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Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
Plc Siemens Training Notes
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Plc Siemens Training Notes

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PLC Siemiens Training

PLC Siemiens Training

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  • 1. Siemens S7-200 PLC training courses
  • 2. PLC history
    • Classical control
    • - More complicated
    • - Longer time for maintenance
    • - Time consuming troubleshooting
    • - Occupies larger area in switchboards
    • - Requires more wiring
    • - Standard reliability
  • 3. History
    • Large projects requirements
    • - More inputs and outputs points
      • -Large program memory
      • -Several programming instructions
      • -Communication with other equipments
      • -Deal with analogue signals
      • -Deal with large number of counters, timers
      • and markers
  • 4. History
    • Historical view
  • 5. Course contents
    • Introduction to PLC
    • Bit logic
    • compare
    • Timers
    • Counters
    • Memory instructions
    • Analog I/O
    • Move , shift
    • Practical examples
  • 6. Introduction
    • What is a PLC
  • 7. Introduction
    • Basic PLC operation
  • 8. introduction
    • S7 200 family
  • 9. introduction
    • S7-200 configuration
  • 10. introduction
    • S7-200 configuration
    • mode switch and analog adjustment
  • 11. introduction
    • S7-200 configuration
    • optional cartidge
  • 12. Introduction
    • S7-200 configuration
    • expansion modules
  • 13. Introduction
    • S7-200 configuration
    • status indicator
  • 14. Introduction
    • S7-200 configuration
    • I/O numbering
  • 15. Introduction
    • S7-200 configuration
    • inputs
  • 16. Introduction
    • S7-200 configuration
    • outputs
  • 17. Introduction
    • S7-200 configuration
    • programming software
  • 18.
    • Analogue I/O
    = Typical analogue signals from 0-10 VDC or 4-20 mA = They are used to represent changing values such as speed, temperature, weight and level
  • 19. Introduction
    • Analogue outputs may be used to produce variable reference signals for devices such as:
    • # Control valves
    • # Chart recorders
    • # Electric motor drives
    • # Pressure transducers
    • # Analogue meters
  • 20. Introduction
  • 21. Introduction
  • 22. Introduction
  • 23. PLC Programming
  • 24. Programming languages Statement list Function block Ladder diagram The instructions are represented by graphic symbols: Contacts, Coils & Boxes The ladder diagram is the most popular programming language
  • 25. Instructions Standard instructions: They are used in most programs. Examples: timer, counter, math, logical, incr., decr. and move High speed instructions: They allow for events and interrupts to occur independently of the PLC scan time. Examples: High speed counters and interrupts Special instructions: They are used to manipulate data Shift, table, conversion, real time instruction .
  • 26. Bit Logic instruction Normally Open contact Normally Open Immediate contact Normally Closed contact Not contact Normally Closed Immediate contact Positive Transition contact Negative Transition contact Input Instructions
  • 27. Input contacts example
  • 28. Output instructions Output Instruction No Operation instruction Output Immediate instruction Set (N bits) instruction Reset (N bits) instruction Set Immediate (N bits) instruction Reset Immediate (N bits) instruction
  • 29. Output, Set & Reset example
  • 30. Starting a motor
  • 31. Hard-wired DOL starting Induction Motor Circuit Breaker Contactor Thermal Overload Induction Motor Aux. contact Contact coil Stop O.L. contact Start
  • 32. Using PLC Before start Starting After start
  • 33. Stopping
  • 34. Input & Output connections
  • 35. Timer instructions On-Delay Timer Retentive On-Delay Timer Off-Delay Timer
  • 36. On-Delay & Retentive On-Delay timers They count time when the enabling input (IN) is ON. When the current value (Txxx) is > the preset time (PT), the timer bit is ON. The On-Delay timer current value is cleared when (IN) is OFF, while the current value of the Retentive On-Delay Timer is maintained. You can use the Retentive On-Delay Timer to accumulate time for multiple periods of the input ON.
  • 37. Off-Delay timer The Off-Delay Timer is used to delay turning an output OFF for a fixed period of time after the input turns OFF. When (IN) turns ON, the timer bit turns ON immediately, and the current value is set to 0. When (IN) turns OFF, the timer counts till PT and the timer bit turns OFF and the current value stops counting. If the input is OFF for a time shorter than PT, the timer bit remains ON.
  • 38. Timers numbers & resolutions Note You cannot share the same timer numbers for TOF and TON. For example, you cannot have both a TON T32 and a TOF T32.
  • 39. Timer examples On-Delay Off-Delay Retentive On-Delay
  • 40. Hard-wired on-delay timer
  • 41. Timer example
  • 42. TONR example
  • 43. Timer example
  • 44. Counter instructions Up counter Up/down counter Down counter A bottling machine, for example, may use a counter to count bottles into groups of six for packaging.
  • 45. Up-counter
    • It counts up on the rising edges of the Count Up (CU) input.
    • When the current value (Cxxx) > (PV), the counter bit (Cxxx) turns on.
    • The counter is reset when the Reset (R) input turns on.
  • 46. Up/Down counter It counts up on rising edges of the Count Up (CU) input. It counts down on the rising edges of the Count Down (CD) input. When the current value (Cxxx) > (PV), the counter bit (Cxxx) turns on. The counter is reset when the Reset (R) input turns on.
