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Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
Steve Price: Teaching
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Steve Price: Teaching

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A selection of examples taken from the workshops and seminars I have given over the years including KHiB, Nottingham Trent University and KBU (Malaysia).

A selection of examples taken from the workshops and seminars I have given over the years including KHiB, Nottingham Trent University and KBU (Malaysia).

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  • 1. Teaching KHiB 2007/2008 KBU, Malaysia, 2007 Nottingham Trent University, 2001/2003/2004/2006/2007 Central Saint Martins, 2006 Winchester Art School, 2008 Birmingham University, 2009
  • 2. University: KBU, Malaysia Date: January 2007 Response-ability “Steve’s workshop was just excellent, it was A three day workshop at Kuala Lumpor’s KB amazing that the students could pick up so much University aimed at challenging the students to create a realistic pitch proposal for a potential knowledge from him in this short engagement. brand awareness campaign for Diesel Clothing. The ‘pitching’ exercise had injected so much There were roughly thirty students in the excitement in this workshop, students were workshop. They were asked to form groups of five. pushed not only to conceptualise, but also The workshop, albeit short, began with an informal to ‘perform’ a professional presentation that presentation to the students about me, my work and my life; so that they had a good idea of who I Steve had required. Steve’s portfolios and his was. work experiences had no doubt given so much After I had briefed the group the workshop inspirations to all of us here at KBU School of began in earnest with one-on-one discussions Design.” between myself and each group. We set a schedule Anis Laila Yap Abdullah for each day and on the afternoon of the third day Head of Graphic Design BA the students presented their work. KBU International School of Design Myself and the tutors all played the role of client and grilled the students during and after their presentations so as to keep them alert.
  • 3. Response-ability Title: Response-ability By: Steve Price Duration: Monday 29th – 31st January 2007 Aims of the workshop • to choose a topic that concerns you • to produce a practical response to communicate that concern • to embrace both the brand (with its guidelines) and your ‘concern’ • to work on a realistic project with a realistic timeline and present your work accordingly Introduction Like the world around us the role of the designer is constantly evolving. We are involved in more than just layout and design, clients now employ us to consult on a vast array of areas such as strategy, marketing, campaigns, brand development. Designers can work across almost every conceivable media platform there is from banners to billboards and from paper to screen. Being a designer also means being constantly aware of the world, social trends even (and perhaps even more importantly) anthropology. But with this evolution of the world and our industry comes questions about our role in the modern world as creatives. Every major brand, product and company seeks the advice and consultation of a creative agency, and at the helm of that agency will be a creative/design/art director(s). So designers/creative directors have a direct impact on our world. Now is the time to start really questioning what level of responsibility that comes with that impact. It is not just about designers suggesting more ethical, climate friendly methods of packaging, printing or marketing platforms (although that is important). It is also about brands across all industries taking responsibility for their own impact on the world to embrace their consumers and their world. For example, youth markets Although aware of such concerns might perhaps engage more with them if certain brands, in some way, spoke to them on their level and showed support for those concerns. ‘Response-ability’ is a play on words. It challenges you as an individual and as a creative person to consider something that is important, to create (using your ability) a response – a message. It might also question you and what you believe your role, your responsilibity is as a designer – is it all just about aesthetics?
  • 4. Life’s a Pitch University: KHiB, Bergen Date: October 2007 A two week workshop with ten very committed students at KHiB. The project was a taste of reality. For two weeks they were to work alone as if freelancers. I set the first project, then two days later they received another project via email, and then another three days later. The purpose of the workshop was not just about working on multiple projects under realistic time frames. It focused on developing their concepts in to presentable work that you could show a client. The project reflected on the decisions that are involved in working for yourself. What happens if you decide to commit to too much work? What happens if you don’t commit to enough? How to communicate with clients? How to present to a client? How to propose costs and discuss those with clients. I held interim seminars showing examples of presentations I had given; the successful and unsuccessful. I had clients send me quotes about what makes a good presentation for them. The result was brilliant, the students worked tirelessly and produced some great work in the process.
