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BSU Research and Teaching Talk

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  • I was asked to talk today about my research and teaching. I have titled this talk “Teaching and Learning in Online Learning Environments”
  • I was told that I have an hour to speak and that I should leave about 15 minutes for questions at the end
  • So when I think about spending about 45 minutes talking about my research and my teaching, I think wow… that is not nearly enough time. I figured I would spend about 30 minutes focused on my research and then about 15 minutes about my teaching. More specifically when I think about talking about my research in 30 minutes I realize that I can’t possibly go into it into much depth. So I figured I would put myself in your shoes and ask myself what is it that each of you want to learn from this presentation and these are the questions I came up with.
  • I have 55 publications. Of those, 24 are refereed journal articles or book chapters
  • To-date I have not published in the top journals in our field – namely, ETR&D, Computers & Ed, and British Journal of Ed. Technology. And while I plan to submit manuscripts to each of these journals in the next six months, I have published in three SSCI journals.
  • SSCI of course is only one way to determine a journals significance. Acceptance rates as well as practitioner beliefs are another
  • This number is deceiving in waysbecause a number of these are short practitioner pieces. However, what it does do is point out that I do regularly publish non-refereed publications. A number of these are the result of my work at UCD. There was an expectation that 20% of our time can be on projects of our choice. I decided to edit two books on giving faculty voice to share their experiences teaching and learning online.
  • We strive to identify multiple ways to determine whether a publication is of value. We first want to see that it’s peer reviewed. We then want to see that it is a high quality publication (which we typically measure by its impact factor), we then want to see if people are actually citing our work.
  • Another way though to measure impact is to look at whether people are actually reading our work. I try to intentionally publish some of my work in open access journals – in large part that more people will read my work.
  • But not only have I published with 25 different co-authors, I have also published with many of them more than once. For instance, while I have written the most with Joni Dunlap, if you look at others, I have worked the most with past colleagues – White & Thomas.
  • So you might be asking yourself… What’s so important about Connecting???? Well, I will respond to that with a story.For a number of years I worked at Regis University – a Jesuit University located in Denver Colorado.I worked in the Teacher Education Department. Our primary job was teacher preparation. So at the end of the fall and spring semesters we had an event to celebrate the successful completion of student teaching called “wine and cheese”.At wine and cheese, we had a Jesuit tell a send off speech (much like a commencement address). For a number of years we had this Jesuit describe his experience teaching social studies at the high school level. He talked about all of these great students he had over the years and time after time he would meet one of them and they could never tell him a thing about “social studies” or what he “taught” them but they could always speak fondly about the way he made them feel about themselves. Education IS a social process. Connecting with others matters… and this plain fact coupled with my initial fears teaching online brought me to this concept called social presence.Image source: Created this image using an image of old main and jacobs
  • Short, Williams, and Christie spent the early 1970’s researching how a communication medium influences how people communicate.Social Presence theory began with the Communication Studies Group in London and was popularized by Short, Williams, and Christie’s book on the subject.They developed a theory called social presence which they outline in their book the social psychology of telecommunications.Social presence is a theory that explains the ability of people to present themselves as "real” and “there” when using a communication medium.For more information check out: http://patricklowenthal.com/the-evolution-and-influence-of-social-presence-theory-on-online-learning/Image source: Created the image from a blue book and added text (couldn’t find a copy of the book anywhere).