  • 47. Down counter It counts down from the PV on the rising edges of the (CD) input . When the current value is equal to zero, the counter bit (Cxxx) turns on. The counter resets the counter bit (Cxxx) and loads the current value with the (PV) when the load input (LD) turns on.
  • 48. Down-counter example
  • 49. Up/down-counter example
  • 50. Counter example A counter might be used to keep track of the number of vehicles in a parking lot. As vehicles enter the lot through an entrance gate, the counter counts up. As vehicles exit the lot through an exit gate, the counter counts down. When the lot is full a sign at the entrance gate turns on indicating the lot is full.
  • 51. The ladder logic
  • 52. Memory types
    • You can access data in many CPU memory areas
    • - process image input register (I)
    • - process image output register (Q)
    • - variable memory area (V)
    • - Bit memory area (M)
    • - sequence control relay memory area (S)
    • - special memory bits (SM)
    • - local memory area (L)
    • - Timer memory area (T)
    • - counter memory area (C)
    • - Analog inputs (AI)
  • 53. Accessing a Bit of Data in the CPU Memory (Byte.bit Addressing) Memory addressing
  • 54. Memory addressing You can access data in many CPU memory areas (V, I, Q, M, S, L, and SM) as: bytes, words, or double words by using the byte-address format.
  • 55. Memory types
    • Process-image input register (I)
    Format: Bit I[byte address].[bit address] I0.1 Byte, Word, Double Word I[size][starting byte address] IB4
    • Process-image output register (Q)
    Format: Bit Q[byte address].[bit address] Q1.1 Byte, Word, Double Word Q[size][starting byte address] QB5
    • Variable memory area (V)
    • You can use V memory to:
    • store intermediate results of the control logic operations.
    • store other data pertaining to your process or task.
    • Format:
    • Bit V[byte address].[bit address] V10.2
    • Byte, Word, Double Word V[size][starting byte address] VW100
  • 56. Memory types
    • Sequence control relay area (S)
    They are used to organize machine operations or steps into equivalent program segments. SCRs allow logical segmentation of the control Format: Bit S[byte address].[bit address] S3.1 Byte, Word, Double Word S[size][starting byte address] SB4
    • Special memory bits (SM)
    The SM bits provide a means for communicating information between the CPU and your program. You can use these bits to select and control some of the special functions of the S7-200 CPU, such as: • A bit that turns on for the first scan cycle • Bits that toggle at fixed rates • Bits that show the status of math or operational instructions Format: Bit SM[byte address].[bit address] SM0.1 Byte, Word, Double Word SM[size][starting byte address] SMB86
  • 57. Memory types
    • Local memory area (L)
    The S7-200 PLCs provide 64 bytes of local (L) memory of which 60 can be used as scratchpad memory or for passing formal parameters to subroutines. Format: Bit L [byte address].[bit address] L0.0 Byte, Word, Double Word L [size] [starting byte address] LB33
  • 58. Memory types
    • Analog inputs (AI)
    The S7-200 converts a real-world, analog value (such as temperature or voltage) into a word-length (16-bit) digital value. You access these values by the area identifier (AI), size of the data (W), and the starting byte address. Since analog inputs are words and always start on even-number bytes (such as 0, 2, or 4), you access them with even-number byte addresses (such as AIW0, AIW2, or AIW4),as shown in Figure Analog input values are read-only values. Format: AIW [starting byte address] AIW4
  • 59. Memory types The S7-200 converts a word-length (16-bit) digital value into a current or voltage, proportional to the digital value (such as for a current or voltage). You write these values by the area identifier (AQ), size of the data (W), and the starting by address. Since analog outputs are words and always start on even-number bytes (such as 0, 2, or 4), you write them with even-number byte addresses (AQW0, AQW2, AQW4), Format: AQW [starting byte address] AQW4
    • Analog outputs (AQ)
  • 60. Move instructions The Move Byte instruction moves the input byte (IN) to the output byte (OUT). The input byte is not altered by the move. The Move Word instruction moves the input word (IN) to the output word (OUT). The input word is not altered by the move. The Move Double Word instruction moves the input double word (IN) to the output double word (OUT). The input double word is not altered by the move. The Move Real instruction moves a 32-bit, real input double word (IN) to the output double word (OUT). The input double word is not altered by the move.
  • 61. The block move instructions
    • The Block Move Byte instruction moves the number of
    • bytes (N) from the input address IN to the output address
    • OUT. N has a range of 1 to 255.
    Example
  • 62. Move byte immediate instructions The Move Byte Immediate Write instruction reads from location IN and writes to physical output OUT. The Move Byte Immediate Read instruction reads physical input IN and writes the result in OUT.
  • 63. Analogue I/O = Typical analogue signals from 0-10 VDC or 4-20 mA = They are used to represent changing values such as speed, temperature, weight and level =The expansion module converts the standard voltage and current values to 12-bit digital representation. These digital values are transferred to the PLC for use in its program
  • 64.
    • Analogue outputs may be used to produce variable reference signals for devices such as:
    • # Control valves
    • # Chart recorders
    • # Electric motor drives
    • # Pressure transducers
    • # Analogue meters
  • 65. Analog o/p example
  • 66. Analog i/p example
  • 67. Analog i/p example

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