Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
1. marketing   vorlesung - ws13 14 (thema 1. einführung)
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

1. marketing vorlesung - ws13 14 (thema 1. einführung)

1,101
views

Published on

Grundlagen des Marketing: Thema 1. Einführung in das Fach Marketing

Grundlagen des Marketing: Thema 1. Einführung in das Fach Marketing

Published in: Business, News & Politics

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,101
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. WIRTSCHAFTSWISSENSCHAFTEN WIRTSCHAFTSINFORMATIK | WIRTSCHAFTSRECHT Juniorprofessur für Betriebswirtschaftslehre, insb. Marketing GRUNDLAGEN DES MARKETING VORLESUNG. THEMA 1: EINFÜHRUNG IN DAS MARKETING WINTERSEMESTER 2013/2014 JUN.-PROF. DR. PAUL MARX Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx Universität Siegen Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx || Universität Siegen 1 !
  • 2. 1.Einführung in das Marketing Lernziele - Evolution und Begriff des Marketing - Abgrenzung von Marketing ggü. anderen Konzeptionen im Unternehmen - Gegenstandsbereich des Marketing Konzeptes - Markt und Marktabgrenzung Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 2
  • 3. MARKETING: DAS WORT mar・ket・ing [‘ma:rkiting] 
 noun Substantiviertes Verb (Gerundium) von to mar・ket [‘ma:rkit]
 verb ( markets, marketing , marketed ) [ with obj. ] Verbalisiertes Substantiv von mar・ket [‘ma:rkit]
 noun
 
 
 
 mar・ket・ing 
 
 ! 
 