  • But what does this mean? Well…
  • But what does this mean? Well…
  • But what does this mean? Well…
  • --Chareen and I share an interest qualitative research, video, and youtube. There are lots of ways we can collaborate whether that is focusing on video in general or specifically on social presence and video or perceptions of screencasting and topics like that.--Kerry Rice and I share an interest on online learning. While she focuses on K12 and I focus on higher ed, I am confident there are multiple projects we can collaborate on--Young Baek and Chris Haskell both focus on “games”. While I am not a game expert, I have an interest in creativity, play, fun, and emotion and learning--Yu-Chang and Yu-Hui have an interest in mobile learning as well as social media / web 2.0 technologies and computer-supported collaborative learning; online community building; Learning and instruction innovation through emerging technologies; Mobile CSCL and Web 2.0 technologies; Social nature of learning; Information and new media literacy--Andy is interested in data mining. I think there are number of ways we could collaborate on projects whether that be current projects like open access journals or through mining LMS for data to inform social presence / interactions--Ross and I share an interest in culture and context as well as professional practice--Barbara has an interest with emerging technologies and teaching skills as well as I do. Not to mention I think we can write a case study on the PMIEF--Dazhi and I’s interests overlap in many ways. She has written a number of article online learning. When I think about STEM, among other things I am interested in issues of identity--Lee Ann and I are both interested in teacher education and literacy.
  • Teacher bios. Since we ask our students to share information about themselves, we share a lot of information about ourselves. Besides helping students to have insight into our values, passions, interests, credibility and so on, our sharing models the type and level of sharing we want them to engage in, in order to set the appropriate tone for social presence and establishing a personal, supporting online learning environment. To this end, we share pertinent resources (e.g., our teaching philosophies, links to articles we’ve written, presentations we’ve delivered, our blogs, and so on)For more info: http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/intentional-web-presence-10-seo-strategies-every-academic-needs-know
  • Joni’s Story -- http://www.augustcouncil.com/~jdunlap/JoniDunlapSOR.movPatrick’s Story -- http://youtu.be/VL0QkVu5t6wFor more info: http://patricklowenthal.com/establishing-social-presence-using-digital-storytelling/
  • Weekly announcements. At the start of each week, we post a new announcement orienting students to the activities of the week, and also send the announcement to students via email. Even though this information exists elsewhere in the course, we like to reach out to students (as opposed to making them log into the course shell) with an enthusiastic and more personal announcement about the week (whether in text format or video). In each announcement, we provide a reminder about how they should focus their time and energy during the week. We also include personal information (e.g., like what we did the week before), and well wishes for a successful up-coming week. Weekly agendas.Finally, for each week in the course, we provide students with a weekly agenda checklist that they can print out to help them track what they should be working on during the week. Again, although this information exists in the course’s master calendar, it helps to have the week’s activities laid out in a checklist format. We also use the agendas as another way to help students connect with us by adding personal touches. For instance, Joni includes inspirational artwork and music at the top of each agenda and a “What’s fun got to do with it?” section at the bottom, where she shares fun and interesting items that are related to the activities of the week.  
  • We also focus on orienting students to our courses much like we do in a face-to-face course. The following are a few “finding-your-way-around” activities we use to help students with course orientation, in the first week and throughout the term. Orientation videos. We present short orientation videos, with each video walking students through different aspects of the course shell, learning activities, and projects (see Figure 6). Using tools like Jing, we create screencasts showing students all around the course shell. We interject our sense of humor where possible, tell stories, and provide explanations for our design decisions. These videos not only orient students to the course, but to us as well (see this example of a video Patrick used to orient his students to the first unit in his course: http://www.screencast.com/t/MmM3MjM5MjUt). We also do: Course & syllabus scavenger hunt. Videos though aren’t the only way to orient students to a course. We also use the quiz feature in our LMS to create a course and syllabus scavenger hunt that students submit by the end of the first week. To complete the scavenger hunt, students have to read the syllabus, locate materials, and watch the orientation videos. The results of the scavenger hunt reassure us that students are locating and tracking important course information, and alert us to any misconceptions or confusions that individual students have about the materials so we can immediately reach out to them and provide additional support and guidance. Weekly announcements. At the start of each week, we post a new announcement orienting students to the activities of the week, and also send the announcement to students via email (see Figure 7). Even though this information exists elsewhere in the course, we like to reach out to students (as opposed to making them log into the course shell) with an enthusiastic and more personal announcement about the week (whether in text format or video). In each announcement, we provide a reminder about how they should focus their time and energy during the week. We also include personal information (e.g., like what we did the week before), and well wishes for a successful up-coming week.  Weekly agendas.Finally, for each week in the course, we provide students with a weekly agenda checklist that they can print out to help them track what they should be working on during the week (see Figure 8). Again, although this information exists in the course’s master calendar, it helps to have the week’s activities laid out in a checklist format. We also use the agendas as another way to help students connect with us by adding personal touches. For instance, Joni includes inspirational artwork and music at the top of each agenda and a “What’s fun got to do with it?” section at the bottom, where she shares fun and interesting items that are related to the activities of the week.  
