible businesses  because property is largely unobstructed.   Airport identified as an Omenica Regional Priority by the Beetle Action Coalition of Community Leaders.   Positive attitude recognized outside of the community.   Positive microclimate in Vanderhoof allows for more favourable flight training conditions, emergency  access and living conditions than other regional airport locations.   There are a number of aircraft owners and operators residing in the community that have an interest in  seeing the airport succeed.   Very favourable and accessible flight approaches due to the better than usual engineering design of the  runways.  Weaknesses  Absence of aviation interests working with the municipal economic development advisory Committee.   Absence of a broad based retention and expansion process for the Municipality makes priorities unclear  regarding potential commercial development on airport lands/   Absence of the market conditions for a Micro Business based Aviation Cluster.   Internet has changed the Repair, Maintenance and Overhaul (RMO) business; these firms now have more  flexibility in terms of business location.   Lack of an owner and pilot ready room with shower, washroom, kit lockers and lounge with web access  for weather.   Relatively short‐term lease terms and low rent levels discourage reinvestment in airport properties.   Suitable civil infrastructure (water/sewer/electricity) may be required for some commercial businesses.   Vanderhoof not profiled in Regional Business Coalitions such as NIMBC and other listed.  Opportunities  A formal process to engage Prince George Airport and others in advocating for regional general aviation  interests. For example, dealing with regulatory bodies such as NAVCAN, the importance of Vanderhoof  airport for medivac service, as a back‐up base for forest fire fighting and other interests.   An informal or formal Community to Community engagement strategy with the College of New  Caledonia’s Aviation Business Diploma program and the following First Nations is an opportunity to be  pursued; Saik’uz First Nation; Nak’azdli First Nation; Nadleh Whut’en First Nation; Stellat’en First Nation;  Takla Lake Band; Tl’azt’en First Nation; Yekooche First Nation; and the Carrier‐Sekani Tribal Council  (CSTC), so the strength of leadership is leveraged for the training and engagement of youth into the  Aviation Industry Cluster, bringing other resources to the table that would not otherwise be present.   Several resident and nonresident business people identified an interest in securing fee simple land to  bring external maintenance contracts within their business operation which is a form of export  replacement resulting in business retention and expansion.   There are opportunities associated with the forestry and natural resource sectors as these sectors  rebound from the economic slowdown.   There could be a link to Resource Management, Helicopters and Training, enough to substantiate a  competency area within a Micro Business Aviation Cluster or further development of the College of New  Caledonia’s aviation programs.   Shortages of commercial land with good road access could increase the property value of vacant airside  reserve, groundside and property adjacent to the main access road running parallel to the paved runway  if airport complementary business activities were steered toward the airport.  Threats  Lack of visibility in regional business coalitions such as: 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 47  Association for Mineral Exploration British Columbia   Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists   Central Interior Logging Association http://cila.ca/   Energy Services BC   Geoscience BC   Kamloops Exploration Group http://www.keg.bc.ca/   Mining Association of BC   Northern BC Construction Association http://www.nbcca.bc.ca/   Regional District of Bulkley Nechako http://www.mining.rdbn.bc.ca/   Smithers Exploration Group http://www.smithersexplorationgroup.com/   Lack of secure areas may decrease potential interest in airport use due to perceived coast of securing  operating areas airside.   Split management of airport and riverfront air operations may result in under achievement of goals.   There has been a shift from medium to small business sizes in the region, now moving down to micro  businesses comprised of owner‐ operators, which makes financing difficult.   The 2006 Land and Coastal Resource Management Plan, a Provincial regulatory process has lapsed.  Uncertainty due to a gap in policy may have a negative influence on the perception of the region as a  profitable place to invest. Completion of the Omenica Regional Economic Development Strategy slated  for December 2011 may also contribute to an uncertainty with respect to regional priorities.   Vanderhoof’s close proximity to a well‐established network of logging roads reduces the need for air  access to the productive forest regions.   
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 48 5.0 Assessing Sunshine Coast Community Forest Diversification Options The following are options available to the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. Board of Directors when consider  how to implement an economic diversification strategic plan:  Do Nothing  By taking no action, the Board will continually be requested to hand over the cash proceeds of their efforts to  some other organization. This will not fulfill the underlying reasons that the organization was created, not will  it uphold the fundamental policies and principles for which the organization was created.  Wind up  A decision to wind‐up the organization would result in the loss of very valuable human resource assets in the  form of the volunteers that contribute tike, energy and professional clout to the tasks of ensuring positive  returns to the constituents of the Sunshine Coast Region. It would also create a legacy issue in that future  prospects would not choose to make a commitment based on the history of previous attempts.  Merge  Merging with other Community Forests owned and operated by local and aboriginal governments is an  option. Not however in the current condition. In some cases, annual allowable cuts and tenures are too small  in terms of individual organizations, to sustain wood manufacturing operations. The decision to merge in the  interest of efficiency and marketability will always be an option. Entitlement, ownership and expectations of  treaty allocations will stand in the way of good business practice.  Acquire  The prospects for acquiring more tenure are already addressed in the overall strategy for the organization.  Contract  There are two types of contractors:   Those that offer one offs; and;  Those that train people in the community to fulfill the work.  The organization should choose the second.  Partner  Clearly, this is the approach that must be3 mastered by the organization as it has no full‐time employees and  is operated by contractors.  5.1 Options to be implemented within the Organization The results of the analysis and stakeholder interviews indicated that the following opportunities represented  the most promising Initiatives for the SCPI economic diversification mandate:  Now   Subject 4. Physical Infrastructure  There is an expressed interest in collaborating with the Sunshine Coast Trails and Secret Grove Societies to  make small contributions to infrastructure that would assist in the completion of this new infrastructure. In  order to proceed, Memoranda of Understanding would need to be created to demonstrate the substance of  the relationship. Capital EDC proposes to deliver these components under a monthly retainer with SCPI  reporting to the President and General Manager.  There may be additional advantages to the General Manager’s direct involvement in these relationships in  terms of visibility on the community and leveraging other professionals to make contributions in addition to  the ones directly made from SCPI.   
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 49 Subject 5. Capilano University Initiative  Working with the leadership of the Capilano University Tourism and Outdoor Recreation program, SCPI and  its volunteers have a great opportunity to apply their personal and professional skill sets to a program which  adds value to the Sunshine Coast. This program takes the unique characteristics of the Sunshine Coast and  combines it with people that seek careers in outdoor education and recreation that will amplify the Forest  values identified by SCPI. It’s a natural relationship that requires exploration and definition.   Subject 6. School District Initiative   There was a distinct interest in keeping young people on the coast. Public educators in British Columbia have  recognized this and its starts before Kindergarten. The Sooke School District 62 has implemented its Nature  Kindergarten program based on experience in other commonwealth countries. SCPI should commit to visiting  this program with a Task Group so that the K to 12 continuum of education that takes children through  programs that prime them for lives in the Forest and Outdoor industry are a priority for School District 42.  Subject 7. District of Sechelt joint plans  The sole shareholder, the District of Sechelt has just elected a new Council for a 36 month term. It would be  approach for the management teams from both organizations to meet to review this strategy with the local  government lens to identify any opportunities for leverage and to ensure that SCPI is contributing to the  shareholders strategic vision.  There should be links made to the Corporate Strategy, OCP and Sustainability plans for the local government.  Subject 8. Regional Alliance joint Plans  Clearly, SCPI has the top Forest and Wood talent in the region. It is important that the Board of Directors,  President and General Manager ensure that they are connected to the new Economic Development Alliance  so that they can provide key focus and direction for the regions business retention and recruitment strategy  from the Forest and Wood perspectives.  Organizational Actions  Subject 13. Upgrade Web & Communications  The web site used to represent SCPI is a static business card. Capital EDC is ready to work with SCPI and the  web service provider to optimize the existing infrastructure to accommodate the Forest and Wood economic  diversification strategy and social media required communicating all of these opportunities. Should the  existing provide be unable to make changes, a suitable provider will be sought on the sunshine coast.  Subject 14. Create Reporting Tools  Due to previous public participation and stakeholder engagements, SCPI has default to responses designed to  accommodate proposed “Freedom of Information” requests. There is an absence of communications tools  designed to convey a positive response and community engagement process. While the Board of Directors  and staff may have many committees, the effort is lost in the transmission. Capital EDC is prepared to work  with staff in developing new tools and conveyances that will ensure that the public better understands the  scope and tangible benefits of the Community Forest.  Subject 15. Sustainability Review  The subject of how well the organization deploys sustainability principles is now a mainstream expectation  for any stakeholder engagement process. Capital EC has a Check List approach that can be fulfilled under a  separate proposal at a reasonable cost. Other process may be sought once Capital EDC has had an  opportunity to discuss Blueplanet Value Management with SCPI.  The benefit to this approach is to mute unsubstantiated criticism regarding the practices of the Community  Forest organization.  Subject 16. Governance Review  The organizational frameworks used to construct SCPI were based in economic development organizations  that operated outside Municipal Hall. There has been a lot of progress made since the late ‘90’s and its time  for SCPI to demonstrate a transparent and responsible Governance Report. 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 50 Capital EDC has a program designed that will be presented as a separate proposal to Blueplanet for the Board  consideration. Some processes can run tens of thousands of dollars. The program provided by Capital EDC  costs far less.  5.2 Options to be contracted by the Organization The results of the analysis and stakeholder interviews indicated that the following opportunities represented  the most promising Initiatives for the SCPI economic diversification mandate:  Now  Subject 1. Communications Tools  An independent wood and forest use web portal designed to tell the stories of the people that value wood  and forest use to be developed on a contract basis providing access and controls to the individual groups that  SCPI partners with.  The community forest corporation made it clear that its existing on‐line assets were to be used for its  corporate reporting purposes. Any additions made to accommodate the economic diversification strategic  plan would cloud the responsibility of the board. Therefore, Capital EDC proposes to work with an  appropriate web designer on the coast to develop a campaign site and network that supports the Sunshine  Coast Community Forest Initiative. New web and social media packages  5.3 Options to be partnered with other Organizations Small matching capital investment in the Sechelt Groves Society, in addition to upgrading the collateral  materials and tools required for fundraising for the Groves trails and communication efforts;  Small matching capital investment in the Sunshine Coast Trails Society initiative to establish a sustainable  operating framework for the development of the outdoor recreation industry opportunities associated with a  regional Trail system, including the addition of the influence of the Board of Directors of SCPI in inviting  corporate interests to participate in the completion of the regional trail system;   Participation in the business retention and expansion operations specifically focused on the wood industry  resident in the region to focus on the “sell local” approach to building the market for Sun Coast Wood  products, services and intellectual property, but not as an isolated effort, only as a partner in a bigger  regional effort;   Participation in the foreign direct investment and recruitment of new business to the Sunshine Coast with a  focus on solid wood use and access to public forest lands as a contribution to the regional Manufacturing and  Processing capacity and the Hospitality Industry that exists in the region. Again, as a partner and not a sole  initiator; and;  Participation in a region wide effort with peer group community forest organizations in an effort to create a  regional community forest portrait suitable for inclusion in the British Columbia Community Forests “Bridges”  initiative.  Now   Subject 2. Agreements  Capital EDC can co‐ordinate the development of the agreements required to define the relationship and  desired outcomes between SCPI and its partners  Subject 3. Community Capacity  Once the agreements are in place, Capital EDC can prepare the actual implementation plans for each of the  projects so that all plans are in the same format and continuity is maintained.  Advocacy  Subject 9. Public use of the Forest  Through strategic partnerships with the Groves and Trails societies, the Board and staff are advocating for  other community interests that demonstrate and support the same values as the community forest. Even if 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 51 collaboration agreements are not completed, SCPI will benefit by supporting these two organizations in the  broader community at‐large.  Subject 10. Wood Culture on the Sunshine Coast  Advocating for the wood culture includes working with artisan groups through to the remaining small and  medium enterprises on the coast. This may or may not include direct working relationships. The Board of  Directors and staff will have to consider which causes they can advocate for on a case by case basis.  Subject 11. Outdoor Recreation Industry  This segment of the retail and service sector is the one that repeatedly emerged in conversations in the  community as having the most prospects in terms of education and training, and resident retention. The  region is Whistler’s “Back 4” and will serve as an important year round training and education lab. The Board  of Directors and staff advocating for groups working to improve the profile of this sector will be useful to SCPI  self‐image and stakeholder engagement.  Subject 12. Resource Education and Training  Working with School District 42 and Capilano University to refine the sustainable resource management and  outdoor recreation management programs is a clear winner for the Board of Directors and staff. Both of  these approaches provide the continuity in education and training to aid in the retention and recruitment of  employees and employers associated with both the Forest and Wood user groups. 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 52 6.0 DIVERSIFICATION STRATEGY ‐ REFINING THE SUNSHINE COAST COMMUNITY FOREST VALUE PROPOSITION 6.1 Diversification Objectives The 2012 Sun Coast Wood Economic Diversification Plan acknowledges that at the present time the  community forest corporation does not have the necessary infrastructure (sustaining revenue, staff capacity,  or skill sets) in place to implement this plan or any economic diversification strategy outside its forest  management mandate. The result of the stakeholder interviews conducted for this study validated the  importance of partnership and leadership.   However, constituents and residents of the Sunshine Coasts vast and diverse groups of neighbuorhood’s need  to be understand that the mere existence of a community forest tenure does not lead to instant investment  in the form of wood manufacturers and processors in the short‐run.  The provision of limited dollars  generated by the sale of local wood to retention and recruitment efforts alone is insufficient to attract new  business to the community because the forest and solid wood sector is still recovering from the full effects of  the waves of economic recession. The Sunshine Coast is competing with existing manufacturing‐processing  and hospitality infrastructure where existing capacity can be used more intensely, expanded more quickly, or  at a cheaper cost than providing new services on the Sunshine Cast.    Two main areas were identified regarding ways to address diversification risks. They involve consideration of  the following factors:  1.  How much the Community Forest organization can implement on its own;  2.  How much the Community Forest Corporation can initiate with the participation of other organizations.  The results of the review of existing operations and consultation with stakeholders clearly indicate that a  broader range of partnered initiatives would improve the success of diversification efforts. The uses to  consider include ‘wood use manufacturing and processing’ and ‘forest use’ businesses.  6.2 Short Term Actions Short‐term actions include:  (a) new communications tools to define wood and forest use awareness created by the Community Forest;  (b) the broadcast of stories by residents and newcomers that share the same values; and;  (c) establishing Letters of Understanding with the Sechelt Groves Society and the Sunshine Coast Trails  Society.  Short‐term Action  (a) New communications tools to define wood and forest use awareness created by the Community Forest  through the creation of a stand‐alone web site for the Sun Coast Wood and Forest Initiative  ‐ Complete a branding strategy. Suitable organizations would include the local and regional societies  surveyed, Capilano University and an open call to residents and business owners in the region. The  maintenance of the web site will be sustained by low cost subscription fees whereby, the users are given full  managed access to the resource section, blogs and most wanted sections with current information and  contact details for opportunities relevant to the wood and forest use in the region.  ‐ Work with the other Community Forests in the Eco Region to build the profile for the BC Community Forest  Association Bridges project.  ‐ Work with local and regional partners to identify 1 quarterly event to coat tail efforts to inform, educate and  train the residents of the coast in the value of wood and community forests.  (b)  The broadcast of stories by residents and newcomers that share the same values  ‐ Work with existing community media and interest groups to provide opportunities to enumerate stories  related to wood culture and forest use.   
