GWT 2014: Emergency Conference - 03 la gestione del processo di acquisizione e gestione dati

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Geospatial World Tour 2014: Emergency Conference.
Napoli, 28 maggio 2014.

La gestione del processo di acquisizione e gestione dati.
Simone Colla, Hexagon Geospatial

Published in: Technology, Business
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  • Huge amounts of geospatial data
    Stakeholders (decision makers, responders, people on the ground) need to leverage huge amounts of geospatial information that increases dramatically in a short time
    Data must be integrated and used in visualization (maps), analysis, decision help, etc.
    Tons of geospatial data created in a short time, plus other current and historic
    Various, independent sources create a variety of mission-critical geodata, including satellite / aerial imagery companies, Government / NGOs, Non-profits, Crowdsourcing, etc.

    Dynamic discovery of dispersed information
    Scattered across different organizations that have a stake in responding to the disaster
    Find data you need, when you need it, from public, private, other sources

    Real time access
    Getting the most up-to-date data into any geospatial application without issues such as file format and size

    The right portals and front ends
    Custom front ends and specialized applications
    Public maps, web services to feed into other applications
  • Disaster management involves protecting human populations from the consequences of catastrophic events
    Planning seeks to create disaster resilience for potentially vulnerable communities.
    Mitigation involves removing humans from the path of a disaster, or structural actions that keep the disaster from affecting human life.
    Preparedness means having correct procedures in place for when a disaster occurs.
    Response is search, rescue and taking care of a population affected by disaster.
    Recovery is returning a community to normalcy.
  • Geospatial information plays a critical role in all phases of disaster management, and can shed light on many key activities. Emergency management operations fundamentally depend on geospatial technologies and solutions to successfully manage and respond to serious and urgent situations.

    Some ways that geospatial data and solutions are used in emergency management:
    Prevention, Mitigation, Preparedness
    Managing and studying data and reports.to provide insights to ultimately save lives and support reconstruction efforts
    Analyzing transportation systems to create evacuation plans
    Environmental planning and analysis (including land and topographic analysis, change detection and other modeling exercises)
    Mapping for public evacuation plans
    Analysis to inform zoning and land use
    Installation of warning devices
    Maps to inform emergency responders in training exercises
    Risk assessment and contingency planning
    Flood analysis
    Response and Recovery
    Ingest, organize, manage, fuse and deliver historic and rapidly updated geospatial imagery, GIS, LIDAR, photos, video, reports and other supporting information to inform all disaster response participants – from the decision-makers to responders-on-the ground to affected citizens – with actionable information
    Web mapping supporting real-time information
    Damage assessments
    Population analysis to quickly understand numbers of affected citizens and their needs (e.g. tents, water, food, shelter, medical)
    Rapid identification of potential areas to support shelters, planning and staging areas, field command and response stations, supply and medical stations, and other logistical operations (i.e. safe vs. hot zones)
    Analysis of available transportation networks and traffic routes for navigating the disaster arena
    Understand location and availability of critical facilities (hospitals, nursing homes, utilities, electricity, communications, etc.) to support affected population and responders
    Analysis of available land, buildings, infrastructure, critical facilities, medical, hazards for both short and long term recovery efforts
  • Productive Data Collection and Management – You must have the right data at the right time to support disaster planning and response. Data for disaster management must be collected from multiple sources including people in the field.  This data should be easy to access and conduct analysis. Having productive data management helps you organize your data holdings, enhance planning efforts, and provide first responders the data they need when they need it.

    Robust Modeling & Analysis –By being more proactive with your disaster planning tasks, including creating data, maps, digital elevation models, and reports, you can be more accurate in your analysis to support evacuation planning and disaster mitigation planning.

    Rapid Delivery – You need an extensive catalog or repository where multiple agencies can access and interactively work with different types of data. By being able to get crucial data to first responders and relief agencies via multiple formats, you can dramatically reduce response time in the field, helping to save lives, property, and infrastructure in the wake of a disaster.

    Actionable Visual Intelligence – You need to be able to view data related to disaster planning, response, and recovery in multiple contexts (e.g., desktop, web, mobile, 3D) to fully understand disaster impacts and support decision-making.

    Powerful Field Collection and Assessment – You need to be able to assess disaster situations in the field and collect information on the damage to assist in recovery operations.
     
