Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
1  Lesson  C I F A  C O A C H E S  C O U R S E  C
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

1 Lesson C I F A C O A C H E S C O U R S E C

1,618
views

Published on

Published in: Sports, Entertainment & Humor

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,618
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
114
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1.  
  • 2. Lesson 1 1 - Laws of the Game:
      • Law 1 - The Field of Play
      • Law 2 - The Ball
      • Law 3 - The Number of Players
      • Law 4 - The Players’ Equipment
      • Law 5 - The Referee
      • Law 6 - The Assistant Referees
      • Law 7 - The Duration of the Match
      • Law 8 - The Start and Restart of Play
      • Law 9 - The Ball In and Out of Play
      • Law 10 - The Method of Scoring
      • Law 11 - Offside
      • Law 12 - Fouls and Misconduct
      • Law 13 - Free Kicks
      • Law 14 - The Penalty Kick
      • Law 15 - The Throw-In
      • Law 16 - The Goal Kick
      • Law 17 - The Corner Kick
      • Procedures to Determine the Winner of the Match
      • The Technical Area
      • The Fourth Official
      • Referee Signals
      • Assistant Referee Signals
  • 3. Law 1 – The Field of Play
    • Its very important for the coach to know the names of the different parts of the field.
  • 4. Law 1 – The Field of Play
    • MEASUREMENTS
    • The maximum and minimum dimensions.
      • Length: 100 – 130 yds
      • Width: 50 – 100 yds
    • Youth games’ field can be smaller.
  • 5. Law 2 – The Ball
    • Number 5 – For players over 15 y. o.
    • Number 4 – For players under 14 y. o.
  • 6. Law 3 - The Number of Players
    • 11 a side.
    • Game is finished when a team has fewer than 7 players.
    • 12 a side or more?
    • Substitutions:
      • 3, including the goalkeeper.
      • No more than 7.
    • Players come out and in?
  • 7. Law 4 – The Players’ Equipment
    • Basic: jersey, shorts, socks, shin guards and footwear.
    • Safety: cannot wear anything that is dangerous.
    • Modern protective equipments not considered to be dangerous are permitted.
  • 8. Law 5 – The Referee
    • One referee.
      • Only the referee?
    • The referee’s decision is final.
  • 9. Law 6 – The Assistant Referees
    • Two assistants.
    • The assistances are subject to the decision of the referee.
  • 10. Law 7 – The Duration of the Match
    • 45 minutes halves.
    • Half time interval must not exceed 15 min. and never less than 5 min.
      • It’s very import for the coach (or the assistant coach) to time the game.
  • 11. Law 8 - The Start and Restart of Play
    • Kick-off
    • Dropped Ball
  • 12. Law 9 – The Ball In and Out of Play
    • The Ball is out when the whole of the ball crosses over the goal or touch lines and when the referee stops (by whistle).
    • The Ball is in at all the other times.
  • 13. Law 10 – The Method of Scoring
    • Goal is when the WHOLE of the ball passes over the line.
  • 14. Law 11 - Offside
    • Offside position is when a player is nearer to his opponents’ goal line than both the ball and the second last opponent.
      • When the player is in his own half field he is not in offside position
    • Offence:
      • At the moment the ball touches or is played by one of his team a player is involved in active play by:
        • Interfering with the play or
        • Interfering with an opponent or
        • Gaining an advantage by being in that position
    • No offence:
        • If he receives the ball from a goal kick or a throw-in or a corner kick
  • 15. Law 11 - Offside
  • 16. Law 11 - Offside
  • 17. Law 11 - Offside
  • 18. Law 11 - Offside
  • 19. Law 11 - Offside
  • 20. Law 11 - Offside
  • 21. Law 11 - Offside
  • 22. Law 11 - Offside
  • 23. Law 11 - Offside
  • 24. Law 11 - Offside
  • 25. Law 11 - Offside
  • 26. Law 11 - Offside
    • New instructions for the referees and assistant referees
      • A player in an offside position but not interfering with an opponent runs towards the ball played by a team-mate.
        • Must the referee wait until he touches the ball to penalize him?
          • Yes. The referee must wait and see if the player in an offside position finally interferes with play by touching the ball.