 Aktivität auf dem

 Markt 
 Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 3
  • 4. MARKETING-BEGRIFF DER AMA M ! arketing
 is the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large. American Marketing Association (AMA), est . in 2007 Quelle: http://www.marketingpower.com/aboutama/pages/definitionofmarketing.aspx Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 4
  • 5. MARKETING-BEGRIFF DER AMA Quelle: http://www.marketingpower.com/Community/ARC/Pages/Additional/Definition/default.aspx Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 5
  • 6. MARKETING-BEGRIFF DER AMA Quelle: http://www.marketingpower.com/Community/ARC/Pages/Additional/Definition/default.aspx Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 5
  • 7. MARKETING-BEGRIFF DER AMA Quelle: http://www.marketingpower.com/Community/ARC/Pages/Additional/Definition/default.aspx Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 5
  • 8. MARKETING-BEGRIFF DER AMA Quelle: http://www.marketingpower.com/Community/ARC/Pages/Additional/Definition/default.aspx Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 5
  • 9. Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 6
  • 10. than selling; it is t only much broader “Marketing is no compasses the ed activity at all.  It en not a specializ e business seen from th ness.  It is the whole entire busi lt, that is, from the view of the final resu point of d responsibility for t of view.  Concern an customer’s poin te all areas of the ust therefore permea marketing m rucker  enterprise.” –Peter D “Marketin g is gettin g someo know, lik ne who h e and tru as a need st you.” — Marketin to Jon Jant g fame)  sch (of D uct Tape “Marketing is the social process by which individuals and groups obtain what they ne ed and want through creating and exchanging products and value with others.” — Philip Kotler  supply its whereby society, to process s “Marketing is the istributive system n needs, evolves d consumptio cting under pants, who, intera ci composed of parti d ethical (social) – nical (economic) an t constraints – tech hich resolve marke sactions or flows w create the tran nsumption.” in exchange and co sult separations and re – Bartles “Marketing is the process by which companies crea te customer interest in prod ucts or services. It genera tes the strategy that underlies sales techniques, busines s communication, and busin ess development.  It is an integrated process throug h which companies build strong customer relations hips and create value for their customers and for th emselves.”  — Wikipedia “Marketing is “The management process responsible for identifying, anticipating and satisfying customer requirements profitably.” — The Chartered Institute of Marketing  ticipating, managing, “Marketing is the process of an products, services, and and satisfying the demand for iversity of Pennsylvania  ideas.” — Wharton School, Un “Marketing is any cont act that your business has with anyone who isn’t a pa rt of your business. Mar keting is also the truth made fa scinating. Marketing is the art of getting people to chan ge their minds.  Marke ting is an opportunity for you to earn profits with your business, a chance to cooperate w ith other businesses in your community or your indu stry and a process of bu ilding lasting relationships.” — Jay Conrad Levinson   “Marketing is everything.” 
 — Regis McKenna  Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 6
  • 11. than selling; it is t only much broader “Marketing is no compasses the ed activity at all.  It en not a specializ e business seen from th ness.  It is the whole entire busi lt, that is, from the view of the final resu point of d responsibility for t of view.  Concern an customer’s poin te all areas of the ust therefore permea marketing m rucker  enterprise.” –Peter D “Marketin g is gettin g someo know, lik ne who h e and tru as a need st you.” — Marketin to Jon Jant g fame)  sch (of D uct Tape “Marketing is the social process by which individuals and groups obtain what they ne ed and want through creating and exchanging products and value with others.” — Philip Kotler  supply its whereby society, to process s “Marketing is the istributive system n needs, evolves d consumptio cting under pants, who, intera ci composed of parti d ethical (social) – nical (economic) an t constraints – tech hich resolve marke sactions or flows w create the tran nsumption.” in exchange and co sult separations and re – Bartles “Marketing is the process by which companies crea te customer interest in prod ucts or services. It genera tes the strategy that underlies sales techniques, busines s communication, and busin ess development.  It is an integrated process throug h which companies build strong customer relations hips and create value for their customers and for th emselves.”  — Wikipedia “Marketing is “The management process responsible for identifying, anticipating and satisfying customer requirements profitably.” — The Chartered Institute of Marketing  ticipating, managing, “Marketing is the process of an products, services, and and satisfying the demand for iversity of Pennsylvania  ideas.” — Wharton School, Un “Marketing is any cont act that your business has with anyone who isn’t a pa rt of your business. Mar keting is also the truth made fa scinating. Marketing is the art of getting people to chan ge their minds.  Marke ting is an opportunity for you to earn profits with your business, a chance to cooperate w ith other businesses in your community or your indu stry and a process of bu ilding lasting relationships.” — Jay Conrad Levinson   “Marketing is everything.” 
 — Regis McKenna  Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 6
  • 12. than selling; it is t only much broader “Marketing is no compasses the ed activity at all.  It en not a specializ e business seen from th ness.  It is the whole entire busi lt, that is, from the view of the final resu point of d responsibility for t of view.  Concern an customer’s poin te all areas of the ust therefore permea marketing m rucker  enterprise.” –Peter D “Marketin g is gettin g someo know, lik ne who h e and tru as a need st you.” — Marketin to Jon Jant g fame)  sch (of D uct Tape “Marketing is the social process by which individuals and groups obtain what they ne ed and want through creating and exchanging products and value with others.” — Philip Kotler  supply its whereby society, to process s “Marketing is the istributive system n needs, evolves d consumptio cting under pants, who, intera ci composed of parti d ethical (social) – nical (economic) an t constraints – tech hich resolve marke sactions or flows w create the tran nsumption.” in exchange and co sult separations and re – Bartles “Marketing is the process by which companies crea te customer interest in prod ucts or services. It genera tes the strategy that underlies sales techniques, busines s communication, and busin ess development.  It is an integrated process throug h which companies build strong customer relations hips and create value for their customers and for th emselves.”  — Wikipedia “Marketing is “The management process responsible for identifying, anticipating and satisfying customer requirements profitably.” — The Chartered Institute of Marketing  ticipating, managing, “Marketing is the process of an products, services, and and satisfying the demand for iversity of Pennsylvania  ideas.” — Wharton School, Un “Marketing is any cont act that your business has with anyone who isn’t a pa rt of your business. Mar keting is also the truth made fa scinating. Marketing is the art of getting people to chan ge their minds.  Marke ting is an opportunity for you to earn profits with your business, a chance to cooperate w ith other businesses in your community or your indu stry and a process of bu ilding lasting relationships.” — Jay Conrad Levinson   “Marketing is everything.” 
