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Using Power Point Differently --  IT6710 -- 2010
 

Using Power Point Differently -- IT6710 -- 2010

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  • So this is the basic agenda or at least how I planned things might go. But I am flexible and realize often there comes a time when you need to abandon the agenda and I am fine with that.
  • What do you think of when you hear “Death by PowerPoint”? [Open Chat pod or use the polling feature]
  • What I often think of is Peter Norvig who did this early spoof about what it might look like if Abraham Lincoln used PowerPoint for the Gettysburg Address. If you haven’t seen this before, I highly recommend checking out the link above or just Google Peter Norvig.
  • But the Death by PowerPoint movement, if you can call it that. Really started with this guy, Edward Tufte. “ Edward Tufte has written seven books, including  Visual Explanations, Envisioning Information, The Visual Display of Quantitative Information,  and  Data Analysis for Politics and Policy.  He writes, designs, and self-publishes his books on analytical design…He is Professor Emeritus at Yale University, where he taught courses in statistical evidence, information design, and interface design.” See www.edwardtufte.com for more information
  • But really it was this book, or monograph (it’s only about 30 pages) that really started the Death by PowerPoint movement. I highly recommend reading this. But if you can’t get a hold of a copy, a colleague and I wrote a review of it, which you might find helpful. I can give you a link to the review if you want: http://edrev.asu.edu/brief/jan08.html#7
  • But while Tufte really became the face of the Death by PowerPoint movement, he wasn’t the only one writing about and ranting about the problems of PowerPoint. The following are just a few titles of some articles written about the problems with PowerPoint.
  • 6x6: use no more than 6 lines per slide and no more than 6 words per line. Guy Kawasaki: 10/20/30 rule – 10 slides, no more than 20 minutes, no font smaller than 30 Ignite : 20 slides timed for 15 seconds each (total time=5 minutes) http://ignite.oreilly.com/ Pecha Kucha : 20 slides timed for 20 seconds each (total time=6 minutes 40 seconds) www.pecha-kucha.org (e.g., http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9NZOt6BkhUg ) Gar Reynolds: Top 10 tips ( http://www.garrreynolds.com/Presentation/slides.html ) No bulleted lists No clip art No handouts of the slides Use stock images Maximum of 6 words per slide Find stock images (Flickr or other sites). The picture should be meaningful to the content on the slide and should take up the entire slide. Lack of bullets keeps it from becoming bogged down with words. Any handouts should be separate documents (in a word processing program usually). Keeping the words to a minimum keeps the information from being overwhelming, and keeps the presenter from reading to the audience.
  • So everything changes online. These rules about what to and what not to do are great but the environment and tools and the way we present change when we are teaching online and therefore so should the way we use PowerPoint and present information (i.e., lecture).
  • So, I have a question. (open chat or poll) 1. So does PowerPoint = lecture? 2. PowerPoint = content? Regarding the my first question, I would say definitely, NO! Or at least it shouldn’t. But yet when faculty want to put their lectures online, I would argue 90% of the time they mean they want to put their PowerPoint's online Regarding the second question, I would say it depends. As much as I hate PowerPoint presentations (especially bad one’s) and I hate poor PowerPoint handouts, at least as a student, I like to have to have the teacher’s notes. Depending on how in-depth (or how much content … typically text) each slide is, maybe they are useful (to a degree). Maybe they do to some degree equal content. But if a faculty member is following many of the tips I addressed earlier, then the slides most likely do not equal content. And of course, I don’t think content or information necessarily equals learning.
  • So I believe that faculty are faced with PowerPoint Online Imperative when they teach online or at least want to use PowerPoint (in the typical way of presenting information) in their online courses. So what is the online imperative you ask? It’s the belief that faculty need to do one of the following two things when using PowerPoint online.
  • 1. Narrate your presentation. That is, record your presentation/lecture. This can simply be an audio recording or even an audio/video recording.
  • Or 2. Faculty must add more content. Now faculty typically think of content as more text but it can also be information rich graphics, audio, video… but the idea is that simply following a less text is better philosophy doesn’t work online (i.e., if you aren’t going to narrate your slides). Why? Because students are missing what connects the bullets. There was a line in a dancing movie I saw a while ago that said dancing is what happens between the steps. Well, a presentation is what happens between the bullets.
  • Have everyone login to this document and create the document together [pull it up so everyone can see it] --http://docs.google.com/Doc?docid=0AU6yjEoIPaTIZGhtaGM2ZmdfNDg4NW1maHFmODc&hl=en (version 2) --http://docs.google.com/Doc?docid=0AU6yjEoIPaTIZGhtaGM2ZmdfNDg5Yzk4amJoNms&hl=en
  • Now there are probably a number of ways to add more content to your slides but the two that I always think of are to either add more text / graphics… to each PowerPoint Slide, specifically in the body of the slide or to complete the notes section for each slide.