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 53 ‐ Determine who the local champions are for each subject area and determine who the subject matter  experts are.  ‐ Develop broadcast media including digital video, audio, print for unique distribution using local producers.   ‐ Partner with all regional media outlets to determine how best to grow the product.  ‐ Train the trainers in understanding the vocabulary and culture of solid wood use and forest uses.  (c) Establishing Letters of Understanding with the Sechelt Groves Society and the Sunshine Coast Trails  Society  ‐ Develop separate Letters of Understanding that address the values of partnering with both local  organizations  ‐ Both organizations speak to forest use values. Use this experience to build the wood use value experience.  6.3 Long Term Actions Long‐term actions include the negotiation of Memoranda of Understanding with each of the four local and  aboriginal governments, economic development task force, community organizations and independent  businesses with respect to wood and forest use strategies designed to diversify the regional economy.  Long‐term Action  Bring forward the longer term subjects upon the completion of the short term in 2012.     
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 54 7.0 Implementing the Diversification Recommendations The following tables are a standard means of communicating strategy in a simple form. They are derived from  forms developed by the Local Government Institute, a business developed by a former Chief Administrative  Officer from British Columbia. Gordon McIntosh is the founder and President of the Local Government  Leadership (LGL) Institute.  Gordon has conducted over 800 sessions involving 80,000 elected and  administrative officials throughout Canada and overseas. He has 31 years of experience in management,  educator and consultancy roles in the public sector. His managerial positions cover the corporate, community  development and human service functions of local government. Gordon's current faculty roles include the  Universities of Alberta, Victoria and Royal Roads. [http://www.lglinstitute.com].  This approach is recommended for use in contexts and applications that are related to reporting to local and  aboriginal governments so that they dovetail into corporate strategies for the sole shareholder. They are  easily transformed into quarterly reports for use by the President and General Manager of public  organizations.  7.1 Economic Diversification Issues and Opportunities Long List Priorities by the Board of Directors and Staff This list is the be‐all, catch‐all for ideas generated at either a public forum or an internal forum. In the case of  this assessment, Subjects were gathered by means of an on‐line survey of the pertinent business community,  personal interviews with local and regional leaders, and a number of focus groups.  As the organization continues on with the strategic plan process, the Long List will be used in October of 2012  when the organization conducts its annual assessment of progress. The results are then reduced into basic  concepts that fit within the 4 capacity groups.  Table 3 Community Forest Economic Diversification Issues | Opportunities Long List  Issues | Opportunities Long List  Subject  Board  Staff  Total  Business infrastructure        Community Capacity Infrastructure        Human Capacity Infrastructure        Physical Infrastructure        7.2 Economic Diversification Issues | Opportunities Short List A short list is then developed by the President and General Manager for review and approach of the Board of  Directors. Based on the primary research conducted by Capital EDC, the following are short list subjects for  the start of this process.  There are two factors that govern how these subjects are illustrated. The capacity of the organization sets  twho is responsible for the action. There are four categories within this set of criteria:  What “Group” does this initiative belong to as it relates to diversification?  1. Business Infrastructure  2. Community Capacity Infrastructure  3. Human Capacity Infrastructure  4. Physical Infrastructure  Secondly, when engaged in economic diversification, there are 5 functions that form a hierarchy. Without   addressing subject 1. Fundamentals and Foundations for Operations, it is difficult to deliver on the following  four criteria. Readers will note that Recruitment of new business is ranked the least important. This is  because organizations that do not focus on retaining existing business, are unsuccessful at recruiting new  business. 98 per cent of the activity in successful business development organizations is focused on business  retention, with the remaining two percent focused on fulfilling new business recruitment.  What “Type” of issues was this defined as being in 2008 by the Facilitator?  1. Fundamentals and Foundation for Operations 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 55 2. Retain Existing Business  3. New Infrastructure that will leverage Growth  4. Communications  5. Recruit New Business and Visitors resulting in Diversification  For the purpose of this plan, the priorization of each of these subjects has been skipped. They will be ranked  when the Long list is created in the October 2012. This worked is conducted in October so that it dovetails  with the sole shareholders financial planning process.  Table 4 Community Forest Economic Diversification Issues | Opportunities Short List  Issues | Opportunities Short List Subject  Board Staff  Total Business Infrastructure    Communications [1] New communications tools to define wood and forest use  awareness created by the Community Forest;        Stories of Forest and Wood Use [4] The broadcast of stories by residents and  newcomers that share the same values; and;        Letters of Understanding [1] Establishing Letters of Understanding with the  Sechelt Groves Society and the Sunshine Coast Trails Society.        Memoranda of Understanding [1] Each of the four local and aboriginal  governments, economic development task force, community organizations and  independent businesses with respect to wood and forest use strategies designed  to diversify the regional economy.        Community Capacity Infrastructure        Sechelt Groves Society MOU of support for communications and development [1]        Sunshine Coast Trails MOU of support for communications and development [1]        Economic Development Alliance for retention and recruitment programs [1]        Human Capacity Infrastructure        Work with Capilano University and School District on K‐2 Sustainability Resource  Management program into Outdoor Education accreditation [3]        Work with School District to foster Forest Kindergarten Program [3]        Physical Infrastructure        Sechelt Grove investments to complete demonstration forest [3]        Sunshine Coast Trails leverage and leadership to complete trails network [3]        CAPITAL = Board Led | Regular Font = Staff Led | UNDERLINED CAPITALS = items for Board & Staff | italics =  consultant led   7.3 Economic Diversification Focus Areas This table illustrates the four focus areas for the organization. It is used when reporting externally and to  summarize the annual priority setting process held in October of each year.  Table 5 Community Forest Economic Diversification Focus Areas  Community Forest Economic Diversification Focus Areas  Subject  Board  Staff  Total  BUSINESS INFRASTRUCTURE        Community Capacity Infrastructure        Human Capacity Infrastructure        Physical Infrastructure        CAPITAL = Board Led | Regular Font = Staff Led | UNDERLINED CAPITALS = items for Board & Staff | italics =  consultant led   7.4 Economic Diversification Strategic Priority Work Program This is the actual work program illustrated in an oversimplified format. It contains the Priority, the intended  outcome, the tangible benefits associated with this priority.  The second column illustrates the title of the people that are required to fulfill the action. Finally, column  three shows the steps such that the people responsible can report out on the state of the action on a  quarterly basis in less than 3 pages. 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 56 Table 6 Community Forest Economic Diversification Strategic Priority Work Program  PRIORITY | Desired Outcomes  OPTIONS | Strategy  ACTION | Responsible  Now  1. Communications Tools  New web and social media packages   Elected Official and staff buy in   Public Support   Shared resources and knowledge   Improved profile   Leverage external human resources   In‐House   Consultant to coordinate   Volunteers  1. Retain facilitator  2. Map out required resources  3. Find local suppliers and  contributors  4. Work with EconDev Committee  5. Coordinate with Regional EconDev  Alliance  6. Launch Fall 2012  2. Agreements  Responsible and Accountable  relationships   Clear mandates to cooperate   Public Understanding   Measurable outcomes   Tangible Outcomes   Annual Reviews   In‐House   Consultant to coordinate   Volunteers  1. Retain facilitator  2. Map out required resources  3. Find local suppliers and  contributors  4. Work with EconDev Committee  5. Coordinate Grove, Trails Societies &  Regional EconDev  6. Launch Summer 2012  3. Community Capacity  Development joint plans with Grove  and Trails Groups   Clear mandates to cooperate   Public Understanding   Measurable outcomes   Tangible Outcomes   Annual Reviews   In‐House   Consultant to coordinate   Volunteers  1. Retain facilitator  2. Map out required resources  3. Find local suppliers and  contributors  4. Work with EconDev Committee  5. Present to societies for review and  approval  6. Launch Summer 2012  4. Physical Infrastructure  Schedule Construction with Partners   Clear mandates to cooperate   Public Understanding   Measurable outcomes   Tangible Outcomes   Annual Reviews   In‐House   Consultant to coordinate   Volunteers  1. Retain facilitator  2. Map out required resources  3. Find local suppliers and  contributors  4. Work with EconDev Committee  5. Present to societies for review and  approval  6. Launch Fall 2012  Next  5. Capilano University Initiative   In‐House   Consultant to coordinate   Volunteers  1. Once Agreements in place, SCIPI  and facilitator to link CU to BC’s  Workforce Initiatives  6. School District Initiative   In‐House   Consultant to coordinate   Volunteers  1. Once Agreements in place, SCIPI  and facilitator to link SD 46  to BC’s  Workforce Initiatives  7. District of Sechelt joint plans   In‐House   Consultant to coordinate   Volunteers  1. Once Agreements in place, SCIPI  and facilitator to link DOS to OCP and  Sustainability Initiatives  8. Regional Alliance joint Plans   In‐House   Consultant to coordinate   Volunteers  1. Once Agreements in place, SCIPI  and facilitator to link EconDev to  retention and recruitment program  Advocacy  9. Public use of the Forest   In‐House   Consultant to coordinate   Volunteers  1. Outcomes and links to items 1‐4  10. Wood Culture on the Sunshine  Coast   In‐House   Consultant to coordinate   Volunteers  1. Outcomes and links to items 1‐4  11. Outdoor Recreation Industry   In‐House   Consultant to coordinate   Volunteers  1. Outcomes and links to items 1‐4  12. Resource Education and Training   In‐House  1. Outcomes and links to items 1‐4 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 57 PRIORITY | Desired Outcomes  OPTIONS | Strategy  ACTION | Responsible   Consultant to coordinate   Volunteers  Organizational  13. Upgrade Web & Communications   In‐House   Consultant to coordinate   Volunteers  1. GM and facilitator to review options  with current service provider.  2. Complete upgrade by Summer 2012  14. Create Reporting Tools   In‐House   Consultant to coordinate   Volunteers  1. GM and facilitator to review options  with current service provider.  2. Complete upgrade by Summer 2012  15. Sustainability Review   In‐House   Consultant to coordinate   Volunteers  1. EconDev Committee to review  Blueplanet Proposal.  2. Complete by Fall 2012  16. Governance Review   In‐House   Consultant to coordinate   Volunteers  1. Chair, President and GM to review  Capital EDC proposal.  2. Complete by Summer 2012    7.4 Blueplanet Sustainability Check Up Research indicates that the general public and consumers have become more diligent in asking for the state  of sustainability associated with products and community organizations. Capital EDC Economic Development  Company developed the Blueplanet Sustainability Program for government and business as a means of  evaluating where the organization stands with respect to basic sustainability criteria. The following is the  mark issued to organizations that are engaged in this annual program.  Figure 5 Blueplanet Value Management System Trademark      Table 7 Blueplanet Sustainability Check Up Categories  Blueplanet Sustainability Check Up  Success Indicators  Compliant  Non‐Compliant  Governance  Achievement of Community Forest Objectives  Achievement of Plan Objectives    Assess Status  Assess Status 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 58 Blueplanet Sustainability Check Up  Success Indicators  Compliant  Non‐Compliant  End Statements  Operational Compliance  Relationship among Directors  Relationship with Buyers  Relationship with CEO  Relationship with Constituents  Relationship with Licensors  Relationship with other Community Forest Organizations  Relationship with Sole Shareholder  Relationship with staff  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Social  Active and Healthy Lifestyle  Arts and Culture  Caring Community  Community Safety  Education  Recreational Uses  Sense of Heritage  Workforce Opportunities    Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Environmental  Designated Natural Areas  Discourage Air and Water Pollution  Environmental Public Education  Planned Growth  Preservation of Agricultural Land  Preservation of Environment  Preservation of Lakes and Streams  Promote Water Quality & Conservation  Protection of View Scapes  Responsible Land Use  Use of Alternate Utilities    Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Economic  Affordable Land Prices  Business Expansion  Business Owner Engagement  Business Recruitment  Business Retention  Competitive Mixed Tax Rates  Economic Stability  Employment Participation Rates  New Construction  Population Diversification  Positive Clout  Skilled Workforce Opportunities  Sustainable Land and Property  Assessment Values    Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  Assess Status  7.5 Strategic Plan Dashboard for External Purposes The following Dashboard was created for the organization to use as a summary table when communicating  progress on the implementation of the strategic plan.  