 — Regis McKenna  Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 6
  • 13. than selling; it is t only much broader “Marketing is no compasses the ed activity at all.  It en not a specializ e business seen from th ness.  It is the whole entire busi lt, that is, from the view of the final resu point of d responsibility for t of view.  Concern an customer’s poin te all areas of the ust therefore permea marketing m rucker  enterprise.” –Peter D “Marketin g is gettin g someo know, lik ne who h e and tru as a need st you.” — Marketin to Jon Jant g fame)  sch (of D uct Tape “Marketing is the social process by which individuals and groups obtain what they ne ed and want through creating and exchanging products and value with others.” — Philip Kotler  supply its whereby society, to process s “Marketing is the istributive system n needs, evolves d consumptio cting under pants, who, intera ci composed of parti d ethical (social) – nical (economic) an t constraints – tech hich resolve marke sactions or flows w create the tran nsumption.” in exchange and co sult separations and re – Bartles “Marketing is the process by which companies crea te customer interest in prod ucts or services. It genera tes the strategy that underlies sales techniques, busines s communication, and busin ess development.  It is an integrated process throug h which companies build strong customer relations hips and create value for their customers and for th emselves.”  — Wikipedia “Marketing is “The management process responsible for identifying, anticipating and satisfying customer requirements profitably.” — The Chartered Institute of Marketing  ticipating, managing, “Marketing is the process of an products, services, and and satisfying the demand for iversity of Pennsylvania  ideas.” — Wharton School, Un “Marketing is any cont act that your business has with anyone who isn’t a pa rt of your business. Mar keting is also the truth made fa scinating. Marketing is the art of getting people to chan ge their minds.  Marke ting is an opportunity for you to earn profits with your business, a chance to cooperate w ith other businesses in your community or your indu stry and a process of bu ilding lasting relationships.” — Jay Conrad Levinson   “Marketing is everything.” 
 — Regis McKenna  Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 6
  • 14. than selling; it is t only much broader “Marketing is no compasses the ed activity at all.  It en not a specializ e business seen from th ness.  It is the whole entire busi lt, that is, from the view of the final resu point of d responsibility for t of view.  Concern an customer’s poin te all areas of the ust therefore permea marketing m rucker  enterprise.” –Peter D “Marketin g is gettin g someo know, lik ne who h e and tru as a need st you.” — Marketin to Jon Jant g fame)  sch (of D uct Tape “Marketing is the social process by which individuals and groups obtain what they ne ed and want through creating and exchanging products and value with others.” — Philip Kotler  supply its whereby society, to process s “Marketing is the istributive system n needs, evolves d consumptio cting under pants, who, intera ci composed of parti d ethical (social) – nical (economic) an t constraints – tech hich resolve marke sactions or flows w create the tran nsumption.” in exchange and co sult separations and re – Bartles “Marketing is the process by which companies crea te customer interest in prod ucts or services. It genera tes the strategy that underlies sales techniques, busines s communication, and busin ess development.  It is an integrated process throug h which companies build strong customer relations hips and create value for their customers and for th emselves.”  — Wikipedia “Marketing is “The management process responsible for identifying, anticipating and satisfying customer requirements profitably.” — The Chartered Institute of Marketing  ticipating, managing, “Marketing is the process of an products, services, and and satisfying the demand for iversity of Pennsylvania  ideas.” — Wharton School, Un “Marketing is any cont act that your business has with anyone who isn’t a pa rt of your business. Mar keting is also the truth made fa scinating. Marketing is the art of getting people to chan ge their minds.  Marke ting is an opportunity for you to earn profits with your business, a chance to cooperate w ith other businesses in your community or your indu stry and a process of bu ilding lasting relationships.” — Jay Conrad Levinson   “Marketing is everything.” 
 — Regis McKenna  Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 6
  • 15. than selling; it is t only much broader “Marketing is no compasses the ed activity at all.  It en not a specializ e business seen from th ness.  It is the whole entire busi lt, that is, from the view of the final resu point of d responsibility for t of view.  Concern an customer’s poin te all areas of the ust therefore permea marketing m rucker  enterprise.” –Peter D “Marketin g is gettin g someo know, lik ne who h e and tru as a need st you.” — Marketin to Jon Jant g fame)  sch (of D uct Tape “Marketing is the social process by which individuals and groups obtain what they ne ed and want through creating and exchanging products and value with others.” — Philip Kotler  supply its whereby society, to process s “Marketing is the istributive system n needs, evolves d consumptio cting under pants, who, intera ci composed of parti d ethical (social) – nical (economic) an t constraints – tech hich resolve marke sactions or flows w create the tran nsumption.” in exchange and co sult separations and re – Bartles “Marketing is the process by which companies crea te customer interest in prod ucts or services. It genera tes the strategy that underlies sales techniques, busines s communication, and busin ess development.  It is an integrated process throug h which companies build strong customer relations hips and create value for their customers and for th emselves.”  — Wikipedia “Marketing is “The management process responsible for identifying, anticipating and satisfying customer requirements profitably.” — The Chartered Institute of Marketing  ticipating, managing, “Marketing is the process of an products, services, and and satisfying the demand for iversity of Pennsylvania  ideas.” — Wharton School, Un “Marketing is any cont act that your business has with anyone who isn’t a pa rt of your business. Mar keting is also the truth made fa scinating. Marketing is the art of getting people to chan ge their minds.  Marke ting is an opportunity for you to earn profits with your business, a chance to cooperate w ith other businesses in your community or your indu stry and a process of bu ilding lasting relationships.” — Jay Conrad Levinson   “Marketing is everything.” 
 — Regis McKenna  Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 6