  • 5. LIFE’S A PITCH THEN YOU GET ASKED TO DO [ANOTHER] ONE Title: Life’s a Pitch – The you get asked to do [another] one By: Steve Price Duration: Monday 3rd – 14st September 2007 Aims of the workshop •  to work under realistic pressures •  to consider your decision making process regarding business •  to consider your role beyond just being a visually literate person •  to work on realistic projects with a realistic timelines and present your work accordingly Introduction Graphic design is extremely competitive. The industry is overwhelmed with talent (although not all good) – very often competing for the same projects for the same companies, brands, record labels and various other sectors. Commissioning editors, marketing managers, product managers, communication managers – the people who commission us now have an endless choice of designers to call upon and frequently do, in vast numbers. Standing out from the crowd has never been more difficult. Good design is not always obvious to a client, and neither is its tangibility –  unlike a new car, building or product they cannot necessarily see, touch, smell, feel the value that you will bring to their brand, campaign, product, etc. How are you going to sell your idea, yourself, your vision? Everyone does it differently. It is a delicate balance of demonstrating your understanding of a brief, of being able to tackle a clients problem, find a range of solutions whilst allowing them to feel part of the process. You also have to show your understanding and research of their market, consumer, product and lastly show some ideas that no-one else has with conviction, passion and enthusiasm – and all this (typically) for free. Pitches are rarely (if ever) paid and as a designer you have to decide whether to take on these pitches in order to be in with a chance of winning new business? If so how long do you spend on the proposal? Do you need to get quotes from printers? How are you going to present it? How much is the project worth and what do you think you can get for it? How long is it going to take you if you get the project? Do you want the project? Do you like the client? That person sitting next to you is now your competitor. You can choose not to pitch, but those that do are a rarity (and mostly out of work).
  • 6. LIFE’S A PITCH THEN YOU GET ASKED TO DO [ANOTHER] ONE The project Like the world around us the role of the designer is constantly evolving. We are involved in more than just layout and design, clients now employ us to consult on a vast array of areas such as strategy, marketing, campaigns, brand development. Designers can work across almost every conceivable media platform there is from banners to billboards and from paper to screen. Being a designer also means being constantly aware of the world, social trends even (and perhaps even more importantly) anthropology. For the next two weeks we are going to test this with a dose of real-life work experience. You are going to be running your own design company. You will choose a name that will represent who you are when presenting your work to the ‘client’ –  this can be anything you like, but do not spend any time thinking too hard. You are going to be working on a pitch/brief that is either a live project of mine, or a pitch I have been invited to partake in. You can choose to work alone, or in pairs. You will be briefed, from there you will be expected to assemble your ideas, and formulate a plan of how to tackle the project. If you are working as a pair consider what your combined and individual strengths are and decide who is going to do what, and by when. This is not just a design project where you hand-in some print-outs to your tutors. We are going to be your potential clients, and you’ll be quizzed as such. You have ten working days (not including weekends), use that time efficiently –  you will be marked on this and the following: 1. your design work and understanding of the brief – what medium/format will the proposed work take? Consider this for the client/product 2. presentation – think about how and what you use to present your work (is it just a pdf/powerpoint, or a video/iChat-webcam, perhaps it has to take place outside?) 3. your consideration beyond the design work – are there any launch/promotion/marketing ideas for the project/product? Is there a moral/ethical viewpoint you want the client to consider? 4. your financial proposal – what is it going to cost the client? (hint: don’t guess) Remember
  • 7. • One thing I’ve learnt is to trust my instinct – no idea is too ridiculous to suggest as long as it is relevant. • The pitch will be awarded to the best proposal, remember this is not always the best design – its about the whole package. • As with real life you never just have one project to work on. •  I am here for any help and advice.
  • 8. Work presented and produced by: Horvaad
  • 9. Work presented and produced by: Nina Helland Sortland
  • 10. Communication in Motion A four week motion graphics workshop created and run by myself and University: Nottingham Trent University Mark Hough. The students were asked to choose a film and re-design, Date: March/April 2001 animate and produce a new opening title sequence. We began by showing our own work, briefing the students and having a Q&A about what we do, and thoughts regarding their own ideas for the project. Alongside the practical work we held seminars aimed at providing an insight in to the industry side of motion graphics, technical advice and support for producing their work. More importantly we refused to allow them to work on the computer for the first week. This was to emphasise and encourage the students to produce ‘scamps’ and storyboards to present their ideas. It meant that we could also create a more informal dynamic with a large group that didn’t normally get to work around each other (shared studio space). At the end of the workshop the students all showed their work. But as a surprise we hired the local cinema in the Lace Market (a trendy part of town) so that they could all get a real sense of their work. We even provided popcorn!