Table 8 Community Forest Economic Diversification Strategic Dashboard  Sunshine Coast Community Forest Economic Diversification Strategy Dashboard  BOARD PRIORITIES [Directors | CEO]  Now  1. Communications Tools  2. Partnership Agreements with Local Societies  3. Community Capacity Building  Advocacy  ‐ Public use of the Forest  ‐ Wood Culture on the Sunshine Coast  ‐ Outdoor Recreation Industry 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 59       4. Physical Infrastructure Investments  Next  ‐ Capilano University Initiative  ‐ School District Initiative  ‐ District of Sechelt joint plans  ‐ Regional Alliance joint Plans  ‐ Resource Education and Training  ORGANIZATIONAL PRIORITIES [ Chair | CEO]  ‐ Sustainability Review and Assessment  ‐ Governance Review and Assessment  OPERATIONAL PRIORITIES [CEO | Assistant | Technical Consultants]  ‐ Upgrade Web & Communications  ‐ Create Reporting Tools 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 60 8.0 Financial Allocations for Diversification Planning Purposes A lot has been learned about the Sunshine Coast, the interest in wood and access to the forest in the past  year. The firm is pleased with the quality and amount of information provided to the economic development  committee. As of this date, the firm is waiting on the opportunity to run through the two documents that  have  been  delivered  to  the  Board,  with  the  intent  of  securing  Board  approval  to  proceed.  The  firm  appreciates that on the face of it, the capacity for SCPI to engage in this plan with existing staff is not an  option.  This  is  why  when  the  firm  engaged  the  committee  last  year,  it  was  with  the  intent  of  following  through on implementation as a contractor and why the firm put considerably more non‐billable hours, time  and energy into producing information upon which the Board can take action.  What is known now that was not known when the work was launched:   The District of Sechelt has an interest in understanding its desired outcomes from engaging in some local  community economic development and economic development internally;   All four local and aboriginal governments have an interest in collaborating on the subject of regional  economic development but have yet to establish the framework for that collaboration; and;   There  are  other  organizations  in  the  community  that  would  appreciate  collaboration  with  Sechelt  Community Projects Inc. that are equally interested in supporting the Sunshine Coast Community Forest  interest in communicating the value of the wood industry and access to the Forest.  It is expected that the firm will complete the process and achieve a resolution of an approval in principle with  the Board of Directors, subject to consulting with the District of Sechelt to ensure that the plan meshes with  their Corporate Strategy and is compliant with their Official Community Plan and Sustainability Plans.   Two proposed budgets have been drafted for Board consideration when funds permit. The first is an estimate  of what is needed to fulfill the first two sections entitled Now 2012 and Next 2013. The second is a schedule  of estimated capital contributions to be made once plans and agreements are in place.  Table 9 Plan Implementation Draft Budget Estimates  Price Proposal‐ Hourly Totals of Tasks by Team Member  CEDC 1  CEDC 2  Admin  Activity  Hours        $150  $150  $75  Subtotal  2012 NOW ‐ SCPI STRATEGIC PRIORITIES | SUNSHINE COAST COMMUNITY FOREST      PROJECT INITIATION                    Project Initiation ‐ Client Meeting  3  1  1  $675  5     Review Existing Documents  4  1  1  $825  6     Refined Work Plan Deliverable  4  1  1  $825  6     Quarterly Committee Meetings 4 days each  32  0  0  $4,800  32     Travel and Accommodation Quarterly   34  0  0  $5,100  34  1  COMMUNICATIONS TOOLS        1.1  Meetings with community organizations  48  0  10  $7,950  58  1.2  Travel and Accommodation 2 visits 3 days each.  16  0  0  $2,400  16  1.3  Site and print design for Plan and Operations  15  100  1  $17,325  116  1.4  Social Media Package  15  5  1  $3,075  21  2  AGREEMENTS        2.1  Sechelt Groves Society Support Plan Consultation  8  0  4  $1,500  12  2.2  Sunshine Coast Trails Society Plan Consultation  8  0  4  $1,500  12  2.3  Regional Economic Development Consultation  8  0  4  $1,500  12  2.4  Training & Education Providers Consultation  8  0  4  $1,500  12  2.5  Industry and Business Consultation  8  0  4  $1,500  12  3  COMMUNITY CAPACITY        3.1  Sechelt Groves Society Final Agreements  8  0  4  $1,500  12 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 61 Price Proposal‐ Hourly Totals of Tasks by Team Member  CEDC 1  CEDC 2  Admin  Activity  Hours        $150  $150  $75  Subtotal  3.2  Sunshine Coast Trails Society Final Agreement  8  0  4  $1,500  12  3.3  Regional Economic Development Final Agreement  8  0  4  $1,500  12  3.4  Training & Education Providers Final Agreement  8  0  4  $1,500  12  3.5  Industry and Business Final Agreements  8  0  4  $1,500  12  4  PHYSICAL INFRASTRUCTURE        4.1  Contribution Agreements for Community Investments  40  4  4  $6,900  48  4.2  Community Investment Monitoring  40  4  4  $6,900  48     Team Member Hours Subtotal  331  116  63           Team Member Cost Subtotal  $49,650  $17,400  $4,725  $71,775  510              Sub  $71,775              Contingency  $1,000                 Sub  $72,775                 HST  $8,733                  Total  $81,508          
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 62 Table 10 Plan Investments in Community Capacity and Infrastructure Estimated Budgets  Estimated Contributions to Third‐Party organizations  Activity  Hours        Subtotal     2013 NEXT ‐ SCPI STRATEGIC PRIORITIES | CAPITAL INVESTMENTS 3 YEAR PLAN     PROJECT INITIATION  1  OPERATIONAL INVESTMENTS        1.1  Sechelt Groves Society Support Plan contribution  $5,000  0  1.2  Sunshine Coast Trails Society Plan contribution  $25,000  0  1.3  Regional Economic Development plan contribution  $10,000  0  1.4  Training & Education Providers contribution  $10,000  0  1.5  Industry and Business contribution  $10,000  0  2  CAPITAL INVESTMENTS        2.1  Sechelt Groves Society Improvement Contribution  $30,000  0  2.2  Sunshine Coast Trails Society Improvement Contribution  $30,000  0  2.3  Regional Economic Development Relocation Website  $30,000  0  2.4  Training & Education Providers Equipment Purchase  $30,000  0  2.5  Industry and Business Retention Workforce Website  $30,000  0     Team Member Hours Subtotal           Team Member Cost Subtotal  $210,000  0     Sub  $210,000        Contingency  0        Sub  $211,000        HST  0         Total  $211,000     In all, by implementing the first 2 sections of the proposed plan, the Board will have fulfilled the intent of  reinvesting  proceeds  from  managing  community  forests  into  community  based  initiatives  designed  to  produce results in terms of:   Retaining existing business by marketing their products;   Recruiting new business by demonstrating the capacity for wood and forest activities;   Growing other wood and forest organizations in the community that would not otherwise have access to  financial resources to move forward; and;   Fostered  new  relationships  through  community  development  that  few  other  community  forest  corporations have accomplished in British Columbia.  End of Report     
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 63 Appendix I ‐ Stakeholder Survey and Interviews   Contact Name  Title    X contacted and interviewed, I contacted to be interviewed, blank to be interviewed, NA means not applicable or available in the time allocated.  I  101 Contracting Co Ltd  Contractors  I  A & T Enterprises  Contractors  I  Aaron Joe  Tymay Industries  I  Adam Wall    I  Akari  Furniture etc  I  Alan Blattler  InterFor  X  Alice Janisch  Sechelt Councillor  X  Alice Lutes  Sechelt Councillor  I  Allan May    I  Alpine Recycled Products Ltd  Recycled Building Supplies   I  Andrew Van Wersch    I  Andrew Van Wersch  Furniture  I  Andy Koberwitz    I  Andy Koberwitz    I  Ann Kershaw  Sechelt Councillor  I  Arnold Skei  Sechelt Plumbing  I  Artwood Custom Homes Ltd.  Contractors  I  B&B Kitchen Concepts  Cabinets Bryan Harkin  I  Bank of Montreal    I  Barrie & Marian Reeves  Gibsons Building Supply Timbr Mart   I  Ben & Alayna Josephson    I  Ben Josephson    I  Bev Nielsen  Nielsen Design Consultants  I  Bill Davis    I  Bill Lasuta  Bill Lasuta and Associates Ltd.  I  Bill Stockwell  Stockwell Sand & Gravel  I  Blue Ox Logging Ltd.    X  Bob Sitter  SCPI Vice Chair  I  Brad Boser    I  Brad Boser    I  Brent Davie & Ron Colpits  Insta Glass  I  Brian Hawrych  BC Wood Specilaties Group  I  Brian Willsie    I  Bruce & Dena Nicholby  Winton Global Homes Division   I  Burns Matkin    I  Burns Matkin    I  Burtnick Enterprises Ltd  Contractors  I  Cam Forrester  Cam Forrester & Associates  X  Caroline Depatie  Sunshine Coast Trails Society  I  Charlie Anderson  Andersen Pacific Forest Products Ltd.  I  Chris Hall  Engineer  I  Chris Moore ‐ Secretary  Prudential Sussex Realty.   I  CIBC    X  Clark Hamilton ‐ President  Clark Hamilton Enterprises   I  Clark Hamilton Enterprises  Contractors  I  Coast Cable Communications Ltd.    I  Coast Columbia Cabinets  Cabinets  I  Coastline Fencing  James Talbot  I  Corona Construction Ltd  Contractors  I  Craig Moore  Remax Oceanview Realty  I  Creekwood Flooring    I  Crystal Creek Homes  Contractors  I  Custom Craft Design  Contractors  I  Dakota Creek Resources  Sawyer Fred Gazeley  I  Dale Allenback  Engineer  X  Dale Eicher  Citizen  I  Dan Giillis    I  Dana Brash    I  Daniel Kokolu    I  Daniel Kokolus    X  Darnellda Siegers  Citizen  X  Darren Inkster  Sechelt Mayor  I  Dave Beauchesene  Suncoast Woodcrafters Guild  I  Dave Clarke  Canadian Overseas Log & Lumber Ltd.  I  Dave Tennant    I  Dave Tennant  Woodworker  I  Dave Vaughan    I  Dave Vaughn    I  David Elstone    I  Dennis Munson    I  Dennis Munson    I  Desmond Paine  Architect  I  Detlev Ahrendt & Marina Ahrendt  Firefly Lighting 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 64   Contact Name  Title    X contacted and interviewed, I contacted to be interviewed, blank to be interviewed, NA means not applicable or available in the time allocated.  I  Din Ruttlyneck    I  Don Ewing  Prima Developments Inc  X  Doug MacLaren  CEO Resource Training Organization  I  Doug Spani ‐ Treasurer  Spani Development Ltd.   I  E & J Perry Home Svc  Contractors  I  Eddie Dignard    X  Elise Rudland  SCPI Director  I  Eric Holtz    I  Excelsa Enterprises  Contractors  I  Fiedler Bros Contracting Ltd  Contractors  I  Fred Gazeley    I  Fred Taylor  Sechelt Councillor  I  Garrett Hunt Construction  Contractors  I  Gary Cross    I  Gary Kelly  Wood turner  I  Gary Kent  Furniture, etc  I  Gibsons Building Supplies Ltd  Building Supplies   I  Gibsons Building Supplies Ltd  Building Supplies  I  Gibsons Building Supplies Ltd ‐ Gibsons & Sechelt    I  Gina Stockwell ‐ Director  Stockwell Sand & Gravel   X  Glen Bonderud  SCPI Ec.D. Chair  I  Heinz Tigge, SC Woodcrafters    I  Hoffmann Construction  Contractors  I  Ian Jacques  The Coast Reporter  I  Inlet Maplewood Products    I  Interlake Hardwoods   Flooring  I  Island Woodcraft    X  Jacquie Cunliffe  SCPI Asisstant  I  Jade Cavalier    I  Jade Cavalier    I  James Michael Klipa  Engineer  I  James Talbot    I  Jan Nielsen  Westwind Hardwoods Inc.  I  Jann Boyd, Joanne Clark    I  Jay Jones    I  Jeanne Robinson  Raven's Cry Cedar Homes  I  Jeff Endress  Canadian Tire  X  Jim Cleghorn  Chamber of Commerce  I  Jim Edgar  Government Agent  I  Jim Slakov    I  JMK Civil Engineering Ltd.    X  Jo‐Anne Frank  SCPI Liaison  I  John Gillespie    X  John Henderson  SCPI Chair  I  John Jensen    I  John Jensen Woodworking  Cabinets, Furniture  I  John Milne  Engineer  I  Julian Burtnick  Burtnick Enterprises Ltd.   I  Keith and Brian Stephens    X  Keith Atkinson RPF  BC First Nations Forestry Council  I  Keith Thirkell  Sechelt Councillor  I  Kelly Barabash  Sawyer  I  Ken & Lois Fuhrmann  CCIS Custom Homes & Renovations   I  Ken Baker  Forestry Innovation Investment Ltd.  I  Ken Birkin  Azimuth Excavation  I  Kenith Perreur Lloyd  Engineer  I  Kensington Cabinets    I  Kensington Cabinets    I  Kensington Cabinets  Cabinets  X  Kevin Davie  SCPI Manager  I  Kim Liptak  Sunshine Coast Credit Union  I  Kim McGinnis    I  KMS Tools    I  Koen Drugmand    I  Kokulus Omnicraft  Contractors  I  Kristi Swanson  Swanson’s Ready‐Mix  I  L J Contracting  Contractors  I  Laima van Turnhout  Habitat for Humanity Sunshine Coast  I  Lamb's Contracting Ltd  Contractors  I  Lance Sparling ‐ Vice President  Wakefield Homes   I  Landwise Consultants Inc.    I  Lanny Matkin    X  Len Pakulak  SCPI Past Chair  I  Lexa Supply  Sawyers  I  Lloyd Engineering    I  Lone Wolf Forest Products    I  Lydia and Gary Jackson  Off the Edge Bike Shop 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 65   Contact Name  Title    X contacted and interviewed, I contacted to be interviewed, blank to be interviewed, NA means not applicable or available in the time allocated.  I  Mackenzie Construction  Contractors  I  Mark & Carol McKray    I  Mark Carota  Super Energy Efficient Developments Inc  I  Mark Safioles  Woodworker  I  Martin Hug  Sunshine Coast Fencing  I  Martini Guitars    I  Mary Blockberger  Sunshine Coast Botanical Garden Society  I  Matthew Kliewer    I  Maurice Arduin    I  MG Engineering    I  Michael Knobloch  Davis Bay Door Ltd  X  Michele Devlin  Gibsons Chamber of Commerce  I  Mike Evans  RE/MAX Oceanview Realty  I  Mike Weber  Weber/McCall Electric  I  Mobius Architecture  Architects  I  Mountain Marine Transportation Ltd    I  Nicholas Simons  MLA  I  Nicola Kozakiewicz  Architect  I  Northwest Contracting  Contractors  I  P.J. Hardwoods    I  Pacific Home Improvements    I  Pacific Home Improvements  Contractors  I  Panorama Construction  Contractors  I  Paul and Doug Saunders  Custom Carpet & Interiors  I  Paul Morris  Paul's Paintin' Place  I  PDM Construction  Contractors  X  Peter Moonen  SCPI Director  I  Peter Sugars    I  Peter Sugars    I  Peter Treuheit    I  Proteus Natural Oils  Cedar oil  I  Rainy River Cedar  Sawyers  I  Rainy River Cedar Ltd. ‐ Brad & Dale Boser    I  Ralph Fraser    X  Ralph Fraser  Citizen  I  Ralph W. Schilling Architects  Architect  I  Raven   Owner/Builder   I  RDM Designs    I  Richard Barrett  Furniture, stairs, doors, windows   I  Richard Crook    I  Rick Hamilton    I  Ridge Point Contracting  Contractors  I  Rob Infanti  Green Coastal Pre‐Fab Systems Inc  I  Rob Milsted  Building Design  I  Robert Mortlock    I  Robert van Norman  Inside Passage School of Fine Cabinetmaking  I  Roger Bordreau  Engineer  I  Ron Cameron ‐ Director  Finishes 1st   I  Rona Home Centre    I  Rona Home Centre  Building Supplies  I  Roy Sunstrom  Coastal Cast Stone  I  Russ Cameron  Independent Lumber Remanufacturers Association  I  Salish Cedar Products Ltd.  Sawyers  I  Scotia Bank    I  Scott Avery  Stairs, finish carpentry  I  Sharon Anderchek  Community Futures Manager  I  Slakov Woodventures    I  Smuggler’s Cove Specialty Wood Ltd Products  Anton Janze  I  Spani Developments Ltd.  Contractors  I  Specialty Wood Products  Building Supplies   I  SSC Custom Cedar  Cedar  X  Stan Anderson  SCPI Director  I  Stephen Edson    I  Stephen Hinton  Architect  I  Stephen Hinton Architect    I  Sue & Bryan Kartinen    I  Sugar Cabinets & Millwork  Cabinets, furniture, millwork  I  Sun Co Recycled Bldg Materials  Recycled Building Supplies  I  Sunco Building Materials Ltd.    I  Sunco Civil Consulting Ltd.    I  Suncoast Lumber & Milling  Sawyers  I  Sunshine Coast Building Centre  Building Supplies  I  Sunshine Coast Eng. Ltd.    I  Sunshine Coast Home Building Centre    I  Sunshine Coast Woodcrafters ‐ Heinz Tigges    I  Sunshine Mobile Milling  Sawyers  I  Susan Ferguson  Sechelt Downtown Business Association 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 66   Contact Name  Title    X contacted and interviewed, I contacted to be interviewed, blank to be interviewed, NA means not applicable or available in the time allocated.  I  Tasse Enterprises Ltd.  Sawyer  I  TD Canada Trust    I  Terry Chow & Aaron Hamilton  RF Binnie & Associates Ltd  I  Terry Dawe    I  Teryl Mullock    I  The Local    I  Thomas Dolker  Sunshine Coast Forest Products Ltd  X  Tim Anderson  SCPI Director  I  Timothy Clement    I  Timothy Clement  Furniture, Chairs, other  I  Todd and George Blas    I  Tom Clelland  Creek Audio Works  I  Tom Dolker    X  Tom Pinfold  SCPI Director  I  Top Notch Hardwood Floors  Floors  I  TR Maplewoods ‐ Tom Stanway    I  Trail Bay Home Hardware    I  Tsain Ko    I  Tsain‐Ko Forest Products  Various products  I  Venture Enterprises  Contractors  I  Versacan Construction‐ Henk deVries    I  W. Blake Fougère   BC Forest Service  I  Wagman Construction  Contractors  I  Wakefield Home Builders    I  Wakefield Home Builders  Contractors  I  Walter Tripp    I  Warren Allen  Sechelt Councillor  I  Wendy  Shishalh CEO  I  West Coast Log Homes  Log and timber frame  I  West Coast Log Homes    I  Will Cummer  Woodworker  I  Windfall Resources    I  Windsor Plywood    I  Woodlatch  Woodworker   