  • Personalized, Detailed Feedback Assessment and evaluation (and the feedback it entails) are difficult aspects of teaching. Whenever possible we strive to provide personalized and detailed feedback to our students to not only improve the learning process but also to maintain our social presence and connection with each student throughout the semester. The following are a few ways that we do this:  One-on-one and group emails. As low tech as it might appear and while it goes against the school of thought that all communication should be kept within the LMS, we are strong believers in the power of one-on-one emails (see Dunlap & Lowenthal, 2010c). While we use one-on-one and group emails in a variety of ways throughout the semester, we primarily use it as a way to provide personalized detailed feedback with our students.   Video feedback. Sometimes though we find the need to provide feedback in a different—high tech—format. For instance, Patrick uses screen recording tools like Jing to provide video feedback to his students on certain assignments in which it is hard to provide feedback in text alone. While cumbersome in that you have to get all set up with your microphone and the software and so forth, students have commented on how valuable it is to hear both the positive and the negative feedback in the tone of our voices.
  • In our experience, it is not realistic to get to know people in an online course with one getting-to-know-you activity during the first week of class. Establishing social presence and building relationships and community requires multiple opportunities to share and connect. So, for reconnection purposes, we use activities like the following to reengage students every few weeks.Soundtrack of your life. Another reconnecting activity (and one of our personal favorites) involves having our students create a playlist of six songs: two that represent their past, two that represent their present, and two that represent their planned/hoped for future. Students share their playlists (using a digital jukebox like Grooveshark). They then ask questions about the songs to figure out why certain songs were selected. You can learn a lot about someone from the music they select (Dunlap & Lowenthal, 2010b).For more information: http://patricklowenthal.com/hot-for-teacher-using-digital-music-to-enhance-students-experience-in-online-courses/
  • Free-flowing, organic interactions Last but not least, one of our most recent attempts at establishing and maintaining social presence in our courses involves social networking tools—specifically, Twitter. We began using Twitter (and inviting our students to follow us) because we wanted to have an informal, playful way for our online students to connect with us and each other throughout the day. On our quest for the social presence grail—as effective as we thought many of the strategies we have previously discussed were—we felt confined within the structure of the LMS. This was exasperated by the fact that we have been missing the informal, playful banter and chit-chat that is possible when everyone is physically located in the same geographic space. This banter helps students connect with us, and experience our personalities. And, it helps them connect with each other in a more emotional way. Twitter seemed to have potential to further support our social-presence efforts. Twitter. We invite our students to follow us on Twitter and to follow each other. In addition, we provide a list of people outside of the course who tweet about course-relevant topics to follow as well as a number of publications and professional organizations. Our decision to use Twitter to enhance social presence in our online courses was reinforced by students’ experiences (see Dunlap & Lowenthal, 2009a, 2009b) as well as the plain fact that our communications via Twitter seemed much more natural than logging into our LMS, getting into the course shell, then getting into a discussion forum and posting a message . . . and then waiting for someone to respond later (after she or he has already moved on to other work, thoughts, issues). But unlike many of the other strategies, we found Twitter to be an extremely time consuming strategy so we were left wondering about its effectiveness.For more infohttp://patricklowenthal.com/tweeting-the-night-away-using-twitter-to-enhance-social-presence/
  • Transcript

    • 1. Teaching & Learning inOnline Learning Environments Patrick R. Lowenthal Boise State University @plowenthal
    • 2. OverviewScholarship Teaching Q&A slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 3. my.Scholarship slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 4. Guiding Questions• Can he publish?• Can he conduct high quality research?• Can he eventually make tenure?• Can he improve the department’s reputation?• Can he collaborate with others? slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 5. Background slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 6. 24 Refereed Publications slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 7. Notable JournalsInternet and Higher Education1.015 impact factor SSCI (JCR)Distance Education0.974 impact factor SSCI (JCR)Review of Higher Education1.324 impact factor SSCI (JCR) slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 8. Acceptance RatesJournal Acceptance Prestige Rate RatingDistance Education 21-30% 4 of 59Internet and Higher Education 21-30% 29 of 59TechTrends 35% 14 of 59Journal of Online Learning and Teaching 45% 38 of 59EDUCAUSE Quarterly 25% n/a slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 9. 