  • 27. Law 11 - Offside
  • 28. Law 11 - Offside
  • 29. Law 11 - Offside
  • 30. Law 11 - Offside
  • 31. Law 11 - Offside
  • 32. Law 12 – Fouls and Misconducts
    • Direct free kick
      • Kicks or attempts to kick, trips or attempt to trip, jumps, charges, strikes or attempt to strike and pushes an opponent
      • Tackles to gain ball possession making contact with an opponent before touching the ball
      • Holds or spits an opponent
      • Handles the ball deliberately (except the goalkeeper in his penalty area)
  • 33. Law 12 – Fouls and Misconducts
    • Indirect free kick
      • Infringements by the goalkeeper
      • Infringements by any player
    • Cautionable offences
    • Sending-Off Offences
  • 34. Law 13 – Free Kicks
    • The Direct Free Kick
    • The Indirect Free Kick
  • 35. Law 14 – The Penalty Kick
    • A penalty kick is awarded when a team commits one of the ten direct free kicks offences inside its own penalty area while the ball is in play
  • 36. Law 15 – The Throw-in
    • When the whole of the ball passes over the touch line
      • The thrower’s procedure
        • Faces the field of play
        • Has part of each foot either on the touch line or on the ground outside the touch line
        • Uses both hands
        • Delivers the ball from behind and over his head
  • 37. Law 16 – The Goal Kick
    • When the whole of the ball last touched by the attacking team’s player passes over the goal line and a goal is not scored
      • The ball is kicked from any point within the goal area
      • Opponents remain outside the penalty area
      • The ball is in play when it is kicked directly beyond the penalty area
  • 38. Law 17 – The Corner Kick
    • When the whole of the ball last touched by the defending team’s player passes over the goal line and a goal is not scored
      • The ball is placed inside the corner arc at the nearest corner flag post
      • The ball is in play when it is kicked and moves
  • 39. Procedures to Determine the Winner of the Match
      • Away goals – home and away
      • Extra time – not exceeding 15 minutes halves
      • Kicks from the penalty mark – 5 p. k.
        • Competition’s rules may provide another methods such as
          • Corner kicks
          • Cards
  • 40. The Technical Area
    • It is designated seated area for technical staff and substitute players
      • The occupants of the technical area are identified before the beginning of the match
      • Only one person at a time is authorized to convey tactical instructions and must return to his position after giving these instruction
      • The coach and the occupants of the technical area must behave in a responsible manner
  • 41.  
  • 42. The Fourth Official
    • He assists with any administrative duties before, during and after the match, as required by the referee
    • Assists with substitution procedures during the match
    • He has the authority to inform the referee of irresponsible behavior by any occupant of the technical area
  • 43. Referee Signals
    • Indirect free kick
  • 44. Referee Signals
    • Direct free kick
  • 45. Referee Signals
    • Caution
  • 46. Referee Signals
    • Sending off
  • 47. Referee Signals
    • Advantage
  • 48. Assistant Referee Signals
    • Substitution
  • 49. Assistant Referee Signals
    • Throw-in
  • 50. Assistant Referee Signals
    • Offside
  • 51. Assistant Referee Signals
    • Offside on the near side of the field
  • 52. Assistant Referee Signals
    • Offside on the centre of the field
  • 53. Assistant Referee Signals
    • Offside on the far side of the field
  • 54. Lesson 1 2 – Ethics in Sports
      • A) Community Relationship
        • The coach is the person that has the responsibility to make all the community support the team.
        • A good team, good staff, good players, good coach could lose all the season’s work if the community does not support.
        • A involved community gives to the team excitement, confidence, responsibility and commitment.
  • 55.
      • B) Relationship Between Players and Coaches
        • The coach should never lie to the players and staff.
        • The team could reach an excellent performance level if the players trust in their coach.
        • There is always time for sincerity, even if the coach has bad news or disappointments to give the team.
        • Its impossible to have all the squad happy because only 11 players can start the game.
    Lesson 1 2 – Ethics in Sports
  • 56.
      • C) Relationship Between Coaches, Staff, Sports Association and Government.
        • The coaches in the same community have to be very careful when comment the other coach’s performance because only who follows the daily activities can criticize.
        • Coaches and Staff are the team’s head, if there are two heads the strength will be split in two.