  • 16. than selling; it is t only much broader “Marketing is no compasses the ed activity at all.  It en not a specializ e business seen from th ness.  It is the whole entire busi lt, that is, from the view of the final resu point of d responsibility for t of view.  Concern an customer’s poin te all areas of the ust therefore permea marketing m rucker  enterprise.” –Peter D “Marketin g is gettin g someo know, lik ne who h e and tru as a need st you.” — Marketin to Jon Jant g fame)  sch (of D uct Tape “Marketing is the social process by which individuals and groups obtain what they ne ed and want through creating and exchanging products and value with others.” — Philip Kotler  supply its whereby society, to process s “Marketing is the istributive system n needs, evolves d consumptio cting under pants, who, intera ci composed of parti d ethical (social) – nical (economic) an t constraints – tech hich resolve marke sactions or flows w create the tran nsumption.” in exchange and co sult separations and re – Bartles “Marketing is the process by which companies crea te customer interest in prod ucts or services. It genera tes the strategy that underlies sales techniques, busines s communication, and busin ess development.  It is an integrated process throug h which companies build strong customer relations hips and create value for their customers and for th emselves.”  — Wikipedia “Marketing is “The management process responsible for identifying, anticipating and satisfying customer requirements profitably.” — The Chartered Institute of Marketing  ticipating, managing, “Marketing is the process of an products, services, and and satisfying the demand for iversity of Pennsylvania  ideas.” — Wharton School, Un “Marketing is any cont act that your business has with anyone who isn’t a pa rt of your business. Mar keting is also the truth made fa scinating. Marketing is the art of getting people to chan ge their minds.  Marke ting is an opportunity for you to earn profits with your business, a chance to cooperate w ith other businesses in your community or your indu stry and a process of bu ilding lasting relationships.” — Jay Conrad Levinson   “Marketing is everything.” 
 — Regis McKenna  Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 6
  • 17. than selling; it is t only much broader “Marketing is no compasses the ed activity at all.  It en not a specializ e business seen from th ness.  It is the whole entire busi lt, that is, from the view of the final resu point of d responsibility for t of view.  Concern an customer’s poin te all areas of the ust therefore permea marketing m rucker  enterprise.” –Peter D “Marketin g is gettin g someo know, lik ne who h e and tru as a need st you.” — Marketin to Jon Jant g fame)  sch (of D uct Tape “Marketing is the social process by which individuals and groups obtain what they ne ed and want through creating and exchanging products and value with others.” — Philip Kotler  supply its whereby society, to process s “Marketing is the istributive system n needs, evolves d consumptio cting under pants, who, intera ci composed of parti d ethical (social) – nical (economic) an t constraints – tech hich resolve marke sactions or flows w create the tran nsumption.” in exchange and co sult separations and re – Bartles “Marketing is the process by which companies crea te customer interest in prod ucts or services. It genera tes the strategy that underlies sales techniques, busines s communication, and busin ess development.  It is an integrated process throug h which companies build strong customer relations hips and create value for their customers and for th emselves.”  — Wikipedia “Marketing is “The management process responsible for identifying, anticipating and satisfying customer requirements profitably.” — The Chartered Institute of Marketing  ticipating, managing, “Marketing is the process of an products, services, and and satisfying the demand for iversity of Pennsylvania  ideas.” — Wharton School, Un “Marketing is any cont act that your business has with anyone who isn’t a pa rt of your business. Mar keting is also the truth made fa scinating. Marketing is the art of getting people to chan ge their minds.  Marke ting is an opportunity for you to earn profits with your business, a chance to cooperate w ith other businesses in your community or your indu stry and a process of bu ilding lasting relationships.” — Jay Conrad Levinson   “Marketing is everything.” 
 — Regis McKenna  Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 6
  • 18. than selling; it is t only much broader “Marketing is no compasses the ed activity at all.  It en not a specializ e business seen from th ness.  It is the whole entire busi lt, that is, from the view of the final resu point of d responsibility for t of view.  Concern an customer’s poin te all areas of the ust therefore permea marketing m rucker  enterprise.” –Peter D “Marketin g is gettin g someo know, lik ne who h e and tru as a need st you.” — Marketin to Jon Jant g fame)  sch (of D uct Tape “Marketing is the social process by which individuals and groups obtain what they ne ed and want through creating and exchanging products and value with others.” — Philip Kotler  supply its whereby society, to process s “Marketing is the istributive system n needs, evolves d consumptio cting under pants, who, intera ci composed of parti d ethical (social) – nical (economic) an t constraints – tech hich resolve marke sactions or flows w create the tran nsumption.” in exchange and co sult separations and re – Bartles “Marketing is the process by which companies crea te customer interest in prod ucts or services. It genera tes the strategy that underlies sales techniques, busines s communication, and busin ess development.  It is an integrated process throug h which companies build strong customer relations hips and create value for their customers and for th emselves.”  — Wikipedia “Marketing is “The management process responsible for identifying, anticipating and satisfying customer requirements profitably.” — The Chartered Institute of Marketing  ticipating, managing, “Marketing is the process of an products, services, and and satisfying the demand for iversity of Pennsylvania  ideas.” — Wharton School, Un “Marketing is any cont act that your business has with anyone who isn’t a pa rt of your business. Mar keting is also the truth made fa scinating. Marketing is the art of getting people to chan ge their minds.  Marke ting is an opportunity for you to earn profits with your business, a chance to cooperate w ith other businesses in your community or your indu stry and a process of bu ilding lasting relationships.” — Jay Conrad Levinson   “Marketing is everything.” 
 — Regis McKenna  Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 6
  • 19. Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 7
  • 20. EVOLUTION DES MARKETING Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 8
  • 21. EVOLUTION DES MARKETING Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 8
  • 22. EVOLUTION DES MARKETING Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 8
  • 23. EVOLUTION DES MARKETING “In building our new temple of knowledge we bury the foundations of the old with scarcely a thought as to their ability to support the new edifice. If we are wrong then, surely, the whole structure is liable to topple about our ears.” “… in creating our vision of the future perhaps what we need most of all is a greater awareness of our past” Michael J. Baker (1995): The Future of Marketing Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 8