31 Non-Refereed Publications slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 10. Other Measures of Impact slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 11. Other Measures of ImpactArticles VisitsHorton Hears a Tweet. EDUCAUSE Quarterly 7,830Death to the Digital Dropbox: Rethinking Student Privacy and Public 7,068Performance. EDUCAUSE QuarterlySituational qualities Exhibited by exceptional presenters. ECAR Research 1,906BulletinRemake / remodel: Using eportfolios and a system of gates to improve 1,306student assessment and program evaluation. International Journal of ePortfolioDefeating the Kobayashi Maru: Supporting Student Retention by Balancing 1,654the Needs of the Many and the One. EDUCAUSE QuarterlyOnline faculty development and storytelling: An unlikely solution to 1,046improving teacher quality. Journal of Online Learning and TeachingDigital campfires: Innovations in helping faculty explore the online learning 789wildness. Journal of Online Learning and TeachingIntentional web presence: Ten SEO strategies every academic should know. 781EDUCAUSE Review Online slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 12. 55 First % Author slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 13. 25 Different co-authors slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 14. slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 15. Quotes• “I use this a lot by the way… One fellow ID called it a brilliant idea!”• “Patrick has the unique ability to dive into research questions and elucidate them more clearly for all parties. I have collaborated with Patrick on a number of articles and presentations. On my own wo rk, Patrick helped me see many areas for improvement. He delved into my areas of research (literacy) and found connections that I h ad not seen. Conversely, Patrick brought me in on a few pieces on which he was working (he is obviously great at collaborating) and r eadily integrated my ideas and used my constructive criticism.”• “There is no question that I like writing with you – if I could just find the time to do it – you inspire me, your enthusiasm is infectious” slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 16. Quotes• “I use this a lot by the way… One fellow ID called it a brilliant idea!”• “Patrick has the unique ability to dive into research questions and elucidate them more clearly for all parties. I have collaborated with Patrick on a number of articles and presentations. On my own wo rk, Patrick helped me see many areas for improvement. He delved into my areas of research (literacy) and found connections that I h ad not seen. Conversely, Patrick brought me in on a few pieces on which he was working (he is obviously great at collaborating) and r eadily integrated my ideas and used my constructive criticism.”• “There is no question that I like writing with you – if I could just find the time to do it – you inspire me, your enthusiasm is infectious” slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 17. Quotes• “I use this a lot by the way… One fellow ID called it a brilliant idea!”• “Patrick has the unique ability to dive into research questions and elucidate them more clearly for all parties. I have collaborated with Patrick on a number of articles and presentations. On my own wo rk, Patrick helped me see many areas for improvement. He delved into my areas of research (literacy) and found connections that I h ad not seen. Conversely, Patrick brought me in on a few pieces on which he was working (he is obviously great at collaborating) and r eadily integrated my ideas and used my constructive criticism.”• “There is no question that I like writing with you – if I could just find the time to do it – you inspire me, your enthusiasm is infectious” slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 18. 20 Sole % Author slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 19. Focus of My ScholarshipTheory Research Practice
    • 20. Research Focus slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 21. Labels???• Online Teaching and Learning• (Social & Teaching) Presence• Computer-mediated Communication• (instructional) Discourse slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 22. slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 23. Labels???• Communicating w/ Emerging Technologies in 21st Learning Environments• Online Teaching and Learning• (Social and Teaching) Presence• Computer-mediated Communication• (instructional) Discourse slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 24. Why doesconnecting matter? slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 25. Theory of Social PresenceSocial presence is the degreeof salience (i.e., quality orstate of being there) betweentwo communicators using acommunication medium. For more info: The evolution and influence of social presence theory on online learning
    • 26. What does all this mean?It’s a quality of a communication medium.Some media (e.g., video) have higher socialpresence than other media (e.g., audio)Media w/ high social presence are sociable,warm, and personal; media w/ low socialpresence are as less personal.