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 67 Appendix II ‐ Acknowledgments A number of organizations and individuals made available their expertise and time in support of this project.    Most importantly, Capital EDC Economic Development Company acknowledges the assistance of the  Bonderud Household, the Moonen Household, the Marshall Household and the Yeoman McDade Household  for without whose support, Capital EDC Economic Development Company would not have been able to  complete this assignment.   In addition, Capital EDC Economic Development Company wishes to express its appreciation to the following  organizations and individuals that assisted us with their time and considerable expertise in the completion of  this project:  Mr. Clark Hamilton, Coast Builders Association  Mr. Darren Inkster, Mayor, District of Sechelt  Mr. David Lasser, General Manager, Sechelt Community Projects Inc.  Mr. Glen Bonderud, Cortex Consultants Inc. and Committee Chair   Mr. Jim Cleghorn, Chair, Sunshine Coast Economic Development Task Force  Mr. John Henderson, Chair [Retired], Sechelt Community Projects Inc.  Mr. Kevin Davie, General Manager [Former], Sechelt Community Projects Inc.  Mr. Peter Moonen, Canadian Wood Council, and Committee Member  Mr. Rob Bremner, Chief Administrative Officer, District of Sechelt  Mr. Tom Pinfold, Gardner Pinfold & Associates, and Committee Member  Ms Darnelda Siegers, Coast Builders Association  Ms Linda Harris, Administrator, Sechelt Community Projects Inc.  Ms Shelley McDade, Chief Executive Officer, Sunshine Coast Community Savings and Credit Union  Ms Wendy Rockafellow, Chief Executive Officer [Former], Tsain‐Ko Corporation  Sechelt Community Projects Inc. Economic Diversification Committee     
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 68 Appendix III – Discussion Paper It takes a Village1  Market Position Statement 2  Identify Business Wish List 3  Create a Supportive Business Environment 4  Make the Environment Appealing 5  Overcome Barriers to Business Investment 6  Offer Incentives, not the kind you think 7  Assemble the Creative 8  Deliver the Story 9  Assemble the Package 10  Being Site Specific 11  Generate Leads 12  Prospecting 13  Personal Visits 14  The Familiarization Tour 15  Make the Pitch 16  Close the Deal 17  The Move 18  The Start 19  What to expect when you’re expecting 20  Repeat the Process 21    Operating Plan  Business Recruitment | Sunshine Coast Community Forest  Focusing on Wood and Forest Value                  Presented By  Patrick Nelson Marshall  Capital EDC Economic Development Company  www.capitaledc.com    May 4th  2011  Sechelt, British Columbia, Pacific Region, CANADA 
    • This is a +1 (604) The fol by Capi meetin needs a move fo results  There a A. Con The and bus Out Sun how res The non the final plan: No rep ) 885‐7809 - ve lowing is a pr ital EDC Econ gs on the Sun assessment fo orward on an identified in t are two main  nduct a series e Wood Focu d processing b siness and no tcomes from  nshine Coast W w the region  ulting in new e Forest Focu n‐governmen e community. production or dis rsion dated – Ma roscribed stra omic Develop nshine Coast.  or the Sechelt n integrated e their Forest M recommenda s of Focus Gro s Group com business, reta on‐governmen the Wood Fo Wood Produc establishes th w construction us Group com nt organizatio   stribution without ay 28 th 2012 ategy that is b pment throug This docume t Community economic dive Management  ations:  oups with bu prised of reso ail and service nt organizatio ocus Group pr cts, collabora he Home Tea n and jobs.  prised of Out ns representi written permissi based on six m gh site visits,  ent is not a st  Projects Inc.  ersification pr Plan.  siness owner ource extract e commercial ons.  rocess will inc ation on estab m to respond tdoor retail a ing social, eco Sechelt Co ion from the Sec months of inv interviews an udy or a repo  economic de rogram desig rs and operat tion and harve l businesses s clude joint m blishing the A d to expressio nd service co onomic and e ommunity Pro chelt Community vestigative wo nd attendanc ort, but rathe evelopment c gned to cause ors in two gro est business,  supply chain t   arketing for t Away Recruitm on of interest ommercial bu environmenta   ojects Inc. 20 Projects Inc. Page ork completed e at public  r, a strategic  committee to e planned  oups:  manufacturi to the wood  the sale of  ment team an  in investmen sinesses and  al interests in 012 e 69 d    ng  nd  nt   
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 70 Outcomes from the Forest Focus Group process will include joint marketing and use of the  Sunshine Coast Forests, collaboration on establishing the use of the Forest for non‐timber  values like organized recreation, free access recreation, another product for destination  marketing for the travel industry, event management and collaboration for botanical interests  and use of non‐wood related products from the Forest and to respond to expressions of  interest in investment resulting in new construction and jobs associated with the Retail and  Service Commercial activities associated with the Forest.  B. Pick Teams  From the participants in the Focus Groups, establish an Away Team to present the Wood and  Forest opportunities and a Home Team to build on business retention, expansion and to host  prospects on familiarization tours, events and eventual relocation.  Home Team – Is responsible for coordinating activities inside the region with respect to  facilitating new activities designed to raise the profile of the Wood and Forest Values  associated with the community forest. This means developing the narrative, tools, products and  opportunities to host people interested in using the Forest and celebrating the value of Wood.    Away Team – is responsible for coordinating activities with respect to presenting offers to buy  unique wood products created on the Sunshine Coast and to communicate the value of Forest  access for recreational and outdoor adventures. This will ultimately address deficiencies in  hospitality and accommodation services associated with larger groups of people and feathering  activities on the shoulders of the traditional 90 day summer season.  C. Establish Metrics  In order to report progress to the community every 90 days, the Focus Groups and Teams need  to establish a simple set of measures to demonstrate tangible and intangible results of this  effort.  1 It Takes a Village  Establish Your Business Recruitment Team. But what you really want is every taxpayer and every  citizen telling the same story to their extended family and associates so that you get the full six  degrees of separation working for you.  To begin the recruitment process, a proactive business recruitment team needs to be assembled.  This team should bring a clear and realistic understanding of the market analysis, have skills in  economic development and real estate, and have an ability to sell and follow through. Training for  the team may be necessary. A team of five to seven participants could include:   Established (and retired) business owners;   Local real estate professionals;   Current building owners who are interested in exploring various uses for their property;   Bankers;   Local development organization representatives;   The Mayor, Regional Chair, Chief Councillor, Elected officials, CAO’s ; and   Chamber of commerce and visitor bureau directors.  The team will help serve as a management entity for recruitment efforts, focusing on those  properties and areas that are critical for the economic success of the area. Through the process, the  team will coordinate efforts with local real estate professionals. 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 71 On the southern Sunshine Coast, there are two processes at work:  The Public Sector – Recently the District of Sechelt, Sunshine Coast Regional District Sechelt Indian  Band and the Village of Gibson’s met to establish a Task Force of Chief Administrative Officers to  determine the best Regional delivery model for economic development. In addition the Mayor of  Sechelt has established “Mayors Task Force on Economic Development.  The Private Sector – The Coast Community‐Association of Builders, The Sechelt Chamber of  Commerce, Tsain‐Ko Forestry Development Corporation, The Gibson’s and District Chamber of  Commerce, The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver all have elements of the formula and  resources required to engage in business recruitment.  In order for the Sechelt Community Forest Corporation to assess the interest in a community  approach to business recruitment, the Corporation, with assistance from these business groups in  identifying likely participants, needs to go back to the community and follow on from the  “Community Forest Forum” held in 2008. Another study was completed by Dan Gilles that should  be revisited as a starting point. Add to that the Inbound Investment Strategy and the Lionsgate  Strategy from 2002 and the area is well served by studies.  2 Market Position Statement For a recruitment program to be successful, the team must be ready to articulate a clear market  position statement for the area.  A market position statement should characterize the type of retail mix, the shopping environment,  and the target customer market. The statement distinguishes your area from surrounding areas.  Often, a community’s market position statement will serve as background for identifying the types  of businesses that could be recruited.  The position statement for Wood and Forest Values on the Sunshine Coast must be derived from the discussion at the Focus Groups if it is to have any authenticity. An example of a statement might say: “The people of the Sunshine Coast value people who live for, work and play with wood”. Once established, the Focus Group would determine what the achievement of this End Statement or position statement would look like when accomplished. From that, metrics are established to measure the stapes towards achievement of this statement. 3 Identify Business Wish List A wish list of potential businesses should be developed by the focus group. These potential  businesses should complement and strengthen the existing businesses and reflect the market  position and vision statements. Realistic annual recruitment goals (number of businesses on the  wish list) should be set.  To identify appropriate business candidates (micro sawmills, custom specialty wood, veneer mill)  for your community, first analyze your business deficits (or opportunities) by specific category.  Those categories that make market sense are then analyzed to make sure they fit into the niche,  space utilization (specifically clustering) and marketing (specifically target market). Use the  following criteria in finalizing your wish list:   Is there appropriate space in the area for this type of business?  Yes, there is. SCPI requires property profiles from each of the four local jurisdiction’s so that the  prospects are clearly identified.   Will it complement existing businesses? 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 72 Each property must be identified for its highest and best use, including what is considered to be  complimentary. Each of the four jurisdictions must be requested to provide the GIS material on one  page area profiles with an overview location map, fit to the Letter sized stationery in a pdf format.   Will it serve targeted market segments?  There will be distinct business uses derived from the wood discussion that relate to harvesting,  manufacturing and more retail, commercial, non‐government uses related to Forest values. Target  markets will be identified at the focus group sessions. Economic Developers can proscribe the  target markets; however, this top down approach often alienates and disconnects the focus group  participants when the Corporation requires their ownership of the outcome.   Does it fill an important gap in the business mix?  Today, there are few, if any business clusters that have been assembled or pursued on the south  Sunshine Coast. Many have been identified, but few have been actually developed around an  implementation plan as if processed in this document.   Will the business strengthen an existing cluster of businesses?  The dominant sector in this economic region is the effect of transfer payments in terms of old age  security, retirement and social service payments pegged at 60%. Introducing the Wood cluster will  have a direct impact in terms of sustaining high paying production, design and development jobs in  the region. The Forest value discussion is bound to influence users of outdoor recreational, cultural  and sport activities which helps build the destination tourism component of the economy. Although  it is noted that there is a lack of large accommodation and hospitality properties located in the  region at this time.   Was this business category identified as important in local consumer research?  