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Winning Grants
 

Winning Grants

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An overview of the Grant Process Cycle, a step-by-step method for librarians, presented on October 27, 2011 for Education Institute, Ontario Library Association

An overview of the Grant Process Cycle, a step-by-step method for librarians, presented on October 27, 2011 for Education Institute, Ontario Library Association

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    Winning Grants Winning Grants Presentation Transcript

      • Education Institute/Neal-Schuman Professional Education Network
      • Webinar
      • October 27, 2011
      Pam MacKellar [email_address] www.pamelamackellar.com
    •  
      • The Grant Process Cycle
      • Importance of Planning
      • Identifying the Right Funder
      • Proposal Basics
      • 4 essential grant skills librarians have:
        • Finding information
        • Answering questions
        • Serving the community
        • Building relationships
    •  
    •  
      • Ask Ask These Key Questions:
      • Where you are going and how will you get there?
      • Do library programs and services relate to your mission and vision?
      • What are your community’s needs?
      • What do you want to accomplish?
      • What difference are you making for the people you serve?
    •  
      • Addresses community needs
      • Offers something new, innovative or creative
      • Maximizes your resources
      • Offers a model that can be replicated
      • Has tangible outcomes or products
      • Has a reasonable budget and realistic timeline
      • Includes community partners
      • Has an evaluation plan that measures progress
      • Has SMART objectives
      • Causes a change in behavior, attitude, skill, life condition or knowledge in the people it serves
      • Is sustainable
    • GRANTS ARE ABOUT PEOPLE … NOT MONEY OR THINGS
      • Common Project Components:
        • Goals, Objectives, Activities and Outcomes
        • Timeline
        • Budget
        • Evaluation Plan
      • Common Grant Proposal Components:
        • Goals, Objectives, Activities and Outcomes
        • Timeline
        • Budget
        • Evaluation Plan
      • Fundamentals of Teamwork
        • Common goals
        • Acknowledged interdependency and mutual respect
        • Common code of conduct
        • Team spirit and energy
        • Shared rewards
      • Initial Informal Meeting
      • First Team Meeting
      • Categories of Grants
        • Government:
          • Federal
          • State/Province
          • Local
        • Private:
          • Foundations
          • Corporations and Businesses
          • Clubs and Organizations
          • Professional and Trade Associations
      5. UNDERSTANDING THE SOURCES AND RESOURCES SOURCES
    • RESOURCES
      • Identify and translate keywords
      • Select the resources
      • Work from general to specific
      • Record what you find
      • Organize your research
      • Match funder priorities with project goals
    • Library Grants Blog http://librarygrants.blogspot.com/
      • Common Grant Proposal Components
        • Cover Letter, Title Sheet, Table of Contents
        • Proposal Abstract/Executive Summary
        • Organizational Overview
        • Statement of Needs
        • Project Description
        • Timeline/Activities
        • Budget
        • Evaluation Plan
        • Appendix
      • Tell the Story
      • Make Your Case
    • FIRST CELEBRATE!
      • Thank your funder
      • Inform your grant team
      • Tell leadership and administration
      • Spread the word to the people you serve
      • Tell the community
      • Don’t give up
      • Ask for reviewers’ comments
      • Strategize a new approach
      • Revise and edit
      • Redesign project
      • Try another source
      • Look for partners
    •  
      • Start with planning.
      • Grants are about people, not about money or things.
      • Project design and proposal writing are closely linked.
      • Grant work is a team effort.
      • Grant work requires support from your organization and leadership.
      • The interests of a funder must match the goals of your project.
      • Always follow the application directions and funder’s guidelines.
      • Grant work does not end when you hear from the funder about success or rejection.
      • If a library project does not meet a community need, you should not be doing it.
      • Developing working relationships with potential funders and partners is part of the grant process.
      • “ Good fortune often happens
      • when opportunity meets preparation.”
      • ~ Thomas Alva Edison
    • COMING SOON!
    • Pam MacKellar [email_address] www.pamelamackellar.com