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  • 1. Parise guidethe travel guide with its own websitealways up-to-date d what’s happening nowwww.eparis.dk.com
  • 2. www.eparis.dk.comIn style • In the know • OnlineParisguidee
  • 3. Produced byDeparture LoungeContributorsMaryanne Blacker, Rosa Jackson, Katherine Spenley, Julie Street, Richard WoodruffPhotographerBritta JaschinskiReproduced in Singapore by ColourscanPrinted and bound in Singapore by Tien Wah PressFirst published in Great Britain in 2005by Dorling Kindersley Limited80 Strand, London WC2R 0RLCopyright © 2005, 2006 Dorling Kindersley Limited, LondonA Penguin CompanyReprinted with revisions 2006All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in aretrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic,mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior writtenpermission of the copyright owner.A CIP catalogue record is available from the British Library.ISBN 13: 978 1 40531 398 8ISBN 10: 1 4053 1398 6The information in this e>>guide is checked annually.This guide is supported by a dedicated website which provides the very latest information for visitors toParis; please see pages 6–7 for the web address and password. Some information, however, is liable tochange, and the publishers cannot accept responsibility for any consequences arising from the use of thisbook, nor for any material on third party websites, and cannot guarantee that any website address in thisbook will be a suitable source of travel information.We value the views and suggestions of our readers very highly. Please write to:Publisher, DK Eyewitness Travel Guides,Dorling Kindersley, 80 Strand, London WC2R 0RL, Great Britain.
  • 4. ContentsThe Website >> Your Password 6Top Choices 8The Year / Morning / AfternoonEvening / NightRestaurants 20Shopping 56Art & Architecture 92Performance 114Bars & Clubs 128Streetlife 152Havens 160Hotels 168Street Finder 182Index by Area 208Index by Type 218Travel Information 228Practical Information 230General Index 232
  • 5. listingsrevi6One book to take…visit www.eparis.dk.com for theStay ahead of the crowd with edguideParis, and find the best places to eat,shop, drink and chill out at a glance.Packed with great ideas, incisive reviewsand stylish photographs, it’s the guidefor those who want to experience thereal soul and pace of the city. With itsown dedicated website, this is the onlyguidebook that’s always up-to-date.• Find a romantic restaurant for a specialoccasion, or a typical Parisian bistro• Explore markets, cafés and bars inParis’s coolest neighbourhoods• Discover the city’s nightlife, from localbars to the latest clubs• Shop till you drop at the very best ofParis’s clothes stores and boutiques
  • 6. what’s newews7Click onto www.eparis.dk.com forthe latest news from and about placeslisted in the guide, plus readers’reviews and chat, features on hot topics,and up-to-the-minute short lists ofParis’s most useful service providers.The website is regularly updated,so every time you visit you bring yourguidebook up-to-date.…one website to visitWhen you click on Log in on thehome page of the website, a log-inbox will appear. Enter your user IDand password (see right).The password will be valid for aminimum of 12 months from thedate you purchased this guide.How to log in• Tap into what’s on at the theatreand who’s in at the galleries, and bookyour tickets online• Look up restaurants by name, by type andby area, and check the latest reviews• Link directly to all the websites in thebook, and many more• Have your say about places in the book,and recommend your favouritesyour password is: paris93581your user ID is: parislatest on what’s happening nowUser ID:Password:parisparis93581
  • 7. top choicesParis is a perennially exciting city.Whatever your interests – dining infine restaurants or local bistros,exploring cultural attractions orshopping in designer boutiques –it’s all on offer here. This guidetakes you to the city’s latest andbest, opening with the top choicesof what to do through the year and24/7. And here, to get you started,are Paris’s most unmissable sights:d Tour Eiffel (p110)d Musée du Louvre (p100)d Notre Dame (p110)d Arc de Triomphe (p103)d Sacré Cœur (p107)d Musée d’Orsay (p100)d Champs-Elysées (p103)d Centre Pompidou (p100)d Ste-Chapelle (p94)d Cimetière du Père-Lachaise (p109)
  • 8. 10Foire du TrônePelouse de Reuilly, 12ème • q Liberté/Porte Dorée/Porte deCharenton Open 11:45am–11pm daily (to 1am Fri & Sat)This colossal fun fair began in AD 957, when merchantsfirst met up with farmers to trade grain and wine. Todayat this site to the east of the city, instead of wheat sacksand wine barrels, there are 350 attractions, including agiant Ferris wheel, gravity-defying rides and carousels,and clouds of candy floss. End Mar–end MayPortes OuvertesAteliers d’Artistes de Belleville (AAB), 32 rue de la Mare,20ème; www.ateliers-artistes-belleville.orgThere’s more to the Paris art scene than majestic muse-ums and pricey private galleries, as the annual BellevilleArtists Open Studios confirms. For four days, more than250 artists in this multi-ethnic quartier (Map 12 F2) opentheir doors to the public. Pick up a map from the AABand set about discovering the neighbourhood’s cornu-copia of painters, photographers and jewellers, alongwith the bistros, funky cafés and shops. Mid-MaySummer Music FestivalsFestival de St-Denis, 01 49 33 66 66, www.festival-saint-denis.fr;Paris Jazz Festival & Festival Classique au Vert, esplanade duChâteau de Vincennes, 12ème • q Chateau de Vincennes;Fête de la Musique, www.fetedelamusique.culture.frThroughout the summer, Paris is alive with the sound ofall kinds of music. St-Denis’ Gothic basilica (see p108) isthe glorious backdrop to a month-long classical- andworld-music festival starting in June. Inside the building,renowned performers belt out Brahms or Beethoven,and jazz, world, urban and folk music also reverberateboth inside and out. At the same time, as part of theParis Jazz Festival (Jun–Jul), both big-name and experi-mental jazz artists strike up in the Bois de Vincennes ina series of open-air afternoon concerts. Noise-pollutionlaws are in abeyance at the Fête de la Musique’s all-dayand all-night extravaganza on 21 June. The summer sol-stice is fêted by apprecia-tive crowds as interna-tional and world-musicacts, serious profession-als, one-man bands andmusical wannabes playtheir kind of music invaried locations all overthe city. To round off thesummer, classical musicwafts over the lawns ofthe Bois de Vincennesduring the FestivalClassique au Vert (Aug–Sep). Jun–SepCelebration is a year-round affair in Paris, with the French ever ready for aparty.The Champs-Elysées is packed with happy revellers on New YearsEve as people congregate to ring out the old and ring in the new. Theannual Fête de la Musique kicks off summer on 21 June, when both sea-soned and amateur performers take to the streets.Then come outdoor jazzand classical music festivals, and dance and theatre performances. Andnext, because it’s summer, a sandy beach materializes beside the Seine. Inmid-July, the Champs-Elysées is swamped again during the Bastille Dayparade and the climax of the Tour de France. Finally, in early October Parisofficially becomes the city that never sleeps as museums, swimming poolsand clubs stay open all night for La Nuit Blanche.Find out what’s on at any time with www.eparis.dk.comSPRINGSUMMERTOP CHOICES – the yearLa Fête des TuileriesJardin des Tuileries, 1erOpen 11am–midnight daily (to 1am Fri & Sat)After the spring Foire du Trône, a similar array of ridesand attractions springs up around the rue de Rivoli bound-ary of the Jardin des Tuileries (Map 9 D4). Aug–Sep
  • 9. 11La Marche des Fiertés LGBT (Gay Pride)www.fiertes-lgbt.orgThis vivacious and flamboyant celebration of gay, lesbian,bi- and transsexual culture attracts around 650,000onlookers and performers. A week of exhibitions, eventsand parties climaxes in the parade, which kicks off at2pm and dances its way to place de la Bastille. It’sfabulous fun, but the underlying message of tolerance,education and equality is serious. End JunLe Quatorze Juillet (Bastille Day)France’s national holiday recalls the storming of theBastille in 1789 and the beginning of the republic. By10am, hordes pack the Champs-Elysées for a glimpse ofFrench military might and the president reviewing thetroops. Later that night, thousands gather under the TourEiffel to watch the fireworks at Trocadéro, as others headoff for more partying at the bals des pompiers (firemen’sballs) held in stations all over the city. Some of thesekick off the previous night, when Parisians can alsodance their heart out on place de la Bastille. 14 JulLe Tour de FranceSee the action at www.letour.frThe world’s best road cyclists descend on Paris eachyear for the final stage of the Tour de France. Riders looppast place de la Bastille before completing nine lapsaround the Champs-Elysées, place de la Concorde andrue de Rivoli, including a final sprint up the ChampsElysées to the finish line. End JulFestival d’Automne01 53 45 17 00, www.festival-automne.comParisians are jolted out of their summer slumber withthe arrival of this forward-looking, city-wide arts festival,showcasing new talent from around the world. It’s allabout music, opera, theatre and dance not previouslyshown in France; the kind of productions that make yousit up and pay attention. Sep–DecJazz à la Villettewww.cite-musique.fr • q Porte de PantinLa Villette’s annual week-long jazz festival spills out intothe Cité de la Musique (see p108), local bars and thepark (scene of free open-air concerts). There’s a penchantfor innovative and experimental music, with appearancesby big names such as Herbie Hancock, as well as a hostof local favourites such as Baptiste Trotignon. SepLa Nuit BlancheCheck out all the activities at www.paris.frThe brainchild of Mayor Delanoë, “Sleepless Night” isdesigned to keep Parisians up all night with a heftydose of culture. And, it’s all free, from nocturnal swim-ming sessions and a 3am art crawl through the CentrePompidou, to techno concerts. A must for the culturallycurious, night owls and insomniacs. Early OctParis sur GlacePlace Hôtel de Ville, 4ème; place Raoul Dautry, 15èmeBoth open noon–10pm Mon–Thu, noon–midnight Fri,9am–midnight Sat, 9am–10pm SunIt might not be a frozen lake in the Alps, but in thedepth of winter, an open-air Paris ice rink can be equallyenchanting. Two rinks are open to the public free ofcharge – the one in front of the grandiose Hôtel de Villeis the largest and perhaps the prettiest, ringed with firtrees and twinkling lights when night falls. Skates areavailable for hire. Early Dec–early MarLe Réveillon (New Year’s Eve)While some Parisians prefer to spend their Réveillon (orFête de St-Sylvestre) sitting around the table suppingoysters and reminiscing, more spirited folk take to thestreets. Crowds throng the Champs-Elysées, barsaround Bastille teem and the Quartier Latin is alivewith people throwing their arms around each otherand screeching “Bonne année!”. 31 DecAUTUMNWINTERFor listings magazines with information on events and programmes in Paris, see p230
  • 10. 12Traditional MarketsMarkets, a centuries-old Parisian feature, offer endlessvariety – from fat Provençal cherries in spring to hairyboars’ heads in autumn. There are over 80 in the city,including roving morning markets such as the MarchéIéna-President Wilson (Wed & Sun, Map 8 E3). Moststart around 8am. Some, such as rue Mouffetard in the5th (Tue–Sun, Map 20 H1), are all-day, open-air affairs,while others, such as the Marché Enfants Rouge (Map11 C4), are covered. The daily flower market on the Ilede la Cité (Map 16 H1) turns into a squawking bird mar-ket on Sundays and is definitely worth a visit. At all day-long markets, the pace is more leisurely in the mornings.and watch the city wake up over a coffee and a croissant.Alternatively, begin any weekday morning in plenty ofstyle with breakfast atMarket, chef Jean-GeorgesVongerichten’s fashionablerestaurant (see p40). Theofferings by master pastrychef Pierre Hermé that aresold here – including hisfamous flavoured maca-roons – are nothing shortof life-enhancing.Wheely FunFor information on bike hire, see p229Shoot along the banks of the Seine on Rollerblades or abike on Sundays (or every day from mid-Jul to mid-Aug),when the riverside expressways are closed to traffic.Glide from the Tour Eiffel down to the Musée dOrsay onthe Left Bank, and from the Tuileries to Bercy on theRight Bank. Alternatively, the roads and tracks of the vastand pleasant Bois de Boulogne are perfect for pedallingor skating – by afternoon, however, the crowds descend.Quiet MuseumsSee www.rmn.fr to check the national museums in ParisA museum city par excellence, Paris is blessed withboth blockbusting temporary exhibitions and stunningpermanent collections. To beat the crowds, arrive early.Note that national treasures such as the Louvre, theMusée d’Orsay and the Centre Pompidou are free onthe first Sunday of each month.Parisians, in general, are not morning people.The city takes its time towake up; so much so that early risers will often find that they have thestreets virtually to themselves.Then, suddenly, its frantic: shop and kioskshutters rattle open, delivery vans unload, Métro stations pour forth com-muters, cyclists and pedestrians dart through traffic, risking life and limb,and café counters fill and empty with alarming speed. One of the great joysis just to sit back and watch the scene unfold. But whatever your plans,mornings in Paris are worth getting up for.The major museums are lesscrowded and, at the other end of the cultural spectrum, there are themorning markets. No two are alike, and each stall has something tempting– from stacks of oozing cheeses to buckets of olives and piles of saucisson.Check for changes in opening hours at www.eparis.dk.comTOP CHOICES – morningBest BreakfastsCafé Marly, 93 rue de Rivoli, 1er, 01 49 26 06 60;Market, 15 avenue Matignon, 8ème, 01 56 43 40 90Kick-start the day at the Café Marly (which opens at8am) with a strong espresso and an uncluttered bird’s-eye view of the Louvre’s iconic glass pyramid before thecrowds arrive. Or, pull up a chair at one of the cafés onrue Montorgueil (Map 10 H3) or rue de Buci (Map 16 F2)
  • 11. 13Morning CinemaFor more on Left Bank art-house cinemas, see p120When the day dawns grey and cold or the rain begins tofall, slip into a cinema and cosy up with a good film.Chains such as the independent MK2 and the multi-national UGC offer a reduced tariff for the first morningsession. Look for version originale (VO) of foreign filmsif you don’t want to suffer French-dubbed renderings.Free Fashion ShowsNo matter if you weren’t on the invitation list for theParis fashion shows. The Galeries Lafayette (Map 9 D1)parades the latest looks in a weekly 30-minute freefashion show (11am Tue). Get there when the storeopens at 9:30am and admire the imposing glass domeand Art Nouveau staircase in relative calm before givingyour credit card a thorough retail work-out.Beauty TreatmentsFor more on beauty, see pp162–7Beauty salons are brimful on Saturday mornings; that’swhen serious working girls book their facials, manicuresand top-to-toe treatments. Join them to experience thebuzz, or opt for a leisurely weekday morning at a snazzysalon with the ladies-who-lunch set, and sit back andenjoy the cosseting.Sunbathing and SwimmingPiscine Butte-aux-Cailles, 5 place Paul Verlaine, 13ème,01 45 89 60 05Come mid-July, the Seine goes seaside for a month aspalm trees, deck chairs, umbrellas, hammocks and vastamounts of sand appear along a 3-km (2-mile) stretch ofthe Right Bank, opposite Notre Dame. Every summer, acouple of million people visit, so get there early if youwant some space to soak up the sun. There’s even aswimming pool. Serious swimmers may prefer thevintage Piscine Butte-aux-Cailles (Map 21 A5), with itsoutdoor pools fed by artesian wells. A morning dip hereis downright civilized.Auction ActionDrouot Richelieu, 9 rue Drouot, 9ème, 01 48 00 20 20,www.gazette-drouot.comThere’s nothing quite like an auction to get the bloodpumping, and Drouot Richelieu (Map 4 F5) holds salesMon–Sat in 16 different salesrooms – enough to sate abig bidding appetite. If you just like to look, auctionitems go on view from 11am the day before. Expecteverything from Louis XV chairs to works by Matisse.Cookery CoursesEcole Ritz Escoffier, 38 rue Cambon, 1er, 01 43 16 30 50, www.ritzparis.com; Promenades Gourmandes, 187 rue du Temple,3ème, 01 48 04 56 84, www.promenadesgourmandes.comAcquire a souvenir of French cuisine that lasts longerthan a wheel of Camembert – expertise! Cookeryclasses with chef Paule Caillat at PromenadesGourmandes (Map 11 C3) run 9am–3pm and include amarket tour, a hands-on class and a three-course lunch.Alternatively, the illustrious Hotel Ritz’s Ecole Escoffier(Map 9 D2) holds Saturday morning introductory work-shops, focusing on seasonal produce (9am–1pm).Hot TicketsPlace de la Madeleine, 8ème (Map 9 C2);Gare Montparnasse, 14ème (Map 19 B1)Buy last-minute, cut-price theatre tickets for same-dayshows from one of Paris’s two Kiosque Théâtres (opendaily). Savvy Parisian show-goers often choose thisoption, as French theatres and some concert halls havecomplicated booking systems – requests for ticketssometimes have to be put in writing months in advance.