Both the Wood and Forest sectors of the economy have long been identified as targets for  development.   Does market demand and supply data support the need for this types of business?  In the case of Wood Harvest, 996% of the wood harvested is shipped away from the region, lacking  the required breakdown and utilization businesses. For the Forest side, there are no indicators of  supply and demand at this time, in order to make an informed decision.   Does the business fit it with the market position and vision statements?  This question will be answered having hosted the focus groups. And can only be answered then  Informed sources from industry suggest that the region will support the following investments:  ‐ Seeding Entrepreneurs: Offer a bursary sufficient to attend UBC Centre for Advanced Wood  Processing (6 months), followed by a grant of $10,000 for starting a wood related business  employing two or more people. The Community Forest Corporation would then monitor and  provide mentorship to the new businesses as a support group.  ‐ Sales Support: Encourage more businesses to pursue the specialized wood furniture and  cabinetry plants with appropriate design and marketing expertise. This would take advantage  of the concentration of wood artisans in the region and enable the extension of invitations to  specialty marketers to come into the region to source product quarterly.  ‐ Forest Guides: Assist in the development on a Region Specific Outdoor Recreation curriculum  with Capilano University using the Community Forest Office as the field classroom.  ‐ Fat Tire Haven: Working wth the Outdoor Adventure Destination Marketers and off‐road  cycling community, develop the short and long term plan that results in the Sunshine Coast  Trail network being sanctioned by World Class organizations as a Bike and Hike destination. This  may involve collaborating with Whistler.  ‐ Artisan Boundaries – Encourage the establishment of a Fence Plant using red and yellow cedar  in the same spirit as the Tsain‐Ko operation. [$1 million] 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 73 ‐ Red Roof Plant – Encourage the investment in a Truss Plant that would produce 1 to 2 home  roof systems a day using Spruce, Pine and Fir [SPF].  ‐ Primary Breakdown – Using the Powell River model, recruit an operator to establish a small  flexible sawmill for all sizes and grades of logs, with a small dry kiln that may have extra  capacity to supply kiln services to others.  ‐ Dry Space – Collocate a custom dry kiln operation for all species and grades of wood. This  investment ranges from $400,000 to $2 million.  ‐ Hew Saw – The Corporation will approach the new owners of Howe Sound Pulp and Paper, as  well as the other operators, to determine who best to invite into the region to construct and  operate a small sawmill specializing in small logs. [~$5 million]  ‐ Thin Veneer – The Corporation will approach Coastland Wood Industries to determine the  feasibility of a Veneer Mill [$30 million].  Additional Investments can be pursued once the Focus Groups have been started on a regular basis  so that existing businesses can identify what they need in terms of support to be retained and  expand in the existing market. In order to engage in recruitment of new investment, the existing  business community needs to commit to the process of identifying priorities and participating in  the offer.    4 Create a Supportive Business Environment Before actual recruitment can begin, the people that step forward from the Focus Groups to work  on these files need to make sure that the area presents itself as an inviting place to do business.  The region must present a quality business environment in order to attract viable businesses and  ensure the successful operation of businesses within the Wood and Forest Clusters. It must appeal  to the rational investor who is seeking to minimize risk and maximize financial return. Often, this  supportive business environment will include incentives to help “level the playing field” with other  centers including those developed on the edge of town.  In this regions case, there are four distinct jurisdictions with separate rules of engagement. These  are to be clearly illustrated in a simple package that forms a part of “The Offer”. This means more  than generic printed matter covering the community’s vision of itself, but rather, a third‐party  validation of those values as discerned by the Focus Groups.  As of this date, Capital EDC Economic Development Company could not locate a valid recruitment  package or Offer package for Sechelt. It needs to be constructed and coordinated with existing  reception offices that include the Visitor Centre, Volunteer Centre, Taxi Companies, Real Estate  Offices and Local Government and First Nation offices.  The Focus Groups will identify the issues and opportunities associated with business retention,  expansion and recruitment.  5 Make the Environment Appealing To grow existing business and recruit new businesses, a community must first make its business  area visibly active, attractive, convenient and safe. This is often more difficult for non‐shopping  center locations including downtowns as they typically do not operate under a central  management. Before the recruitment process begins, work with existing business operators and  city officials to ensure:   An aesthetically pleasing commercial and industrial environment;   Safe, Secure and accessible industrial and commercial properties are available ;   Adequate and conveniently located parking and transportation services; and 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 74  High business operational standards and service which project a quality, unified and consistent  image for the area.  Using the Focus Group process: Help the region understand how it is viewed by outsiders. Also,  refer to findings from local consumer attitudes research. Capital EDC Economic Development  Company has blind shopped the region for the required resources, but will defer to the  conversation within the Wood and Forest focus groups.  6 Overcome Barriers to Business Investment in the Area Many retail and service businesses choose "edge" locations on the outside of town because such  locations have proven successful and expansions are easy to replicate. Downtown and other in‐ town commercial areas need to recognize and overcome barriers to business investment in their  areas. Barriers often include:   Higher land costs;   More title problems (because of their history, properties often present complex title issues);   Permitting that is more complex and time‐consuming;   Zoning that may be more restrictive;   Site preparation (for new construction) that is more complex;   Construction and renovations that are more complex;   Building footprints that are typically smaller; and   Parking that is more restrictive.  These factors need to be assessed as part of the Focus Group process. The Corporation needs to ask  its existing businesses and peers to identify barriers and develop a coordinated response to issues  and weaknesses.  The Corporation and the leadership group should understand these barriers, both perceived and  real, and work with business and community leaders to minimize them. Sometimes creative  incentives can be developed to make the area more competitive from a business investment  perspective.  7 Offer Incentives, not the kind you think It is also important that the Corporation fully understand what the community can to offer the  prospective business. Incentives might include:   Technical assistance including market and feasibility analysis, business plan development,  governmental regulations, advertising and physical design.  These resources are available from institutions and volunteers in the community. The  Corporation needs a Task Group arising from the Forums to provide lists of people prepared to  provide support in these areas.   Negotiation and leasing of space if the prospect is not working with a broker or not familiar  with the area;  There needs to be an orientation to the ICI Real Estate Offerings so that both practitioners and  the public understand what is on offer and what uses are best suited to the available land.  Again, another task suited to a group coming out of the Focus Group sessions.   Financing of building improvements, facades, displays, fixtures, inventory and start‐up costs  including a low‐interest loan pool;  This is an area that should be discussed with the lending community and Coast Community‐ Builders Association to determine if this approach is feasible.   Counseling with local financial institutions and assistance in completing loan applications; 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 75 Another subject for which a team of volunteers need to be recruited or at least a referral  process to the people best suited to put packages together.   Financing options and incentives appealing to developers such as low‐interest loan;  The only option here is if Local Government and First Nations own land with which they can  engage in non‐conventional property acquisition processes or staged sale closing.   Area  wide image and marketing programs and advertising and promotion assistance for  individual firms;  There are at least five separate marketing programs being discussed currently. Clearly, the  Woof and Forest Focus Group strategies will require an independent labeling program as a sub  of an overarching regional positioning strategy. The Corporation and its peer group operating in  the region are best suited to advise on what that positioning narrative is comprised of.   An effective business to business networking system;  The Focus Groups bring together like minded individuals from the private sector to collaborate  on short bursts of activity designed to benefit the community.   Private development partnerships made up of local investors who might develop, own and  operate a needed business;   The Coast Community‐Builders Association is one of the more advanced organizations Capital  EDC has come across. It already has a program policy identified in this regard and the  Corporation should seek ways of supporting and endorsing its approach; and;   Business incubator(s) to help establish new businesses at a reasonable cost and provide them  with space and common services.  This is always a challenge in smaller communities as no one wants to compete with private  property owners. However, the Focus Groups may identify orphaned public property that is  surplus to public needs. The Kitimat Valley Institute and Campbell River’s Enterprise Centre are  great examples of old infrastructure put to new uses.   Using the Focus Group process: Identify locally valued business incentives.  8 Assemble the Creative Attractive recruitment and marketing materials should be developed to convey the market  potential of the business area. Business recruitment materials must help convince a business  operator that this region is unique and that it offers a competitive edge over other locations.  Recent efforts to communicate unique values in the region are of a high quality. As the Focus Group  conducts its conversation, creative opportunities unique to conveying the Wood and Forest  opportunities are expected to come out of the Focus Group process.  9 Deliver your story There is no evidence of market analysis data available to help business operators evaluate the  potential for their venture. When developing marketing materials, provide only relevant  information to avoid information overload. Consider the following in the Wood and Forest  packages:   Letter of introduction including compelling reasons why the area  makes economic sense for  them;   General information and photos of the community highlighting its assets;   Market position and vision statements;   Wish list of new businesses supported by market demand and supply data;   New developments demonstrating investment downtown;   Information on past openings and closings of businesses; 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 76  Trade area geographic definition and demographic and lifestyle data;   Trade area economic data including actual and potential sales data if available;   Nonresident consumer data (including daytime population and tourism visitation);   Descriptions of target market segments served;   Major employers and institutions;   Vehicle and pedestrian traffic volume;   Mix of existing retail, service, dining, housing, office and lodging in the area ;   Press coverage and testimonials highlighting success stories;   Promotional calendar; and   Summary of incentives and other business assistance available in the business area.  Using the Focus Group process: Summarize applicable data and recommendations from assembled.  10 Assemble the Package Graphs and maps are particularly effective ways to describe the region, the local area, retail  competition, and development trends. For the business area and trade area, include:   Property schedules from the RD, the two urban municipalities and the Sechelt Indian Band;   Current area  vacancy map;   Business mix and clustering map displaying information on all area  buildings;   Major employers, institutions and points of interest map of area;   Traffic volume map;   Trade area maps defined by customer origin and drive‐times; and   Consumer spending demand and supply maps.  When targeting prospects, remember that not all businesses have the same requirements. A  portable saw mill typically requires a different market than an Outdoor Guide. Communities should  customize information to fit the needs of the particular prospect and collaborate on what the  common package for the Sunshine Coast looks like. The “look and feel’ should not reflect  government design standards, but should be customized to suit the industry targeted for sicussion.  11 Being Site Specific In addition to market data, information on specific buildings is required. This information includes:   Maps and photos describing the location, building and it history;   Complementary businesses and business clusters nearby;   Sales and rent per square foot (with comparison market data);   Available commercial and residential space and floor plan;   Operating expenses including utility rates and taxes;   Current tenants and how the building could be optimally reused; and   Property owner or other contact for more information.   When completed, recruitment and marketing materials should be assembled in an attractive  packet and offered online. Quality content, graphics and formatting are required.   Using the Market Analysis: To help summarize building specific data.  The Greater Vancouver Real Estate Board advises that this information is limited for the region,  however, the community of realtors should be approached by the Corporation to advise on the  contents of this package. The Board has already expressed an interest in working with the  Corporation at its April Luncheon.  12 Generate Leads