        • The coach shall keep all the sports associations working together.
          • E. G.: The Track & Field association could help the team in fitness trainings.
        • Football is a very political thing and the politicians are involved in football everywhere.
          • Governments’ sport policy take football very seriously because football is the most popular game in the world.
          • BRAZIL:
            • 1970 World Cup – Military Regime.
            • 2002 World Cup – Democratic Regime.
    Lesson 1 2 – Ethics in Sports
  • 57. Coach’s code of ethics
    • I will place the emotional and physical well-being of my players ahead of a personal desire to win.
    • I will treat each player as an individual, remembering the large range of emotional and physical development for the same age group.
    • I will do my best to provide a safe playing situation for my players.
    • I will promise to review and practice the basic first aid principles needed to treat injuries of my players.
    • I will do my best to organize practices that are fun and challenging for all my players.
    • I will lead by example in demonstrating fair play and sportsmanship to all my players
    • I will provide a sports environment for my team that is free of drugs, tobacco, and alcohol, and I will refrain from their use at all youth sports events.
    • I will be knowledgeable in the rules of each sport that I coach, and I will teach these rules to my players.
    • I will use those coaching techniques appropriate for each of the skills that I teach.
    • I will remember that I am a youth sports coach, and that the game is for children and not adults.
      • Extracted from National Youth Sports Coaches Association – Florida web site.
  • 58. Lesson 1 3 – The History of Football Association
    • A) The Beginning
    • Old Games
      • II and III Centuries
        • “ Tsu’Chu” – China
      • VIII and IX Centuries
        • “ Kemari” – Japan
      • Between Centuries X
      • and XVIII
        • “ Episkyros” – Greece
        • “ Harpastum” – Rome
        • “ Calcio” – Italy
  • 59. Lesson 1 3 – The History of Football Association
    • The Modern Football
      • 1863 - The Football Association
        • England
          • First organized football association.
          • The football is ruled.
  • 60. Lesson 1 3 – The History of Football Association
    • B) The FIFA Era
    • The Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) was founded in Paris on 21 May 1904. The foundation act was signed by the authorized representatives of the following Associations: France, Belgium, Denmark, Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland.
  • 61.
    • The first official international match took place on the Europe at the beginning of the century. The idea of founding an international federation began taking form. In general, one intended recognizing the leading role of the English who had already founded their Football Association in 1863.
    • Belgium faced France at the first official international match in Brussels on 1 May 1904. On that occasion, both Association secretaries had a discussion. It was now definite that the Football Association, England would not be participating in the foundation of an international federation.
    • The first FIFA Statutes were laid down. The following points were determined: the reciprocal and exclusive recognition of the National Associations represented and attending; clubs and players were forbidden to play simultaneously for different National Associations; recognition by the other Associations of a player's suspension announced by an Association and the playing of matches according to the Laws of the Game of the Football Association Ltd. It was decided that these regulations would only come into force as of 1 September 1904.
    • On 14 April 1905, the Executive Committee of the Football Association Ltd. recognized the National Associations affiliated to FIFA and joined.
  • 62.
    • FIFA only consisted of European Associations up until 1909. The first members from overseas joined in the following order: South Africa in 1909/1910, Argentina and Chile in 1912, USA in 1913. This was the start of FIFA's international activities. The long path towards full expansion had been sketched out.
    • The start of the First World War (1914) caused a major interruption. Who talked then about football and its mission to unite nations? And yet, all the international relations were not broken, even if they were only maintained on a small scale. International matches were still played, being organized on neutral territory. However, some members were faced with difficulties when having to cross frontiers and this prevented Congress being convened. The dream of having an international competition seemed to have evaporated forever.
    • Jules Rimet became President on 1 March 1921. FIFA became the life task of the then 48 year-old Frenchman. When he took over the world football federation, the latter which had been shaken by the I World War, counted 20 members. The British had left in unison and neither Brazil nor Uruguay were present. In the 33 years of his presidency, FIFA experienced an incredible upswing in spite of the II World War. One ought to talk about a "Jules Rimet Era" because he managed to reorganise FIFA and to materialize the dream of a World Cup. On passing on the reins of FIFA in 1954, when he opened his 5th World Cup in Switzerland, FIFA counted 85 members!
