QM2010Keynote

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Keynote presentation, Quality Matters Program 2nd Annual Conference, June 11, 2010, Chicago, IL

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  • Outside: 3rd party tools not included with cms, guest experts, research, resources, colleagues who have taken the course – anything outside the core design, materials, and instructor experience
  • Outside: 3rd party tools not included with cms, guest experts, research, resources, colleagues who have taken the course – anything outside the core design, materials, and instructor experience
  • Outside: 3rd party tools not included with cms, guest experts, research, resources, colleagues who have taken the course – anything outside the core design, materials, and instructor experience
  • Outside: 3rd party tools not included with cms, guest experts, research, resources, colleagues who have taken the course – anything outside the core design, materials, and instructor experience
  • Outside: 3rd party tools not included with cms, guest experts, research, resources, colleagues who have taken the course – anything outside the core design, materials, and instructor experienceOutside program: student communities, LinkedIn, job search resources, professional colleagues
  • Outside: 3rd party tools not included with cms, guest experts, research, resources, colleagues who have taken the course – anything outside the core design, materials, and instructor experienceOutside program: student communities, LinkedIn, job search resources, professional colleagues
  • QM 1 just as important as QM 3. Introducing myself doesn’t have as much importance.
  • Instructions on how to meet the objectives rank higher than the learning objectives themselves.
  • QM2010Keynote

    1. 1. Do quality standards matter to students?<br />Penny Ralston-Berg<br />The Quality Matters Program 2nd Annual Conference<br />June 11, 2010<br />http://www.slideshare.net/plr15<br />
    2. 2. From their fingertips to our ears<br />2300+, 31 institutions, 22 states<br />Qualitative, preliminary survey<br />Throw light on how students perceive quality<br />Snapshot of trends<br />Not trying to predict behavior<br />Lay groundwork for future quantitative studies<br />
    3. 3. Instrument<br />Converted existing quality elements to student-centered language<br />How important are these features to success in an online course?<br />0 - Not at all important - does not contribute to my success<br />1 - Important <br />2 - Very important <br />3 - Essential – could not succeed without it<br />(Ragan & Sax, 2005)<br />
    4. 4. Demographics<br />Range in age from 18 to 65+<br />Range from 0 to 9+ courses completed<br />Most comfortable or very comfortable with technology<br />Most have experienced only cohort-based or combo of cohort and some self-paced<br />57% female<br />59% employed full or part time<br />64% taking at least 2 courses<br />
    5. 5. 25 Areas of study<br />Agriculture <br />Architecture, Engineering, and Drafting <br />Arts, Visual and Performing<br />Business and Finance <br />Community and Social Services <br />Computers and Math <br />Construction and Extraction <br />Education, Museum Work, and Library Science <br />Environment <br />Health Care Support, Diagnosis, Treatment, or Technology <br />Humanities <br />Installation, Maintenance, and Repair <br />Law and Government <br />Management <br />Media and Communications <br />Life and Physical Science <br />Office and Administrative Support <br />Personal Care and Culinary Services <br />Production <br />Protective Services <br />Sales <br />Social Science <br />Sports and Fitness <br />Technical <br />Transportation<br />
    6. 6. Agenda<br />How do students see quality?<br />Are QM standards important to students?<br />What do students say about quality?<br />What else should we consider?<br />Topics for more study<br />
    7. 7. Quality online course?<br />
    8. 8. Quality online course?<br />
    9. 9. Holistic View of Quality<br />Outside Course<br />
    10. 10. Holistic View of Quality<br />
    11. 11. Holistic View of Quality<br />
    12. 12. Holistic View of Quality<br />
    13. 13. Holistic View of Quality<br />
    14. 14. Holistic View of Quality<br />
    15. 15. Yes, quality matters<br />Agree – QM rubric items are important<br />Many QM 2,1 items => QM 3 items<br />Known effective course design practices<br />Add value<br />Contribute to quality<br />Relevance and alignment more important than specific media, tool, delivery mode<br />
    16. 16. QM: Course Overview and Introduction<br />
    17. 17. QM: Learning Objectives<br />
    18. 18. Clear expectations<br />What’s due when -- and how to do it; “no surprises”<br />Don’t assume we know how to do it<br />Concise instructions with links to more detailed instructions<br />Realistic, reasonable workload<br />Expectations for instructor<br />
    19. 19. QM: Assessment and Measurement<br />
    20. 20. Opportunities to enhance learning<br />
    21. 21. Opportunities to enhance learning<br /><ul><li>Don’t repeat text / readings
    22. 22. Supplement with audio / video
    23. 23. Share expertise
    24. 24. Share alternate perspectives
    25. 25. Supplement with experts other than instructor
    26. 26. Explain and provide examples</li></li></ul><li>Opportunities to enhance learning<br /><ul><li>Automated comprehension check (Do I “get” it?)