    • 27. What does all this mean?It’s a quality of a communication medium.Some media (e.g., video) have higher socialpresence than other media (e.g., audio)Media w/ high social presence are sociable,warm, and personal; media w/ low socialpresence are as less personal.
    • 28. What does all this mean?It’s a quality of a communication medium.Some media (e.g., video) have higher socialpresence than other media (e.g., audio)Media w/ high social presence are sociable,warm, and personal; media w/ low socialpresence are as less personal.
    • 29. Community of Inquiry (CoI) slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 30. Types of Questions• What does social presence look like?• How do we establish social presence in online learning environments?• What are the best strategies to establish social presence?• How do we measure social presence?• What is instructor social presence? slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 31. 1st ExampleThe Changing Nature of Online Communities ofInquiry: An Analysis of How Discourse andTime Shapes Students Perceptions of Presence• Investigate how students’ perceptions of each of the elements of the CoI framework differ across different discourse communities (specifically, business, education, computer science, and humanities) in accelerated online programs• 406 students were surveyed using the CoIQ• No statistical difference across discourse communities slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 32. 1st ExampleThe Changing Nature of Online Communities ofInquiry: An Analysis of How Discourse andTime Shapes Students Perceptions of Presence• Investigate how students’ perceptions of each of the elements of the CoI framework differ across different discourse communities (specifically, business, education, computer science, and humanities) in an accelerated online programs• 406 students were surveyed using the CoIQ• No statistical difference across discourse communities slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 33. 2nd ExampleInvestigating Instructor Social Presence inAccelerated Online Courses• A mixed methods exploratory methodology utilizing both quantitative and qualitative methods was used to explore how instructors establish their social presence in accelerated online courses.• The course discussions from three courses were analyzed using content analysis and constant comparative analysis. slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 34. 2nd ExampleInvestigating Instructor Social Presencein Accelerated Online Courses• A mixed methods exploratory methodology utilizing both quantitative and qualitative methods was used to explore how instructors establish their social presence in accelerated online courses.• The course discussions from three courses were analyzed using content analysis and constant comparative analysis. slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 35. 3rd ExampleInvestigating Students Perceptions ofInstructional Strategies to Establish SocialPresenceMulti-phased mixed methods study:• Phase One: Sought feedback on different instructional strategies (e.g., Twitter)• Phase Two: Constructed a survey to investigate students’ perceptions of the tools, technologies, and instructional strategies used to establish and maintain social presence in online courses. Administered this survey to four sections of courses.• Phase Three: Conducted semi-structured interviews with a subset of the students from phase 2. slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 36. 3rd ExampleInvestigating Students Perceptions ofInstructional Strategies to Establish SocialPresenceMulti-phased mixed methods study:• Phase One: Sought feedback on different instructional strategies (e.g., Twitter)• Phase Two: Constructed a survey to investigate students’ perceptions of the tools, technologies, and instructional strategies used to establish and maintain social presence in online courses. Administered this survey to four sections of courses.• Phase Three: Conducted semi-structured interviews with a subset of the students from phase 2. slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 37. 4th ExampleSocial Presence: What is it? How do wemeasure it?• A mixed-methods exploratory study; employed both quantitative and qualitative methods to investigate the question: How does social presence manifest in an asynchronous, online graduate-education course?• In order to explore social presence in a specific situated asynchronous learning environment in great detail, I analyzed the online threaded discussions using word count, content analysis, and constant comparison analysis slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 38. 4th ExampleSocial Presence: What is it? How do wemeasure it?• A mixed-methods exploratory study; employed both quantitative and qualitative methods to investigate the question: How does social presence manifest in an asynchronous, online graduate-education course?• In order to explore social presence in a specific situated asynchronous learning environment in great detail, I analyzed the online threaded discussions using word count, content analysis, and constant comparison analysis slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 39. Future Scholarship slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 40. Future Scholarship• Investigate student perceptions of social presence indicators developed by Rourke et al.