  • 12. 14HammamLes Bains du Marais, 31–33 rue des Blancs Manteaux, 4ème,01 44 61 02 02, www.lesbainsdumarais.comBefore a night of bar-hopping, unwind at a single-sexsession in the Hammam at the Mosquée de Paris(see p164) or, at the more chic Les Bains du Marais(Map 11 B5). At both spots, the entry fee (5€ at theformer, 30€ at the latter) buys you hammam (Turkishbath), sauna and lounging-room access and a feeling ofhaving slipped into the pages of 1,001 Arabian Nights;massages, gommages (scrubs) and facials are extra.BrocantesThe appearance of fluttering street banners announcesthe onset of the season of antiquitiés-brocantes (bric-a-brac and antiques fairs). From Apr to May and Sep to Oct,dealers peddling country furniture, silverware, jewellery,linen, books and prints invade local streets and squares.Many sellers travel in from the provinces, and prices areoften lower than those at the permanent city antiquesmarkets. The weekly La Vie du Collectioneur (publishedevery Thursday) lists brocantes all over France.Stroll around any Paris park in the afternoon and you’ll find you’re notalone. Afternoon promenades, particularly following the customary, longSunday lunch, are de rigueur, and the wide-open, well-manicured publicspaces are the place to be. Boules players, with furrowed brows andflicking wrists, take over the dusty paths, and tittering children line up forweekend puppet shows. In the afternoon, too, shopping areas are alwaysbuzzy, especially on Saturdays; and, at the smallest hint of sunshine, thecobblestoned quays of the Seine are awash with sunbathers and picnick-ers. Between lunch and the apéritif is also prime time for visiting private artgalleries. Alternatively, Paris is a rewarding city to explore on foot, and anafternoon amble through the streets reveals myriad riches, from impressivearchitecture to inviting cafés.Look out for upcoming antiques fairs on www.eparis.dk.comTOP CHOICES – afternoonSunday LunchLa Guinguette de l’Ile du Martin Pecheur, 41 quai Victor HugoChampigny-sur-Marne, 01 49 83 03 02, www.guinguette.frSunday lunch doesn’t get much more quintessentiallyFrench than at La Guinguette de l’Ile du Martin Pecheur(just 20 minutes from central Paris on RER line A2),where they serve chanson with the entrecôte à laBordelaise (Mar–Sep). Lazing at long tables (in the openair, weather permitting) beside the river Marne, enjoyinga singalong – it’s a scene straight out of a Renoir painting.Resolute foodies seeking a three-star bite on Sundayare, however, limited to lofty hotel establishments –haute-cuisine restaurants are all closed on Sundays.PicnicsFor other recommendations for food to go, see p38The tastiest of titbits, from earthy terrines and exquisitepatisseries to fragrant strawberries and cold champagne,can be found at the gourmet emporia Hediard orFauchon (both are located on place de la Madeleine,Map 9 C2) or La Grande Epicerie de Paris (see p80).Then, settle on a bench by the Seine on the Ile de laCité, or alternatively,déjeune sur l’herbe (picnic)in place des Vosges (Map17 C1). Sadly, the temptingexpanses of unspoiledlawn in the Jardin duLuxembourg or theTuileries are strictly“pelouse interdit” – keepoff the grass – domains.
  • 13. 15TeaFor more suggestions on salons de thé, see p55Take tea at Ladurée (see p55), famed for the richest andthickest hot chocolate around and addictive macaroons.Alternatively, try a more exotic milieu and sample stickybaklava and mint tea in Le Ziryab, the restaurant withthe Seine-side view on the top floor of the Institut duMonde Arabe (see p98); or at funky Andy Wahloo (seep137), where pop art meets Morocco. Or, just aboutevery place on boulevard de Belleville (see p159) servesup palate-cleansing fresh mint tea.Architectural TreasuresPassage de Retz, 9 rue Charlot, 3ème, 01 48 04 37 99; Pavillonde l’Arsenal, 21 boulevard Morland, 4ème, 01 42 76 33 97Much of the cityscape was created between the 17thand 19th centuries, but you can also pay homage tosome modern masters of architectural design. LeCorbusier’s genius is on display at Villa La Roche (seep105); and the 60s avant-garde French Communist PartyHQ (2 place Colonel Fabien, 19ème, Map 6 E4) is thework of one of his contemporaries, Brazilian architectOscar Niemeyer. Paris’s first skyscraper – just 22 storeyshigh – was designed by Edouard Albert in the 50s, andis found at 33 rue de Croulebarbe in the 13th (Map 21A3). If you’ve a head for heights, whizz up to the top ofthe colossal Grande Arche de la Défense – one of ex-President Mitterand’s Grands Projets – for spectacularviews. A visit to the Pavillon de l’Arsenal (Map 17 C3),the museum dedicated to architecture and urban design,will then help explain what you’ve just surveyed. Winddown in the Passage de Retz, a former toy factory turnedart gallery. This 17th-century hôtel particulier with a mod-ern twist also features a boutique and café by the muchsought-after designer Christian Blecher (Map 11 C4).GamesStop off at the Jardins des Luxembourg (Map 16 E4) fora spot of cerebral jousting with the chess devotees whohuddle around board-topped tables and do battle through-out the afternoon. You can either watch or join thequeue to play. Serious card-players also occupy a tableor two. If you prefer a spot of pétanque, try the Arènesde Lutèce (see p98). The other players might let youjoin in, otherwise, bring your own set and some friends.Gallery-HoppingLa Maison Rouge, 10 boulevard de la Bastille, 12ème,01 40 01 08 81, www.lamaisonrouge.orgSt-Germain, with its maze of commercial art galleries,particularly along rue de Seine, rue des Beaux Arts andrue de Guénégaud, is the ultimate for an urbane after-noon wander. Artistic pickings on the Right Bank,though, can be a little more edgy; explore the art squatLes Frigos (see p112) and La Maison Rouge (Map 17D4), a former factory specializing in exhibitions of con-temporary art from private collections.ShoppingFor more on shopping in Paris, see pp56–91Go with the flow and shop, shop, shop in the 6th and7th arrondissements, where the fashion choice is sec-ond to none. Rue de Grenelle is the magic mile ofdesigner shoes, with clothes to match. Rue du ChercheMidi also does a fine line in shoes, bags and bread –the famed Poilâne bakery is here – while rue desSts-Pères is the place to stock up on sexy lingerie andglamorous outfits. Also, trawl rue du Bac, rue du Dragon,rue St-Sulpice and rue du Four before collapsing in ahappy heap encircled by shopping bags.From June through September, the Parc Floral in the Bois de Vincennes stages afternoon concerts (see p10)
  • 14. 16Salons SceneJim Haynes, 01 43 27 17 67, www.jim-haynes.com;Patricia Laplante-Collins, 01 43 26 12 88, parissoirees@noos.frEmulate Gertrude Stein at a salon, a kind of intellectualopen-house. Maverick academic and philosopher JimHaynes’s Sunday evening gatherings are legendary.Up to 50 people who call ahead are invited to his homeand a mix of ages, nationalities and professions isalways on the cards – as well as good food and wine.Patricia Laplante-Collins’s Paris Connections nights, alsoheld on Sundays, are similarly full of interesting typesand excellent food; each week has a different speakerand theme – such as tips on writing screenplays, or anintroduction to shamanism. Book in advance.Views over the CapitalAeroparis balloon operates summer to 9:30pm,winter to 5:30pm, 01 44 26 20 00, www.aeroparis.comTake an unofficial tour of the City of Lights. When thestreetlights are switched on, it’s a thrill to stand on theopen platform at the back of the No. 29 bus and checkout the sights from the Gare St-Lazare via the Marais toBastille. Alternatively, for another great view of Paris atdusk, take the last trip up in the tethered balloon at theParc Andre Citroën (see p167).Pre-Dinner DrinksLes Apéros de Jeudis, www.aperodjeudis.com; Apollo, 3 placeDenfert-Rochereau 14ème, 01 45 38 76 77; Hotel Raphael, 17avenue Kléber 16ème, 01 53 64 32 00, www.raphael-hotel.comTo relax after a long day, grab a table at your favouritecafé around 7pm and enjoy a glass of champagne or a kir.(Parisians consider Pastisto be a drink for old men inthe South of France.) If it’ssunny, stake out your terri-tory on a terrace and catchthe last rays along withyour tipple. Trendy bar-restaurant Apollo is ideal,but Paris’s chicest summercocktail spot is the stun-ning rooftop terrace at theHotel Raphael. In less accommodating weather, try LeFumoir (see p132), Kong (see p134) or Pershing Hall (seep178). Or, every Thursday evening during summer, jointhe crowd at Les Apéros de Jeudi, when Parisians gatherin different open-air locations to meet over apéritifs.Open LecturesFor forthcoming events, see www.louvre.frPublic lectures at the Louvre are an erudite way toexpand your mind. They start at 7 or 8:30pm, are held inAt 7pm, the city’s tone shifts noticeably as people escape from the work-place and prepare to get on with the business of enjoying themselves.Given the emphasis the French place on eating, it comes as no surprise thatapéritif time is filled with anticipation. Parisians head to their local bar orcafé in droves as a prelude to dinner, or to wind up before a big night out.Midweek is a popular time for locals to hit town, be it to dance the nightaway or take in the season’s must-see show, so on Wednesdays andThursdays, in particular, the atmosphere is charged with excitement. Andclubbers who cant wait till late are well-catered for: the latest nightlifecraze is for “after-work” clubs, which allow people to go straight fromoffice to club and start – rather than end – their evenings with a boogie.Keep track of openings and closures at www.eparis.dk.comTOP CHOICES – evening
  • 15. 17French and are usually linked to current exhibitions. Tomake the most of it, visit the show before attending thelecture – and bring a dictionary. The atmosphere, whileintellectual, is inclusive, and the speakers seemgenuinely keen to share their insight with Joe Public.ClubbingFor further details, check www.soiree.fr, www.sortiraparis.com,www.workinzecity.org. Seven 2 One, 161 rue Montmartre, 2èmeEarly evening clubs (l’after work in French), catering tothose who just can’t wait to get a little bit of dance-flooraction, are currently hugely popular in Paris. Seven 2One, which kicks off at apéritif time on Wednesdaysand Thursdays, is the largest; while Work in Ze City clubnights (Thursdays) start a little later at 8pm and takeplace at various more upscale venues, such as theEtoile club, with a clientele to match.Shopping for LoveFor a singles scene with a difference, head to GaleriesLafayette’s (see p83) singles’ supermarket night (Thu),where you can pick up some gastronomic treats andperhaps a Parisian soulmate. Locals on the lookoutchoose a special purple basket to signal their singlestatus. If it all seems too overwhelming, there’s anexcellent in-store wine bar to help break the ice.Modern SoiréesReservations on 01 42 18 56 72The Fondation Cartier (see p113) hosts Soirées Nomades(Nomadic Evenings) for cool, arty types. These exceed-ingly hip events encompass anything that can be vaguelydescribed as “the arts”, from avant-garde electric-harpmusic to circus performances, storytelling evenings andbrass-band jam sessions. The programme is nothing ifnot eclectic. If you have time, get there early to checkout the building and the current exhibition before thesoirée begins. It’s essential to reserve ahead.A Romantic SunsetThe Pont des Arts (Map 10 F5) is one of Paris’s prettiestbridges, and certainly one of the most romantic. Theviews across the city are stunning, and couples clutch-ing bottles of champagne and the makings of a picnichead here in droves. Note, though, that it’s also whereboisterous foreign exchange students and buskingtravellers with questionable musical talents hang out.It may be a little sentimental, but watching the sun setover the city from this vantage point is a real pleasure.Early DinnerBe one of the lucky few and reserve an early table atL’Atelier de Joel Robuchon (see p37). The hugely populargourmet restaurant run by the eponymous superstar chefonly takes bookings for 6:30 or 11:30pm; anyone wishingto eat at a more usual hour has to turn up and queue.Outside. Even if it’s raining. So it’s a great idea to skiplunch and arrive early for a chance to try Robuchon’sexquisite – if pricey – food. Seating is arranged in a longbar formation so expect to sit alongside your companionand don’t be shy about talking to your neighbour.Come DancingFrom June to October, usually on Sundays, people flockto dance on the banks of the Seine. In the earlyevening, the square Tino Rossi (Map 17 C4) – the site ofan open-air sculpture park – comes alive with rhythmjunkies doing the rumba, executing a mean tango andsamba-ing as if their lives depended on it. Some of thedancers here are awe-inspiring, most are fairly averageand absolute beginners are welcome too. All that’srequired is a little enthusiasm and a large grin.