  • This is an example of a slide with more text. Notice that if violates a lot of the rules discussed earlier about ways to design PowerPoint presentations for F2F situations. But I think this can work just fine in an online environment. Further, by creating slides like this, you are essentially creating little learning objects that you can then use a tool like iSpring to export as a flash web site.
  • But perhaps the easiest way to go is to just complete the notes section and to print your slides with notes as a PDF and share these with students. I say this is the easiest because it enables you to keep one slide deck for F2F and online situations.
  • So I believe that faculty are faced with PowerPoint Online Imperative when they teach online or at least want to use PowerPoint (in the typical way of presenting information) in their online courses. So what is the online imperative you ask? It’s the belief that faculty need to do one of the following two things when using PowerPoint online.
  • Digital Storytelling Music Video Games
  • Here are few of the places you might use to post and share your PowerPoint slides (or Presentations)

Using Power Point Differently --  IT6710 -- 2010 Using Power Point Differently -- IT6710 -- 2010 Presentation Transcript

  • Using PowerPoint differently online Patrick R. Lowenthal CU Online [email_address]
  • Agenda
    • Death by PowerPoint Movement
    • Strategies to improve PowerPoint Use
    • Everything Changes Online
    • Tools of the Trade
    • Distribution
    • Q & A
  • Death by PowerPoint
    • Peter Norvig -- http://norvig.com/Gettysburg/sld001.htm
  • Edward Tufte
  • Cognitive Style of PowerPoint
    • “ Official: PowerPoint is bad for Brains”
    • “ Bad PowerPoint: When is enough, enough?”
    • “ PowerPoint: Shot with its own bullets”
    • “ PowerPoint is evil”
    • “ Does PowerPoint make us Stupid?”
    • “ PowerPoint: Can software edit our thoughts?”
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6tGq3tH4qSw
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FJ5dbUCu2Ug
    • Low resolution
    • Bullet outlines dilute thought
    • Deeply hierarchical and linear structure
    • Fragments narrative and data
    • Preoccupation with format, not content
    • Decoration and phluff
    Tufte’s Problems
    • Focused on presentations—not learning
    • Blames the tool
    • Over-emphasis on content
    • Doesn’t offer any strategies to improve PowerPoint
    Problems w/ Tufte
  • Improving PowerPoint Use
    • Use more visuals and give handouts
    • Avoid bulleted outlines
    • Develop non-linear presentations
    • Use non-distracting backgrounds; avoid distracting images
    Tufte’s Implicit Tips
    • Should support learning objectives
    • Avoid PPT templates
    • Avoid using more than one level of bullets
    • Less is better: less words & fewer slides
    • Avoid distracting clip art or unrelated images
    • Avoid distracting slide transitions
    • Use CARP to improve design
    • Avoid using all CAPS
    • Leverage multimedia
    • Don’t let PowerPoint control your teaching
    Rules of Thumb
    • Should support learning objectives
    • Avoid PPT templates
    • Avoid using more than one level of bullets
    • Less is better: less words & fewer slides
    • Avoid distracting clip art or unrelated images
    • Avoid distracting slide transitions
    • Use CARP to improve design
    • Avoid using all CAPS
    • Leverage multimedia
    • Don’t let PowerPoint control your teaching
    Rules of Thumb
    • Should support learning objectives
    • Avoid PPT templates
    • Avoid using more than one level of bullets
    • Less is better: less words & fewer slides
    • Avoid distracting clip art or unrelated images
    • Avoid distracting slide transitions
    • Use CARP to improve design
    • Avoid using all CAPS
    • Leverage multimedia
    • Don’t let PowerPoint control your teaching
    Rules of Thumb
    • Should support learning objectives
    • Avoid PPT templates
    • Avoid using more than one level of bullets
    • Less is better: less words & fewer slides
    • Avoid distracting clip art or unrelated images
    • Avoid distracting slide transitions
    • Use CARP to improve design
    • Avoid using all CAPS
    • Leverage multimedia
    • Don’t let PowerPoint control your teaching
    Rules of Thumb
    • Should support learning objectives
    • Avoid PPT templates
    • Avoid using more than one level of bullets
    • Less is better: less words & fewer slides
    • Avoid distracting clip art or unrelated images
    • Avoid distracting slide transitions
    • Use CARP to improve design
    • Avoid using all CAPS
    • Leverage multimedia
    • Don’t let PowerPoint control your teaching
    Rules of Thumb
    • Should support learning objectives
    • Avoid PPT templates
    • Avoid using more than one level of bullets
    • Less is better: less words & fewer slides
    • Avoid distracting clip art or unrelated images
    • Avoid distracting slide transitions
    • Use CARP to improve design
    • Avoid using all CAPS
    • Leverage multimedia
    • Don’t let PowerPoint control your teaching
    Rules of Thumb
    • Should support learning objectives
    • Avoid PPT templates
    • Avoid using more than one level of bullets
    • Less is better: less words & fewer slides