    27. 27. Access to tutor prior to assignment due date
    28. 28. Instructor answers questions about materials
    29. 29. Study group reviews materials
    30. 30. Feedback on draft assignments
    31. 31. Able to review example / exemplary assignments
    32. 32. FYI resources</li></li></ul><li>Opportunities to enhance learning<br /><ul><li>Graded activities between exams (I’m on track / learning the material.)
    33. 33. Time to think between posts
    34. 34. Discuss work with instructor and peers
    35. 35. Study group debrief of graded activities</li></li></ul><li>Opportunities to enhance learning<br /><ul><li>Study guide provided / study group
    36. 36. Feedback on graded activities
    37. 37. Practice online exam (for comprehension and technical practice)
    38. 38. Resubmit assignments to improve grade based on detailed feedback
    39. 39. Feedback on activities received prior to assessment</li></li></ul><li>Opportunities to enhance learning<br /><ul><li>Grade as well as detailed feedback
    40. 40. See results of online exams
    41. 41. Chance to re-learn what I didn’t get the first time (Why did I lose points? What do I study to “get it?”)</li></li></ul><li>QM: Resources and Materials<br />
    42. 42. Learning materials<br />Materials accessible prior to course start<br />Materials designed specifically for course<br />Direct links to online resources – not generic site / list of articles / page of reserves <br />Too many resources can dilute focus / clarify required vs. FYI <br />
    43. 43. Learning materials<br />Tutorials, examples, explanations; multiple ways to grasp the concept<br />Expert opinions other than instructor / multiple sources of research <br />Relevant, thorough, important, up-to-date<br />Draws in current events; related to real world<br />
    44. 44. QM: Resources and Materials / Media<br />
    45. 45. QM: Learner Engagement - Activities<br />
    46. 46. Course design activities<br />More than just reading and writing <br />Activities:<br />Challenging<br />Promote deeper understanding<br />Analysis<br />Critical thinking<br />Application to real world activities <br />Don't assume student is already working in field <br />
    47. 47. QM: Learner Engagement - Instructor<br />
    48. 48. Instructor<br />Alters teaching style for online course<br />As active as students – “don't phone it in” <br />Willing to answer questions immediately; relates materials to real world<br />Strong computer / technical skills<br />New instructors receive mentoring from more experienced instructors <br />Brings out the best in students<br />
    49. 49. Instructor is not the author<br />Students notice when an instructor:<br />Doesn’t appear in videos, etc.<br />Doesn’t have handle on grades / assignments<br />Not familiar with materials<br />Not familiar with CMS<br />Don’t appreciate, “Don’t blame me – I didn’t write this course.”<br />
    50. 50. Feedback<br />Timely<br />Relevant<br />Detailed, meaningful, helpful<br />Justifies the grade <br />Tells me “where I'm at” or “how I'm doing” <br />Constructive, positive<br />“Good or bad - am I on the right track?”<br />Given prior to assessments, future graded assignments <br />
    51. 51. QM: Learner Engagement - Students<br />
    52. 52. Student interaction<br />Off-topic / open discussion<br />Not simple post / post reply <br />Meaningful, thought provoking questions <br />Discuss what you've learned with someone other an professor <br />“Wouldn't have opportunity to talk to as many people” if the class was face-to-face<br />Don’t like it – other students hold up my progress <br />
    53. 53. Learner Engagement - Technology<br />
    54. 54. QM: Course Technology<br />
    55. 55. Convenient Technology<br /> Available 24/7 <br />Works with all computer platforms / browsers / media players <br />One password for everything<br />Email works inside and outside the course<br />Tools are established (not experimental)<br />Portability; apps for handheld devices; import to calendar<br />Real time text / IM / chat with instructor (to answer questions)<br />Reach the professor at any convenience <br />
    56. 56. QM: Learner Support<br />
    57. 57. Support services<br />Complete research online <br />Contact proxy if instructor isn't available <br />Access tutoring <br />Prepare a job search<br />Access the library <br />Contact counselor / advisor / admissions <br />Check status of financial aid <br />Buy books<br />Get training on how to use course system<br />
    58. 58. QM: Accessibility<br />
    59. 59. Accessibility good for all<br />Watch/listen, read online, or print<br />Use handouts or transcripts to take notes<br />Replay or print explanations / directions<br />Find specific points in video or audio<br />Captions: better understanding is speaker talks too fast or is difficult to understand<br />