  • 16. 18BaladesFor further details, check www.paris-roller.comOn Friday nights, police close off boulevards aroundthe city to offer thousands of skaters a nocturnaladrenalin rush. The event starts at 10pm outside GareMontparnasse (Map 19 B1), but beginners can turn upfor free tuition (8–9pm). In order to join in the fun, youmust be experienced enough to know how to stop! Inorder to reduce the spills, the parade is cancelled in wetweather. If you need to hire roller blades, check out thewebsite for useful addresses.Late-Night FoodMany restaurants across the city serve until 11pm butone of the best options for a late meal is to indulge in aspecial late menu, offered after 10:30pm, at brasseriessuch as La Coupole (see p218). Two courses of classicbrasserie fare (see p29), a quarter bottle of wine and aterrific atmosphere will set you back a little over 20€.If hunger strikes in the early hours of the morning,head for Au Pied du Cochon (see p24) or La Tour deMontlhéry, aka Chez Denise (see p25), where you canorder anything, from a bowl of onion soup to a fullthree-course meal – even at 5am.Art AppreciationCatch an exhibition at the devastatingly cool Palais deToyko (see p104), which is open until midnight. Theshows are invariably interesting, offbeat and a hit withParis’s bright young things, who wander around thewarehouse-like space as much to be seen as to beinspired. The shop has become a destination in itself andTokyo Eat, the on-site restaurant, is currently one of thecity’s hippest places to go for a meal. Don’t miss a tripto the toilets-for-two and take advantage of the humanjuke-box concept – the waiter presents you with amenu of songs that the DJ will work into his playlist.Hitting the ShopsElyfleur, 82 avenue Wagram, 17ème, 01 47 66 87 19;Pavillon Noura, 21 avenue Marceau, 16ème, 01 47 20 33 33Most of the city’s shops and stores close at 7pm, butuntil midnight (and sometimes even later) on theChamps-Elysées you can stock up on magazines atThe twinkling Tour Eiffel is an appropriate metaphor for a night out in Paris:frivolous, fun and rather beautiful. Residents of the City of Lights reallycome to life after dark.The city looks stunning and, more often than not, itsinhabitants dress up accordingly. Night-time pursuits are taken veryseriously.There’s even a cultural all-nighter – La Nuit Blanche (see p11) –organized each year by the Mairie (city council).Year-round, a surprisingarray of high- and low-brow cultural attractions vies for your attention,ranging from late-opening exhibitions to mass roller-blading events, back-to-back film shows and wild club nights. Wherever you end up, take a cabhome – a drive along the expressways on the banks of the Seine or aroundthe place de la Concorde in the early hours is not to be missed.Stay in touch with late-night Paris through www.eparis.dk.comTOP CHOICES – night
  • 17. 19Publicis Drugstore (see p83); music and videos at VirginMegastore (see p223); and general supermarket provi-sions and beauty products at Monoprix (see p220). It’seven possible to get a free makeover at Sephora (seep220) – perfect for a pre-club transformation. Nearby,pick up delicious Lebanese titbits at Pavillon Noura andflowers at 24-hour Elyfleur. Over in the Marais, books andwine are on offer at La Belle Hortense (see p139).Exotic PleasuresLes Jardins d’Alexandrie, 28 rue Marbeuf, 8ème, 01 42 25 14 48;Café Egyptien, 112 rue Mouffetard, 5ème, 01 43 31 11 35Hook up with a hookah and smoke some shisha at anauthentic Arabian spot. Les Jardins d’Alexandrie offersup-market lounging as you listen to Arabic music anddrag on sweet tobacco in between sips of mint tea. Italso serves delicious food. Over on the Left Bank, CaféEgyptien is a more laid-back affair, and while the decormay be simple the shisha menu is extensive, and noteven remotely expensive for the excellent quality. Bothvenues stay open until around 2am.Dancing the Night AwayCheck www.novaplanet.com, www.flyersweb.com and www.lemonsound.com for special club nights and one-off events;Latina Café, 114 avenue Champs-Elysées, 8ème, 01 42 89 98 89From up-market boîtes, to totally unpretentious – ifsomewhat seedy – haunts, Paris has every aspect ofthe clubbing scene covered. Those chasing the latestbig thing should check the listings for any night run byparty collective La Johnson. Current darlings of theclubbing set, they specialize in running very cool partiesin distinctly uncool clubs such as La Scala and ClubMadeleine Plaza. Alternatively, hit perennial favouritessuch as Le Queen (see p145), Le Cab (see p132), LeSee pp132–51 for our pick of Parisian clubsRex (see p135) and Batofar (see p151). Latino loversshould join a salsa session at the Latina Café (opendaily), but if you prefer a little more of a multimediaapproach, head to alternative club space Project 101(see p147).Cinematic All-NightersCinemas, in particular those on the Left Bank (seep120), often run special directors’ retrospectives atwhich three films are shown back-to-back starting atmidnight on Saturday. Breakfast is included for thesurvivors. If an all-nighter is too much, several movietheatres run special midnight showings of headliningfilms (also on Saturday nights). Check listings maga-zines such as Pariscope for details.Late BarsChao Ba, 22 boulevard Clichy, 18ème, 01 46 06 72 90The city is full of places to suit drinkers who prefer tostart late and end early, and this after-2am crowd tendsto be more relaxed and friendly than cocktail Cinderellaswho start at a reasonable hour. Fortunately, late barsdon’t charge entry. Unfortunately, drinks tend to bepricey. But when only an all-nighter will do, head to oneof these bars, which really get going after midnight: LeConnetable (see p137) is perfect for a très Frenchsession that often lasts until dawn; the Highlander pub(see p212) is open earlierbut is absolutely jammedafter hours; Le Bar (seep135) is a quiet place for alate tipple; Le Crocodile(see p141) is a prime spotfor cocktails; and the ChaoBa is a rather classy drink-ing den in Pigalle.
  • 18. restaurantsRestaurants alone are reasonenough to come to Paris, whetheryou’re seeking a slice of history, adash of panache or a pinch ofperfection. What sets French chefsapart is their mastery of technique,which has filtered down to a younggeneration of bistro chefs whosecreative cuisine highlights seasonalingredients. The current trend isfor “tapas” – elegant food servedin tiny portions.
  • 19. 22 www.eparis.dk.comTOP CHOICES – restaurantsMaison Blanche15 avenue Montaigne, 8èmePerched on top of the Théâtre desChamps Elysées, the dining roomoverlooks dusky rooftops and themeandering Seine. (See p40)Kastoori4 place Gustave Toudouze, 9èmeOf all the terraces in this part oftown, Kastoori’s is the most indemand – for its great-value lunchmenu and thalis. (See p44)Le Cristal Room11 place des Etats-Unis, 16èmeActually the Baccarat store’s in-house restaurant, this PhilippeStarck-designed dining room is astunning location for lunch. (See p40)Market15 avenue Matignon, 8èmeThe place to be during Fashion Week,Market always puts on a great break-fast, with goodies by star pâtissierPierre Hermé. (See p40)La Tour d’Argent15–17 quai de la Tournelle, 5èmeIn addition to a lofty gourmet repu-tation, this restaurant has amazingviews over the Seine. (See p33)Le Square Trousseau1 rue Antoine-Vollon, 12èmeThe early 20th-century dining roomis full of charm, and in summer thepavement tables of this popularbistro can’t be beaten. (See p52)Restaurant du Palais Royal110 galerie Valois, 1erWith tables in the Palais Royal gar-dens, this restaurant has an enviablesetting. Fortunately, the foodis equally fine. (See p24)DESIGNERGREAT VIEWSLe Vieux Bistro14 rue du Cloître Notre-Dame, 4èmeLike Notre Dame, its imposing nearneighbour, this bistro is a Parisianclassic. A table on the terraceguarantees relaxing views. (See p30)L’Iode48 rue dArgout, 2èmeThis Breton outpost serves beau-tifully fresh fish and seafood and hasoutside tables on a pleasant, traffic-free street. (See p26)Café Noir15 rue St-Blaise, 20èmeWell off the beaten track, in summerCafé Noir makes the most of thetranquil location on a pedestrianstreet with outside tables. (See p49)R’Aliment57 rue Charlot, 3èmeThe bright, modern interior ofthis Marais eatery cuts acreative dash; the healthydishes follow suit. (See p28)Au Bon Accueil14 rue de Montessuy, 7èmeThe terrace view can’t be beaten asthe Tour Eiffel soars to dizzyingheights just metres away. (See p38)ALFRESCO
  • 20. 23TOP CHOICES – restaurantsThe city’s Chinatown, with its many cheap restaurants, is located in the 13th arrondissementVelly52 rue Lamartine, 9èmeA local bistro can be just the placefor a tête-à-tête. In this time-worndining room, the updated bistrofood is a sensual pleasure. (See p45)L’Ambroisie9 place des Vosges, 4èmePosh frocks and suave suitsare de rigueur at this elegantrestaurant, with its exquisite settingand luxury food. (See p29)Le Souk1 rue Keller, 11èmeLess extravagant than a trip toMorocco, Le Souk is just as exotic,with its spiced tagines, mood light-ing and attentive service. (See p51)Abazu3 rue André-Mazet, 6èmeFreshness is key at this Japaneserestaurant, where Parisians go tochill out and enjoy the theatricalteppanaki experience. (See p34)Fogon St-Julien10 rue St-Julien-le-Pauvre, 5èmeFind first-class Spanish food at thisaddress near Notre Dame. Their sixdifferent paellas will have you stamp-ing your feet for more. (See p32)L’As du Fallafel34 rue des Rosiers, 4èmeThere are falafal joints galore on thisstreet, but few can match this one.“Often imitated, never equalled”,says the sign. (See p29)Chez Vong10 rue de la Grande Truanderie, 1erIn a city where convincing Chinesecuisine is all too rare, Chez Vong isa real find, with tasteful decor andstunning food. (See p25)Aux Lyonnais32 rue St-Marc, 2èmeThis traditional bistro with vintagedecor, charming service and fragrantLyonnais food will deliver a perfectParis moment. (See p25)Sardegna a Tavola1 rue de Cotte, 12èmeThis sunny Sardinian restaurant hasestablished itself as the best of itskind in Paris, thanks to the quality ofits ingredients and cooking. (See p52)LATE NIGHTROMANTIC GLOBALBrasseries are a good choice for alate dinner; most remain open untilmidnight or later.Au Pied de Cochon6 rue Coquillière, 1erDon’t be put off by the name – thisbuzzy round-the-clock spot doesserve pig’s feet, but there’s also lesschallenging fare on offer. (See p24)La Tour de Montlhéry5 rue des Prouvaires, 1erA remnant of Les Halles’ marketdays, this is a great spot for a vaststeak in the small hours. (See p25)
  • 21. 249 C310 G4To find more of Paris’s thousands of eating-places, check out www.eparis.dk.comL’Ardoise seasonal menus28 rue du Mont Thabor, 1er • 01 42 96 28 18Open lunch & dinner Tue–Fri, dinner only Sat & SunPierre Jay’s bistro is one of the few in Paris to open onSundays, but that’s only one reason to visit. Localoffice workers and Parisians in the know congregatehere for the great-value food, ranging from pig’strotters to pan-fried scallops with oyster mushrooms.Desserts are not their strong point though. ModerateL’Espadon luxury lunchingHôtel Ritz, 15 place Vendôme, 1er • 01 43 16 30 80www.ritzparis.com Open lunch & dinner dailyL’Espadon delivers everything you’d expect of the Ritz:sumptuous surroundings, smooth (and surprisinglyunsnooty) service and simply fabulous food. The lunchmenu (68€) is a bargain, entitling diners to a lavishfour-course feast, including a stunning cheese trolleyand coffee with mignardises (tiny cakes). ExpensiveAu Pied de Cochon former market eatery6 rue Coquillière, 1er • 01 40 13 77 00www.pieddecochon.com Open 24/7The signature dish of humble grilled pig’s trotter withBéarnaise sauce is one to try at this jolly 24-hourbrasserie in the heart of Les Halles, the city’s formercentral food market. It’s great for a meal of onion soupand briny oysters, too, and gets lively after 2am, whentheatre folk and clubbers tend to drop by. ExpensiveRestaurant du Palais Royal real class110 galerie Valois, 1er • 01 40 20 00 27Open lunch & dinner Mon–SatIn summer, a table on the terrace here is hotly sought-after, so book ahead. In winter the jewel-toned diningroom is a treat, and the Mediterranean-inspired foodis consistently delicious. (The chef claims to make thebest risotto in Paris.) For dessert, try millefeuillesfilled with fruit and crème Chantilly. Moderate9 D210 F3Restaurants
  • 22. 25Cheap: under 13€ for a main course; moderate: 13–20€; expensive: over 20€CentreLa Tour de Montlhéry late-night joint5 rue des Prouvaires, 1er • 01 42 36 21 82Open lunch & dinner dailyHearty food (mutton chops, stuffed cabbage) and anoisy, smoke-filled atmosphere are the order of theday at this round-the-clock haunt in Les Halles.Closely packed tables mean that there is often cross-table chat; luckily, the flowing wine helps makeconversation a breeze. ModerateCafé Moderne creative cuisine40 rue Notre-Dame-des-Victoires, 2ème • 01 53 40 84 10Open lunch & dinner Mon–Fri, dinner only SatAchieving a balance between hip and inviting isn’teasy, but Café Moderne proves that it can be done –and well. The cosy red banquettes accommodate acosmopolitan bunch who contentedly polish offdishes such as thyme-flavoured lamb in filo pastry,and squid filled with Parmesan. ModerateChez Vong flavourful Oriental10 rue de la Grande Truanderie, 1er • 01 40 26 09 36www.chez-vong.com Open lunch & dinner Mon–SatThose who despair of ever finding great Chinese foodin Paris are relieved to discover this discreet LesHalles restaurant. Among the plants and chinoiserie,discriminating diners savour authentic steamed fish,Peking duck and prawns in lotus leaf. Not cheap, butthe freshness and flavour justify the price. ModerateAux Lyonnais revitalized bistro32 rue St-Marc, 2ème • 01 42 96 65 04Open lunch & dinner Tue–Fri, dinner SatFrench super-chef Alain Ducasse has rejuvenated an1890s restaurant into a classic bistro complete withburnished red façade, zinc bar, tiles and majesticmirrors. This is updated regional food at its finest –sabodet (pork sausage), eggs poached in red wine,and irresistible Saint-Marcellin cheese. ModerateLe Meurice heavenly hotel diningHotel Meurice, 228 rue de Rivoli, 1er • 01 44 58 10 50Open lunch & dinner dailyThe cloud-painted ceiling, gilt galore and cushy chairsput you in just the right relaxed frame of mind to appre-ciate the subtle tastes of Yannick Alleno’s understatedcreations. Try a lightly smoked salmon chunk wrappedin paper-thin crisp potato, John Dory dotted with cuminor the most delicate lemon meringue tart. Expensive9 D3 10 F210 G210 G410 H4