  • 11. Brief Communication in motion Duration: four week project Deadline: March 29th 2001 Tutor: steven price Date: March 1st 2001 Introduction Graphic design is fundamentally about the communication and information. Albeit in billboards, books, tickets, television adverts, the bible or a brand identity, graphic designers are the mediators between the interpretation and the audience. This is never more applicable than when concerned with 'motion graphics' for film credits, tv commercials, interstitials or documentary inserts. There are many platforms for designers to visualise their creative process in animated sequence, but what is more important is the basis of all projects concerning graphic design: understanding, meaning and interpretation of content. Films, title sequences, opening/closing credits are about narrative, context, form and the use of space (on the screen). For the audience, they enable the transportation from reality to an environment of thought and meaning; the viewer can allow him/her self to be submerged within a story. All films and television programs have some form of promotional material through the various platforms of media, but it is the use of imagery, text, colour and movement on screen that creates a platform for designers to animate their creative process. Aim Your aim will be to produce one of the following options: 1. open or end title sequence for a film (to be agreed upon by you and your tutors) 2. a promotional sequence for a film (N.B this is different from title sequences) 3. a promotional sequence and 10 second interstitial for a channel four documentary (title/theme to be discussed) In order to establish a concept for creating these animated sequences you will need to establish a contextual understanding of both the medium and the content that you are dealing with. For example, if you produce a credit sequence for a film, or even a trailer, it is vital to understand the films' characteristics; the plot, the lighting, cinemaphotography, directorship, the meaning, colour themes and probably most importantly: how the film made you feel, not as a designer, but as an audience member. You may note that there is no time limit set by these choices because that should be decided upon by you as individual designers according to the content and concept. The choices of film/documentary will be discussed throughout the project within the group seminars, although it may be advised to use an existing film or programme. whilst working on this project you will be expected to take part in discussion groups concerning the language of films, television programmes and their title sequences. N.B your participation and communication will be an essential part of the process. (see schedule). Summary I aim to work with you based on our experiences within the industry, to establish a working relationship based upon an understanding of the medium, but to also allow you the opportunity to produce work within a medium that you may not have previously used before. I will look to use our time (of one day a week) as productively as possible so that you may gain from our experience and discussions. I will be primarily concerned with your individual process of working, your ideas, concepts and responses to the brief, more so than the end product.
  • 12. Meaning through Motion University: Nottingham Trent University Date: March 2002 I was invited back to run another four week workshop with the second year BA Graphic Design students. This time I was asked to run a similar project but to create something more abstract. The students were asked to choose a word from a list and then animate that word. The group worked individually and were scheduled to present their developments twice a week to myself and the tutor.
  • 13. Brief Meaning through motion Duration: four week project Deadline: March 15th 2002 Tutor: Steve Price Date: February 11th 2002 Motion Graphics The printed word on the page, static, but a powerful form of communication. A single word can inspire a myriad of meanings and experiences and spark the imagination in the minds eye. Designers have sought to capture these thoughts and portray them in print. New technologies have enabled the designer to go even further with movement and sound adding yet further dimensions to the visual interpretation. By adding movement and sound designers can lead the viewer on a journey, where elements are animated to portray a thought, convey a message and evoke an emotion. Project Aims • To express personal ideas to an audience about the meaning of words, semiotic or otherwise. • To understand the differences of designing for screen as apposed to designing for print • To create a piece of thought provoking work to express an emotion or a mood • To develop skills with motion graphic technologies Design Brief Express one of the following words in the form of an animated sequence. Use image, typography along with sound to convey to the viewer your definition of the word. While you may employ a personal/experimental approach, strive to convey your ideas in a way that in intended to provoke a particular response. Urban Pollution Decay Structures Symmetry Generation Serendipity Populace Descent Utopia Hallucinate The Quicktime clip produced must be 320pixels x 240pixels to run for a maximum duration time of 60 seconds. It can contain any elements you feel is necessary to convey the chosen word, but it must not contain actual video footage. Learning Outcomes • Demonstrate the advantages of using the medium compared to print • Use image and/or sound to express a mood to create a reaction to the viewer • Investigate motion graphics computer software technology • Have an understanding of Quicktime Video clips to play back on computer screens Submission Details • A Quicktime clip 320pixels x 240pixels with a maximum running time of 60 seconds that can play back on a standard desktop computer. • Two A2 Storyboards to support the concept.