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 77 The Corporations next responsibility is to find appropriate businesses that might be interested in a  site in the market area or need new space to expand. Leads can be broken town into four general  categories:   Existing Businesses within or near the business area  – Often the best leads are found near  home. Leads might include existing businesses seeking more space or a better location in the  business region. The Focus Groups outcomes and ongoing conversations and personal contacts  of the recruitment team, chamber of commerce and other economic development  professionals can help identify these leads. The Corporation should offer a non‐disclosure to  provide certainty in these private discussions. It is in a unique position to bridge the initial  dialogue between the private operator and government institutions.     Emerging Entrepreneurs ‐ Downtowns and business area s are often attractive to independent  businesses. Accordingly, leads might include home‐based or garage‐based businesses seeking  more space and a convenient location for their customers. These leads might include managers  of existing businesses wishing to go into business on their own. Commercial lenders, business  schools, Community Futures counselors, Downtown BIA’s, Service Corps of Retired Executives  (SCORE), Rotary Club International (PROBUS), Chamber of Commerce and other public or  private small business professionals should be asked to help identify these leads and to engage  in a common protocol agreement for being accountable for fulfilling the needs of existing and  prospective businesses.     Existing Local or Regional Businesses ‐ Local or regional businesses, particularly those that have  multiple locations and are ready to expand, are often excellent prospects. These business  operators typically have a good knowledge of the market area, and may already have multiple  stores. They are often interested in expansion as a way to improve their penetration of the  market. These leads can be identified through the Focus Group process knowledge of the  business mix in other communities in the region and information collected from local sources.  In addition, realtors, commercial brokers, sales representatives and suppliers that work within  the region must be enlisted in the cause.      National Chains and Corporate Operations ‐ National chains and public|private corporations  must be canvassed. It is important to be realistic about the kinds of chains that might be  interested in a small community as their market, operations size and site requirements may  preclude them from considering the type of land governments and the market have available.  The best source of Leads in this category is derived from personal contacts. The Corporation  has one of the best volunteer Boards for these activities as their networks are extensive. In  addition, leads will also come from commercial brokers, trade shows, “deal making forums,”  and conferences such as those already identified in the Lionsgate Strategy and the Warner  Investment Attraction Strategy.  Once leads have been identified, an industrial and commercial assessment checklist needs to be  developed by the Corporation to ensure quality standards for prospects and to make sure the  business would fit the market. The checklist could be completed by a Corporation volunteer  member on a reconnaissance visit to the business. It might include:   Business category (type); 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 78  Target markets;   Businesses’ location requirements;   Image;   Inventory and selection;   Pricing;   Presentation;   Exterior appearance;   Interior décor, lighting and fixtures;   Service; and   Traffic generated.  The Corporation needs to establish a “Home Team” and an “Away Team”. The Focus Groups should  be assessed for appropriate volunteers to make up the Home Team whose sole purpose is to  receive people into the community. Clearly, in Sechelt’s case, the Volunteer Centre, Community  Foundation and the Visitor Centre have the right combination of talents, with some training, to  accomplish this function.   The Away Team has a different sales oriented skill set. This experience is about low key, high quality  people that can tell the regions story using simple tools and personal professional candour to  communicate the opportunities.  The Corporation will coordinate the Home and Away Teams such that offers are coordinated to  match the resources available. Person to Person communications are far and away more productive  than ad or advertising placement. These structured marketing efforts are high cost producing low  results. A Themed web site combined with a simple narrative and coordinated volunteers often  produces the biggest results.  13 Prospecting The Corporation must now focus on a personalized sales effort that conveys a message that the  area is a good location for expansion or new business development. Efforts to personally  communicate and then follow up with potential business are essential to the success of a  recruitment effort. Presented below is a sequence of steps to reach potential business owners or  developers.  Once the communications program has been set, including coordinated social media using a vast  network of citizens as correspondents, the Corporation can commence the task of following up  leads and challenges derived from the Focus Group, enlisting Focus Group participants as team  members, and start the process of following the step‐by‐step process of ground trothing challenges  to business retention and expansion, while communicating opportunities associated with both the  Wood and Forest clusters of businesses and Non‐government organizations. This will then inform  government process related to business interface operations like building inspection, planning and  development processes, while at the same time provide the elected people with a team of  coordinated people to work with.  14 Personal Visits After the initial contacts are made a letter of introduction should follow to set up an appointment  for a personal visit by someone from the Corporation or its volunteer Away Team. The purpose of  the appointment is to explain why your community is interested in their business. Explain why their  business would be profitable and what incentives might be available. Provide recruitment and  marketing materials and any other information to demonstrate the pro‐investment Wood and  Forest character of Region. Offer an invitation to the business operator to visit your community. 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 79 Each quarter, there are community events around which business expansion and recruitment  candidates can be hosted in small, one‐to‐one and group environments. Consider buying two or  three tables at the next Botanical or Community Foundation fund raiser as the means for  establishing the personal relationships required to move files forward.  Coordination between the Away Team and the Home Team is critical. Here is where Mayors,  Electoral Area Directors, Chairs and Chief Councilors combine forces with Chamber and Rotary  Presidents, to put the best and united face of the region forward. There is no room for local rivalry  and continued seemingly harmless rumors or innuendo are not appropriate.  15 The FAM‐iliarization Tour or the “Quad Cab” It is the Home Team’s job to persuade the prospective business or developer that your region has a  distinct advantage over other locations. The site visit is a critical opportunity to persuade the  business owner to invest in your area. Prospects should be personally invited to tour the  community. The tour (previewed and rehearsed time and again ahead of time) should include stops  at possible business sites, competitive business areas, residential neighborhoods, employment  centers and Government Offices.   Set up visits with key local merchants. Lunch or dinner should be included with selected business  operators and public officials.  In Campbell River, the “Quad Cab” tour was pioneered. The economic development receptionist,  would pick up a brand new demonstration Dodge Quad Cab with a hemi and give the tour,  dropping the prospect off at the Mayor’s office for a visit.  Throughout the prospect’s visit, the Home Team must be prepared to answer questions such as  why similar businesses have closed, the history of adjoining businesses next to prospective sites,  and how to contact local landlords. Local property owners, lenders, government officials, and other  businesses can be part of this welcoming and persuasive effort.  After the visit, it is important that thank you letters be sent from various community leaders  including the government leaders and selected business representatives. Mail or fax articles and  publicity about community events and businesses during the following weeks. Deliver a basket of  merchandise unique to your region. Finally, make sure the Away Team is prepared to promptly  answer follow up information requests in a prompt and professional manner.  16 Make the Pitch A leader on the Away Team should close the deal by selling the merits of locating in the business  area. Remind the prospect that your area is looking for a business with their characteristics.  Practice effective sales presentation skills and focus on key selling points of interest to the  prospect:   Key market data (such as a population density surrounding the area );   Findings from the analysis of demand and supply in the particular business category;   Expected sales per square foot and reasons why they would be successful there;    Examples of comparable businesses in the area  that have prospered; and   Why the area is a better place to do business.  17 Close the Deal The Away Team continues to stay in contact with the prospect. If the prospect is interested, the  Corporation will follow‐up immediately with an action plan and necessary assistance (however, will  not attempt to broker the property, but rather, engage in an informed referral). If only marginally  interested, the designated rep from the Away Team will call the prospect again in six weeks. If not  interested at this time, include the prospect on your mailing list of correspondent businesses. 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 80 18 The Move There will be some bumps and setbacks. Don’t forget, moving is one of those traumatic times in  people’s lives. The Home Team will need to script all elements required for those prospects that  have been converted into suspects and finally new business into the community.  It is the sole responsibility of the Home Team to develop the steps, coordinate resources and  ensure that the business expansion or entry into the region is well managed and appropriate. This  process does not end with a ribbon cutting. The Corporation must check in with its businesses a  minimum of twice annually. Business GPS [growth, planning and succession] must be included in  this process.  19 The Start Once the decision to expand or locate in the region has been made, they must be welcomed and  supported as are existing businesses. Marketing the new business and helping the owners network  with others in the area is especially important in its early months of operation. Ongoing advocacy  and follow‐up will be essential. Again, this is another task for the Home Team.  20 What to expect when you’re expecting There is no Handbook or Guide to what you need to do to keep your business recruited. In fact,  there will be no warnings other than if the Founder or Owner has a less than perfect experience,  you will be the last to know, so stay on top of the move and check in with them at exceedingly  longer terms.  21 Repeat the Process   Patrick Nelson Marshall  Economic Developer  Capital EDC Economic Development Company         
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 81 Appendix IV – Survey Results    
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 1 Sechelt Community Projects Inc. November 2011 Stakeholder Edition Patrick Nelson Marshall BES SURP | Economic Developer This Report illustrates the views of the Sunshine Coast Community Forest Stakeholders at the Third Quarter 2011 STAKEHOLDERS VIEWS AND ATTRIBUTES
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 2 Stakeholder View of Regional Image Stakeholder views of their own community and region may differ. It is  generally seen as a positive image with some reservation. How Outsiders view the Region Their experience with outsiders perception of the Region may also be  different.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 3 Effective Economic Development Clearly, the stability of existing business is a priority but other influences  factor in as important, like providing opportunities for families. Personal Lens on Subjects Stakeholders should have different lenses and sensitivities so that there  is balance.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 4 Expansion and Recruitment Targets Each Sector exponentially effects the local economy from lowest at  Government to highest in the Manufacturing segment. The Sun Coast Three Greatest Strengths Proximity, Affordability | Entrepreneurs, and Recreational Opportunities
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 5 Sun Coast Biggest Challenges Availability of well paid jobs, Worker Retention, Local Government  Leadership and citizen attitude. Top Three Economic Development Subjects Supporting Existing Business, Growth of Small Business and Recruitment  of new employers.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 6 Local Government should spend Opinions are consistent across the profile. Strong Opinions lean towards  More Employment Opportunities and Other things than those listed. Stakeholders Sectoral History Where you are employed influences your view of the subjects before the  Stakeholders.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 7 Stakeholders Length of Service How long you have been operating in any given position may indicate an  ability to change or not. Stakeholders Accountability at Work The level accountability you are used to may be an indicator of how  much risk you are willing to take.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 8 Stakeholder Gender Gender Balance is sometime a factor in decision making style and  management. Sun Coast Citizen Sometimes, the length of residency influences your ability to see the  Forest.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 9 Stakeholder Origins In other cases, bringing fresh eyes to a community can provide the  benefit of a new view on old issues and challenges. You can Work anywhere The mobility of Stakeholders can be a positive influence over decision  making.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 10 Regionalism Sometimes, the place where you were born shapes your view of the  world. Stakeholder  Business Class While we do live in a classless society, sometimes, your root experience  is an influencer. 