  • 23. 26 www.eparis.dk.comChez Georges quintessential bistro1 rue du Mail, 2ème • 01 42 60 07 11Open lunch & dinner Mon–SatOn this quiet corner, the glorious old Paris bistro offilm and fiction is alive and well and full to the raftersevery night. Its success rides on the winning combina-tion of a worn but grand interior, maternal waitressesand good, honest food such as duck with ceps andplump profiteroles doused in chocolate. ModerateL’Iode piscatorial delights48 rue d’Argout, 2ème • 01 42 36 46 45Open lunch & dinner Mon–Fri, dinner SatIn the busy shopping area of the 2ème, this cheerfulseafood stop sticks to a mantra of keeping thingssimple. Expect treats such as grilled sole or crispydeep-fried baby squid; nothing flashy or too fancy,just fresh produce, relaxed service and lots of locals,especially in the airy upstairs room. ModerateLe Petit Dakar African chic6 rue Elzévir, 3ème • 01 44 59 34 74Open lunch & dinner dailyThanks to its link with the shop opposite sellingAfrican art and objets, Le Petit Dakar would look rightat home on the pages of Marie Claire Maison. Its menuis limited to just a few reliably tasty Senegaleseclassics such as thieb’oudjen (fish stew) or maffé(meat in peanut sauce). CheapRue Ste-Anne noodle centralDemand from Japanese ex-pats has created many greatnoodle shops in the 10ème, particularly on rue Ste-Anne. Higuma (at No. 32bis), with an army of dextrouswok-handlers in the open kitchen, is a favourite. Try agiant bowl of ramen topped with grilled pork, rice withtempura, or yakisoba (stir-fried noodles). Nearby, LaïLaï Ken (at No. 7) is equally popular with a youngclientele who comes for more of the same. Cheap11 C510 E210 G310 G3Restaurants
  • 24. 27If a restaurant is crawling with locals, you’re likely to be on to a good thingCentreL’Ambassade d’Auvergne hearty fare22 rue du Grenier St-Lazare, 3ème • 01 42 72 31 22www.ambassade-auvergne.com Open lunch & dinner dailyThis two-storey tavern with heavy oak beams anddangling hams has a well-earned reputation for servingup Auvergne on a plate. That means sturdy farmhousefood that’s perfect for an icy winter’s evening (ifslightly less appealing in the height of summer). Porkand cabbage are menu staples, from cabbage soupwith Roquefort cheese to braised pork with cabbageand white beans. Also on offer is the famed regionalSalers beef, as well as lamb and fish dishes. Thehighlight, however, has to be the aligot, a creamypotato and Tomme cheese mixture, delivered to thetable in a large copper dish, that is then teased intolong ribbons by deft waiters and served as a sidedish. Admittedly, you’ve got to be in the mood for anintense cholesterol hit. There’s also a great selectionof regional cheeses, and eau de vie (fruit-basedbrandy) to round things off. ModerateAnahï South American hideaway49 rue Volta, 3ème • 01 48 87 88 24Open dinner only dailySisters Carminia and Pilat brought a little bit of LatinAmerica to this old Parisian deli almost 20 years ago.Since then, they’ve converted a stylish crowd, includingthe occasional celeb, to the joys of Argentinian beef,Mexican stews and assorted South American titbits.The snug atmosphere is appealing, too. ModerateLes Enfants Rouges winning wine bar9 rue de Beauce, 3ème • 01 48 87 80 61Closed Sun & Mon; closed dinner Tue, Wed, & SatRun by the couple behind the legendary Montmartrebistro Le Moulin à Vins – now Café Burq (see p46) –this intimate wine bar guarantees a serious selectionof wines from both well-known and up-and-comingproducers. Also on the menu is simple but robustFrench grub and a festive atmosphere. Moderate11 A411 C411 B3
  • 25. 2811 C4www.eparis.dk.comLes Petits Marseillais southern comfort72 rue Vieille du Temple, 3ème • 01 42 78 91 59Open lunch & dinner dailyA trendy crowd frequents this lively bistro run by twofriends from Marseille – they’re the nice guys behindthe bar. Food has a southern bent: pasta with babysquid and saffron, duck with polenta and Parmesan.As quarters are close, getting into a conversation withyour neighbours is also on the menu. ModerateR’Aliment trendy organic quick bites57 rue Charlot, 3ème • 01 48 04 88 28Open lunch & dinner Tue–Sat, dinner only MonPlenty of colour in the decor makes this funky organic eatery popular witha young, design-conscious set. Soups, quiches and daily changing hotdishes – such as vegetable gratin with squash seeds, and fried grouperwith roasted potatoes – are prepared directly behind the bar, within viewof the customers and filling the room with wholesome smells. It’s a goodidea to bring a book or a friend as service can be slow. ModerateLe Potager du Marais vegetarian food22 rue Rambuteau, 3ème • 01 42 74 24 66Open lunch & dinner dailyIt may be vegetarian and organic, but that doesn’tmean it’s all tofu and sprouts. Instead, tuck into tastydishes such as meat-free pasta carbonara with chan-terelles, minestrone and chunky tarts. No incense andbatik throws either, just a galley-style room with pared-back decor and an emphasis on healthy eating. CheapLe Pamphlet quick-change menu38 rue Debelleyme, 3ème • 01 42 72 39 24Open lunch & dinner Tue–Fri, dinner only Sat & MonThe menu at this Pyrenees bistro takes its lead fromseasonally available produce and changes severaltimes a week; one day, rack of Pyrenean lamb, thenext, glazed suckling pig. Owner-chef Alain Carrère –an aficionado of butter and cream – can be gruff, butgenerally a friendly atmosphere reigns. Moderate11 A511 B511 C4Restaurants
  • 26. 2917 B1BrasseriesWhen you want a vintage setting, straightforwardfood, professional waiters and great atmosphere,nothing can beat a Parisian brasserie. Many of thecity’s most historic examples belong to the Flogroup, whose owner Jean-Paul Bucher founded theempire in 1968 with the purchase of Brasserie Flo,which resembles a hunting lodge but still has thefeel of an Alsatian tavern. Nearby, another Floflagship, Julien, brings a dash of class to this grittypart of town, near the Gare de l’Est, with its glitzyArt-Nouveau interior. Perhaps the most belovedFlo brasseries, however, are the Art-Deco LaCoupole – no longer a bona fide literary haunt, butstill a great venue — and the more intimate LeBalzar, whose purchase by the group sparked anoutcry among its intellectual habitués. The typicalbrasserie fare of choucroute (shredded, fermentedcabbage, also known as sauerkraut), enormousseafood platters, steaks and sole meunière isgenerally good enough in Flo brasseries to preventthe regulars from grumbling, and the desserts,such as giant ice-cream sundaes and parfaits,can be spectacular.Among the independent brasseries, the Brasseriede l’Isle St-Louis is a favourite for its tavern-likeinterior and view of Notre Dame’s elegant rear.Near the Gare St-Lazare, Garnier is known for itsoutstanding seafood and rather glamorous setting,while the down-to-earth Le Grand Colbert, next tothe Palais Royal, may have the oldest interior – partof the dining room dates from the 17th century.Whatever the brasserie, try not to be tempted bythe more complex dishes – the kitchens can getoverwhelmed at peak times, resulting in slapdashpreparations. For contact details, see p218.If you haven’t reserved a table, arrive by 12:30 for lunch or 7:30 for dinner to beat the crowdsCentreL’As du Fallafel Middle-Eastern mecca34 rue des Rosiers, 4ème • 01 48 87 63 60Open all day Sun–FriOne of many falafel joints on the bustling rue desRosiers, but undoubtedly the best. The “special”,with crunchy chickpea balls cooked to order, friedaubergine, shredded cabbage, hummus and spicysauces will convert non-believers. This is the epitomeof fast food, so don’t expect to linger. CheapL’Ambroisie classy cuisine9 place des Vosges, 4ème • 01 42 78 51 45Open lunch & dinner Tue–SatBernard Pacaud’s food is sedate and sophisticated,just like the interior of this 17th-century town housewith high ceilings and gilt flourishes. High-end diningmeans polished cooking, artistic presentation anddeluxe ingredients (lobster, foie gras, truffles).Service is efficient but sometimes frosty. Expensive17 C1
  • 27. 3017 C3For the secrets of services charges and tipping, check www.eparis.dk.comL’Enoteca Italian know-how25 rue Charles V, 4ème • 01 42 78 91 44Open lunch & dinner dailyThis welcoming wine bar is the place to try both Italianwine (there are some 30,000 bottles in the cellar) andchoice Italian food. Dishes such as swordfish carpacciowith pesto, risotto with asparagus, and bunet (choco-late flan), together with unpretentious service anddecor, mean reservations are advisable. ModerateLe Vieux Bistro timeless attraction14 rue du Cloître Notre Dame, 4ème • 01 43 54 18 95Open lunch & dinner dailyDespite its touristy address, The Old Bistro retains anauthentic feel, including a dining room that looks asif it hasn’t changed in decades, and a cache of regularswho never tire of dishes such as Lyonnais sausagewith potatoes, boeuf bourguignon and tarte tatin.Portions are generous; the service likewise. ModerateGeorget rustic bliss64 rue Vieille du Temple, 4ème • 01 42 78 55 89Open lunch & dinner Mon–Fri, dinner only SatMore like a country kitchen than a Paris restaurant,this is the kind of place where you get to watch yoursteak being chopped off an enormous side of beef andthrown on to the wood-fire griddle to sizzle. Theatmosphere might be smoky and the staff can berude, but the food is good and filling. Moderate11 B517 C216 H2RestaurantsLa Canaille eccentric eating4 rue Crillon, 4ème • 01 42 78 09 71www.lacanaille.frOpen lunch & dinner Mon–Fri, dinner only SatIn this quirkily laid-back literary café, don’t besurprised if the waiter hands you his note pad andasks you to write down your food order. The Frenchcuisine with a twist – salmon in a crunchy peanutsauce, for example – is reassuringly reliable. Cheap
  • 28. 3116 H3CentreMon Vieil Ami modest inventiveness69 rue St-Louis-en-l’Ile, 4ème • 01 40 46 01 35Open lunch & dinner Wed–SunDistinguished French chef Antoine Westerman’s takeon Alsatian cuisine bears no hint of pedestrian porkand cabbage. Instead, it’s all about innovative foodcombinations to match the unmistakably moderninterior of his one Paris bistro. Westerman’s culinarymastery lurks behind a demure, easily missedfaçade; in fact, compared to many eateries on the tinyIle St-Louis, Mon Vieil Ami seems very low-keyindeed. All the action is inside and on the plate:generous servings of chicken with caramelizedsauerkraut and potato purée, and roast cod withcarrots, raisins and dates. It’s lighter and more variedthan traditional Alsatian fare, but that’s because aMichelin three-star chef devised the menu.Westerman might not be flinging the pans out back,but he’s there in spirit, and that means that the bistrois fast becoming an old friend to many. ModerateL’Osteria risotto central10 rue de Sévigné, 4ème • 01 42 71 37 08Open lunch & dinner Tue–Fri, dinner only MonToni Vianello is the risotto maestro; he’s even writtena cookbook on the subject, and his risottos aresimply sensational – especially the one with pheasantand black truffles. This is some of the finest Italianfood around and, as a result, tables are jam-packed,often with designers and political gurus. ModerateAnahuacalli a trip down Mexico way30 rue des Bernardins, 5ème • 01 43 26 10 20Open dinner only dailyCooking from south of the border doesn’t come muchbetter than this; forget runny guacamole and dry tacoshells, this is mole poblano (turkey cooked with choc-olate) territory. It’s serious regional Mexican food withvery good margaritas served up by charming staff,albeit in a rather subdued atmosphere. Moderate17 C117 A2Wines by the glass and half-bottle can be disproportionately expensive compared to full bottles
  • 29. 20 H13216 H216 G4www.eparis.dk.comLes Délices d’Aphrodite Greek odyssey4 rue de Candolle, 5ème • 01 43 31 40 39www.mavrommatis.fr Open lunch & dinner Mon–SatWith a dining room done out in cool Mediterraneanblue, a ceiling of trellised ivy, and good-quality Greekfood, from dolmades to spit-roasted lamb, this is theperfect antidote to a grey day in Paris. The service istypically Greek too – it can be slow but it comes witha smile, so relax. ModerateLe Reminet sugar and spice3 rue des Grands-Degrés, 5ème • 01 44 07 04 24Open lunch & dinner Thu–MonThis romantic little bistro just gets better and better,thanks to chef Hugues Gournay’s passion for food. Hisinterest in spices results in dishes such as lamb chopswith a cumin-and-red-pepper crust. Desserts are out-standing and service couldn’t be more helpful. A 13€lunch menu is available (Mon, Thu and Fri). ModerateLe Cosi rugged cuisine9 rue Cujas, 5ème • 01 43 29 20 20Open lunch & dinner Mon–SatCorsica has its own mountain cuisine featuring unusual cheeses, out-standing charcuterie and long-simmered stews, and the red walls of thisbistro create a suitably warm setting for this hot-blooded food. Expect asophisticated spin on rustic ingredients, with pulses, brocciu (a ricotta-like cheese) and cabri (kid) featuring large on the menu. If you’ve roomfor dessert, do try the delicious fiadone cheesecake. ModerateFogon St-Julien Spanish class10 rue St-Julien-le-Pauvre, 5ème • 01 43 54 31 33Open lunch & dinner Sat & Sun, dinner only Tue–FriOwner-chef Alberto Herraiz dishes up some of the bestSpanish food in Paris in this sunny dining room on oneof the city’s oldest streets. His quest for quality ingredi-ents is evident in his elegant tapas and superb paellaValenciana: saffron-stained rice topped with plumpchicken, rabbit, snails and vegetables. Moderate16 H3Restaurants