  • 24. EVOLUTION DES MARKETING “In building our new temple of knowledge we bury the foundations of the old with scarcely a thought as to their ability to support the new edifice. If we are wrong then, surely, the whole structure is liable to topple about our ears.” “… in creating our vision of the future perhaps what we need most of all is a greater awareness of our past” Michael J. Baker (1995): The Future of Marketing Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 8
  • 25. Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 9
  • 26. Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 9
  • 27. ANFANG 20. JAHRHUNDERT Situation: Verkäufermarkt Preiskonkurrenz Fokus: Produktion Distribution “Erfindungen”: Marke Werbung Technologische, demographische, sozio-ökonomische, politischrechtliche, sozio-kulturelle Faktoren Technischer Fortschritt, Industrialisierung Rasantes Bevölkerungswachstum (ca. 3x in 100 Jahren), Konzentration der Bevölkerung in schnell wachsenden Städten Ausbau der Verkehrswege (Eisenbahn, Straßen, Kanäle) ! Tendenzen auf dem Markt Fließban Verkäufermarkt (Übernachfrage) Massenproduktion Ausnutzung der Skaleneffekte (economies of scale) Erhöhung der Umlaufgeschwindigkeit der Produkte Durchschnittskosten darbeiter 1900 X1 Xopt Produktionsmenge Produktionsorientierung mit Fokus auf Produktionsmethoden Marketing als Distributionsfunktion Warenhaus Wertheim in Berlin 1897 Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 10
  • 28. 1950ER-1960ER Situation: Marktsättigung Käufermarkt Fokus: Produkt Absatz Verbraucher “Erfindungen”: Marketing-Mix Push- & PullStrategie Technologische, Demographische, sozio-ökonomische, politischrechtliche, sozio-kulturelle Faktoren Wiederaufbau nach dem 2. Weltkrieg:
 Deutsches Wirtschaftswunder Mittelstandsgesellschaft: Massenkonsum als Lebensgefühl Babyboom (da Leitbild der Familie mit Kind) Einwanderungswelle (Ostflüchtlinge, Gastarbeiter) Tendenzen auf dem Markt Marktsättigung → Käufermarkt (Überangebot) Marketing als “dominante Engpassfunktion” Produkt- (i.S.v. Qualität) und Absatzorientierung Systematisierung des absatzpolitischen Instrumentariums durch die sog. “4P’s”: product, price, promotion, place (a.k.a. “Marketing-Mix”) 1969: erster Marketing-Lehrstuhl in Deutschland (Meffert) Aufbau von Marketingabteilungen Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 11
  • 29. 1950ER-1960ER Situation: Marktsättigung Käufermarkt Fokus: Produkt Absatz Verbraucher “Erfindungen”: Marketing-Mix Push- & PullStrategie Technologische, Demographische, sozio-ökonomische, politischrechtliche, sozio-kulturelle Faktoren Wiederaufbau nach dem 2. Weltkrieg:
 Deutsches Wirtschaftswunder Mittelstandsgesellschaft: Massenkonsum als Lebensgefühl Babyboom (da Leitbild der Familie mit Kind) Einwanderungswelle (Ostflüchtlinge, Gastarbeiter) Tendenzen auf dem Markt Marktsättigung → Käufermarkt (Überangebot) Marketing als “dominante Engpassfunktion” Produkt- (i.S.v. Qualität) und Absatzorientierung Systematisierung des absatzpolitischen Instrumentariums durch die sog. “4P’s”: product, price, promotion, place (a.k.a. “Marketing-Mix”) 1969: erster Marketing-Lehrstuhl in Deutschland (Meffert) Aufbau von Marketingabteilungen Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 11
  • 30. MARKT ALS ENGPASSFAKTOR DES UNTERNEHMENS Merkmal Käufermarkt Verkäufermarkt Wirtschaftliches Entwicklungsstadium Knappheitswirtschaft Überflussgesellschaft Verhältnis Angebot zu Nachfrage Nachfrage > Angebot Nachfrager aktiver als Anbieter Angebot > Nachfrage Anbieter aktiver als Nachfrager Engpassbereich der Unternehmungen Beschaffung und/oder Produktion Absatz bzw. Kunde Primäre Anstrengungen der Unternehmungen rationelle Erweiterung der Beschaffungsund Produktionskapazitäten, (physische) Distribution von Gütern Stimulierung der Nachfrage und Schaffung von Präferenzen für eigenes Angebot Quelle: in Anlehnung an Zentes/Swoboda 2001, S. 261. Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 12
  • 31. PUSH- VS. PULL-(WERBE)-STRATEGIE Push Pull Hersteller Hersteller Handel Handel Konsument Konsument Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 13
  • 32. MARKETING-MIX (4 P’S) Produktpolitik: Distributionspolitik: Funktionalität / Kundennutzen Markierung: Marke / Bezeichnung / Gütesiegel Qualität / Beschaffenheit / Stil Sicherheit Verpackung Gewährleistung / Service Sortiment / Programm /Zubehör ... Distributionskanäle Marktabdeckung (voll, selektiv, exklusiv) Lager / Logistik / Transport Auftragsabwicklung Handhabung der Retoure ... Preispolitik: Preisgestaltung (Kostendeckungs-, Penetrations-, Abschöpfungspreis, usw.) ise UVP retail / Großhandelspre Discounts / Skonto, usw. Saisonalität Bundling Preis-Diskriminierung … Kommunikationspolitik: Marketing-Mix ≈ ! Festlegung und “richtige Dosierung” der MarketingInstrumente Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Promotionsstrategie (push , pull, usw.) Werbungskanäle Personal selling & sales fo rce Sales promotions Public relations & publicit y Marketing communicatio ns budget. ... Vorlesung “Marketing” 14
  • 33. 1970ER Situation: Marktsättigung Käufermarkt Sonntagsfahrverbot in Nov-Dez 1973 Fokus: Marketing = Führungsfunktion “Erfindungen”: Segmentierung Kaufverhalten Technologische, Demographische, sozio-ökonomische, politisch-rechtliche, sozio-kulturelle Faktoren Geburtenrückgang Inflation, Nullwachstum Rezessionen durch Ölkrisen 1973, 1979 Konsumkritik (insb. Erich Fromm, Herbert Marcuse) Tendenzen auf dem Markt Verlierer der beiden Ölkrisen waren Unternehmen mit gar keinem oder mit einem unterentwickelten Marketing Beschaffungsmarketing Übergang von Verkaufs- zu Marketingkonzeption Marketing als integrierte Denkhaltung, Marketingmanagement Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 15
  • 34. ERWEITERUNG VOM MARKETING(SELBST)VERSTÄNDNIS AbsatzMarketing Unternehmung Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Kunden Vorlesung “Marketing” 16
  • 35. ERWEITERUNG VOM MARKETING(SELBST)VERSTÄNDNIS BeschaffungsMarketing Lieferanten AbsatzMarketing Unternehmung Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Kunden Vorlesung “Marketing” 16
  • 36. MÖGLICHE DENKHALTUNGEN IM AUSTAUSCHPROZESS MIT ABNEHMERN Produkt- und Produktionsorientierung nur Leistungserstellung Verkaufsorientierung nur Leistungsverwertung Marketingorientierung marktorientierte Denkhaltung der Unternehmensführung Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 17
  • 37. VERKAUFS- VS. MARKETINGKONZEPTION Hauptaugenmerk Verkaufskonzeption Marketingkonzeption Mittel Ziele Erreichung der Organisationsziele durch gesteigertes Volumen Produkte des Unternehmens Verkauf und Absatzförderung Kundenbedürfnisse und -wünsche Integrierte Marketinganstrengungen Erreichung der Organisationsziele durch die Zufriedenstellung der Kunden Quelle: in Anlehnung an Kotler, P. (1982): Marketing-Management, 4. Aufl., Stuttgart, S.34. Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 18
  • 38. VERKAUFS- VS. MARKETINGKONZEPTION „Beim Verkaufen stehen die Bedürfnisse des Verkäufers im Mittelpunkt; beim Marketing die Bedürfnisse des Käufers. Da s Verkaufen ist beseelt vom Wunsch des Verkäufers, sein Produk t zu Geld zu machen; Marketing ist beseelt von der Idee, die Wünsche des Kunden zu erfüllen, und zwar durch das Produk t und alle dazugehörigen Handlungen - von seiner Kreation und Bereitstellung bis hin zu seinem Verbrauch“ ! Theodore Levitt Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 19