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 11 Stakeholder  Achievement Balancing experiences is important to stakeholder dynamics. Stakeholder  Skill Sets Determining where you are weakest and backfilling skills is important to  the recruiting process.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 12 Stakeholder  Cohorts Balancing experience and generational perspectives is important. Stakeholder  Financial Responsibility
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 13 Stakeholder  Diversity Speaking other languages is a helpful skill set when engaged in business  development. THE TOP 10 LIST & NEED FOR STRATEGIC FOCUS This section is about what the Peer group sees as Regional priorities in Q3
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 14 Ernst Young Top 10 Issues List What the world sees as Top priorities are not necessarily a factor locally. Our Region Needs Attention Sometimes these graphs speak for themselves.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 15 BOARD PEERS BUSINESS ACTIVITY Q3 This section is about the Peer Groups Business Activity Your Peers Product Mix Change This illustrates innovation and market dynamics.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 16 Your Peers Product Mix Change >18 Months In the next 18 months, a couple of businesses are introducing new  products which is a positive sign. Your Peers Special Niche There is not a high incidence of specialization amongst the group.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 17 Your Peers Business Sales Turnover This indicates an average group of businesses. Your Peers Business Trade Area Indicates a slight diversity in your peer group.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 18 Your Peers Customer Frequency This is a poor sample so no real information derived from this question. Your Peer Business Sales Q3 Indicates a sense of strong change and increasing.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 19 Your Peer Average Sales The perception is that sales are on average, stable, with one indication of  increases. Your Peer Type of Customer Dominance of one‐to‐one sales is higher risk of rapid change. Lack of  dependence on Government sales is a positive attribute.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 20 Your Peer Customer Age Cohorts Not enough data to give a clear picture. If there was, there are clear gaps  that would indicate lack of balance in perspectives. Your Peer Estimated Incomes Not enough data to give a clear indication.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 21 Your Peer Marketing Sales Tools Not a lot of diversity of tools here which is useful when planning for the  Sun Coast Wood Campaign. Your Peer Expansion Plans Not enough responses to determine a strong pattern here.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 22 Peer New Location Plans No movement here. STAKEHOLDER  VIEWS ON  REGIONAL WORKFORCE
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 23 Quality of Workforce Views are moderate and non committal on this subject. Head of Household There are a variety of perceptions on this subject.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 24 Workforce Demand Not a big enough indication to warrant a detailed workforce labour  market assessment. Unfilled Employment Positions Not a big enough indication to warrant specific recruiting.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 25 Imported Workforce Not a big enough indication to warrant detailed study and response. Change in Workforce Would have expected a stronger indication of awareness of change due  to issues around succession and ageing workforce.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 26 Provision of Benefits Interesting spread of experience on this subject. Provision of Benefits Another interesting indicator of experience with benefits.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 27 Workforce Training Provisions Strong diversity of experience here. Investment in Training Not a strong indication for this subject.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 28 Workforce Initiatives Diversity of experience indicated here. REGIONAL CHANGE This section focuses on expectations of change
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 29 Are Changes Expected Somewhat conflicting view of the near term. Attitude towards doing business No change here.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 30 Are there Businesses needed in the Region? Not so much. Regulatory Barriers Some indications identified, but not a major issue amongst the group.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 31 Regulatory Reprieve None anticipated here. TECHNOLOGY TALK This section is about the Influence of technology on the peer group.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 32 Emerging Technology None anticipated. Some would think of the passing of social media and  the beginning of the mobility era. Opportunities with Technology Not a strong enough indicator to warrant detailed study.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 33 Use of Technology Very diverse use of technology within the peer group. Investment in Technology Somewhat average.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 34 Regional Technology Infrastructure Adequate. MANAGEMENT TEAM DYNAMICS This section is about the Peer groups business management team
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 35 <18 Months Change in Leadership Not a strong indication of change. Ownership Involvement Not a strong enough response for analysis.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 36 Top Performers Not strong enough to indicate a pattern. Advertising Budget It would be difficult to ask this group to contribute to the Sun Coast  Wood Campaign.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 37 Community Engagement There is a likelihood that this group would contribute to the Sun Coast  Wood Campaign. Collaboration Tends to indicate that the group does not necessarily play well with  others.
    • Capital EDC Economic Development  Company 11/15/2011 Sechet Community Projects Inc. 2011 38 Supplier Relationships Not much opportunity to introduce new ideas as the relationships, while  stable, are not introducing new players who might be more inclined to  participate in a community driven campaign. WE APPRECIATE YOUR CONTINUED SUPPORT End of Survey Results Third Quarter 2011
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 120 Appendix V – Focus Group Results It was recommended that the reporter consult with the operators of www.voiceonthecoast.com and  www.bigpacific.org on aspects of building communities on the Sun Coast.  The region is amongst the top ten dependent on residential tax base estimated to be above 93% which is not  sustainable.  There needs to be an effort to reduce the dependency on retirement income by building income from  employment.  Media personality Bill Good is a part‐time resident of the region and an avid supporter of conservation  campaigners that apply global preservation agendas to the local areas without taking into consideration the  fact that as citizens, they do have a say in what happens, unlike corrupt or some developing countries.  Although, they would debate that as well.  The draft sustainability plan for the regional district is lacking business literacy or applications. There is no  reference to sustainable harvesting practices by the Community Forest organization.  One of the respondents was a retiree from the aerospace industry applying personal skills to a number of  community organizations. It was recognized that there is a significant organizational skill set resident in both  the full‐time and part‐time residents whose talents could be applied to wood and forest community of users.  It was reported that there is frustration in the community at the lack of action with respect to building some  community assets and leadership in general. The subject of the Airport arose in terms of its lack of facility and  development.  One participant acknowledged that when they first arrived, the region showed prospects of becoming a  Carmel by‐the‐sea or La Jolla, the jewel of California. Today, years later, the community has not  demonstrated the ability to work together.  Challenges include a reference to alleged unspecific “side deals” in Victoria, Howe Sound Pulp and Paper  survivability, declining enrollment and the out‐migration of young adults, too many unsold homes and too  many realtors chasing too few buyers.  www.kenanmackenzie.com was identified as an involved realtor.  There is limited supported from the Greater Vancouver Real Estate Board in terms of leading industrial,  commercial and institutional promotion or recruitment.  The 100 acres of vacant industrial land was identified as a prospective development site however, the  representative contact is a non‐resident and there is no real effort to promote the site.  The Pender Harbour community was held up as a coordinated neighbourhood, but they tend not to “play  well with others.”  There was speculation that the market on the lower coast was too small to support a full time Truss Plant. A  couple of efforts collapsed and so Trusses are imported from Vancouver Island over Metro Vancouver  suppliers.  Kensington Cabinets www.kensingtoncabinets.com was held up as a great example of a leader in the regions  wood community and they are just developing a new showroom on Field Road.  A Dry Kiln was identified as an investment that would be welcomed in the region and would serve as an  investment leverage that would attract the attention of artisan and commercial producers.  There needs to be a way to engage business in participating. The Chambers don’t appear to work together  on common opportunities. Maybe this subject could be one of the first.  The region is perceived as an artisan community driven by local events throughout the year like the recently  launched art crawl, the Pender Jazz Festival and the writer’s festival. These should feature prominently in the  recruitment strategy and used in the retention and expansion strategies as authentic area products. 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 121 There is a need for a regional theatre, event and meeting centre as well as a number of seniors amenities.  However, there is no industry to pay for them and the residents will not support referenda for local public  spending. So the community and region is stymied.  These facilities would support investments like Rock Water Secret Cove Resort  www.rockwatersecretcoveresort.com .  The Proximity to Squamish, Whistler, Metro Vancouver, Powell River, Desolation Sound and Vancouver Island  is the asset that people appreciate in the region.  The wood industry on the Sun Coast is a “Pulp” Culture and so the value proposition for solid wood is not as  strong as it might otherwise be as is the case in the Interior Regions of British Columbia.  Proach Models is another example of a regional secret that should be promoted www.spacemodel.com .  Elon Musk, the co‐founder of PayPal and Tesla Motors was also mentioned in the context of a community  builder with connections to the region.  There must be an opportunity to build and supply manufactured homes to Japan. There was also a company  working with the Sechelt First Nations in supply homes to the Yukon.  The Target Marine file was a good example of why business investment will be conducted well below public  radar and there will be a reluctance to consider the community.  Other opportunities include the Capilano University Nursing program and medical tourism associated with  St. Mary’s Hospital.  The regional ambassadors program that supports people on the ferries was identified as a worthy  investment for promotional reasons.  There is an Outdoor Education niche at Capilano University in Sechelt. This program is exclusive and can be  used as an enterprise centre for the development of Forest use values. There is a proposal before SCPI for an  investment designed to develop this sector in the region. There is also an existing business community of  interest around this subject that is ready for support from the Community Forest organization.  The Community Foundation approved a small investment in the recent TEDX event before many of the  people realized the positive implications of having this event in the region. The theme was the Nature of  Creativity and the results are posted at www.tedxsechelt.ca .  There are few, if any Log Graders on the coast. It is a labour shortage and an art that is not being sustained.  The Gibsons Chamber supports travel ambassadors on BC Ferries during peak travel season. This initiative  should be supported and could be expanded to include year round reception for prospective investors.  The Trails organization works with the B&B Association, Chambers and others to promote the region as  backyard to Whistler. This includes the 2 day long bike race, sun coaster race, sprokids and th3e prospects of  a sea to sky outdoor education school.  The VOICE group was initiated by a number of young adults to focus attention on the need to retain young  people on the coast. Silas White, Chair of the School District also supports this initiative.  The Labour Council, Jim Hood should be included in all efforts.  BC Parks no longer have the staff or resources to maintain provincial parks in the region.  SCPI donated wood to park development in Gibsons.  Events to plan around include: August Written Arts Festival, October Arts Crawl, Pender Jazz Festival, Long  Board Pender in May, April Fools Run. There is little or no collaboration between outdoor outfitters and  retailers to support events throughout the year.  Families want homes. No work, no house. CCBA is developing a strategic plan along the lines of better  together, imagine. 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 122 Watershed issues cause fear that there won’t be any community forest harvest for 25 years. There should be  an effort to support Hidden Grove as a demonstration of the history and environmental context of the  community forest.  Unfortunately, SCPI will have to set aside areas that are ready to cut that are invisible and focus on cut along  the urban interface which will raise greater awareness of the community forest.  The community foundation would be a great partner for SCPI to work with. One Coast, One Climate.  Sailor Soils, working with SIB, would be an easy business to support by making it easy for them to get waste  residual from community forest to contribute to soil recipe.  The Community Forest Association has a new web site to connect buyers and sellers of solid wood. The same  should be done for all local wood products and forest values.  sctrails.ca should be supported as a means of opening the community forest to all users.  BC Stumpage should be set aside for reinvestment into affected communities.  SCPI needs to focus on 1 investment inside the region, 2. Exporting products and 3. Education.  End of Notes   
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 123 Appendix VI – Raw Log Exports Explanation We should not be talking about banning log exports, we should be talking about how best to manage and  regulate them.   Vancouver, September 26, 2011—There has been a longstanding debate about log exports and many people  continue to insist that exporting logs means we are exporting B.C. jobs. This is simply not the case. Log  exports have a key role in the development of B.C.’s economy, particularly on the coast, by supporting jobs  and economic activity in the logging and transportation sectors.   “We can debate which logs we should export, what the export fees should be and what the process should be  to export, but what we should not do is talk about banning log exports and making claims that we are  exporting jobs,” says Dave Lewis, executive director of the Truck Loggers Association. “The forest industry is  running at full tilt right now – largely because of log exports. A ban on exports would have a net negative  impact on employment as harvesting jobs would not be replaced by manufacturing jobs.”   As Bob Matters of the United Steel Workers said at a recent forum, “Log exports that strategically support  jobs is something we can support and is a good place to start.”    Our inability to harvest our Allowable Annual Cut (AAC) since 2005 has resulted in an elimination of more  than 2,100 direct jobs in the timber harvesting sector each year. Even if log exports were banned, the timber  that is currently being exported would not be redirected to a local mill. It would stay in the forest because  local mills are not prepared to pay the cost to harvest it. This puts loggers, engineers, silviculture workers and  forest managers out of work.    “Of course the forestry sector should continue to diversify and, yes, timber should go to local mills first, but  at a fair price. Finding the right balance is the key to the long‐term success of B.C.’s forest harvesting and  sawmilling sectors,” explains Lewis.    ‐30‐  For all enquires please contact:  Jennifer Fowler  Director, Communications  Truck Loggers Association  Phone: (604) 684‐4291  Email: jennifer@tla.caThe Truck Loggers is pleased to have the opportunity to provide the following input  regarding the export of logs from BC.    Submitted to the Province of British Columbia on behalf of the Truck Loggers Association (TLA) September 15, 2011 Log exports: The reality The volume of logs being exported from our province to Asia has increased dramatically over the past two  years.  This has brought the issue of log exports to forefront of the political debate as it is politically charged.   Those within the harvesting and timber management sector are seeking a greater degree of freedom,  efficiency and certainty of export as foreign buyers have filled a void that has been created due to falling  domestic demand.  Those within the manufacturing sector are asking to maintain or increase controls on log  exports to facilitate their ability to secure logs at prices that they can afford to pay for logs.  These two  interests from the two sectors generally do not align with one another and create friction whenever changes  to the current system are proposed.  Historically the default position has been to leave the current system in  place, not because it is without warts, but simply because it is the most convenient path forward.   