  • 30. 33Don’t hope to rush through an evening meal: expect a minimum of two hours at the tableCentreRestaurant Marty Art Deco dining20 avenue des Gobelins, 5ème • 01 43 31 39 51www.marty-restaurant.com Open lunch & dinner dailyThe Marty stands out among Parisian brasseries ontwo counts: it is independent, and chef Thierry Colashas an haute cuisine pedigree. As a result, the foodgoes beyond brasserie classics. Try salmon sautéedwith grapes and served with a celeriac purée, or vealwith herb butter and violet mustard. ModerateLa Tour d’Argent fine food with a view15–17 quai de la Tournelle, 5ème • 01 43 54 23 31www.tourdargent.com Closed Mon & Tue lunchViews don’t get much more Parisian than this, andthe cuisine doesn’t get more ageless: the restauranthas been serving the same pressed-duck recipe since1890. It’s kid-glove treatment all the way, but youdon’t have to blow the budget. The lunch menu isgreat value and the view’s the same. ExpensiveLe Pré Verre a modern twist on the classic8 rue Thénard, 5ème • 01 43 54 59 47Open lunch & dinner Tue–Sat, dinner only MonThe Delacourcelle brothers do French classics with anod to the modern. Chef Philippe is a fan of herbs andspices, and it shows in his pairing of rabbit withcumin, adding ginger to shallot sauce, showeringsquid with sesame vinaigrette or popping parsley inthe strawberry dessert. The cuisine is slightly fusion,but with an emphasis on good, sustaining food (suchas mashed potato with foie gras). Perched on a cornerin the scholarly Quartier Latin, this bistrot à vins isvery much a neighbourhood favourite, attractingcooing couples, conversing academics, serious suitsand curious visitors. It’s casual and friendly, with awooden floor and walls dotted with vintage jazz LPs.Très cool – especially in summer, when the doors areflung back and the tables spill on to the street. Thewine list is worthy, and the lunch menu is a bargain.Moderate16 G317 A321 A2
  • 31. 34 www.eparis.dk.comAbazu Japanese cool3 rue André-Mazet, 6ème • 01 46 33 72 05Open lunch & dinner Tue–Sat, dinner only SunTeppanaki restaurants are rare in Paris, so it’ssurprising to find this Zen oasis in the heart of bustlingSt-Germain. On the main floor you can watch the sharp-knifed chefs at work, grilling fresh, raw ingredientsbefore the customers’ eyes, while the downstairs roomfeels calmer thanks to a small fountain. ModerateAllard old timer41 rue St-André-des-Arts, 6ème • 01 43 26 48 23Open lunch & dinner Mon–SatAllard doesn’t seem to have changed much since the1940s, and that’s just the way its regulars like it.Against a backdrop of weathered wallpaper, visitorsmix with the neighbourhood’s bourgeois, who flockhere for hearty dishes such as Bresse chicken withmushrooms and the canard aux olives. ModerateL’Epi Dupin creative cooking11 rue Dupin, 6ème • 01 42 22 64 56Open lunch & dinner Tue–Fri, dinner only MonChef François Pasteau’s bistro is full day and nightthanks to a mix of imaginative cooking (mackerel in ahazelnut-and-fennel crust and pigeon with braisedonions), fast, friendly service and a cosy old diningroom. Blackboard specials reflect the best producethe seasons have to offer. ModerateYen a slice of Tokyo22 rue St-Benoît, 6ème • 01 45 44 11 18Open lunch & dinner Tue–SatIf you have a yen for noodles, this is the place tosatisfy your craving. The neighbourhood couldn’t bemore Parisian, but once in the wood dining room youcould easily be in Tokyo. At lunchtime, try a bento box;at dinner, the speciality is soba – buckwheat noodlesserved with a delicious dipping sauce. Moderate15 C316 E2Restaurants16 F216 F2
  • 32. 3516 F3CentreLe Salon d’Hélène southwest-side story4 rue dAssas, 6ème • 01 42 22 00 11Open lunch & dinner Wed–Sat, dinner only TueFrench chefs in general don’t tend to stray too far fromformality – but there are exceptions, and HélèneDarroze is one of them. In an effort to make her south-western cooking more accessible, she opened Le Salond’Hélène, a more reasonably priced, more casualeatery on the floor below her Michelin two-star restau-rant. Rather than a three-course-plus-cheese meal,Darroze took to tapas – she hails from France’s Basquecountry, and the Spanish influence is evident in hercooking. Graze on a range of beautifully presentedsmall dishes (oyster with foie gras ‘ice cream’, lan-goustine tempura, duck liver with dried fruit) from thecomfort of a plush pink sofa, bar-style high chairs withraised tables or a banquette loaded with cushions.Darroze comes from a family of chefs and also spenttime in Alain Ducasse’s restaurant in Monte Carlo, sodiners are in capable, and creative, hands. ExpensiveLa Table d’Aude country helpings8 rue de Vaugirard, 6ème • 01 43 26 36 36Open lunch & dinner Tue–Fri, dinner only Sat, lunch only MonBernard Pautou’s welcome is as warm as hiscassoulet – a robust duck, pork and bean stew forwhich the Aude, a region in Languedoc-Roussillon insouthern France, is renowned. This is no-nonsensecountry food – just the thing to keep winter chills andhunger pangs at bay. ModerateLe Timbre a modern touch3 rue Ste-Beuve, 6ème • 01 45 49 10 40Open lunch & dinner Mon–Fri, dinner only SatGarret-like Le Timbre serves refined French food (roastpigeon with mango and ginger chutney, Jerusalemartichoke purée with truffle oil) with a dash of theBritish, thanks to its Mancunian owner. Cleverlyarranged around the long counter, the dining roomencourages conviviality. Moderate15 D515 D3
  • 33. 3615 A1Keep in touch with the Parisian restaurant scene at www.eparis.dk.comL’Ami Jean Basque is best27 rue Malar, 7ème • 01 47 05 86 89Open lunch & dinner Tue–SatSome of the best bistro chefs in Paris come from theFrench Basque region, and Stéphane Jégo, who ownsthis tavern-like bistro, is one of them. Jégo cooks upspecialities such as axoa (veal stew) alongside moremodern inventions like marinated scallops withshaved ewe’s-milk cheese. ModerateL’Arpège art appreciation84 rue de Varenne, 7ème • 01 45 51 47 33Open lunch & dinner Mon–FriChef Alain Passard caters for the serious food connois-seur. His food is close to art, which seems appropriategiven that the Musée Rodin (see p101) is just opposite.The wine list is almost as long as War and Peace, thedecor is discreetly modern and the prices are rathersteep. In recent times, Passard has shunned red meat,preferring instead to serve fish, shellfish, poultryand – his overriding passion of late – vegetables. InL’Arpège’s kitchen at least, légumes have finally beengranted their rightful place alongside fish and meat asdiet staples. Passard prides himself on retaining theunique colours and flavours of his ingredients; conse-quently, his food looks as if it has escaped the pagesof a glossy art mag. Tender lobster braised in Jura wineand his signature dessert, a candied 12-flavour tomatofilled with dried and fresh fruit, nuts and spices, arebeautiful to look at and even better to eat. ExpensiveBellota-Bellota simple Spanish pleasures18 rue Jean-Nicot, 7ème • 01 53 59 96 96Open lunch & dinner Mon–SatThis breezy, tiled bar-cum-grocery is devoted toSpain’s finest ham: ruby-red meat from black-footedIberian pigs that graze on acorns (bellotas). And it’sthe acorns that give the ham its wonderful flavour.Excellent manchego cheese, anchovies, olives andtuna are also on offer. Perfect for lunch or a late8 G5Restaurants8 G5
  • 34. 37In France, bread is broken at the table, and can just be put on the tablecloth if there’s no side plateCentreL’Atelier de Joël Robuchon hot spot5 rue de Montalembert, 7ème • 01 42 22 56 56Open lunch & dinner dailyHe might not be a household name outside France,but in Paris Joël Robuchon stands for French cuisineat its most refined. Gastronomes were devastatedwhen he announced his retirement from the rest-aurant world at the age of 51, and his comeback wasthe subject of rumours for years. Now in his late 50s,Robuchon has not only opened what is probably themost modern restaurant in Paris (with a twinestablishment in Tokyo), but he is also planning otherprojects, including one in the 16th arrondissement.What is all the fuss about? Well, his potato purée forone, made from the flavourful ratte variety and withnearly as much butter as potato. At L’Atelier, dinerssit around two bars in the compact, red-and-blacklacquered dining room (there are no individual chairsand tables), while cooks toil in the open kitchen,slightly removed from the communal counters. Youcan order a little – from a selection of about 20 smallplates inspired by Asia, Spain and offerings from thebest Parisian chefs – or a lot, as it is also possibleto have a blow-out three-course meal of full-sizedofferings without feeling rushed. Some of the mostoutstanding dishes are spaghetti à notre façon (anAlsatian take on carbonara), turbot with the famouspotato purée and, among the smaller plates, clamsstuffed with garlic and a crisp mackerel tart withParmesan cheese. Desserts, such as the chartreusesoufflé, are served in small portions to allow forgrazing. Telephone reservations are possible only for11:30am and 6:30pm; otherwise, be prepared toqueue alongside Left Bank lawyers and publisherswho are willing to swallow their pride for extraordina-rily good food. Expensive15 D1
  • 35. 388 F58 F5Best Places to Buy Food to GoLong limited to a sandwich or a quiche, takeawayfood in Paris is growing more varied by the minute.For salads, hot dishes and perhaps a slice of pâté,stop by any neighbourhood charcutier/traiteur,where you will be charged according to the weight ofyour order. The gourmet counters at Le Bon Marché’sGrande Epicerie offer more exotic options, as dothose at Galeries Lafayette. British-style sandwichesare sold at the popular Cojean, while top chef AlainDucasse and à la mode baker Eric Kayser providehigh-class sandwiches at Be. Perhaps the best mealto go, though, is the fat falafel sandwich at L’As duFallafel, the pick of Lenny Kravitz and otherdiscriminating chickpea fans. For 5€, it’s heaven ona plastic plate. For contact details, see p219.www.eparis.dk.comAu Bon Accueil a success story14 rue de Monttessuy, 7ème • 01 47 05 46 11Open lunch & dinner Mon–FriLying in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower, this bistro isteeming most days and nights (often with out-of-towners in the tourist season). Owner Jacques Lacipièrehas refurbished it to give it a trendier edge and betterlighting, but the seasonal menu remains good qualityand the service is always agreeable. ModerateCafé Constant simply delicious139 rue St-Dominique, 7ème • 01 47 53 73 34Open lunch & dinner Tue–SatAs head chef at the luxury hotel Le Crillon (see p177),Christian Constant trained many of the best bistrochefs in Paris today, including Christian Etchebest ofLe Troquet (see p55). Constant is gradually colonizingthe rue St-Dominique with this eponymous café; hisclassic restaurant, Le Violon d’Ingres; and mostrecently, La Table de la Fontaine, an affordable fishhouse. But Café Constant is the locals’ favourite, andit’s here that the chef can express his casual side (heis often seen having lunch here, which shows howcomfortable he is with this simpler style of cooking).The menu is something of a nostalgia trip – oeufsmimosa, pumpkin soup with Gruyère, veal CordonBleu, profiteroles and île flottante, all prepared just asthey should be. Like the food, the setting doesn’t puton airs – white walls, old tile floors and red banquettes– and the staff are exceptionally friendly. ModerateRestaurants
  • 36. 392 G58 H18 F2Centre & WestL’Angle du Faubourg cornering success195 rue du Faubourg St-Honoré, 8ème • 01 40 74 20 20www.taillevent.com Open lunch & dinner Mon–FriBoosted by the success of his Michelin three-star rest-aurant, Taillevent, owner Jean-Claude Vrinat openedthis more cost-conscious bistro. Contemporary in look,it combines both the classical and the modern in thekitchen, sending out attractive dishes such as braisedveal cheeks to an up-market clientele. ModerateLe Bistrot Napolitain perfect pizza18 avenue Franklin D Roosevelt, 8ème • 01 45 62 08 37Open lunch & dinner Mon–Fri, dinner only SatDown-to-earth bistros are thin on the ground in theseparts, which explains the popularity of this Italiantrattoria. It’s hard to resist the crisp-crusted classicpizzas, such as Margherita, but the carpaccio, fishand pasta are equally tempting. Perfect for a quickbite after the cinema, but book ahead. ModerateFlora provincial elegance36 avenue George V, 8ème • 01 40 70 10 49Open lunch & dinner Mon–Fri, dinner only SatThis stylish restaurant’s menu is influenced by south-ern France (chef Flora Mikula was born in Provence),but also dips into even sunnier lands, such as Turkey,Morocco and India. Mikula has a sure touch with pro-duce and lots of finesse, as dishes such as lobster withwild mushrooms in coral vinaigrette attest. ModerateGarnier a fishy business111 rue St-Lazare, 8ème • 01 43 87 50 40Open lunch & dinner dailySup on freshly shucked oysters at the bijou oyster barjust inside the door, or take an impeccably laid tablenear the window and watch the commuters fromnearby Gare St-Lazare grind by. The setting is elegant,waiters are considerate and the seafood is a cut wellabove that of most Paris brasseries. Expensive3 C5Many restaurants close in August for 2 weeks – call ahead to check