    • Avoid distracting clip art or unrelated images
    • Avoid distracting slide transitions
    • Use CARP to improve design
    • Avoid using all CAPS
    • Leverage multimedia
    • Don’t let PowerPoint control your teaching
    Rules of Thumb
    • Should support learning objectives
    • Avoid PPT templates
    • Avoid using more than one level of bullets
    • Less is better: less words & fewer slides
    • Avoid distracting clip art or unrelated images
    • Avoid distracting slide transitions
    • Use CARP to improve design
    • Avoid using all CAPS
    • Leverage multimedia
    • Don’t let PowerPoint control your teaching
    Rules of Thumb
    • Should support learning objectives
    • Avoid PPT templates
    • Avoid using more than one level of bullets
    • Less is better: less words & fewer slides
    • Avoid distracting clip art or unrelated images
    • Avoid distracting slide transitions
    • Use CARP to improve design
    • Avoid using all CAPS
    • Leverage multimedia
    • Don’t let PowerPoint control your teaching
    Rules of Thumb
    • Should support learning objectives
    • Avoid PPT templates
    • Avoid using more than one level of bullets
    • Less is better: less words & fewer slides
    • Avoid distracting clip art or unrelated images
    • Avoid distracting slide transitions
    • Use CARP to improve design
    • Avoid using all CAPS
    • Leverage multimedia
    • Don’t let PowerPoint control your teaching
    Rules of Thumb
    • 6 x 6
    • 10, 20, 30 rule
    • Ignite
    • Pecha Kucha
    • Gar Reynolds Top 10 (Presentation 2.0)
    Other Strategies
  • Everything Changes Online!
  • I Have a Question ???
  • Online Imperative
  • Narrate
  • Add Content
  • Ways to Narrate
    • 1. Use PowerPoint 2. Use a PPT add-on (e.g., Adobe Presenter, iSpring, Articulate, Impatica)
    • Use a third party app (e.g., Adobe Connect, Jing, PhotoStory, MovieMaker, iMovie)
  • Lets Create this Document Together http://tinyurl.com/FLCpowerpoint
  • Ways to Add Content 1. Add More Text / Graphics to Body of the Slides 2. Add Notes
  • This slide is an example of what a PowerPoint slide online might look like: More content is better online When developing PowerPoint presentations for online learning, the rules change. The number one reason is because your audience is now sitting right at a computer screen. Therefore, while the two central principles (i.e., sound instructional design and sound message design) remain important because learners often skim instead of read content online, the actual development of the PowerPoint presentation changes and becomes more like designing a webpage. Implications The number one way this impacts faculty is by the fact that one presentation cannot and should not be used for classroom and online courses—that is, unless you are going to include audio or video to supplement the slides. Adding More Text
  • Adding More Text
  • Other Things
  • Adding Interactivity
  • The Rules Change Online This slide is another example of what a PowerPoint slide online might look like: Interactivity When developing PowerPoint presentations online, it is important to recognize and take advantage of the fact that your learner is now able to interact with your presentation. Therefore, including URL’s, video, audio, games, quizzes, can all strengthen your presentation as a learning experience. Bandwidth The size of your files, images that you use, and any video components takes on new importance. As a general rule of thumb, it is hard to email anything over 4mb so you should strive to keep your PowerPoint presentations under 4mb . Home :: Week 1 :: Quiz 1 :: Week 2 :: Quiz 2 :: Week 3 :: Quiz 3 ::  Back | Home | Next 
    • Interactivity
    • MS Producer for PowerPoint
    • Articulate Presenter
    • Impatica for PowerPoint
    • Games
    • Digital Stories
    Moving Beyond Static Text We need to think of ways to get students to interact and actively engage in their learning.
    • Interactivity
    • MS Producer for PowerPoint
    • Articulate Presenter
    • Impatica for PowerPoint
    • Games
    • Digital Stories
    Moving Beyond Static Text MS Producer is a good tool if you want to add audio and video to your slides. It is also free!
    • Interactivity
    • MS Producer for PowerPoint
    • Articulate Presenter
    • Impatica for PowerPoint
    • Games
    • Digital Stories
    Moving Beyond Static Text Articulate Presenter offers a seamless (but expensive) alternative to Producer. Also has quiz making tools.
    • Interactivity
    • MS Producer for PowerPoint
    • Articulate Presenter
    • Impatica for PowerPoint
    • Games
    • Digital Stories
    Moving Beyond Static Text Impatica is an easy tool to covert PowerPoint slides for the web.
    • Interactivity
    • MS Producer for PowerPoint
    • Articulate Presenter
    • Impatica for PowerPoint
    • Games
    • Digital Stories
    Moving Beyond Static Text PowerPoint can used to create learning games to engage students online
    • Interactivity
    • MS Producer for PowerPoint
    • Articulate Presenter
    • Impatica for PowerPoint
    • Games
    • Digital Stories
    Moving Beyond Static Text Digital stories can be an effective way to build teacher presence online.
  • Other Ideas?
  • Distribution
  •  
  • Patrick Lowenthal [email_address] www.slideshare.net/plowenthal