• An analysis of MOOCs for aspects of social presence• Literature review of social presence• Investigate social learning strategies in self-paced learning• Students’ perceptions of video feedback• Teaching presence and open educational resources• Building presence with mobile devices• Instructors perceptions of social presence• An analysis of popular definitions of social presence slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 41. Future Scholarship• Investigate student perceptions of social presence indicators developed by Rourke et al.• An analysis of MOOCs for aspects of social presence• Literature review of social presence• Investigate social learning strategies in self-paced learning• Students’ perceptions of video feedback• Teaching presence and open educational resources• Building presence with mobile devices• Instructors perceptions of social presence• An analysis of popular definitions of social presence slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 42. Future Scholarship• Investigate student perceptions of social presence indicators developed by Rourke et al.• An analysis of MOOCs for aspects of social presence• Literature review of social presence• Investigate social learning strategies in self-paced learning• Students’ perceptions of video feedback• Teaching presence and open educational resources• Building presence with mobile devices• Instructors perceptions of social presence• An analysis of popular definitions of social presence slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 43. Future Scholarship• Investigate student perceptions of social presence indicators developed by Rourke et al.• An analysis of MOOCs for aspects of social presence• Literature review of social presence• Investigate social learning strategies in self-paced learning• Students’ perceptions of video feedback• Teaching presence and open educational resources• Building presence with mobile devices• Instructors perceptions of social presence• An analysis of popular definitions of social presence slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 44. Future Scholarship• Investigate student perceptions of social presence indicators developed by Rourke et al.• An analysis of MOOCs for aspects of social presence• Literature review of social presence• Investigate social learning strategies in self-paced learning• Students’ perceptions of video feedback• Teaching presence and open educational resources• Building presence with mobile devices• Instructors perceptions of social presence• An analysis of popular definitions of social presence slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 45. Future Scholarship• Investigate student perceptions of social presence indicators developed by Rourke et al.• An analysis of MOOCs for aspects of social presence• Literature review of social presence• Investigate social learning strategies in self-paced learning• Students’ perceptions of video feedback• Teaching presence and open educational resources• Building presence with mobile devices• Instructors perceptions of social presence• An analysis of popular definitions of social presence slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 46. Future Scholarship• Investigate student perceptions of social presence indicators developed by Rourke et al.• An analysis of MOOCs for aspects of social presence• Literature review of social presence• Investigate social learning strategies in self-paced learning• Students’ perceptions of video feedback• Teaching presence and open educational resources• Building presence with mobile devices• Instructors perceptions of social presence• An analysis of popular definitions of social presence slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 47. Future Scholarship• Investigate student perceptions of social presence indicators developed by Rourke et al.• An analysis of MOOCs for aspects of social presence• Literature review of social presence• Investigate social learning strategies in self-paced learning• Students’ perceptions of video feedback• Teaching presence and open educational resources• Building presence with mobile devices• Instructors perceptions of social presence• An analysis of popular definitions of social presence slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 48. Future Scholarship• Investigate student perceptions of social presence indicators developed by Rourke et al.