  • Amass and centralize constantly updating data stores
    Data updating constantly
    Discover data across many agencies and stakeholders
    Search against master index of rich, geospatial metadata
    Protect ownership rights with tight security
    Get data to first responders fast, and into any application in the office or in the field
    No hassles with file format size or translation
    Dramatically reduce the time it takes to forward data to all requestors for disaster planning and response purposes.
    Promote better information sharing, coordination, and reuse
  • Run powerful analysis and figure out what’s going on, NOW.
    Supported by dynamic, graphical, spatial data modeling environment
    With real time feedback and previews
    Make disaster plans more precise
    Be more accurate in your analysis
    Alert affected neighborhoods with greater precision

    Efficiently perform proactive disaster planning tasks including creating data, maps, digital elevation models and reports.
    Perform 2D and 3D modeling including drainage, floodplains, SLOSH, sea level rise and storm tide analysis, change detection and more.
    Show the exact number and location of affected structures based on the predicted storm surge.
  • Rapidly create quality data before and during an event
    Simple, straightforward data access, data integrity, quality, safeguarding, and dynamic analysis of ever-changing data
    Protect infrastructure assets and properties
    Enhances proactive planning efforts and drives efficiency

    Aggregate data from a variety of sources and analyze them in unison to extract clear, actionable information.
    Instantly update geospatial information, edit feature layers on a map and query repositories.
    Develop one unified information source for each municipally-owned parcel.
     
  • Get utilities and infrastructure back on line, faster.
    Leverage highly-productive, task-oriented, geospatial business tools in the field.
    Improve staff collaboration and communication while lowering cost of ownership for disaster planning and response

    Appropriate tools for the user and task at hand with a user interface.
    Advanced geo-caching for performance and disconnected mobile editing.
  • Field crews assess infrastructure and sites immediately following the event
    Update GIS enterprise from the field using downloadable iOS and Android
    Practical and highly effective

    Powerful utility for viewing maps and assets and performing simple point and attribute updates in the field.
    Users can work directly in their database without any data conversion, synchronization, or temporary data stores
  • Reliable, cost-effective means of collecting actionable data about damage or problems
    Uses geo-referenced reports from members of the public
    Scale on demand

    Enlist the masses to report on incidents
    Far more people report on critical issues

    Empower watchful citizens to use their own GPS-enabled smartphones to report on disaster-related damages.
    Free and available to anyone from iOS and Android app stores.
  • Hurricane Sandy was the second-costliest hurricane in United States history as well as the deadliest and most destructive hurricane of the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season. While it was only a Category 1 storm when it made landfall in the Eastern US, the storm became the largest Atlantic hurricane on record (as measured by diameter, with winds spanning 1,100 miles (1,800 km)). Preliminary estimates assess damage at nearly $75 billion surpassed only by Hurricane Katrina in costs. At least 285 people were killed along the path of the storm in seven countries. The severe and widespread damage the storm caused in the United States, as well as its unusual merge with a frontal system, resulted in the nicknaming of the hurricane by the media and several organizations of the U.S. government "Superstorm Sandy
  • Lucky that Hurricane Sandy stayed 400 miles off the VA coast. Still a large storm that produced a lot of pressure, wind and speed over a 600 mile distance. It still caused flooding in the VA Beach primary in the Lynnhaven Bay area inside the Chesapeake bay. The City was very fortunate to avoid widespread damage
    That occurred up North.
  • This is an example of the Storm Surge model.
  • Because of the way the wind was blowing and the direction that Sandy was moving – we had high water marks on the ocean side of only 1 foot. Very minimal flooding along the ocean front and not much damage at all.
  • However in the Lynnhaven Bay since the water was pushed up into it you can see the Pier in the Chesapeake Bay see actually a lot of storm surge going on. That is a 14 foot high pier and that is a storm surge of 15 to 16 feet going in. That ended up pushing the water into the Lynnhaven Bay and causing flooding inside the bay of 5.5 feet.
  • When Sandy did come through we reported the high water marks.
    At the time of the flood we did not have enough detailed data to process what was coming in on the predictive flood. Again, we were predicting a 6.5 elevation and flooding.
    And, we really needed for this event to have 1 foot contours but we had 2 foot contours and our spot elevations where not close enough. We had millions of data points from 2004 LIDAR trapped in xyz files. They were trapped in 1500 different tiles and couldn’t be accessed in a timely manner. Our concerns were we knew where we were going to have localized flooding in these areas and there were thousands of residents in these specific areas that were a concern.
  • Flow Direction/Drainage Inundation Flood prone areas
    DEM – lidar topography product that allows for you to do different types of analysis with different types of software. Some of these screen captures are coming from GeoMedia GRID and GeoMedia 3D. Allows you to do the Flow Analysis and the Flood Analysis as well as map the sub contours and visualize that in a 3D system.
  • Our current DTM was flown in 2004.
    It had 1500 XYZ files, 36,000 features in each tile
    Basically our old system took months to process each one of the tiles.
    So if we wanted to make a 1 foot contour out of our 2 foot contour – we would have to import these files and convert them into a stable file format.
  • During Sandy, our Intergraph Rep ended up calling us and asking if there was anything they could do to help. We explained we had 1500 xyz tiles and we were trying to do a reverse 911 call. Intergraph gave us access to their FTP site and we uploaded those files to that site.
    Intergraph converted each of those tiles to LAS format. They then displayed it on their Apollo Website. And, we were able to download and complete our DEM and hill shades from Apollo website.