  • 37. 40 www.eparis.dk.com9 A28 G3Maison Blanche a drop of the Med15 avenue Montaigne, 8ème • 01 47 23 55 99www.maison-blanche.frOpen lunch & dinner Mon–Fri, dinner only Sat & SunThe Pourcel twins just love the Mediterranean and itshows in their inventive menu. A plate of roast pigeonfillets with pan-fried peaches and cacao accompaniedby a penthouse view of Paris might not come cheap,but extravagance has its rewards. ExpensiveMarket exemplary innovations15 avenue Matignon, 8ème • 01 56 43 40 90www.jean-georges.com Open breakfast, lunch & dinnerdailyJean-Georges Vongerichten, the whizz kid behind NewYork’s Mercer Kitchen and Vong, has returned to hisFrench roots with this fashionable spot. Celebrities andlocal suits can’t get enough of his clever food, suchas raw-tuna spring roll or “burnt” foie gras with aLe Cristal Room glass actLa Maison Baccarat, 11 place des Etats-Unis, 16ème01 40 22 11 10 Open breakfast, lunch & dinner Mon–SatA giant chandelier immersed in an aquarium gives aclue as to who was in charge of decorating the newBaccarat museum and boutique: the daring and wittyPhilippe Starck. Formerly a private residence, thismansion is now, literally, a crystal palace, with glassand mirrors creating dizzying optical effects. The in-store restaurant, a showcase for Baccarat’s crystaland porcelain, has become a huge hit thanks to itsironic-but-chic decor and simple, yet deliciouslyprepared, food. What can you expect to eat? Most ofthe modish folk who come here probably don’t careall that much, but dishes such as a frothy soup ofpotimarron (a type of pumpkin that tastes likechestnut) and the very good club sandwich show thatthe kitchen is far from careless. If you have anymoney left over, you can pick up a jewel or accessoryas a souvenir. Be sure to book ahead. Expensive8 E2Restaurants
  • 38. 41A three-course prix fixe menu, though often limited in choice, is much cheaper than eating à la carteWest3 C59 C2Lucas Carton haute cuisine9 place de la Madeleine, 8ème • 01 42 65 22 90www.lucascarton.comOpen lunch & dinner Tue–Fri; dinner only Sat & MonAlain Senderens believes passionately that fine foodmerits fine wine: he looks for hints of dried fruit, herbsor toasted nuts in wine and then marries them with thereal thing. Thus, each dish here is accompanied by awine that harmonizes perfectly with it; a late-harvestGewurztraminer with its rose-lychee bouquet teamedwith roasted foie gras in an exotic fruit vinaigrette is amatch made in heaven. The food is the perfectpartner for one of the most lavish dining rooms inParis – boasting curved Art-Nouveau wood partitionswith glass-encased butterflies and rich, merlot-coloured banquettes. Senderens bought therestaurant in 1985, perhaps as a nostalgic nod to thetime he spent here as a young saucier for therenowned chef Soustelle. Twenty years later, theapprentice is now the acclaimed master. ExpensiveSavy regional traditions23 rue Bayard, 8ème • 01 47 23 46 98Open lunch & dinner Mon–FriAn old-fashioned bistro, both in decor and disposition,that provides welcome relief from the 24-caratdesigner shops and salons of nearby avenueMontaigne. Comfort food, from coddled eggs to ribsteak with bone marrow and matchstick potatoes, isserved up in comfortable surroundings. ModerateA Toutes Vapeurs all steamed up7 rue de l’Isly, 8ème • 01 44 90 95 75Open until 11pm Mon–SatWaistline-watchers and the health conscious love thelittle paniers (baskets) of vegetable, fish and meatcombinations at this self-service eating house – allcooked while you wait. Choose a pre-prepared basket,a flavoured oil and, presto, it’s in and out of thechrome “dry” steamer in minutes. Cheap8 G3
  • 39. 42 Locate Paris’s vegetarian restaurants through www.eparis.dk.comL’Astrance top tables4 rue Beethoven, 16ème • 01 40 50 84 40Open lunch & dinner Mon–FriThis three-year-old, 25-seat dining room near Trocadérois arguably the most exciting restaurant to haveopened in Paris this century (though Joël Robuchon’sAtelier (see p37) is a close rival). Pascal Barbot andChristophe Rohat (who runs the dining room) workedwith Alain Passard at L’Arpège (see p36) before branch-ing out on their own with a style that reflects Barbot’stime as a chef in Sydney. Asian spices turn up in allsorts of unexpected places, but never shock the pal-ate. Minimalist names on the menu create an elementof suspense, but first come surprise nibbles: soupmade with nearly burnt bread (much more intriguingthan it sounds) or an avocado and crab millefeuilleflavoured with almond oil and a tiny Granny Smithjulienne. Then comes “The Pea”, a frothy green creamtopped with crisp, golden-brown shavings of bakedTomme d’Auvergne cheese and a fresh pea pod linedwith plump, tender peas. “The Mackerel” shows whatBarbot can do with a humble fish: boneless filletscome coated in spiced crumbs, on a bed of Asian-stylespinach with sesame. More amuse-gueules, such asherb-infused sorbets and an eggshell filled with eggycream, pave the way for inventive desserts combiningfruits and spices. The sober – but not off-puttingly so –grey dining room, its walls decorated with gilt-framedmirrors, puts the spotlight on the food. So cherishedare reservations here (you must book exactly onemonth ahead) that foodies congratulate each otheron their success in securing a table. ExpensiveRestaurants7 C5
  • 40. 43A pichet (carafe) of house wine is usually good value and very drinkableWestLa Grande Armée modern classic3 avenue de la Grande Armée, 16ème • 01 45 00 24 77Open breakfast, lunch & dinner dailyJointly owned by the Costes brothers and designerJacques Garcia, this contemporary take on the classicbrasserie is more bordello red and leopard skin thanbeer and brass. Count on dependable food (duckshepherd’s pie), a stylish crowd and a surprisinglycosy atmosphere. Great for breakfast, too. ModerateLe Petit Rétro trad French5 rue Mesnil, 16ème • 01 44 05 06 05www.petitretro.frOpen lunch & dinner Mon–Fri, dinner only SatIn keeping with its authentic Belle Epoque decor, LePetit Rétro is a bastion of traditional French cooking.Melt-in-your mouth duck liver pâté and creamy vealstew never go out of fashion, which is precisely whythis not-so-little bistro is always brimful. ModerateL’Entredgeu packed-out bistro83 rue Laugier, 17ème • 01 40 54 97 24Open lunch & dinner Tue–SatDoes Paris need another bistro? Of course it does,when it’s as good as this one. The space is crampedand smoky, but locals crowd in nonetheless for thedaily changing menu, which might include spot-ondishes such as veal en cocotte with new potatoes orrack of lamb with a salsify jus. ModerateJamin cooking with class32 rue de Longchamp, 16ème • 01 45 53 00 07Open lunch & dinner Mon–FriBenoit Guichard, longtime second-in-command to master chef JoëlRobuchon (see p37), is a traditionalist at heart as his pigeon sausage withfoie gras exemplifies, but his menu reveals some contemporary thinking,too. And while the staid green-and-pink decor doesn’t have many fans, thefood does. The lunch menu is an excellent (and relatively economical) wayto sample his culinary prowess. Expensive7 C21 D27 E17 D3
  • 41. 444 F42 F33 C1www.eparis.dk.comLa Table de Lucullus net benefits129 rue Legendre, 17ème • 01 40 25 02 68Open lunch & dinner Tue–SatSelf-taught chef Nicolas Vagnon doesn’t compromiseon quality, to the extent that his menu now focusesentirely on wild fish caught off France’s Ile d’Yeu. HisTuesday-night tasting menu presents a single seacreature, such as eel or scallops, in different guises.The modest dining room is non-smoking. ExpensiveLe Bistrot d’à Côte Flaubert a treat10 rue Gustave Flaubert, 17ème • 01 42 67 05 81www.michelrostang.fr Open lunch & dinner dailyIt’s no surprise that haute cuisine chef MichelRostang’s first bistro turned out to be more sophi-sticated than many of its genre. The period interior,and walls of kaleidoscopic majolica ceramics and oldMichelin guides, provide a convivial setting in whichto sample consistently good bistro cooking. ModerateKastoori Indian idyll4 place Gustave Toudouze, 9ème • 01 44 53 06 10Open lunch & dinner dailyThere aren’t many Indian restaurants in Paris whereyou can enjoy a fairly authentic meal in warm, tastefulsurroundings, or on a quiet pavement terrace. Hencethe popularity of Kastoori, with its carefully spiced – ifnot chilli-potent – food. The 8€ lunch menu is one ofthe city’s best bargains. Cheap4 F5RestaurantsCasa Olympe fixed-menu finesse48 rue St-Georges, 9ème • 01 42 85 26 01Open lunch & dinner Mon–FriDominique Versini, aka Olympe, is a diva of the Parisrestaurant scene. The compact, ochre-painted diningroom showcases her fine cooking, which draws on herCorsican roots. The three-course, 34€ menu offerssimple dishes, like potato salad with truffle shavings,that highlight the quality of the ingredients. Moderate
  • 42. 454 F44 F5West & NorthRose Bakery daytime distraction46 rue des Martyrs, 9ème • 01 42 82 12 80Open during the day Tue–SunThis café is dedicated to typically British products(from baked beans to sausages), many of themorganic. Quiches, soups and snack-sized pizzas satisfythe lunch crowd, but the big draw is the childhood-fantasy cakes, from tangy lemon tarts to sticky toffeepudding. The decor is as simple as the food. CheapMartel trendy French-Algerian3 rue Martel, 10ème • 01 47 70 67 56Open lunch & dinner Mon–Fri, dinner only SatThe latest haunt of couscous-loving fashionistas is thisbistro in the interesting and up-and-coming 10th.Among the most popular dishes are the “lovers’ arti-choke” a spiky treat to be shared, and lamb tagine withalmonds, prunes and apricots, but it’s hard for thefood to compete with the glamorous crowd. ModerateVelly down-to-earth bistro52 rue Lamartine, 9ème • 01 48 78 60 05Open lunch & dinner Mon–FriJust off the old-fashioned rue des Martyrs, Velly is thekind of bistro everyone hopes to find in Paris. In a no-frills setting, the real star is the food, prepared withseasonal ingredients and attention to presentation.Regulars love the oeuf cocotte with foie gras, and meatymains like onglet de veau with salsify fritters. ModerateChez Dom funky West African34 rue Sambre et Meuse, 10ème • 01 42 01 59 80Open lunch & dinner Mon–Fri, dinner only Sat & SunTypical of the quartier, Chez Dom serves authenticSenegalese food. Flower-printed tablecloths set thecheerful tone, and a glass of potent ti ponch arriveseven before you’ve asked for it. Boldly spiced meatand fish stews will have you licking the plate, but try tosave room for the “sexy chocolate” dessert. Moderate6 E511 A1
  • 43. 46 www.eparis.dk.comTerminus Nord classy destination23 rue de Dunkerque, 10ème • 01 42 85 05 15www.terminusnord.com Open lunch & dinner dailyDespite its position opposite the busy northern railwaystation, the august Terminus Nord is no tourist trap,just one of the city’s most handsome brasseries. Refuelpost-journey on onion soup and fresh seafood servedby white-suited waiters under the gaze of huge fres-coes and turn-of-the-20th-century posters. ModerateCafé Burq fashionable French6 rue Burq, 18ème • 01 42 52 81 27Open dinner only Tue–SunFormerly a sepia-toned wine bar, the Moulin à Vins,this bistro has been reborn as a slick hang-out forMontmartre’s young artists, film-makers and mediafolk. The mostly classic French food is decent enough,but what people really come for is the joyous, ifsmoky, atmosphere. ModerateChez Michel from Brittany with love10 rue de Belzunce, 10ème • 01 44 53 06 20Open lunch & dinner Tue–Fri, dinner only MonThere’s no mistaking Thierry Breton’s roots: the menuis piled high with hearty seasonal offerings from hisnative Brittany. And to quash any doubt, he also sportsthe Breton flag on his chef’s whites. While the areaisn’t very chic, the restaurant, with its red velvet ban-quettes and farmhouse-style seating in the basement,is nicely perched behind the imposing St-Vincent-de-Paul church, and the food is very smart indeed. Theblackboard specials echo the seasons and carry anadditional cost but they’re worth it – game-lovers arewell catered for in the cooler months with pigeon,wild boar and venison. At other times, try plump, freshscallops with velvety celeriac purée. Breton’s Paris-Brest, choux pastry filled with hazelnut butter cream,is pure dessert happiness. The service can be excru-ciatingly slow, but the staff are affable, and if there’sany tension it melts when the food appears. ModerateRestaurants4 E25 A45 A4
  • 44. 47When asking for water, specify une carafe unless you want mineral waterNorth4 E24 F1Chez Toinette neighbourhood bistro20 rue Germain-Pilon, 18ème • 01 42 54 44 36Open lunch & dinner Tue–SatYou don’t expect to find a discreet, candle-lit jewellike this one around the corner from bawdy Pigalle, soit’s all the more surprising to discover that ChezToinette also has seriously good food. You’ll oftenfind Provençal dishes on the menu, such as daube deboeuf; game is a speciality in winter. ModerateLao Siam Southeast Asian offerings49 rue de Belleville, 19ème • 01 40 40 09 68Open lunch & dinner dailyNeither service nor decor are particularly charming,but Lao Siam is almost always packed thanks to thelip-smacking flavours of its Thai and Laotian dishes.Squid salad is a good bet to start, followed by coconut-milk curry and a giant, juicy mango. The separatenon-smoking dining room is less busy. CheapLe Poulbot Gourmet trad French food39 rue Lamarck, 18ème • 01 46 06 86 00Open lunch & dinner Mon–Sat; closed Sun Jun–Sep;lunch Sun Oct–MayIt’s a little out of the way, but this Montmartre restau-rant has a loyal following thanks to the sincerity of itsowner and of its cooking. The small dining room isthe perfect place to savour hearty dishes such as vealkidney with morel mushrooms. ModerateLa Cave Gourmande hidden talent10 rue duGénéral-Brunet,19ème • 01 40 40 03 30 • q BotzarisOpen lunch & dinner Mon–FriThis sedate neighbourhood near the Butte Chaumontpark is not where you’d expect to find an up-and-coming US chef, but Paris has a few such secret eatingdestinations. Mark Singer puts a modern spin ontraditional French dishes, so you might find escargots,but not bathed in the usual garlic butter. Moderate12 G1