  • 63.
    • The first World Cup was opened at the Centenary Stadium in Montevideo on 18 July 1930. A new epoch had begun for world football.
    • The World Cup in Montevideo became a remarkable success, both in a sporting and a financial sense. Of course, the organizers were disappointed since only four national teams from Europe participated.
    • Over the past twenty-five years football has not only taken root as the world's major game in an ephemeral world but has also blossomed in other branches of society, commerce and politics. Football, more than any other factor, has enveloped whole regions, people and nations. With approximately two hundred million active players it now constitutes a substantial chunk of the leisure industry, having opened up new markets for itself and for the rest of the business world
    • The potential has yet to be exhausted, especially in Asia and North America. As of mid-2000, FIFA has grown to include 204 member associations, thus making it one of the biggest and certainly the most popular sports federation in the world.
  • 64. THE FIFA’S PRESIDENTS
  • 65. 17 FIFA World Cups Winners, Runners up and Hosts
  • 66. The Champions
    • Only seven countries have won the World cup Championship since it began in 1930.
    • Brazil is the only country who has participated in all the world cups.
    • Brazil and Germany participate in 7 World Cup finals each.
    • Brazil and Germany played all the World Cup finals since 1950 except in 1978.
    • 6 World Cup winners will be in Germany 2006 and Uruguay is playing a knock out against Australia.
    • Only two continents’ countries have won the World Cup – South America 9 X 8 Europe.
    • Uruguay (1930), Italy (1934), England (1966), Germany (1974), Argentine (1978) and France (1998) won the World Cup as a host team.
    • Brazil and Sweden lost the final game when hosted.
    • Only Brazil (1966, 1970, 1994 and 2002) and Argentine (1986) have won the World Cup outside their own continent.
  • 67. Lesson 1 3 – The History of Football Association
    • C) Football in Cayman Islands and Caribbean
      • Football in the Caribbean
      • The Caribbean’s football is organized by the CFU (Caribbean Football Union). It is composed of 26 nations and part of the CONCACAF.
      • The most traditional competition organized by CFU is the Caribbean Cup, actually Digicel Cup and Shell Cup before the last tournament.
      • The CONCACAF (Confederation of North, Central America and Caribbean Association Football) is one of six FIFA’s continental confederations. It is composed of 40 national associations, from Canada in the north to Suriname in the south.
  • 68.
      • The primary function of the CONCACAF is the organization of competitions for national teams and clubs.
      • The CONCACAF Gold Cup is showpiece event for men’s national sides. Contested every two years, it crowns the champion team of the region. The USA won the inaugural competition in 1991, defeating Honduras before 40,000 fans at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in California.
      • Mexico then won three consecutive titles, the third in 1998 before a crowd of 91,000 in Los Angeles before Canada won its first major international honor in more than 100 years of football history in 2000. After the USA claimed the 2002 title, Mexico returned to the top of the Confederation with their fourth crown last year.
    Lesson 1 3 – The History of Football Association
  • 69. THE CARIBBEAN CUPS’ WINNERS AND RUNERS UP
  • 70. THE CARIBBEAN CUPS’ WINNERS AND RUNERS UP
    • Trinidad & Tobago is the greater winner lifting the trophy 8 times.
    • Trinidad participated in 10 finals of 12 editions.
    • Jamaica has 3 titles.
    • Martinique broke the rule winning in 1993.
  • 71. CONCACAF Gold Cup and Previous Competitions Winners and Hosts
  • 72. THE CONCACAF CUPS’ WINNERS
    • Costa Rica won the most but the last time was in 1969.
    • The last 12 editions had the Mexicans winning.
    • Mexico won 4 of the last 8 editions while USA won 3. Canada is out of the rule.
  • 73. Lesson 1 3 – The History of Football Association
    • C) Football in Cayman Islands:
      • The decade of the 1950s marked the genesis of the development of football in the Cayman Islands. Long before there were proper football fields and other facilities that modern day players of the game enjoy, the sport’s early followers made do with whatever they could for balls, and wherever there was an open space to play.