  • 39. VERKAUFS- VS. MARKETINGKONZEPTION „Beim Verkaufen stehen die Bedürfnisse des Verkäufers im Mittelpunkt; beim Marketing die Bedürfnisse des Käufers. Da s Verkaufen ist beseelt vom Wunsch des Verkäufers, sein Produk t zu Geld zu machen; Marketing ist beseelt von der Idee, die Wünsche des Kunden zu erfüllen, und zwar durch das Produk t und alle dazugehörigen Handlungen - von seiner Kreation und Bereitstellung bis hin zu seinem Verbrauch“ ! Theodore Levitt Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 19
  • 40. MARKETING ALS FÜHRUNGSFUNKTION Marketing als gleichrangige Führungsfunktion Produktion Personal Marketing F&E Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Finanzierung Beschaffung Vorlesung “Marketing” 20
  • 41. MARKETING ALS FÜHRUNGSFUNKTION Marketing als gleichrangige Führungsfunktion Produktion Personal Marketing F&E Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Finanzierung Beschaffung Vorlesung “Marketing” 20
  • 42. 1980ER Situation: Marktsättigung Käufermarkt Fokus: Wettbewerb, Stakeholder “Erfindungen”: Situations-, Portfolioanalyse, Complaint-Mngmt Technologische, Demographische, sozio-ökonomische, politischrechtliche, sozio-kulturelle Faktoren Verändertes Kunden- und Umweltverhalten Wettbewerbsdruck, insb. seitens Japan Entwicklungen in der Kommunikationstechnologie Tendenzen auf dem Markt Global Corporations Triade Markt (USA, Japan, Deutschland) Kampf um langfristiges Überleben 
 → erweiterte Berücksichtigung der Unt.-Uwelt
 → Wettbewerbsorientierung
 → strategisches Marketing
 → Beziehungsmarketing Buzzwords: Wettbewerbsvorteile, Positionierung, Stakeholder, Beschwerdemanagement Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 21
  • 43. TRANSAKTIONS- VS. BEZIEHUNGSMARKETING Unterscheidungskriterien Zeithorizont Transaktionsmarketing Beziehungsmarketing Kurzfristig Langfristig Produkt bzw. Leistung Produkt bzw. Leistung UND Kunde Marketingziel Kundenakquisition Kundenakquisition Kundenbindung Kundenrückgewinnung Marketingstrategie Leistungsdarstellung Dialog mit dem Kunden Ökonomische Erfolgs- und Steuergrößen Gewinn Deckungsbeitrag Umsatz Kosten zusätzlich: Kundendeckungsbeitrag Kundenwert Marketingobjekt Quelle: in Anlehnung an Bruhn (2001), S. 12. Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 22
  • 44. REICHWEITE DES MARKETINGBEGRIFFS BeschaffungsMarketing Lieferanten Unternehmung ! Internes ! Marketing Mitarbeiter AbsatzMarketing Kunden Gesellschaftsorientiertes Marketing andere Austauschpartner Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 23
  • 45. REICHWEITE DES MARKETINGBEGRIFFS BeschaffungsMarketing Lieferanten Unternehmung ! Internes ! Marketing Mitarbeiter AbsatzMarketing Kunden Gesellschaftsorientiertes Marketing Wettbewerbsumfeld andere Austauschpartner Gesellschaft Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 23
  • 46. INSTRUMENTARIUM DES STRATEGISCHEN MARKETING (EINE UNVOLLSTÄNDIGE ÜBERSICHT) Anzahl der Jahre Absatz 7 Mio € 6 Grenzabsatz Gewinn Durchschnittliche Produktlebenszeit (PL) 100 5 80 4 95 60 Kosten 3 PE > PL 40 2 t Einführungsphase Wachstumsphase Durchschnittliche Produktentwicklungszeit (PE) 1 Rückgangsphase Reifephase 20 Jahr 0 1 0 1978 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ______________ __ 10 Umsatzverlust während 10 Jahren Opportunitätskosten einer zeitlichen Markteintrittsverzögerung bei einem Umsatzpotential von € 60 Mio pro Jahr SWOT B hoch 67 k E ti D e mittel v S Factor 2 Compaq Toshiba new a Übergangsstrategie Distinctiveness (Attribute 1) Toshiba Factor 1 (Design) tr Marktattraktivität → C Sanyo te AST exec. Dell TI IBM g 33 ie niedrig A le Reife Wachstums- bzw. Investiotionstrategien e Sättigung Offensivstrategie Wachstum S Marktwachstum, % hoch Einführung Verbrauch an Ressourcen → Wertschöpfung → 100 Elegance (Attribute 2) niedrig n 0 niedrig 1 Relativer Marktanteil hoch G Abschöpfungs- bzw. Desinvestitionsstrategien 33 niedrig mittel F Defensivstrategie 67 hoch 100 All das kommt wieder in Detail … etwas später Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 24
  • 47. Aufmerksamkeit / Erwartungen THE HYPE CYCLE Gipfel der überzogenen Erwartungen Plateau der Produktivität ad Pf r de E u rle ng c u ht Tal der Enttäuschungen Technologischer Auslöser Zeit Quelle: Fenn, Jackie and Mark Time (2008): “Understanding Gartner's Hype Cycles”, Harvard Business Press Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 25
  • 48. 1990ER-2000ER Situation: paradoxer Wettbewerb, Macht der Konsumenten Fokus: Umwelt, Netzwerke, eCommerce “Erfindungen”: Multy-Channel-Mkg. CSR SEO,SEM Long Tail Technologische, Demographische, sozio-ökonomische, politischrechtliche, sozio-kulturelle Faktoren Sprunghaftes Progress in Mikrochip- und Informationstechnologie Verschwinden der Grenzen und einheitliche Währung in Europa Globalisierung Tendenzen auf dem Markt Verlagerung des Geschäfts in Online Nahezu absolute Markttransparenz Hyper- bzw. paradoxe Wettbewerb
 “der nächste Anbieter ist nur einen Klick entfernt” Konsument → Prosument Verhaltenswissenschaftliche Orientierung Mikrosegmentierung / Individualisierung Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 26
  • 49. Anzahl Verkäufe LONG TAIL Regalplatz “Businesses with distribution power can sell a greater volume of otherwise hard to find items at small volumes than of popular items at large volumes” Anderson 2004 Produkte Anderson (2004), “The Long Tail” 27
  • 50. Anzahl Verkäufe LONG TAIL “Businesses with distribution power can sell a greater volume of otherwise hard to find items at small volumes than of popular items at large volumes” Regalplatz Anderson 2004 1.500 Games 75.000 Filme & TV Shows 2.500.000
 Bücher 65.000 
 30.000.000 Songs Filme 720.000 Apps 28.000.000 Songs Produkte Anderson (2004), “The Long Tail” 27
  • 51. MARKTORIENTIERTE UNTERNEHMENSFÜHRUNG Marketing als gleichrangige Funktion Produktion Personal Finanzierung Marketing F&E Beschaffung Quelle: in Anlehnung an Kotler/Bliemel (2001), S. 43 Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 28
  • 52. MARKTORIENTIERTE UNTERNEHMENSFÜHRUNG Marketing als gleichrangige Funktion Der Kunde im Mittelpunkt Produktion nal Perso Beschaffung A I N Kunde M ng G E un aff g F& F&E T zieru Marketing E Finan Personal R K sch Finanzierung Be Produktion Quelle: in Anlehnung an Kotler/Bliemel (2001), S. 43 Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 28
  • 53. MARKTORIENTIERTE UNTERNEHMENSFÜHRUNG Der Kunde im Mittelpunkt “Marketing ist die bewusst marktorientierte Führung des gesamten Unternehmens” Produktion N ng Kunde M G E un aff g F& nal A I zieru Perso T sch E Finan “Marketing is so basic that it cannot be considered a separate function… It is the whole business seen from the point of view of its final result, that is, from the customer’s point of view” R K Be Heribert Meffert Peter Drucker Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 29
  • 54. 2010ER Situation: paradoxer Wettbewerb, Macht der Konsumenten Fokus: ! ? “Erfindungen”: Social-Media-Mkg. Empfehlungssystemen, Big Data Technologische, Demographische, sozio-ökonomische, politisch-rechtliche, sozio-kulturelle Faktoren Progress in mobilen und DatenverarbeitungsTechnologien Verlagerung sozialer Aktivitäten ins Online bzw. in Social-Netzwerke ! Tendenzen auf dem Markt zunehmende Dynamik und Komplexität der Märkte Gläserner Konsument Individualisierung und Personalisierung der Leistungen (Re-)Targeting auf Individualniveau https://history.google.com/history/ information overload Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 30