  • 14. Design Means University: Nottingham Trent University Date: March 2006 A three day workshop where the students were challenged to question both the role as designers and to use their skills to promote just one word, in whatever form they felt defined their role. The object was to create a means with which their role could be explained to someone who wasn’t a designer. To surprise the students I brought in a whole host of volunteers from around the University campus and town to listen to and ask questions of the presentations. The result was a very compelling debate about design at large, and it gave each student the chance to really discuss and attempt to educate the kinds of people that could very well be a client of theirs one day.
  • 15. BA(Hons) Graphic Design Nottingham Trent University School of Art & Design Module GDES20065 Project 1 2005|06 Gd2 Project brief Title Design means _____________™ Tutor/s Steve Price, Alison Barnes Duration Mar 20th – 23rd Aims of the project • to define your role as designer - there is no right or wrong answer • to work on a project within a realistic timeline • to produce a visual response to the brief and be prepared to present it and yourself at the end Introduction “During a 45-minute journey, I had been exposed to more than 130 different advertising "elements" showcasing more than 80 brands. I was "looking" at adverts for 29 minutes but couldn't recall a single brand without prompting.” ‘Shopper's eye view of ads that pass us by’ Owen Gibson, media correspondent, Saturday November 19, 2005 In a 90 minute commute to work, Owen Wilson (of the Guardian Newspaper) saw 250 adverts from more than 100 brands in 70 different formats. The number of those he could recall without prompting was 1. Escaping this for those that can afford to seek it is becoming harder, advertising and information is everywhere. Space is an expensive commodity, global-growth, for the rich and powerful has become a powerful reality. Communication is a vehicle with which information is delivered, which is why the message can sometimes be misguiding, confusing, misleading, unclear and distorted. Whether it is spoken, written or signalled, the medium really is the message. Graphic Design is the medium most commonly used to communicate this and many other forms of information, and it is an ever-expanding industry of possibilities but with that comes other challenges and competition. It is now time for us as designers (and you as under-graduates) to start questioning, reviewing and redefining our/your role and the responsibility that could/should accompany it. Stand up, stand out and really start thinking. Could/should our creative abilities be used to also bring about more space, meaning, substance, clarity, emotion or even nostalgia to a message? Or were the likes of Ken Garland (‘First Things First’ Manifesto, 1964) and more recently Rick Poyner merely shouting in the wind. Is our role and responsibility limited to aesthetics? Is it simply about selling, for example, dog food? Whatever your beliefs about the role of design, and responsibility of the designer, ‘Design means _____________™’ is an opportunity for you to partake in this debate. It is a chance to produce a message that you want to communicate, to educate, inspire, expose, eradicate or perhaps just share. The task • Choose a word or phrase to reflect your message of what design could ”mean”, to fill in the blank. • Work individually – this is about you and you and your message. • Do not disclose your subject to any of your fellow students - the ability to surprise, shock or capture an audience is achieved by the originality of the delivery. • Use whatever medium you wish (image, typography, space, colour, motion, sound, interaction, etc) to convey your definition of the subject – there are no restrictions (apart from time). • Consider your choice of medium that will best express the emotion or a mood for your message Staff contact You will undertake this project without interim tutorials.