    THIS ENTIRE PROCESS TOOK LESS THAN 24 hours.
    We were facing something that looked like it would take months to do And with Intergraph’s help we were able to turn that information around in 24 hours.
  • Our digital elevation model has approximately 2000 tiles
    We’ve taken the data from a LIDAR now and Mosaicked together to create a continuous point cloud
    We’ve also taken out those data holidays using ERDAS software. So if we had a section in the city that has a hole, we can set it to different elevations or resample to fill those holes.
  • Create one continuous surface
    From the LIDAR point could we developed a complete DEM that covers the whole city. The lighter areas are showing the areas that are higher up in the city.
  • Going back to Hurricane Sandy, we know we have some really low areas that are really susceptible. So we really wanted a tool to predict so we could do our reverse 911. First on the list of priorities was to create continuous inundation surface
  • Basically we have extents from 0 to 2 feet up to 0 to 12 feet. This is an image that shows the entire city. Average elevation is 12 feet.
    We have transferred these into polygons so that if we have any type of localized flooding We will be able to pull those polygons up and do a reverse 911 on those areas using our GeoMedia tools.
  • This is an example of a spatial query we ran and reran this one during Hurricane Sandy based on the last files that Intergraph provided us. Basically, we went with the Buildings affected by 5.5’ predictive flood elevation we came up with close to 6000 buildings within that range. What we did was take those polygons and transformed them into that reverse 911 system VB alert and broadcast the message out to all of those home owners that were going to be potentially affected by that type of flood. The reason we targeted those 6000 structures is we didn’t want to send out a notification out to the entire city. We have 430,000 residents. We wanted to target the areas because it gives it more impact when you target the area. So they do not ignore the message due to information overload.
    But with Intergraph technology we were able to take that information and narrow it down to the target zones.
  • Looking forward – where we want to go and how we want to improve our notification system. We want to do Additional 3D Modeling using Intergraph GeoMedia 3D tools – here are some screen captures from that. It really helps us notify the public where we have drainage issues, where things are in the flood plains and where our low line and flood prone areas are. We think with 3D models overlaid on top of Arial photography really hits home for the people that are living in those vulnerable areas
    Helps us improve the city and the drainage in those areas. And take further flood preventive measures.
    Also with 3D modeling we are able to do predictive 3D modeling with the SLOSH, HAZUS Analysis, and especially the
    Sea Level Rise

    Since we have it in a DTM we are able to do more of that modeling and show the different elevations and do calculations based off the finished first floor elevations – from this we plan to Event/Subject Specific Web Apps so if we have a predictive tidal search coming in from a storm, we would plug the number into our website and it would spit out those polygons with the inundation zones and would come into the emergency center, give the notifications to the decision makers, affected areas, what structures are affected, locations are, what addresses that will help us to determine if we should evacuate an area.
    Type in a Storm Tide and have it calculate number of structures affected and their locations.
  • Productive Data Collection and Management – You must have the right data at the right time to support disaster planning and response. Data for disaster management must be collected from multiple sources including people in the field.  This data should be easy to access and conduct analysis. Having productive data management helps you organize your data holdings, enhance planning efforts, and provide first responders the data they need when they need it.

    Robust Modeling & Analysis –By being more proactive with your disaster planning tasks, including creating data, maps, digital elevation models, and reports, you can be more accurate in your analysis to support evacuation planning and disaster mitigation planning.

    Rapid Delivery – You need an extensive catalog or repository where multiple agencies can access and interactively work with different types of data. By being able to get crucial data to first responders and relief agencies via multiple formats, you can dramatically reduce response time in the field, helping to save lives, property, and infrastructure in the wake of a disaster.

    Actionable Visual Intelligence – You need to be able to view data related to disaster planning, response, and recovery in multiple contexts (e.g., desktop, web, mobile, 3D) to fully understand disaster impacts and support decision-making.

    Powerful Field Collection and Assessment – You need to be able to assess disaster situations in the field and collect information on the damage to assist in recovery operations.
     