  • 55. OF MARKETING Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 31
  • 56. Netzwerke Umwelt Wettbewerb Handel Verbraucher Unternehmun g Funktionale Sicht des Marketing ? 1950er 1960er 1970er 1980er Distributionsfunktion Dominante Engpassfunktion Führungsfunktion Strategisches Marketing 1990er Informationstechnologie → Hyper- 
 bzw. paradoxe Wettbewerb Verhaltenswissenschaftliche Orientierung Marktsättigung → Käufermarkt Absatz- und Kundenorientierung Verkäufermarkt, Massenproduktion Problemfokus: systematische Vermarktung Stagnation weiterer Märkte; 
 Verändertes Kunden- und Umweltverhalten Langfristige Orientierung auf alle Marktteilnehmer Quelle: in Anlehnung an Meffert (1994) Marketingfokus EVOLUTION DES MARKETING NACH MEFFERT 2000er multioptionales Marktvernetztes orientiertes Führungskonzept Beziehungsmkg. Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen 2010er Zeit Sozial-Mkg Big Data Ära Vorlesung “Marketing” 32
  • 57. ANSATZPUNKTE ZUR INTERPRETATION DES MODERNEN MARKETING Marketing als Denkhaltung Konsequente Ausrichtung aller Entscheidungen an den Erfordernissen und Bedürfnissen der Konsumenten bzw. Abnehmer ! Marketing als Führungskonzept Systematische, moderne Techniken nutzende Entscheidungsfindung ! Marketing als Sozialtechnologie Koordinierter Einsatz marktbeeinflussender Instrumente zur Schaffung von Präferenzen und Wettbewerbsvorteile Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 33
  • 58. ANSATZPUNKTE ZUR INTERPRETATION DES MODERNEN MARKETING Marketing als Denkhaltung Konsequente Ausrichtung aller Entscheidungen an den Erfordernissen und Bedürfnissen der Konsumenten bzw. Abnehmer ! Marketing als Führungskonzept Systematische, moderne Techniken nutzende Entscheidungsfindung ! Marketing als Sozialtechnologie Koordinierter Einsatz marktbeeinflussender Instrumente zur Schaffung von Präferenzen und Wettbewerbsvorteile Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 33
  • 59. AUSDIFFERENZIERUNG DES MARKETING Beispiele nach Objekten KonsumgüterInvestitionsgüterDienstleistungs- nach Marketingteibenden kommerzielles Marketing nicht-kommerzielles Marketing nach Problemschwerpunkten internationales Marketing Relationship Marketing Sozial-Media-Marketing Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Medien- ! -marketing Vorlesung “Marketing” 34
  • 60. AUSDIFFERENZIERUNG DES MARKETING Beispiele nach Objekten KonsumgüterInvestitionsgüterDienstleistungs- nach Marketingteibenden kommerzielles Marketing nicht-kommerzielles Marketing nach Problemschwerpunkten internationales Marketing Relationship Marketing Sozial-Media-Marketing Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Medien- ! -marketing Vorlesung “Marketing” 34
  • 61. MARKETINGSYSTEM Analyse Strategieentwicklung, Zielfindung, Implementierung, Erfolgskontrolle Instrumentelle Gestaltung Konsumentenverhaltenstheorie, Marktforschung Strategisches Marketing Produkte, Innovation, Marken, Preispolitik, Kommunikationspolitik, Distributionspolitik Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 35
  • 62. MARKETINGSYSTEM Analyse Strategieentwicklung, Zielfindung, Implementierung, Erfolgskontrolle Instrumentelle Gestaltung Konsumentenverhaltenstheorie, Marktforschung Strategisches Marketing Produkte, Innovation, Marken, Preispolitik, Kommunikationspolitik, Distributionspolitik Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 35
  • 63. MARKETING-BEGRIFF DER AMA M ! arketing
 is the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large. American Marketing Association (AMA), est . in 2007 Quelle: http://www.marketingpower.com/aboutama/pages/definitionofmarketing.aspx Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 36
  • 64. MARKETING-BEGRIFF DER AMA M ! arketing
 is the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering,irls faldinexechth what ng offerings “G an l lov wi angi they he ar. Boys fall in love with what they see. That' s that have value for customers, whyients, cl girls wear make up; and boys lie.” partners, and society at large. use M.D. Ho quoting Wiz Khalif American Marketing Association (AMA), est a . in 2007 Quelle: http://www.marketingpower.com/aboutama/pages/definitionofmarketing.aspx Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 36
  • 65. MARKETING-BEGRIFF DER AMA M ! arketing
 is the activity, set of institutions, and processes for creating, communicating, delivering, and exchanging offerings that have value for customers, clients, partners, and society at large. American Marketing Association (AMA), est . in 2007 “Girls fall in love with what they he ar. Boys fall in love with what they see. That' s why girls wear make up; and boys lie.” House M.D. quoting Wiz Khalifa Quelle: http://www.marketingpower.com/aboutama/pages/definitionofmarketing.aspx Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 36
  • 66. THE ESSENCE OF MARKETING Companies  are  not  in  business  to  create  things     but  they  are  in  business  to  create  customers Hauptziel des Marketing: 
 Wert für den Kunden zu schaffen. Marketing beinhaltet i.d.R. einen Austauschprozess zwischen Käufer und Verkäufer (bzw. zwischen anderen Parteien). Marketing beeinflusst das Unternehmen, seine Lieferanten, Kunden und andere von den Entscheidungen des Unternehmens betroffenen Parteien. Grundlegende Prozesse des Marketing sind: Herstellung, Kommunikation, Distribution und Austausch von Produkten und/oder Dienstleistungen KLAUSURRELEVANT Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 37
  • 67. THE ESSENCE OF MARKETING Companies  are  not  in  business  to  create  things     but  they  are  in  business  to  create  customers Hauptziel des Marketing: 
 Wert für den Kunden zu schaffen. Marketing beinhaltet i.d.R. einen Austauschprozess zwischen Käufer und Verkäufer (bzw. zwischen anderen Parteien). Marketing beeinflusst das Unternehmen, seine Lieferanten, Kunden und andere von den Entscheidungen des Unternehmens betroffenen Parteien. Grundlegende Prozesse des Marketing sind: Herstellung, Kommunikation, Distribution und Austausch von Produkten und/oder Dienstleistungen KLAUSURRELEVANT Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 37
  • 68. THE ESSENCE OF MARKETING Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 38
  • 69. 1.Einführung in das Marketing Lernziele - Evolution und Begriff des Marketing - Abgrenzung von Marketing ggü. anderen Konzeptionen im Unternehmen - Gegenstandsbereich des Marketing Konzeptes - Markt und Marktabgrenzung Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 39
  • 70. WAS IST MARKT? “Marketing ist die bewusst marktorientierte Führung des gesamten Unternehmens” Heribert Meffert Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 40
  • 71. WAS IST MARKT? “Marketing ist die bewusst marktorientierte Führung des gesamten Unternehmens” Heribert Meffert Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 40
  • 72. WAS IST MARKT? “Marketing ist die bewusst marktorientierte Führung des gesamten Unternehmens” Heribert Meffert Marketing als “marktorientierte Unternehmensführug” im Sinne Mefferts erfordert ein Verständnis davon, was “der Markt” ist. Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 40
  • 73. DER MARKT Market 
 