  • 16. BA(Hons) Graphic Design Nottingham Trent University School of Art & Design Module GDES20065 Project 1 2005|06 Timetable Monday 20th March Briefing Thursday 23rd March (3pm) Deadline & presentation – all will be revealed, that’s all I can say. Links & reading ‘First Things First’ (the original 1964 manifesto) http://kengarland.co.uk/KG%20published%20writing/first%20things%20first/index.html ‘Shopper's eye view of ads that pass us by’ Owen Gibson, The Guardian. http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,,1646240,00.html
  • 17. B.O.B. Presenting is never easy; if it is to two people or two thousand. University: KHiB, Bergen Date: October 2008 A two week workshop with ten more third year students from KHiB. Getting up, remembering your lines, is not easy. Which is why the The project was still based on ‘reality’ with the students producing details of the third and final presentation was a kept a secret from the pitches, but this time for much more challenging briefs as well as students. presentation formats. I arranged a Pecha Kucha night; a concept created by Mark This workshop focused more on presentation and communication. Dytham (Tokyo) whereby speakers are invited to a public place Presentations can win or loose work and there are guidelines (usually a bar or auditorium) to present twenty slides of their work, and golden rules that should be considered. So alongside the with only twenty seconds per slide to talk. practical, conceptual work the students were set three very different I hired a local cafe/bar in Bergen, I made posters, I invited a presentations. local designer (and former KHiB graduate) Magnus Helgeson from Following the briefing the students were immediately asked to Grandpeople and sound artist Jeremy Welsh to talk alongside myself prepare an informal presentation for the following morning, entitled and the students. ‘Me, Myself and I’. Presenting six slides that told me who they Each speaker had 20 slides x 20 seconds. It is a great format, and are. They could show and tell as much as you like but there are no the evening went really well with lot of the students admitting that animations or video. Just six slides and only 20seconds per slide. they were very nervous, but afterwards felt elated and rewarded from Presentation two was more formal and was for them to presen having taken part. To follow are the briefs for that workshop, and the their work for the main project that everyone had to participate in, subsequent live briefs that I set as well as examples of work. called ‘Vesterålen’. A (live) brief that required the students to consider not just the design, but research in detail the many facets that are involved with branding and marketing a location.
  • 18. B.O.B By: Steve Price of Plan-B Studio (www.plan-bstudio.com) Duration: Monday 1rd – 12st September 2008 Aims of the workshop • to work under realistic pressures on a live project(s) • to understand and develop your skill-set and role as a designer • to develop your presentation skills and understanding of your own capabilities • to consider your decision making process regarding business decisions • to work on realistic projects with a realistic timelines and present your work accordingly Introducing B.O.B Graphic design is extremely competitive. The industry is overwhelmed with talent (although not all good) – very often competing for the same projects for the same companies, brands, record labels and various other sectors. Commissioning editors, marketing managers, product managers, communication managers – the people who commission us now have an endless choice of designers to call upon and frequently do, in vast numbers. Standing out from the crowd has never been more difficult. Good design is not always obvious to a client, and neither is its tangibility – unlike a new car, building or product they cannot necessarily see, touch, smell, feel the value that you will bring to their brand, campaign, product, etc. How are you going to sell your idea, yourself, your vision? Everyone does it differently. It is a delicate balance of demonstrating your understanding of a brief, of being able to tackle a clients problem, find a range of solutions whilst allowing them to feel part of the process. You also have to show your understanding and research of their market, consumer, product and lastly show some ideas that no-one else has with conviction, passion and enthusiasm – and all this (typically) for free. Pitches are rarely paid for and as an independent designer/small company you have to decide whether to take on these pitches in order to be in with a chance of winning new business? If so how long do you spend on it; a day, two days, a month? Do you need to get quotes from printers? How are you going to present it? How much is the project worth and what do you think you can get for it? How long is it going to take you if you get the project? Do you want the project? Do you like the client? Are their moral obstacles? The person sitting next to you, maybe a friend, is now your competitor or partner. Remember: You can choose not to pitch, but not pitching means you definitely won’t get the new work.