  • 45. 484 F2Seek out Paris’s classic brasseries through www.eparis.dk.comLa Famille globe-trotting hit41 rue des Trois-Frères, 18ème • 01 42 52 11 12Open dinner only Tue–Sat, dinner 1st Sun of each month,brunch 2nd–4th Sun of each monthFew Paris chefs have come to grips with fusion food,which is why La Famille, in newly fashionableMontmartre, has become such a hit. Young Basquechef Inaki Aizpitarte has had his passport stampedaround the world, particularly in Latin America andMorocco, and also worked with the inventive GillesChoukroun at Le Café des Délices before opening thisrestaurant with his cousin (he’s the one in charge ofthe bar and the hip music). The short, constantlychanging menu combines French (and especiallyBasque) ingredients with more tropical flavours,resulting in dishes such as pan-fried foie gras withmiso sauce, gambas pan-fried with passion fruit, andchocolate custard with Espelette chilli pepper. Noteverything works all the time but any culinary near-misses are easily compensated for by the fact thatdinner here is guaranteed fun. This is especially trueof the first Sunday of each month, when the entiremenu is served in tapas-like portions so that you canreally do Aizpitarte’s creative endeavours justice andgraze your way through every dish. A help-yourselfall-day brunch of French pastries and egg dishes isserved on the other Sundays, making customers feelthat they are really part of the family. Since the sparespace is rather limited and word has already been outfor a while, it’s essential to book. ModerateRestaurants
  • 46. 49North & EastCafé Noir eccentric surprise15 rue St-Blaise, 20ème • 01 40 09 75 80 • q Porte de BagnoletOpen dinner only dailyA thriving bar scene has put this quartier on the map, but if it’s agood meal you’re seeking here, this quirky bistro is the place to go.Located on a pedestrianized street, the restaurant’s terrace tablesare irresistible in summer; inside you can admire the coffee potand hat collections while tucking into unusual dishes such astandoori prawns with chicken livers. ModerateAstier fashionably shabby chic44 rue Jean-Pierre Timbaud, 11ème • 01 43 57 16 35Open lunch & dinner Mon–FriResolutely old-fashioned, Astier is as much loved forits worn decor and overrun tables as for its great-valuefour-course menu. That doesn’t imply second-ratefood: the cooking is classy and finely balanced bet-ween traditional dishes and seasonal specials. Thewine list is long and worthy. Moderate12 E34 E2La Mascotte old Montmartre52 rue des Abbesses, 18ème • 01 46 06 28 15Open lunch & dinner dailyAt this old-fashioned neighbourhood institution, dinerscan choose from the extensive seafood selection orsatisfy serious hunger pangs with the good-value 26€menu. This might include a salad of green beans andendive, chicken with potato purée, and an almondcake with Berthillon ice cream. Moderate12 F1Benisti North African pit-stop108 boulevard de Belleville, 20ème • no phoneOpen lunch & dinner Tue–SunJewish, Arab and Chinese communities comfortably co-exist in Belleville, as a walk down the main boulevardwill testify. One of the most popular places to stop andrefuel is this Tunisian snack and pastry shop, whereyou can order a gargantuan grilled-meat sandwich orsip mint tea with a plate of sticky pastries. Cheap
  • 47. 12 E35018 F212 F1www.eparis.dk.comCrêperie Bretonne Fleurie pancakes67 rue de Charonne, 11ème • 01 43 55 62 29Open lunch & dinner dailyTwo steps from the booming Bastille bar scene, thiscrêperie shows the quartier’s flip-side, with realBreton specialities. Proof of its authenticity is thecrêpe filled with andouille (tripe sausage), but youcan also stick to the more conventional ham, cheeseand egg variations, washed down with cider. CheapDong Huong Vietnamese canteen14 rue Louis-Bonnet, 11ème • 01 43 57 18 88Open lunch & dinner Wed–MonWhen you can’t face another multi-course meal, a bowlof Vietnamese noodles can be just the thing to reviveyour appetite. Dong Huong stands out for the quality ofits pho (noodle soups) and grilled meats and for itslarge non-smoking room – a rarity in Paris. The crunchyimperial rolls are also exceptionally good. CheapL’Homme Bleu North African local55bis rue Jean-Pierre Timbaud, 11ème • 01 48 07 05 63Open dinner only Mon–SatThe queue out the door attests to L’Homme Bleu’spopularity (they don’t take reservations, so show upearly). The main floor is more atmospheric thanks toits open kitchen, but those lucky enough to get atable anywhere won’t complain. Delicious couscousand fragrant tagines are the stars. ModerateJacques Mélac no-frills wine bar42 rue Léon-Frot, 11ème • 01 43 70 59 27 • q CharonneOpen lunch & dinner Tue–SatThere’s nothing complicated about moustachioedJacques’ wine bar: cheese is hacked off a giant hunk,charcuterie is sliced before your eyes and the non-smoking room is reached through the tiny kitchen,where the day’s specials such as porc aligot (sausageand cheesy potato mash) are prepared. ModerateRestaurants
  • 48. 5118 F118 F2Post-dessert coffee is served black; if you want milk, you’ll have to ask for it (expect strange looks)EastLe Petit Keller retro home cooking13bis rue Keller, 11ème • 01 47 00 12 97Open lunch & dinner Tue–SatThis little 1950s-vintage restaurant is popular for itsgreat-value set menu — 10€ at lunch and 15€ in theevening. The food is more like decent home cookingthan ambitious restaurant fare, which is fine with thelocals who can’t be bothered to whip up salmon withsorrel sauce, duck magret or apple crumble. ModerateLe Train Bleu vintage diningGare de Lyon, place Louis-Armand, 12ème • 01 43 43 09 06www.le-train-bleu.com Open breakfast, lunch & dinner dailyWith its stockpile of cherubs, gilt and big oak benches,Le Train Bleu is a glamorously vintage experience amidthe hubbub of the Gare de Lyon train station. As you’dexpect from a Belle Epoque dame, the food is a loftytake on French classics (lobster salad, veal chops)and there’s a bar, too, for a quiet drink. ModerateLe Souk spice-scented haven1 rue Keller, 11ème • 01 49 29 05 08Open lunch & dinner Sat & Sun, dinner only Tue–FriThough it’s run by chatty Algerians, Le Souk’s food istotally Moroccan, with sweet and fragrant tagines andpastillas (poultry wrapped in crisp pastry, sprinkledwith sugar) featuring alongside couscous. Tables areso sought after that there are two fixed dinner sittings,for which bookings are essential. Moderate18 E5Le Bistrot Paul Bert seasonal food18 rue Paul-Bert, 11ème • 01 43 72 24 01 • q Faidherbe-ChalignyOpen lunch & dinner Mon–SatThis place seems to have it all: an atmospheric set-ting, genuinely friendly service, a hip, festive crowd,intriguing (organic) wines and, best of all, great foodthat follows the seasons to the extent that the black-board menu changes every day. It’s a little out of theway, but you’re unlikely to regret the effort. Moderate
  • 49. 5221 A418 F3www.eparis.dk.comLe Square Trousseau outstanding bistro1 rue Antoine-Vollon, 12ème • 01 43 43 06 00Open lunch & dinner Tue–SatThanks to its setting next to a leafy square, its beau-tifully weathered 1900s interior and the charismaticand friendly staff, Le Square Trousseau oozes charm.Wines from small producers complement modernbistro fare, such as green asparagus with melon andlamb shank in a syrupy sauce. ModerateAu Trou Gascon regional refinement40 rue Taine, 12ème • 01 43 44 34 26 • q DaumesnilOpen lunch & dinner Mon–Fri, dinner only SatDevotees of serious, French southwestern cookinghunt out this contemporary restaurant overseen byMichelin two-star chef Alain Dutournier. Dishessuch as the surprisingly light cassoulet and the gutsyregional Madiran wine make the trek to this outpostmore than worthwhile. ExpensiveL’Avant Goût top-quality bistro fare26 rue Bobillot, 13ème • 01 53 80 24 00Open lunch & dinner Tue–FriJust a taste of Christophe Beaufront’s creative fare andit becomes patently clear why landing a table in herewithout a reservation is impossible. The pot-au-feu decochon (pork simmered with fennel, carrot and spices),accompanied by ginger chips, onion in cider, gherkinsand horseradish purée, is exceptional. ModerateRestaurantsSardegna a Tavola authentic Italian1 rue de Cotte, 12ème • 01 44 75 03 28Open lunch & dinner Tue–Sat, dinner only MonIt’s rare to find an authentic Italian restaurant in Paris,let alone a Sardinian one that gives you a flavour ofthis rocky, sun-baked isle. No compromises here:both ingredients and dishes are genuine, from therobust Sardinian wines to the pasta dishes, oftenflavoured with almonds, mint or orange. Moderate18 F3
  • 50. 53East & SouthLes Cailloux casual yet classy58 rue des Cinq-Diamants, 13ème • 01 45 80 15 08Open lunch & dinner Tue–SatThe owners of Les Cailloux are on to a winning formulawith this Italian wine bar-restaurant located in thevillagey Butte-aux-Cailles (see p159). Some 40 winesare available, half of them Italian and a few by theglass, and the food (linguine with crab, roasted pepperwith mozzarella) is simple but satisfying. ModerateNatacha family values17bis rue Campagne-Première, 14ème • 01 43 20 79 27Open lunch & dinner Mon–Sat, lunch only SunLong a fashion haunt, Natacha is a family affair, with young chefAlain Cirelli running the kitchen while his mother is front of house.And following a home-cooking tradition, many dishes are served intheir casseroles: a roasted pheasant nestles in a copper pot andhachis parmentier (shepherd’s pie) comes in a cast-iron dish.Desserts are similarly comforting. ModerateTricotin Oriental roundup15 ave de Choisy, 13ème • 01 45 84 74 44 • q Porte de ChoisyOpen lunch & dinner dailyIt won’t win any prizes for decor or location, butTricotin wins out with its steaming display of Chinese,Cambodian, Thai and Vietnamese dishes. It’s frantic,canteen-style eating, but the food is fresh and veryaffordable: pho, the Vietnamese meal-in-a-bowl soup,is the bargain deal. Cheap19 E1Au Petit Marguery timeless bistro9 boulevard de Port-Royal, 13ème • 01 43 31 58 59Open lunch & dinner Tue–SatThis bistro is famous for its game, and in winter itserves up the classic dish lièvre à la royale, acomplex creation involving hare, foie gras, wine andblood. Service can be grumpy, but the clientele oflocal gourmands tucking into pâtés and partridgecreates an atmosphere of pure enjoyment20 H220 H5
  • 51. 5414 F3Check on disabled access in Paris restaurants at www.eparis.dk.comLe Père Claude excellent grill51 avenue de la Motte-Piquet, 15ème • 01 47 34 03 05Open lunch & dinner dailyMeat-lovers are well catered for in Paris but nowheremore so than at this caramel-coloured local with itsglassed-in grill bar. The protein-strong mixed grillcomes with steak, black pudding, lamb and chicken,and golden gratinéed potatoes. A perennial favouritewith omnivorous French politicians. ModerateL’Os à Moëlle &La Cave de l’Os à Moëlle local heroes3 rue Vasco de Gama, 15ème • 01 45 57 27 27;181 rue Lourmel, 15ème • 01 45 57 28 28 • q LourmelOpen lunch & dinner Tue–SatChef Thierry Faucher produces food that is consistentlyattractive, satisfying and reasonably priced. Lunch anddinner are a pre-fixed (32€) blackboard affair, andmight include velvety cauliflower soup ladled overroasted thyme and crispy croutons, foie gras coated ingingerbread crumbs, or roast pigeon with chestnuts.The four-course lunch menu offers several choices,while the indulgent six-course dinner menu is pre set.In contrast, the casual and cheaper La Cave de l’Osà Moëlle, opposite, features three communal tablesand a 20€-buffet (you can have seconds and thirds) ofrobust fare. Terrines, bowls of olives and sea snails, atureen of steaming soup and one main-course choice,such as pheasant with lentils, plus cheese, dessertsand good-value wine are all included. ModerateRestaurantsL’Assiette market leader181 rue du Château, 14ème • 01 43 22 64 86Open lunch & dinner Wed–SunUnquestionably elitist, L’Assiette attracts bourgeoisdiners who find it amusing to pay through the nosefor bistro cooking in a bare-wood setting. The factremains, however, that chef Lulu draws on the finestingredients and her food is delicious. The puddingsare the kind maman might make. Expensive19 C3
  • 52. 5514 G5No-one will look twice if you pull out a magazine or book while eating alone in a café or bistroSouthChez Foong Malay peninsula32 rue de Frémicourt, 15ème • 01 45 67 36 99Open lunch & dinner Mon–SatChez Foong offers a welcome taste of Malaysia’s little-known (certainly in Paris) cuisine. The prix-fixe menusare great value; light, tasty starters such as omelettewith ginger-peanut sauce are followed by steamedspiced fish and curries or grilled meats flavoured withlemongrass and coconut. ModerateLe Troquet upscale Basque21 rue François-Bonvin, 15ème • 01 45 66 89 00Open lunch & dinner Tue–SatWhile this bistro in a nondescript street appearsintensely old-fashioned, looks can be deceiving.Christian Etchebest’s menu, while brief, is strictlyseasonal and contemporary, often displaying thechef’s Basque bias (fish wrapped in Bayonne hamwith liberal sprinklings of Espelette pepper). ModerateLe Suffren neighbourhood favourite84 avenue de Suffren, 15ème • 01 45 66 97 86Open breakfast, lunch & dinner dailyThe timber and maritime theme may have given wayto fashionable shades of black and orange andclubby fabric chairs, but the menu at this adoredneighbourhood brasserie escaped unscathed.You’ll find all the classics, from seafood platters andsteaks to choucroute. ModerateSalons de ThéCoffee might be the brew of choice when it comes todunking a croissant, but tea has caught on in Parisin a big way. The deservedly famous Ladurée, datingback to 1862, is excellent for lemon tea and multi-flavoured macaroons – they sell one of these every25 seconds! Fuel up on a cup of strong Darjeelingand a fruit-crammed crumble at A Priori Thé in theglitzy Galerie Vivienne, or calm down after a seriousLeft Bank shopping spree with a pot of CelestialEmpire at La Maison de la Chine. Stop by Angelinafor mud-thick hot chocolate and gooey cakes in ele-gant surroundings, or, take a seat under a shady figtree on the serene terrace of the Grande Mosquée’sCafé Maure and sup on mint tea and honey-drizzledbaklava. For contact details, see p220.14 F314 F4
  • 53. shoppingThe capital of style, Paris has allthe retail opportunities that ashopaholic might crave. The city’s20 arrondissements house adazzling and diverse array, fromtiny glamour-puss boutiques onserpentine streets to venerabledepartment stores on sweepingboulevards. Trawl for luxury labels,pore over silky lingerie, search outone-off handbags or stock up ondeliciously French homewares.