 is any structure that allows buyers and sellers to exchange any type of goods, services and information. There are two roles in markets, buyers and sellers. The market facilitates trade and enables the distribution and allocation of resources in a society. Markets allow any tradable item to be evaluated and priced. Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 41
  • 74. DER MARKT Market 
 
 is any structure that allows buyers and sellers to exchange any type of goods, services and information. There are two roles in markets, buyers and sellers. The market facilitates trade and enables the distribution and allocation of resources in a society. Markets allow any tradable item to be evaluated and priced. Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 41
  • 75. DER MARKT Market 
 
 is any structure that allows buyers and sellers to exchange any type of goods, services and information. There are two roles in markets, buyers and sellers. The market facilitates trade and enables the distribution and allocation of resources in a society. Markets allow any tradable item to be evaluated and priced. Im Sinne des Marketing: Der Markt wird gebildet aus allen tatsächlichen und potentiellen Anbietern und Nachfragern gegenseitig substituierbarer Güter. Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 41
  • 76. MARKTABGRENZUNG Die Auffassung des relevanten Marktes beeinflusst ALLE ManagementEntscheidungen Strategie Budget Strukturierung eines Marktes Definition des Relevanten Marktes aus der Perspektive eines Anbieters Wettbewerber Markt Konsumenten Marktabgrenzung MarketingMix Produkt ! Definition von Gruppen von Produkt-Substituten bzw. von (potentiellen) Konkurrenten Reduktion der Heterogenität möglicher relevanter Austauschprozesse zwischen Kunden und Anbietern Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 42
  • 77. MARKTABGRENZUNG Marktanteil von Chiquita Gesamter Fruchtmarkt: 5% Markt für Bananen: 50% Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 43
  • 78. MARKTABGRENZUNG “Wir haben früher immer geglaub t, im Markt der Kekse tätig zu sein. Kekse si nd aber gar kein Markt, sondern ein Produkt. Wir sind im Prinzip in dem Markt der Esswar en tätig, die man nicht auf dem Teller verspeist ” ! Werner Bahlsen (1987) Märkte sind nicht objektiv gegeben, sondern sind abhängig von der unternehmerischen Gestaltung “Unternehmen schaffen Märkte” Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 44
  • 79. MARKTABGRENZUNG Die Abgrenzung des relevanten Marktes muss sollte kann in folgender Hinsicht erfolgen: Sachlich Welche Art von Leistungen werden im Markt angeboten? Zeitlich Ist der Markt zeitlich begrenzt? Räumlich Ist der Markt lokal, regional, national oder international begrenzt? Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 45
  • 80. MARKTABGRENZUNG Die Abgrenzung des relevanten Marktes muss sollte kann in folgender Hinsicht erfolgen: Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 46
  • 81. MARKTABGRENZUNG Die Abgrenzung des relevanten Marktes muss sollte kann in folgender Hinsicht erfolgen: Sachlich Welche Art von Leistungen wird im Markt angeboten? Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 46
  • 82. OBJEKTE ZUR ABGRENZUNG DES RELEVANTEN MARKTES Anbieter: Definition des Marktes über Gruppen von Anbietern z.B. Chemiemarkt als Markt, welcher von Chemieunternehmen bedient wird Abnehmer: Definition des Marktes über bestimmte Nachfragergruppen z.B. der Markt der vermögenden Privatkunden, Business-Traveller Produkte: Definition des Marktes über bestimmte Produktgruppen z.B. der Markt der Fernreisen Bedürfnisse: Definition des Marktes über bestimmte Bedürfnisse 
 der Abnehmer z.B. der Markt für Unterhaltung und Freizeit Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 47
  • 83. MARKTABGRENZUNG Die Abgrenzung des relevanten Marktes muss sollte kann in folgender Hinsicht erfolgen: Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 48
  • 84. MARKTABGRENZUNG Die Abgrenzung des relevanten Marktes muss sollte kann in folgender Hinsicht erfolgen: Sachlich Welche Art von Leistungen wird im Markt angeboten? Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 48
  • 85. MARKTABGRENZUNG Die Abgrenzung des relevanten Marktes muss sollte kann in folgender Hinsicht erfolgen: Sachlich Welche Art von Leistungen wird im Markt angeboten? objektiv vs subjektiv Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 48
  • 86. NUTZENORIENTIERTE VS. PRODUKTIORIENTIERTE MARKTABGRENZUNG he sachlic Marktzung abgren Produktorientierte Marktabgrenzung Markt für... Eisenbahnen Markt für... Software Markt für... Bücher Markt für... Nutzenorientierte Marktabgrenzung Smartphones Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 49
  • 87. NUTZENORIENTIERTE VS. PRODUKTIORIENTIERTE MARKTABGRENZUNG he sachlic Marktzung abgren Produktorientierte Marktabgrenzung Markt für... Eisenbahnen Markt für... Software Markt für... Bücher Markt für... Nutzenorientierte Marktabgrenzung Smartphones Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 49
  • 88. NUTZENORIENTIERTE VS. PRODUKTIORIENTIERTE MARKTABGRENZUNG he sachlic Marktzung abgren Produktorientierte Marktabgrenzung Markt für... Eisenbahnen Markt für... Software Markt für... Bücher Markt für... Nutzenorientierte Marktabgrenzung Smartphones Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Transport Vorlesung “Marketing” 49
  • 89. NUTZENORIENTIERTE VS. PRODUKTIORIENTIERTE MARKTABGRENZUNG he sachlic Marktzung abgren Produktorientierte Marktabgrenzung Markt für... Eisenbahnen Markt für... Software Markt für... Bücher Markt für... Nutzenorientierte Marktabgrenzung Smartphones Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Transport Textverarbeitung Vorlesung “Marketing” 49
  • 90. NUTZENORIENTIERTE VS. PRODUKTIORIENTIERTE MARKTABGRENZUNG he sachlic Marktzung abgren Produktorientierte Marktabgrenzung Markt für... Eisenbahnen Markt für... Software Markt für... Bücher Markt für... Nutzenorientierte Marktabgrenzung Smartphones Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Transport Textverarbeitung Bildung Vorlesung “Marketing” 49
  • 91. NUTZENORIENTIERTE VS. PRODUKTIORIENTIERTE MARKTABGRENZUNG he sachlic Marktzung abgren Produktorientierte Marktabgrenzung Markt für... Eisenbahnen Markt für... Software Markt für... Bücher Markt für... Smartphones Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Nutzenorientierte Marktabgrenzung Transport Textverarbeitung Bildung ... Vorlesung “Marketing” 49
  • 92. BSP: SACHLICHE MARKTABGRENZUNG FÜR DIET COKE he sachlic Marktzung abgren Getränke Apfelsaft Diet Coke Bier Club Cola Light Orangenlimonaden Wasser Pepsi Light Kalorienarme Colas Zitronenlimonaden Soft Drinks Milch Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 50
  • 93. MARKTABGRENZUNG Die Abgrenzung des relevanten Marktes kann in folgender Hinsicht erfolgen: Sachlich Welche Art von Leistungen werden im Markt angeboten? Zeitlich Ist der Markt zeitlich begrenzt? Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 51
  • 94. MARKTABGRENZUNG Die Abgrenzung des relevanten Marktes kann in folgender Hinsicht erfolgen: Sachlich Welche Art von Leistungen werden im Markt angeboten? Zeitlich Ist der Markt zeitlich begrenzt? z.B.: - im Sommer: Fussballtickets, Cola, Kinderkaugummi, wenig TV; - Lebenszyklusdauer, technologische Veränderungen, Neu- und Umpositionierungen Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 51
  • 95. MARKTABGRENZUNG Die Abgrenzung des relevanten Marktes kann in folgender Hinsicht erfolgen: Sachlich Welche Art von Leistungen werden im Markt angeboten? Zeitlich Ist der Markt zeitlich begrenzt? Räumlich Ist der Markt lokal, regional, national oder international begrenzt? Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 52
  • 96. MARKTABGRENZUNG Die Abgrenzung des relevanten Marktes kann in folgender Hinsicht erfolgen: Sachlich Zeitlich Räumlich Welche Art international, global, … lokal, regional, national,von Leistungen werden im Markt ABER! zwei Produkte sind nur dann Substitute, wenn angeboten? beide für den Konsumenten erhältlich sind Marktbarrieren Ökonomische (z.B. Transportkosten) Protektionistische Handelshemmnisse 
 (z.B. Ist der Markt zeitlich begrenzt? Einfuhr- u. Exportverbote, länderspezifische technische Normen -> Anpassungsaufwand, Kundenverhalten a-la „buy Britisch“) Ist der Markt lokal, regional, national oder international begrenzt? Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 52
  • 97. MARKTABGRENZUNG Die Abgrenzung des relevanten Marktes kann in folgender Hinsicht erfolgen: Sachlich Welche Art von Leistungen werden im Markt angeboten? Zeitlich Ist der Markt zeitlich begrenzt? Räumlich Ist der Markt lokal, regional, national oder international begrenzt? Jun.-Prof. Dr. Paul Marx | Universität Siegen Vorlesung “Marketing” 53

×