  • 19. The B.O.B workshop (part 1) The world around is evolving at a rapid pace. Technology and applications are as vast as the social networks that have exploded online. Designers are now involved in more than just layout and design, clients now employ us to consult on a vast array of areas such as strategy, marketing, campaigns, brand development. Designers can work across almost every conceivable media platform there is from banners to billboards and from paper to screen. Being a designer also means being constantly aware of the world, social trends even (and perhaps even more importantly) anthropology. For the next two weeks you are going to be tested with a of real-life workload. You are going to be running your own design company. Choose a name that represents who you are when presenting your work to the ‘client’ – this can be anything you like, but do not spend any time thinking too hard. You are going to be working on a pitch/brief that is either a live project of mine, or a pitch I have been invited to partake in. You can choose to work alone, or in pairs. You will be briefed with a project on Monday morning around 11am. After that from there you will be expected to assemble your ideas, and formulate a plan of how to tackle the project. If you are working as a pair consider what your combined and individual strengths are and decide who is going to do what, and by when. This is not just a design project where you hand-in some print-outs to your tutors. We are going to be your potential clients, and you’ll be quizzed as such. You have ten working days (not including weekends), use that time efficiently – you will be marked on this and the following:
  • 20. The B.O.B workshop (part 2) – Presentation is everything Whether you become freelance/self-employed, or employed; presenting to your creative director, a client or just your colleagues is about presenting yourself, your ideas and your work. It is an integral part of a designer’s job. It is fundamentally about communication. Speak too quietly, or without any sign of interest or passion and the client might pick up on it. Be too loud, obnoxious or arrogant and this can equally work against you. Too long, too short, too boring, too informative, too creative… There are many different ways to do it. There are no right ways, but there are certainly wrong ways. There are lots of theories: imagine the audience being naked (almost impossible). However, there is one interesting theory that says ‘there is nothing that cannot be presented in six slides’. Over the course of the next ten days you are going to give three presentations. They will all follow a similar format; you will present from a laptop/projector a series of slides/jpegs. Each slide will be shown for 20seconds and 20 seconds only. In that time you will say what you need to say and move on. This is based on the Japanese created ‘Pecha Kucha’ (meaning chitter- chatter). It is a quick, simple, (sometimes) amusing way to present your work, yourself, your cat, who cares! Presentation 1: Me, Myself and I - Tuesday 2nd September (@ KHiB) You will present 6 slides/jpegs that tell me/us who you are. You can show and tell as much as you like but there are no animations. No video. Just one slides/jpegs x 6. You will have 20seconds per slide. That is two minutes. Presentation 2: Vesterålen - Monday 8th September (@ KHiB) You will present 6 print-outs that show your research, findings, interesting facts concerning the Vesterålen project. Again, you can show and tell as much as you like but there are no animations. No video. Just six print-outs on the wall. You will have 20seconds per print-out. That is two minutes. Presentation 3: Pecha Kucha Style - Friday 12th September (@ TBC) You will present 20 slides/jpegs of anything you like. There are no animations. No video. Just twenty slides/jpegs. You will have 20seconds per slide. That is 6mins 40secs. Considerations for B.O.B This is not a project where you just hand-in some print-outs to your tutors. It requires absolute commitment. You will be marked on your research, your development work as well as the final executions and ideas. As well as how, where and in what form you choose to present will also be under heavy scrutiny. You will present your final project at the end of the workshop to the client who will be visiting on Friday 12th September. You have ten working days (not including weekends), use that time efficiently – you will be marked on and need to consider the following criteria 1. your design work and understanding of the brief – what medium/format will the proposed work take? Consider this for the client/product 2. presentation – how you present your work and yourself. Think about how and what you use to present your work (is it a pdf/powerpoint, or a video/skype webcam, perhaps it has to take place outside? Or just work on the wall – encourage discussion and communication) 3. your consideration beyond the design work – are there any launch/promotion/marketing ideas for the project/product? Is there a moral/ethical viewpoint you want the client to consider? 4. your financial proposal – what is it going to cost the client? (hint: don’t guess)
  • 21. Remember • Trust your instinct – no idea is too ridiculous to suggest as long as it is relevant • Do not panic, breathe deeply and manage your time wisely • I am here for any help and advice in person for two weeks, or via email 24/7: steve@plan-bstudio.com or cell phone: +447971 207 276