• An analysis of MOOCs for aspects of social presence• Literature review of social presence• Investigate social learning strategies in self-paced learning• Students’ perceptions of video feedback• Teaching presence and open educational resources• Building presence with mobile devices• Instructors perceptions of social presence• An analysis of popular definitions of social presence slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 49. Future ScholarshipAECT Proposals• Lessons from the field: An analysis of online instructors lessons learned about teaching online• Educational Technology Professionals Perceptions of Open Access Journals• Getting Graphic about Infographics: An analysis of popular infographics• Visions of the alternative dissertation in educational technology: Perspectives of the community• Orienting Online Students During the First Week of Class and Beyond• Design is Design is Design: What We’ve Learned from Designers about Preparing Instructional Designers• In search of quality: An analysis of MOOC course structure and design This might be my favorite. Which one do you like? slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 50. Future ScholarshipAECT Proposals• Lessons from the field: An analysis of online instructors lessons learned about teaching online• Educational Technology Professionals Perceptions of Open Access Journals• Getting Graphic about Infographics: An analysis of popular infographics• Visions of the alternative dissertation in educational technology: Perspectives of the community• Orienting Online Students During the First Week of Class and Beyond• Design is Design is Design: What We’ve Learned from Designers about Preparing Instructional Designers• In search of quality: An analysis of MOOC course structure and design This might be my favorite. Which one do you like? slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 51. Future ScholarshipAECT Proposals• Lessons from the field: An analysis of online instructors lessons learned about teaching online• Educational Technology Professionals Perceptions of Open Access Journals• Getting Graphic about Infographics: An analysis of popular infographics• Visions of the alternative dissertation in educational technology: Perspectives of the community• Orienting Online Students During the First Week of Class and Beyond• Design is Design is Design: What We’ve Learned from Designers about Preparing Instructional Designers• In search of quality: An analysis of MOOC course structure and design This might be my favorite. Which one do you like? slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 52. Future ScholarshipAECT Proposals• Lessons from the field: An analysis of online instructors lessons learned about teaching online• Educational Technology Professionals Perceptions of Open Access Journals• Getting Graphic about Infographics: An analysis of popular infographics• Visions of the alternative dissertation in educational technology: Perspectives of the community• Orienting Online Students During the First Week of Class and Beyond• Design is Design is Design: What We’ve Learned from Designers about Preparing Instructional Designers• In search of quality: An analysis of MOOC course structure and design This might be my favorite. Which one do you like? slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 53. Future ScholarshipAECT Proposals• Lessons from the field: An analysis of online instructors lessons learned about teaching online• Educational Technology Professionals Perceptions of Open Access Journals• Getting Graphic about Infographics: An analysis of popular infographics• Visions of the alternative dissertation in educational technology: Perspectives of the community• Orienting Online Students During the First Week of Class and Beyond• Design is Design is Design: What We’ve Learned from Designers about Preparing Instructional Designers• In search of quality: An analysis of MOOC course structure and design This might be my favorite. Which one do you like? slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 54. Future ScholarshipAECT Proposals• Lessons from the field: An analysis of online instructors lessons learned about teaching online• Educational Technology Professionals Perceptions of Open Access Journals• Getting Graphic about Infographics: An analysis of popular infographics• Visions of the alternative dissertation in educational technology: Perspectives of the community• Orienting Online Students During the First Week of Class and Beyond• Design is Design is Design: What We’ve Learned from Designers about Preparing Instructional Designers• In search of quality: An analysis of MOOC course structure and design This might be my favorite. Which one do you like? slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 55. Future ScholarshipAECT Proposals• Lessons from the field: An analysis of online instructors lessons learned about teaching online• Educational Technology Professionals Perceptions of Open Access Journals• Getting Graphic about Infographics: An analysis of popular infographics• Visions of the alternative dissertation in educational technology: Perspectives of the community• Orienting Online Students During the First Week of Class and Beyond• Design is Design is Design: What We’ve Learned from Designers about Preparing Instructional Designers• In search of quality: An analysis of MOOC course structure and design This might be my favorite. Which one do you like? slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 56. Collaborate• Dr. Chareen Snelson• Dr. Kerry Rice• Dr. Youngkyun Baek• Dr. Yu-Hui Ching• Dr. Chris Haskell• Dr. Yu-Chang Hsu• Dr. Jui-long Hung• Dr. Ross Perkins• Dr. Barbara Schroeder• Dr. Dazhi Yang• Dr. Lee Ann Tysseling slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 57. my.Teaching slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 58. Guiding Questions• What experience does he have teaching online?