While labour, industry, and all levels of government have not found common ground with regard to specific  export policy criteria or objectives, they have all expressed an opposition to the industry’s ongoing erosion.   Given the historic difficulty in changing policy, perhaps the most benefit can be gained by applying the  existing policies in a manner that serves to increase the economic and social well being of all participants.  If a  way can be found to do this, we will eliminate some of the extreme polarization that exists around this issue 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 124 (ban log exports) and can proceed with the objective of “how to best manage and control the export of logs  from BC.”  As Bob Matters of the United Steel Workers said at a recent forum “Log exports that strategically  support jobs is something we can support and is a good place to start.”    The TLA feels that the current review of log export policy could be divided into the following three distinct  components in order to accommodate the diversity of stakeholder interests, while still meeting the  government’s social and economic policy objectives.    1. How do we best apply or target the existing policy to meet current objectives?  2. How do we change individual components of the existing policy in order to improve its efficiency,  certainty and cost to stakeholders in the short‐term?  3. What does a durable export policy that meets stakeholder’s long‐term objectives look like?        This submission speaks to the first component: “how best to apply the existing policy”, in the best interests of  the Province.  The single biggest issue that has plagued the coastal forest industry over the past two decades  has been the alarming and increasing negative trend of undercutting our coastal AAC.  This proposal seeks to  address that issue.   We have provided some background documentation as well that hopefully provides  useful information for politicians as they wrestle with this sensitive topic.  How do we best apply the existing policy to meet current objectives? While changing policy requires either consensus from stakeholders or courageous decision makers, applying  the existing policy in a differential manner is not only possible – it is the norm.  Presently an opportunity  exists to utilize current policy in a targeted fashion to address the undercut issue that has plagued the coast  for two decades. While there is interest in changing some of the current policy, not all aspects of current  export policy are bad or require change.  The government should continue to apply the existing policy in an  effective and efficient manner as it undertakes the current policy review.     The TLA proposes that current export policy could be targeted towards forest stands with characteristics that  make them uneconomic to harvest, so that they are provided greater certainty of access to higher value  international markets.  Despite widespread disagreement amongst stakeholders on how to change existing  export policy, there seems to be at least an initial universal acceptance towards this sort of application of the  existing policy.    A Common Problem The coastal Annual Allowable Cut (AAC) has not been harvested since 1992.  Since 2005, annual harvests have  fluctuated between 50% and 80% of our ACC and 46 million m3 of sustainable timber harvest has been  neglected.  The gap between our sustainable harvest level and our economically viable harvest level has been  widening for at least three market cycles.  Market prices do not seem to have enough impact to change the  trend towards an ever‐increasing undercut of typically lower grade timber in high cost operating areas; and  the current surplus test does not provide the certainty of access to export premiums that are required by  licensees to justify the millions of dollars that must be invested to plan, develop and harvest this timber.  As a  result, the majority of the timber stands that languish around the economic margin of profitability are left  unharvested.    Stands of lower value old growth on Vancouver Island typically require an investment of $100/m³ before they  can be sold.  More isolated areas on the coast or those that require special management or aerial harvesting  can be upwards of $150/m³ of cost.  Typcially the lower value timber that dominates these stands carries  domestic prices that are less than $70/m³.  In the past two years, foreign buyers were paying almost double  what domestic manufacturers were for some of this lower value timber.  The current system however, did  not provide guaranteed access to these prices, so often the timber went unharvested as operators were not  prepared to take the risk.  This lack of certainty not only impacts sub‐marginal timber stands, but it also  impacts the timber stands that are within $10/m³ of the margin as the time that it takes to develp this timber  exposes it to market fluctuations. (Typically on a pro‐forma basis, stands with less than $10/m3 positive  return are avoided.)   Most old growth stands contain a variety of species and grades of timber.  They are able to be harvested  without exports if the higher value timber can subsidize the cost of taking the low value timber.  Fewer and  fewer stands have enough higher value timber to offset the low value timber.  While each region has its own 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 125 specific challenges, this problem has largely been characterized as the Hemlock/Balsam issue on the coast.   The cost of old growth log production on the BC coast is generally between $400 and $650/thousand board  feet.  The current market price for commodity lumber destined to China is $250/thousand board feet. The  average price paid for logs (to the same market) is roughly $630 per thousand board feet.  Coastal stands that  are largely comprised of low value timber are generally uneconomic to harvest (even when stumpage is  negligible) given commodity lumber prices, unless a significant component of export is allowed.  In the  absence of high value timber in the stand, export premiums act as a surrogate subsidy for lower value stands.  Over the past two years the mechanism that has been most successful in terms of adding value has been the  sale of logs on the export market.  Over time, the price of finished goods has not kept pace with the raw  material cost so while demand exists for finished goods, coastal manufacturers are economically challenged  in terms of acquiring fibre.  It would appear that Asian manufacturing facilities have significantly lower  production costs and tend to get more value out of low grade logs than our domestic coastal mills given the  fact that they pay significantly more for logs than lumber.  Interior mills seem to be able to supply a  commodity product at that market price due to their lower manufacturing costs and lower log cost.  To  improve the economics of the current coastal situation, we need to either reduce costs or increase revenues.  Cost cutting measures continue to be a focus; however, after reducing costs 20% over a ten year period from  1998 to 2008 (Russ Taylor), most of the low hanging fruit has been plucked, This would tend to indicate that  the solution lies on the revenue side of the equation.  Most log export critics espouse that exporting logs  leaves domestic mills short of fibre.  That is simply not the case.  Coastal Log Demand Summarized below is the log demand data over the past 6 years together with a forecast through 2028 and  charted it by type of consumer against the coastal AAC inclusive of private contributions to available log  supply.    When operating at historic capacity, BC coastal mills can consume approximately 16 million m3 of logs per  year. BC’s sustainable coastal harvest level is 24 million m3 (including private land). If every coastal mill got  every log that they needed, there would still be approximately 8 million m3 of timber left over for export.   While it is true that we are exporting more and more timber, it is also true that there is still considerable  timber that is in excess of demand, still left over.  Coastal Log Demand Forecast 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 '000 cubicmetres Sawlog Demand Peeler Log Demand Shake and Shingle Demand Post and Pole Demand Pulp Log Demand Log Exports Crown AAC + Private
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 126 Policy Vision Export policy should:   seek to ensure that BC manufacturers, who will pay a fair domestic market price for economically viable  crown timber, have access to it;     should be applied to facilitate the harvest of otherwise uneconomic timber and to entice the harvest of  the entire timber profile.  Logs that are surplus to BC manufacturer's needs should be made available for  export;     should seek to provide both timber buyers and sellers with a reasonably certain and efficient process to  sell or buy logs, while preserving accurate domestic pricing signals for MPS calculations;      should seek to maximize the total domestic economic activity within the forest sector, preserve forestry  infrastructure and optimize future timber supplies.  The TLA believes that if this policy is solely targeted towards the component of the AAC that is deemed  “uneconomic” there can be fewer objections to exports. Log exports is critical to the health of our coastal  logging economy. It is not our intent to suggest only patchwork solutions. Many people want to see log  exports reduced.  As shown, this is counterproductive to sound economic policy and good forest  management. The TLA looks forward to feedback on this submission and with the support of government will  continue with its analysis and the development of this policy proposal.  The TLA is also prepared to provide  subsequent input with regard to short term changes to the existing policy or the long‐term objectives of log  export policy should government choose to undertake those initiatives.    To Contact the TLA:  Dave Lewis: Executive Director  725 – 815 West Hastings Street  Vancouver, BC  V6C 1B4  Phone: 604‐684‐4291  Fax: 604‐684‐7134  Email: dlewis@tla.ca  Web: www.tla.ca     
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 127 Appendix VII – Remarks by Executive Director Russ Cameron Independent Wood Processors Association of British Columbia address to the Mayors at UBCM  2011  Introduction  Update on the state of BC’s family owned, non‐tenured wood processors.  Forty years ago, formed the Independent Wood Processors Association, or IWPA (formerly ILRA)   We are all family owned, none of us have been given the renewable right to harvest the public’s  timber, and we all buy our wood fibre on the open market at prevailing market prices.  We are currently working with DFAIT, NRCan, and the Government of BC on the implementation of  the EU’s Legal Harvest legislation, similar pending legislation in Australia and China, possible  changes to the US Lacey Act, the current Australian anti‐dumping investigation, log export policy,  consultations on the CETA, BC Timber Sales, Category 2, SLA extension or expiry, and the BC Interior  SLA Arbitration to name a few of the issues.    So how are we doing?  I am sure that you are all aware that we are in serious trouble and no doubt some of you have lost  some family owned businesses in your communities.  Prior to the SLA 2006 with the United States, the IWPA had 120 members employing over 4000  British Columbians.  We have now lost 37 companies to bankruptcy or voluntary closure and most of the remaining  members are running between 40% and 50% capacity and are presently hanging on by their finger  nails.  Why are we going broke?  We are going broke because we do not have fair access to the US market and we do not have fair  access to BC grown wood fibre.  We hear all this talk about China.  Well, China might be great for the major licensees, but as far as  we are concerned, they are a low cost competitor that BC is bending over backwards for to make  sure that they are supplied with the BC logs and lumber that we used to buy and process here.  We  wish that the BC Government was making the same effort on behalf of the British Columbian  families that are employing people in BC, paying taxes in BC, and processing BC wood fibre in BC.  When we asked our members, 2 years after the US market collapse, why they were going broke,  the number one reason was their inclusion in the Softwood Lumber Agreement and the number  two reason was difficulty obtaining wood fibre due to the Softwood lumber Agreement and due to  the consolidation of the major licensees.  Only 20% of them even mentioned the collapsed US  housing market.  We are all aware that US housing starts are only a third of what they were 6 years ago but did you  know that:   As of September 19, 2011, the US Residential BuildFax Remodeling Index rose 24% year‐over‐year  and for the twenty‐first straight month to the highest number in the index to date.  The major licensees traditionally supply 30 to 35% of the US commodity framing market, but we  only supply 1% of the US specialty market.  For the, housing start dependent, major licensees to 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 128 maintain a survivable US market share is impossible, but for us it is not.  We can maintain market  share because we can supply small volumes of high quality specialty products and an exceptional  degree of service to a nearby specialty market that has not suffered to the same extent as housing  starts.  When you can’t sell your house … or get credit to buy a new one … you remodel.  We do acknowledge the negative effects of the US recession and the appreciation of the Canadian  dollar relative to the US dollar, but due to the specialty niche products and services that we  provide, those are problems that we can deal with.   What we have been unable to deal with is the $75/mfbm tax on our products shipped to our  primary market. The tax was designed to make us unable to compete in the US market and in that  respect it has worked very well.  The problem for us is that in an effort to retain the tenure and administrative timber pricing  systems for the tenured sector, the GOC and GBC have imposed a border tax to the US market that  also applies to the non‐tenured sector.  This is in spite of the fact that we already pay market prices  for our lumber in competition with the Americans and others.  As the US Coalition for Fair Lumber Imports stated in their offer to Canada:  “The settlement accord should provide that a province’s adoption of fully open and competitive  timber and log markets would automatically result in lifting of interim measures for that province.   Absent fully open and competitive markets, however, the nature of criteria on the basis of which  interim measures would be reduced or lifted remains in question.”  We understand the desire of the large public companies to retain their tenures and the systems of  administratively pricing the public timber under their control. We also understand their willingness  to pay duties and border taxes, or to be subject to quotas.  That is the price that they chose to pay  to retain their benefits and avoid having to buy their wood fibre on the open market as we do.  But  the effect of applying these penalties to the products of companies that have to compete for their  wood fibre on the open market in competition with the Americans and others, has been  devastating.  Here is what the tax does to us:  As intended by the tax, our US competitors can undercut us by up to $75/mfbm.   We know that we must pay an extra $75/mfbm that the American and Chinese wood processors do  not have to pay, therefore we must buy our lumber $75/mfbm cheaper.  Good luck with that.  We know that we must pay an extra $75/mfbm that the American and Chinese wood processors do  not have to pay, therefore we must buy our logs $18 to $20 / m3 cheaper.  Good luck with that too.   In fact, it is difficult for us to understand why BC doesn’t impose a border tax on logs equivalent to  that the Americans demand we apply to our “subsidized” lumber that is cut from the same logs.   The $75 tax helps to subsidize the shipment of our wood to China where they can take advantage  of low labour rates, and then ship it back to the US where it enters tax free.  BC has barred non‐tenured wood processors from bidding on BCTS public timber sales unless we  agree to pay additional border tax on the costs of adding value to BC wood fibre in BC.  Labour,  heat, light, insurance, property tax, leases, etc  And now our remaining non‐tenured BC Interior members live in fear of being pushed over the  edge by becoming subject to any additional penalties that may be imposed by the Grade 4  Arbitration should it be judged that the tenured companies paid insufficient stumpage.   What BC and Canada need to do is to recognize, as we do, that the tenured companies do not wish  to compete for their wood fibre but do wish to retain the administrative pricing systems that they 
    • Sechelt Community Projects Inc. 2012 This is a final plan: No reproduction or distribution without written permission from the Sechelt Community Projects Inc. +1 (604) 885‐7809 - version dated – May 28 th 2012 Page 129 currently have. The proof is in the fact that they are willing to pay 15% to retain these benefits. The  non‐tenured companies that do compete for wood fibre have no problem with their decision but  we do not wish to pay part of the penalty on their behalf.  Given that the tenured companies are the only ones to receive the benefit, we need you to insist  that provincial and federal politicians have the tenured companies pay the entire cost of retaining  their benefits instead of having the family owned businesses in your communities pay part of the  price for them.  The opportunity for you to do so may occur if we lose the Arbitration and Canada decides that non‐ tenured family owned businesses in the BC Interior should pay part of the penalty on behalf of the  licensees.    The opportunity will occur during extension or expiry negotiations or during the next round of the  softwood lumber dispute, as we assume that the licensees will once again prefer to pay some kind  of penalty to keep their tenures and avoid having to compete for their fibre.  This problem is solvable if there is the political will to solve it.  Russ Cameron  Executive Director