  • 22. CREATIVE BRIEF Purpose of Document The purpose of this document is to provide the project specifics to the creative team involved so that recommendations can best be developed for presentation back to the client. This document should be used at all stages of the project, and can be refined and extended as and when appropriate. Project Contacts Date: 25/08/07 Campaign/Project Name: Vesterålen reposition Agency: Creative/Art Director: Project Manager (if needed specify by agency): Client Project Signatory Silja Szetu Purchase Order Number (PON): - st Response Date: 1 September 2008 By when you need the agencies to respond to this brief. Background Norwegians enjoy the second highest GDP per-capita (after Luxembourg) and third highest GDP (PPP) per-capita in the world, and has maintained first place in the world in the UNDP Human Development Index (HDI- an index combining normalised measures of life expectancy, literacy, educational attainment, and GDP per capita for countries worldwide) for six consecutive years (2001-2006). The Norwegian economy is an example of mixed economy, featuring a combination of free market activity and large government ownership. The government controls key areas, such as the strategic petroleum sector (StatoilHydro), hydroelectric energy production (Statkraft), aluminium production (Norsk Hydro), the largest Norwegian bank (DnB NOR) and telecommunication provider (Telenor). It’s oil and gas exports are vast and only Saudi Arabia and Russia export more than Norway. However, more importantly Norway is also one of the world's largest exporter of fish. This is made possible due to Norway’s coastline bordering the North Atlantic Ocean, which extends over 13,050 miles (21,000km). Almost 82% of all exports are to the EU, and a large percentage of that is fish; particularly the Salt Cod to Italy, Spain and France. Everyday Norway exports the equivalent of 27million meals of fish everyday! Unlike most other countries in the surrounding EU and Scandinavia the population is sparse and considerably lower at 4.8million (consider that in London alone there are thought to be over 8million people alone). Confidential Page 1 of 5 Plan-B Studio Limited
  • 23. CREATIVE BRIEF Brand/Product/Service/Offer (Describe the product/service/offer that you are launching / promoting. What are the key features and/or benefits? What are the details about the launch / product (if relevant) – how it is made, packaged, distributed, priced, its history, strengths and weaknesses, issues and goals?) We want to reposition our brand, products and district of Vesterålen to become the tourist location of North Norway to compete with our biggest rival Lofoten. The two key focus points for you to focus on are tourism and trade. Lofoten is one of the major resorts that attracted over 222,000 in the summer of 2007. We want to equal that, and over the next five years it is our intention to do so. Vesterålan has vast fishing export business but we currently sell most of our products directly to Lofoten; almost all of the fish sold from Lofoten is bought from Vesterålan! Whilst we do not wish to discount this as an existing sales revenue it is now time for us to start developing our own products within the region for export to Europe. We must also increase our long term economy with a sustainable investment in tourism. We can boast some of the most spectacular attractions; fjords, coastline, beaches , whale tours, historical trips and scenery – not to mention the northern lights! Marketing Objective(s) (What is/are the Marketing Objective(s) you are trying to achieve? Do you want to encourage perceptual or behavioural changes? Do you want to create awareness? Are there specific response rates or direct sales you want to generate? Prioritise them if there is more than one For too long we have become lazy in promoting our area. We have relying upon our existing relationship with Lofoten to provide a economical stability and jobs. We want to have a campaign that will help promote the district in two areas: 1. Tourism – new location identity/brand and awareness national and international campaign 2. Products for purchase and export We want to increase our current tourism rates from circa 30,000 people to 200,000 within the next five years. This means trying to encourage people from places like Lofoten to come to us instead. We must highlight our USP’s and make these in someway engaging for people to want to visit us. We want to have you create ideas for products that we might sell that can be produced locally and sold both online, in resort and further afield. This is your chance to help us develop our location and future economy. Target Audience (Who is the target market? What are their demographics, psychographics, attitudes, usage and geographics? Are they existing or new customers? If existing, what do they think of the brand right now? If this varies by communications channel (ATL, BTL, OL) please specify. Are there any considerations by channel (e.g. OL- email penetration, web literacy?)) Tourism Our expansive landscape here offers some of the finest walking, climbing, kiaking, fishing and whale tours in Northern Europe. Our target for tourism is a broad demographic. Confidential Page 2 of 5 Plan-B Studio Limited