• Would he be happy only teaching online?• Will he need a lot of mentoring?• What courses can he teach?• Will students like him? slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 59. Valuesslides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 60. Philosophy• You can learn more from a wrong answer than a right one• Online learning can be better than F2F• Face-to-face isn’t the gold standard• Just because you can doesn’t mean you should• Students’ need choice• Instructors’ need to remain flexible• Students’ need feedback• Formal education is social and emotional slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 61. Social Presence StrategiesBio strategiesOrientation strategiesReconnecting strategiesFeedback strategiesDiscussion strategiesSmall group strategiesOrganic interaction strategies
    • 62. Teacher BiosFor more info:Intentional Web Presence: 10 SEOStrategies Every Academic Needsto Know
    • 63. Digital Bios Digital StoriesFor more info:From Pixel on a Screen to Real Person inYour Students’ Lives: Establishing SocialPresence using Digital Storytelling
    • 64. Orientation StrategiesDetailed Announcements& Emails
    • 65. Orientation Strategies Orientation Videos slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 66. Feedback StrategiesVideo Feedback
    • 67. Reconnecting Strategies Soundtrack of your life For more info: Hot for teacher: Using digital music to enhance student’s experience in online courses
    • 68. Organic Interaction Strategies Social Media For more info: Tweeting the night away: Using Twitter to enhance social presence
    • 69. Evidence slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 70. Regis Evaluationsslides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 71. Regis Comments• “…incredibly patient!”• “…very knowledgeable”• “…incredible”• “… instructor made it a very relaxed atmosphere”• “…went above and beyond to make sure everyone understood”• “…very organized & focused on how to relate the course material to teaching”• “…the best instructor Ive had yet in the step program” slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 72. UCD Evaluationsslides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 73. BSU Evaluationsslides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 74. BSU Comments• “one of my favorite classes…the class challenged me…”• “…was amazing. When I felt like I was struggling…he took the time to help me…and gave me great feedback”• “did an outstanding job…was very responsive to the students and their needs…was genuine and honest with…I would definitely take another course with Mr. Lowenthal…”• “…was very prompt in response to questions, concerns and feedback for submitted assignments. I would highly recommend him to future students and believe he is a true asset to the BSU staff. I would also take any course he would teach”• “…Video updates were helpful for keeping close…contact”• “…a very personable instructor who obviously loves his subject and takes time to help students.” slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 75. BSU Comments• “…knowledgeable and focused…truly cares about his students”• “a great instructor…always took time for his students…was well-informed on the subject and always willing to help. I would definitely take another class with him...”• “a great online instructor, he is organized and interactive.”• “Awesome! I have had about 7 professors so far…Patrick will stand out to me as one of my favorites. He would create special videos for me just to answer my questions about fireworks. This was so helpful!! There were times that I knew he spent a lot of time figuring out things that I was asking. He is such a great teacher. Before I took this class I heard so many wonderful things about him and everyone was right." slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 76. Teaching Interests slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 77. Preferred Courses• 502 Internet for Educators• 504 Theoretical Foundations of Educational Technology• 506 Graphic Design for Learning• 511 Interactive Courseware Development• 512 Online Course Design• 513 Multimedia• 522 Online Teaching for Adult Learners• 523 Advance Online Teaching• 602 Emerging Trends in Ed Tech• 652 Qualitative Research Methods• 663 Adv. Qualitative Research Methods• 672 Design-based Research slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 78. Topics Courses• Social presence and online learning• History of Distance Education• Digital Storytelling in the Classroom• Learning in Synchronous Environments• Rapid Development Authoring Tools (captivate, articulate storyline)• Academic Writing• Delivering Effective Online Presentations• Mixed Methods Research• Researching in Online Environments• Designing and Delivering Professional Development• Data Visualization• Creative Design of Instructional Materials slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 79. &slides @ patricklowenthal.com
    • 80. slides @ patricklowenthal.com