      • By the early 1960s, Clifton Hunter and Teacher Timothy McField, had a vision to build a football field – the Annex in Grand Cayman’s capital, George Town. Parallel to this Clifton Hunter worked in West Bay, thus began an intense rivalry between the two districts which endures to this day.
      • For a long while, the Annex and the West Bay town hall fields were the main centers for playing football.
      • In 1966, the Cayman Islands Football Association was formed, to administer the sport in the Islands.
      • In 1982 the Annex Field, originally built by developer Mike Simmons, was further improved.
      • The Ed Bush field was built in West Bay and opened by the Queen on March 6, 1994, followed by a memorable game in which the Cayman Islands beat Jamaica to qualify for the finals of the Shell Caribbean Cup in Trinidad & Tobago.
      • In 1995, the association presided over the further development of the sports complex, which was transformed into a modern multi-purpose facility, and renamed the Truman Bodden Sports Complex.
      • On July 30 of that year, the Cayman Islands hosted the Shell Caribbean Cup Finals.
  • 74. Lesson 1 3 – The History of Football Association
    • C) Football in Cayman Islands
      • Among the guests were then FIFA President Joao Havelange and the legendary Brazilian king of football, Pele. While on this visit, Pele officially opened the Donovan Rankine Field in East End, also built in 1995.
      • In May 1992, CIFA became a member of CONCACAF and in July of that same year became a member of FIFA.
      • In 1992, for the first time, the Cayman Islands had a Minister of Sports, the Honorable McKeeva Bush who appointed a National Sports Committee, headed by current CIFA President Jeffrey Webb.
      • In 1988, the Cayman Islands football program had its first professional coach, Winston Chung of Jamaica as Technical Director.
      • In 1995, German national Bernard Schumm, was appointed as a National Coach.
      • This support continued with the Brazilian Coaches Brandão, Maximo and from 2003, Marcos Tinoco.
      • In 1996 the association initiated the Women’s League and today CIFA organizes specific competitions for all age levels; from 12 to 55 years old women and men can enjoy the beauty of the most popular game of the world.
  • 75. Lesson 1 3 – The History of Football Association
    • C) Football in Cayman Islands:
      • The Presidents
        • 1981-1985: Allan Moore
        • 1985-1987: Ed Bush
        • 1987-1989: Allan Moore
        • 1989-1991: Tony Scott
        • 1991- Present: Jeffrey Webb
  • 76. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
    • A) Passes Training to the Beginners
    • Instep foot
  • 77. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
    • A) Passes Training to the Beginners
    • Instep foot
  • 78. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
    • A) Passes Training to the Beginners
    • Outside foot
  • 79. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
  • 80. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
  • 81. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
  • 82. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
    • A) Passes Training to the Beginners
    • Top of instep
  • 83. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
    • Passes the ball ahead (forward) to the teammate.
  • 84. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
  • 85. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
  • 86. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
  • 87. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
    • Passes the ball back to the teammate.
  • 88. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
  • 89. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
  • 90. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
    • Passes the ball wide to the teammate.
  • 91. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
  • 92. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
  • 93. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
    • Make the right decision to who and when passing
    • the ball.
  • 94. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
    • Overlapping.
  • 95. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
    • Counterattack – short and fast.
  • 96. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
  • 97. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
  • 98. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
  • 99. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
  • 100. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
  • 101. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
  • 102. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
  • 103. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
  • 104. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
    • Counterattack – long.
  • 105. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
    • Switching side.
  • 106. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
    • Actions after pass the ball.
          • Moving forward or finding space
  • 107. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
  • 108. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
    • Actions after pass the ball.
          • Marking after the ball possession is lost
  • 109. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
    • B) Passes Training in Game Situations
      • Small games
        • Scrimmage
  • 110. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
    • B) Passes Training in Game Situations
      • Small games
        • Half field
  • 111. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
    • B) Passes Training in Game Situations
      • Small games
        • 2 X 2, 3 X 3, 4 X 4…
  • 112. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
    • B) Passes Training in Game Situations
  • 113. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
    • B) Passes Training in Game Situations
      • Small games
        • Full field with limitations
  • 114. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
    • B) Passes Training in Game Situations
      • Small games
        • More defenders and less attackers?
  • 115. Lesson 1 4 – Long and Short Passes
    • B) Passes Training in Game Situations
      • Real situation.