  • 24. CREATIVE BRIEF With the current economy we are seeing a decrease in foreign visitors, but an increase in Norwegians who are interested in their heritage and reluctant to travel due to huge costs. However we also need to look at other markets globally that do travel and do spend money – we will require you to steer this. Particularly Japan and the far east as well as North America (New York, Boston and Canada). Products We have no specific ideas in mind what these might be, but given our local fishing businesses it is perfect to consider fish as a base ingredient as we have the industry and infrastructure already in- place. Our market for this is both tourists, region and national Norwegians as well as ideas for mass export to the rest of the world. Catering trade is also another profitable audience. Key Proposition (What is the single most important thing we should say?) We are Vesterålen; a place of natural beauty, possibility and exploration. Supporting Rationale (What is the key reason to believe the Key Proposition? What are the most compelling facts in priority order including research where appropriate (do not simply list product features))? Tourism ‘The proof is in the pudding’ – meaning we have it all here, you just have to see for yourself. However we will need to make sure that people understand this. We are not Lofoten, we know that, but it is about quality, not quantity. Here are some key features to emphasise: 1. Scenery: Fjords, Coastline, Beaches, natural splendor 2. Seasonal: the winter can be just as beautiful as the summer, but for different reasons 3. Adventure: kayaking, climbing, fresh water fishing, whale watching, walking, hiking 4. Northern Lights Products This is dependent on what product(s) you feel we can make and export. We already make most of the salt cod (Klippfisk) that is exported to Spain and Italy. But our fish is some of the best, and we are now reverting from big trawlers to more environmentally sound fishing boats that are either using line methods, or smaller trawler nets: as apposed to the unsustainable, expensive freight ships that drag the entire sea bed: this is a massive selling point: 1. The best Norwegian fish 2. Line caught (sustainable) fish 3. Kilppfisk Confidential Page 3 of 5 Plan-B Studio Limited
  • 25. CREATIVE BRIEF Desired Consumer Take Out (What do you want the consumer to think/feel/do as a result of the campaign?) Simple: ‘Why haven’t we been here? Let’s go!’ Tone of Voice (What is the tone and style to be reflected in the brand / creative?) Historical, but modern. Subtle, small but beautiful. Friendly. Charming. Aspirational. Inspirational. Creative Starter (List starter ideas, if any, that you would like the agency to consider when developing the creative concept.) Tourism We want you to break the mould. We are not just looking for a simple ad campaign in magazines and billboards (but do not discount this if appropriate). We want to set new standards and attract a wide range of audience/tourists which means finding new ways to meet their aspirations. Products Fresh water fish Line caught fish Sustainable methods being used Communications Requirement(s) (Are there any specific media/formats that you would like to be considered (e.g. press ad, radio, post card , online) Break the mould. Impress us. Budget (What is the budget? If this is a multi-phased project / campaign please give the breakdown ) We want you to give us an estimate of costs for: 1. A new identity 2. Brand message and promise for the district of Vesterålen. 3. Campaign for tourism promotion 4. Branding, packaging, launch and promotions for the product(s) you recommend developing 5. Online presence We realise that a solid brand and online presence is likely to form a large proportion of our costs. Brand is king. Having a cohesive brand and web presence is key to our success. Confidential Page 4 of 5 Plan-B Studio Limited
  • 26. CREATIVE BRIEF Timing (When should launch / campaign be in the market and why? Supply any key dates and stages.) th You will present on Thursday 11 Sept 2008, time TBC. Mandatory & Legal Requirements (What must be included in the copy, Terms & Conditions if available? What, if anything, must be avoided? Are there any legal constraints? What are the necessary qualifications if any?) N/A Considerations (Are there additional opportunities (e.g. ambient)? Are there any special issues to be considered? Blue Sky thinking and if so why? What area should the communication cover- national or regional? Looking at London first for direct marketing, but orders could come from anywhere with the website. Creative Executional & Delivery Requirements for presentation Based solely on what we expect you will need for the initial launch, this is a breakdown of what we would like to see presented: 1. A new Vesterålen identity; inc. overall consideration for the brand message and promise 2. Campaign for tourism promotion 3. Branding, packaging, launch and promotions for the product(s) you recommend developing 4. Online presence Confidential Page 5 of 5 Plan-B Studio Limited
  • 27. Else & Sunniva (a.k.a. Jatterful) Working as a pair seemed to work well for Else and Sunniva. There presentation was good, well rehearsed and delivered. Some of their projects focus was a little misdirected at times, but overall they went further than anyone else in thinking about different aspects of the project; the place, the placement of camp sites, the ecological/sustainable angle, the web site. They also presented their own design ideology concerning their belief that imagery could and would sell the place much better than many words. Their opening line was Vesterålen is spellbinding and images are a powerful tool to sell it’.

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