    60. 60. How do students see quality?<br />Beyond course quality<br />Learning is an organic experience<br />Tied with items inside and outside courses<br />Tied to program and institution<br />
    61. 61. What Else?<br />Everything matches<br />Consistency:<br />Style within a course<br />Across courses<br />Across institution<br />
    62. 62. What Else?<br />Planning tools<br />Flexibility<br />Affective considerations<br />Student motivation<br />After the class ends<br />
    63. 63. Planning tools<br />Access to full course and assignments from the start of the course <br />Progress checks<br />What should I be working on each day? (not just due dates) <br />Able to monitor grade at all times <br />Measure my own strengths and weaknesses <br />Timeline for instructor grading <br />Access to other courses for future planning<br />
    64. 64. Flexibility<br />Opportunity / access to education <br />Flexible due dates; extensions<br />Set my own due dates<br />Finish early, turn in assignments early<br />Windows of time to complete online assessments <br />My objectives may be different than course objectives <br />
    65. 65. Affective considerations<br />“Where the instructor was less involved, I felt lost…” <br />Courteous instructors <br />Receive encouragement <br />Fairness <br />Atmosphere of community; camaraderie<br />Accountability <br />Instructor cares about my success <br />Feel instructor's guidance and leadership <br />Gives same sense of satisfaction as in-person class <br />Can be myself in discussions <br />
    66. 66. Student motivation<br />Self-discipline <br />Time management<br />Willing to learn and participate <br />“A quality online course is full of people who are there and want to be there and want to participate and learn the most that they can from the experience.”<br />
    67. 67. After the class ends<br />Classmates interact outside the course / make connections in industry <br />Application of material learned<br />Degree / certification<br />Satisfaction <br />Sense of accomplishment <br />Learned something that could be used in career<br />
    68. 68. Continued study<br />Differences between:<br />Age groups<br />Number of online courses completed<br />Comfort with technology<br />Media choices<br />Others?<br />
    69. 69. Do quality standards matter to students?<br />Encourage effective design practices<br />Add value<br />Contribute to quality<br />Materials provide flexibility, choice, convenience; learn in different ways<br />Relevance and alignment more important than specific media, tool, or delivery<br />Yes, solid foundation in holistic system<br />
    70. 70. Thank you!<br />Questions?<br />Contact info:<br /> PLR15@psu.edu LinkedIn<br />Presentation online at:http://www.slideshare.net/plr15<br />
    71. 71. References<br />Garrison, D.R. & Arbaugh, J.B. (2007). Researching the community of Inquiry Framework: Review, Issues, and Future Directions. The Internet and Higher Education, 10(3), 157-172.<br />Legon, R. (2006). Comparison of the Quality Matters rubric to accreditation standards for distance learning. Retrieved January 14, 2008, from http://www.qualitymatters.org/Documents/Comparison%20of%20the%20Quality%20Matters%20Rubric%20-%20Summary.pdf<br />North American Council for Online Learning (NACOL). (2008). NACOL National standards for quality online  teaching. Retrieved May 1, 2009, from http://www.inacol.org/resources/nationalstandards/index.php<br />Quality Matters rubric standards 2008-2010 edition with assigned pointvalues. (2008). Retrieved May 1, 2009, from http://qminstitute.org/home/Public%20Library/About%20QM/RubricStandards2008-2010.pdf<br />Ragan, L. & Sax, C. (2005). Defining and implementing quality assurance standards for online courses. Presentation at EDUCAUSE Annual Conference, Orlando, FL.  <br />
    72. 72. References<br />Ralston-Berg, P. & Nath, L. (2008). What makes a quality online course? The student perspective. Paper presented at Annual Conference on Distance Teaching and Learning, Madison, WI.<br />Research literature and standards sets support for quality matters review standards. (2005). Retrieved January 14, 2008, from http://www.qualitymatters.org/Documents/Matrix%20of%20Research%20Standards%20FY0506.pdf<br />Stodel, E. J. Thompson, T. L. & McDonald, C. (2006).  Learners' perspectives on what is missing from online learning: Interpretations through the community of inquiry framework. International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 7(3), 1­24. <br />Universal Design Education Online: http://www.udeducation.org/<br />Young, A. & Norgard, C. (2006). Assessing the quality of online courses from the students’ perspective.  Internet and Higher Education, 9, 107­115.<br />
    73. 73. Demographics: Age<br />
    74. 74. Demographics: Courses completed<br />
    75. 75. Demographics: Comfort with technology<br />

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