  • GWT 2014: Emergency Conference - 03 la gestione del processo di acquisizione e gestione dati

    1. 1. La gestione del processo di acquisizione e gestione dati Simone Colla Geospatial Presales Manager – EMEA Southern Europe Intergraph Corporation – SG&I Division
    2. 2. Geospatial needs previous and during a disaster
    3. 3. What is Disaster Management? 3
    4. 4. Geospatial information is critical in a disaster! Prevention, Mitigation & Preparedness • Pre-planning and analysis • Risk assessment • Public evacuation planning Response & Recovery • Real time data authoring, including mapping and analysis • Rapid fusing, managing, and delivery of critical data • Damage assessment 4
    5. 5. 5  Productive Data Collection and Management  Robust Modeling and Analysis  Rapid Data Delivery  Actionable Visual Intelligence  Powerful Field Collection and Assessment How Can Intergraph Geospatial Solutions help you in Natural Disaster Management?
    6. 6. Data management and distribution (ERDAS APOLLO) • Centralize constantly updating data stores • Discover data across agencies • Protect ownership rights • Get data to first responders fast • Promote better information sharing and re-use 6
    7. 7. Data modeling and analysis (ERDAS IMAGINE) • Run powerful analysis and figure out what’s going on, NOW • Make disaster plans more precise • Be more accurate in analysis • Alert affected neighborhoods with greater precision 7
    8. 8. Powerful Data Capture and Analysis capabilities (GeoMedia) • Rapidly create quality data before and during an event • Protect infrastructure assets and properties • Enhances proactive planning efforts and drives efficiency 8
    9. 9. Powerful field workflows (GeoMedia Smart Client) • Leverage task-oriented, geospatial business tools in the field • Proactively design evacuation and recovery actions • Get utilities and infrastructure back on line, faster 9
    10. 10. Powerful field workflows (Mobile MapWorks) • Field crews assess infrastructure immediately following the event • Update enterprise GIS using downloadable iOS and Android apps • Practical and highly effective 10
    11. 11. Crowd-source critical information (Mobile Alert) • Reliable, cost-effective means of collecting actionable data • Enlist the masses to report on incidents – Far more people report on critical issues 11
    12. 12. DISASTER PLANNING FOR HURRICANE SANDY
    13. 13. Source: Wikipedia Hurricane Sandy 13
    14. 14. Hurricane Sandy • 400 Miles off the Virginia Coast • Large amounts of pressure and wind speed over 600 mile distance • Caused high flooding levels from surge inside the Lynnhaven Bay • City was fortunate to avoid widespread damage 14
    15. 15. Storm surge - Map 15
    16. 16. High Water Marks Sandy- Ocean Side 1ft 16
    17. 17. High Water Marks Sandy- Lynnhaven Bay 5.5 feet 17
    18. 18. Sandy Lessons Learned – Business Drivers • Data was not detailed enough for this event: – Public Works needed 1 ft. contours and we were at 2 ft., spot elevations • Had millions of data points but no easy way to process the information 18 • Had 1500 tiles that could not be processed in a timely manner • Had to notify 1000’s of residents for specific flooding concerns
    19. 19. Digital Elevation Model (DEM) uses Flow Analysis/Drainage Slope/Contours 3D Visualization 19
    20. 20. Current DTM, from 2004 • Flown in 2004 • 1500 XYZ files • 36,000 features in each tile • Takes months to reprocess the tiles 20
    21. 21. How Intergraph Assisted • During Sandy we sent Intergraph the 1500 xyz tiles • Intergraph converted each tile to LAS format • Displayed on the ERDAS APOLLO demo site • Able to download completed DEM and hill shades from Apollo • All In less than 24 hours! 21
    22. 22. Digital Elevation Model • Approximately 2000 Tiles – Mosaicked together to create a continuous point cloud – Interpolate across data holidays Single LiDAR Point Cloud Tile Mosaicked LiDAR Point Cloud 22
    23. 23. Digital Elevation Model 23
    24. 24. Inundation Extent - Storm Surge Due to the highly susceptible nature of our topography to storm surge, we need accurate reality based tools to predict and respond to its impact. 24
    25. 25. Inundation Extents 25
    26. 26. Inundation Extents - Polygons Enable Spatial Queries • Buildings effected by 5.5’ inundation – 5916 total • Polygons will also be used for VBAlert (Virginia Beach Alert system) 26
    27. 27. • Additional 3D Modeling – Drainage • Floodplains • Low Lying and Flood Prone Areas • Predictive 3D Modeling – SLOSH – HAZUS Analysis – Sea Level Rise – Event/Subject Specific Web Apps • Type in a Storm Tide and have it calculate number of structures affected and their locations. Looking forward 27
    28. 28. 28  Productive Data Collection and Management  Robust Modeling and Analysis  Rapid Data Delivery  Actionable Visual Intelligence  Powerful Field Collection and Assessment How Can Intergraph Geospatial Solutions help you in Natural Disaster Management?
    29. 29. QUESTIONS

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