  • 54. Paris’s flea markets (puces)aren’t as well-stocked as they used tobe, but it’s still possible to unearth somegreat vintage finds.58 Get in touch with French style on www.eparis.dk.comTOP CHOICES – shoppingSentou Gallery18 & 24 rue Pont Louis-Philippe, 4èmeIf you like contemporary style, you’lllove Sentou’s homewares, which aredesigned by international namesas well an in-house team. (See p73)AB3333 rue Charlot, 3èmeThis homely boutique offers anexpertly put-together selection ofwomen’s fashion and accessories.(See p69)Christian Tortu6 carrefour de l’Odéon, 6èmeTortu believes that all plants werecreated equal. His chic arrangementsoften fuse fruit with branches, budsor blooms. (See p79)Catherine Arigoni14 rue Beaune, 7èmeFans of vintage clothing are wowedby Arigoni’s well-selected couturecache, including items by namessuch as Pucci and YSL. (See p82)Yukiko97 rue Vieille du Temple, 4èmeThis pint-sized shop sells excellent-quality vintage clothing. Someitems have been given a moderntwist. (See p71)The city’s most design-consciousdepartment stores – Printemps (see p83)and Le Bon Marché (see p83) – both sella range of stylish homewares. GaleriesLafayettes (see p83) has four entirefloors dedicated to the home.Isabel Marant16 rue de Charonne, 11èmeMarant puts a unique bohemian-style spin on ethnic chic, weavingmulticultural influences into herultra-wearable clothes. (See p90)Coin Canal1 rue de Marseille, 10èmeGroovy 60s lamps, chunky 50sfurniture and dainty old glasswareare just some of the retro treasuresin this light-filled shop. (See p89)Antik Batik18 rue de Turenne, 4èmeThis store attracts trendsetters whoare keen to snap up garments andaccessories from all over the world.(See p67)Stella Cadente93 quai de Valmy, 10èmeThe name is Italian for “falling star”,and this designer’s creations cer-tainly sparkle. Pretty coloursare the norm here. (See p87)VINTAGE & RETROFOR THE HOME BOUTIQUESThomas Boog52 rue de Bourgogne, 7èmeBoog’s fanciful creations are coveredin shells, from chandeliers encasedin white coquilles to mirrors ringedwith mother-of-pearl. (See p82)Vanessa Bruno25 rue de St-Sulpice, 6èmeBruno’s clothes are fresh, well-cut and easy to wear. Womenof all ages will find somethingthat suits them here. (See p77)
  • 55. 59TOP CHOICES – shoppingMadelios23 boulevard de la Madeleine, 1erAlmost a male service station,Madelios stocks all manner of gar-ments and accessories, and alsohas a men’s beauty salon. (See p61)Paul & Joe40 rue du Four, 6èmeMen who know about fashion arefans of Paul & Joe’s retro-styleshirts, contemporary jackets andmodish accessories. (See p77)Charles Jourdan23 rue François Premier, 8èmeBy injecting fun and colour intoshoes, design director Patrick Coxhas breathed new life into thisaugust company. (See p84)Pierre Hardy156 galerie de Valois, 1erThe city’s most cutting-edge foot-wear for women, and sharp shoesfor men. Pierre Hardy designs shoesto make an entrance in. (See p61)The 7th arrondissement’s rue deGrenelle is lined with shoe shops, whichrange from design outlets, such as Iris(see p80) and Jean-Baptiste Rautureau(see p82), to those selling copycat stylesat greatly reduced prices.Martine Sitbon13 rue Grenelle, 7èmeSitbon’s clothes are modern instyle, but the secret of theirsuccess is that they’re alsocomfortable to wear. (See p81)Martin Grant44 rue Vieille du Temple, 4èmeDramatically structured, elegantcoats are Grant’s trademark. Healso turns out impeccably tailoreddresses and skirts. (See p72)Lagerfeld Gallery40 rue Seine, 6èmeThe boutique-cum-gallery of thisperennially elegant designer offers hissignature Lagerfeld line, as well assome Fendi titbits. (See p77)Helmut Lang29 rue St-Honoré, 1erBranded as a minimalist, a decon-structionist and even a futurist, theachingly hip Lang is always ahead ofthe fashion pack. (See p61)Karine Dupont22 rue Poitou, 3èmeIdeal for women on the go, Dupont’ssturdy, functional bags, in snappycolours and designs, are fancyenough to take anywhere. (See p67)Loft Design by56 rue de Rennes, 6èmeThis store’s not about flashy style.It’s known for its well-thought outbasics for the urban man. (See p78)LEclaireur10 rue Hérold, 1erThe world’s most avant-garde mens-and womenswear – from rare Italiancouture to underground Japaneselabels – are collected here. (See p63)Jamin Puech43 rue Madame, 6èmeThe unique handbags of designduo Jamin Peuch are perfectfor women who want to standout from the crowd. (See p78)FOR MENSHOES & BAGS DESIGNER FASHIONAgnès b12 rue Vieux Colombier, 6èmeAgnès b man likes to look good, andthis designer makes it easy with herdurable, modern pieces. (See p76)
  • 56. 6010 F4by Terry couture cosmetics21 galerie Véro-Dodat, 1er • 01 44 76 00 76www.byterry.com Open 10:30–7 Mon–SatTerry de Gunzburg, a former make-up artist andcreative director of YSL’s cosmetics line for 15 years,knows a thing or two about beauty and luxury; forinstance, that women can’t get enough of it. So, shelaunched “by Terry”, a line of made-to-order hautecouleur cosmetics. Simply book a consultation withTerry, self-described couturier pour le visage, todiscover what she can do to make you radiant.The make-up, which boasts some of the most costlypigments around, is mixed up by a team of chemistsand colourists in the lab upstairs and packaged intosilver containers, which can be personalized withinitials or a message. Each order will comprise a year’ssupply of a unique product, albeit at a handsomeprice. There’s also a range of ready-to-wear cosmetics(a few doors away at No. 36), but it’s more interesting– and much more Parisian – to go for the bespokewww.eparis.dk.comChristian Louboutin fabulous footwear19 rue Jean-Jacques Rousseau, 1er • 01 42 36 05 31Open 10:30–7 Mon–SatLouboutin’s extravagant red-soled shoes are extremelyglamorous. Displayed in a white wall set with redalcoves, the styles veer from fantasy (bejewelledvelvet) to resolutely feminine (leather and spiderylace). Shoes, claims Louboutin, are like faces: someare extraordinary front-on, others are better in profile.Fifi Chachnil ultra-feminine frills231 rue St-Honoré, 1er • 01 42 61 21 83www.fifichachnil.com Open 11–7 Mon–SatNobody does girly lingerie like Delphine Véron.Think baby-doll dresses in soft candy colours,G-strings with feathery pom-poms at the hips, lushred bras with cute little bows — all guaranteed tosummon up the femme fatale in every woman. Justbrowsing in this sugary pink boudoir is fun.Shopping10 F49 D3
  • 57. 619 C210 E4Helmut Lang master of minimalism219 rue St-Honoré, 1er • 01 58 62 53 20www.helmutlang.com Open 11–7 Mon–SatLang’s gallery-cum-boutique features a concrete stair-case flanked by two imposing, black monolithic boxes,black vinyl ottomans and art by names such as LouiseBourgeois. These clean lines are also evident in themen’s and women’s clothes: razor-sharp pants andjackets, figure-hugging dresses and skinny T-shirts.Pierre Hardy his-and-hers heels156 galerie de Valois, 1er • 01 42 60 59 75www.pierrehardy.com Open 11–7 Tue–SatFormer Hermès accessories designer Pierre Hardy hashad a big hit with his sophisticated, own-brand rangeof shoes. His elegant boutique is located within theup-market arcades enclosing the Palais Royal gardens(see p162): lit by a wall of coloured neon tubes, ithas something of a gallery feel to it, an impressionreinforced by the fact that the shoes are presentedon one long black shelf running round the walls.Hardy’s women’s collection revolves around vertigi-nous heels, daring foot “décolletés” and open-toedstilettos in nude pink and coral that fasten withlingerie straps. But fans of flatter styles are also wellserved with kitten heels, sexy gladiator sandals andcute ballerina shoes in candy colours. The designer’scapsule men’s collection includes stylish cowboyboots, kangaroo-skin lace-ups and white leather desertboots. Unusually for Paris, service is with a smile.Madelios male domain23 boulevard de la Madeleine, 1er • 01 53 45 00 00www.madelios.com Open 10–7 Mon–SatA one-stop shop for men’s fashion, with two floors ofstylish, if faintly conservative, clothing. This meanssharp suits by Dior, Paul Smith and Givenchy; stylishcasuals by the likes of Lacoste and Diesel; plus alarge range of accessories and shoes. Also found in-store are expert tailors and a men’s beauty salon.Centre10 F4
  • 58. 62 www.eparis.dk.comL’Artisan Parfumeur evocative scents2 rue Amiral de Coligny, 1er • 01 44 88 27 50www.artisanparfumeur.com Open 10–7:30 Mon–SatThis boutique rekindles memories with its cleverlyscented candles and perfumes. Premier Figuier(First Figs) is Provence on a hot summer’s day, JeMe Souviens (I Remember) conjures up childhoodcuddles, while Pour des Prunes (Plum Pudding) isreminiscent of a pie baking in the oven. Delicious.Martin Margiela bold fashion statements23 & 25bis rue de Montpensier, 1er • 01 40 15 06 44(menswear), 01 40 15 07 55 (womenswear)Open 11–7 Mon–SatThe Belgian fashion maverick’s first Paris boutique isa startling all-white space. Margiela’s avant-gardemens- and womenswear tends to be on theconceptual side, but everything – apart from theweird split-toed shoes – is actually very wearable.Maria Luisa always in fashion2 rue Cambon, 1er • 01 47 03 96 15Open 10:30–7 Mon–SatMaria Luisa has impeccable taste and a discerning eye.Her boutiques are favoured by the fashion elite whocome by each season for the latest by Gaultier, OlivierTheyskens, Ann Demeulemeester and Jean-Paul Knott,to name but a few. Whether you crave cutting-edge orclassic, new or established, this is prime territory.Salons du Palais Royal regal perfumes25 rue de Valois, 1er • 01 49 27 09 09www.salons-shiseido.com Open 10–7 Mon–SatEvery year Serge Lutens, Shiseido’s creative director,comes up with new fragrances that are added to therange and sold exclusively in this lavish shop. Best-sellers include Rahat Loukoum, with its bittersweetalmond, honey and vanilla scent, and Amber Sultan,aromatic amber spiced with evergreen rock rose.10 F3Shopping10 F510 F39 C3
  • 59. 63L’Eclaireur directional fashion10 rue Hérold, 1er • 01 40 41 09 89www.leclaireur.com Open 11–7 Mon–SatIt might be Paris’s hippest multi-brand boutique, butwith no shop window it’s certainly not the city’s mostobvious. You’ll have to press the buzzer to get in tothe dimly lit cavernous space, where, despite thestore’s ultra-trendy reputation, the welcome is warmand the staff are genuinely enthusiastic abouthelping customers put an outfit together.The store’s focus is on innovative, internationalfashion, showcasing superbly tailored men’scollections by Austrian designer Carol Christian Poelland avant-garde mens- and womenswear by Japaneselabel Undercover. Other highlights include tactiledeconstructed sweaters in vintage cashmere by LA-based designer Koi, a great selection of Linda Farrowvintage sunglasses and a more classic collection ofmenswear designed by actor John Malkovich that isexclusive to L’Eclaireur in France.Ventilo effortless chic13–15 boulevard de la Madeleine, 1er • 01 42 60 46 40Open 10:30–7 Mon–SatAn upmarket concept store, Ventilo sells a small butsophisticated range of women’s fashion and homeaccessories. The look is chic with a Moroccan/Indiantwist; think gorgeous fabrics, floaty djellebas and lotsof beading and embroidery. The in-store café serves aselection of Japanese teas and world food.Many shops are shut on Mondays and for all or much of AugustOdette & Zoe handbags galore4 rue des Petits Champs, 2ème • 01 42 61 48 75Open 11–7 Mon–SatThis pink boutique is packed with bags of everyimaginable style, shape and colour. The focus is onfun and originality rather than famous designerlabels: quirky finds include suitcases printed withMarilyn Monroe’s face, practical foldaway bags byBensimon and purses made from vintage saris.Centre9 C210 F310 G3
  • 60. 64 For information on tax refunds, check www.eparis.dk.comFlavie Furst real gems16 rue de la Soudière, 1er • 01 42 60 06 01Open 11–7 Mon–SatFlavie Furst makes glorious jewellery, her husbandRonald makes gorgeous bags – and that means thattheir tiny boutique is one big temptation. Flavie, whodesigned accessories for Lanvin before turning to full-time jewellery-making, loves the colour and emotivequalities of precious stones, and is careful not to over-power them with extravagant designs. She createspieces that are original, expressive and, above all,easy to wear: an effortlessly pretty pale-blue teardropsapphire set off-centre on a silver band, a singleplump Tahitian pearl draped on a delicate gold chain.No less eye-catching are her partner’s handbags,which run from totes to baguettes, all with matchingmake-up bags inside. The bags are made in amultitude of colours and textures, including stripesand rowdy floral prints, tweed and cowhide; few whoenter can leave without buying at least one.Lavinia wine emporium3–5 boulevard de la Madeleine, 1er • 01 42 97 20 20Open 10–8 Mon–SatIf your wine-appreciation skills need some polishing,Lavinia is the place to go. With a selection of over6,000 bottles (including 3,000 French wines, 2,000foreign wines and 1,000 spirits), 500 books, a staff of15 sommeliers, dozens of glasses and decanters aswell as various other wine-related paraphernalia, it’sEurope’s largest wine shop. The slick three-level storeis maintained like a traditional wine cellar, with a tem-perature of 19°C (68°F), though a special section forrare wines is kept at 14°C (58°F). Prices range from afew euros a bottle through to several thousand-plus.The glossy 80-seat, in-store restaurant serves lunchonly (shark steak and chardonnay are a winningcombination), though the bar is open till 8pm. Ineither, you can sample any wine in the store andthere’s no extra mark-up in price. Lavinia also holdsregular tastings and runs wine courses.Shopping9 D210 E3
  • 61. 65Killiwatch hip hand-me-downs64 rue Tiquetonne, 2ème • 01 42 21 17 37Open 2–7 Mon, 11–7 Tue–Sat (to 7:30 Sat)This store buys pre-worn clothing, cleans it up a treatand puts it back out on the rails. Not just any old rags,though – this is stylish stuff: from fur-trimmed coats toleather minis and swirly 70s shirts. There’s also club-wear from their in-house label, non-vintage jeans andstreetwear, plus magazines and the latest club flyers.Barbara Bui clean-cut style23 rue Etienne Marcel, 2ème • 01 40 26 43 65www.barbarabui.com Open 10:30–7:30 Mon–SatBarbara Bui’s designs can be described as clothes forstyle-conscious rebels: refined, with an offbeat femi-ninity. Born and raised in Paris in a Franco-Vietnamesefamily, Bui designs clothes that subtly reflect both cul-tures. Her exquisitely finished and flattering trousersare wardrobe must-haves; ditto, her leather jackets.Erik & Lydie jewels galore7 passage du Grand Cerf, 2ème • 01 40 26 52 59Open 2–7 Tue–SatSeriously pretty jewellery is what Erik & Lydie do best;contemporary and gently artistic with a slightVictorian bent. Spidery necklaces draped with flower-shaped stones recall the delicate garlands favouredby a previous generation, while the slim metal chokerswouldn’t be out of place in the coolest of clubs.10 H3Robert Le Héros arty decor13 rue de Saintonge, 3ème • 01 44 59 33 22www.robertleheros.com Open 1–7 Tue–SatAfter much anticipation, this leading textile design agency set up byfour art-school friends now has its own boutique. Step past the jauntyred façade and you’ll find a veritable art and design laboratory with aseasonally changing decor. The foursome’s eye-catching graphicdesigns in gorgeous colourways are reproduced on everything fromcushions, curtains and wallpaper to handbags and diaries.Centre10 G310 H411 C4
  • 62. 66 www.eparis.dk.comShoe Bizz fashion for feet48 rue Beaubourg, 3ème • 01 48 87 12 73Open 10:30–7:30 Mon–SatShoe Bizz zeroes in on the hottest footwear trends,reproduces the styles and sells them for a lot lessthan you’d pay elsewhere. Don’t expect flawlessfinishes or sturdy quality, though. These shoes aren’tmeant to last forever, just as long as the style is envogue – but that’s more than enough.Goumanyat & Son Royaume spices3 rue Charles-François Dupuis, 3ème • 01 44 78 96 74www.goumanyat.com Open 2–7 Tue–Fri, 11–7 SatA whiff of faraway lands emanates from this elegantlittle shop-cum-olfactory-museum run by Jean MarieThiercelin, a sixth-generation spice merchant. Hisfamily started out dealing in saffron in 1809; todaytheir business encompasses 180 spices, includingpink peppercorns from Pondicherry, vanilla beansfrom Madagascar, black peppercorns from Kerala andsea salt and oils from around the world.This is where Michelin-starred chefs, such as AlainDucasse and Joel Robuchon, come to stock up on rarecondiments. Poke your nose into the jars on le bar àsniffer to discover the vibrant aromas of star anise,cloves and nutmeg; get a lesson on spices from thegracious Monsieur Thiercelin himself; or browse thestore for gifts of saffron-flavoured chocolate, caviar,fine linen aprons, plant-based bath and skincareproducts, kitchen utensils and heady spice mixes.Nodus crisp shirts and ties22 rue Vieille du Temple, 4ème • 01 42 77 07 96www.nodus.fr Open 10:30–7:30 Tue–Sat, 2–7:30 Sun–MonNodus pays homage to smart men, with a range of400 shirts and over 300 different ties. This cosybranch in the Marais displays its myriad models inneat, colour-coded rows that cover every inch of walland much of the floor space in between. Trendycufflinks and tie-pins complete the experience.Shopping17 B111 C311 A5
  • 63. 67Karine Dupont it’s in the bag22 rue Poitou, 3ème • 01 40 27 84 94www.karinedupont.com Open noon–7 Tue–SatDupont makes practical, soft nylon bags in all shapesand sizes, from roomy totes to shoulder slingers.There are bags for every occasion, with names likeKampus Lady, Kasual Travel and Klub. They come inan array of modish colours and prints and many havehandy sections that can be detached as required.Food gourmet’s hang-out58 rue Charlot, 3ème • 01 42 72 68 97Open 11–1, 2–7 Tue–Fri, 2–7 SatMuch of the rue Charlot buzz was started by the open-ing of this intriguing bookstore-cum-gallery. With itswall-to-wall bookshelves, it’s a foodie’s paradise,where browsers linger over a range of mouthwateringcookbooks in French, English and Japanese. Food alsostocks larder goodies and designer tableware.Chic on the CheapDépôt-ventes are where canny Parisians shop forcut-price designer clothes. Try Annexe des Créateurs(40–70 per cent off previous seasons’ Versace,Vivienne Westwood, Dolce & Gabbana and more),Réciproque (six stores in one street selling womens-wear, menswear and the biggest range of second-hand Chanel in Paris) and Dépôt-Vente de Buci (twoneighbouring stores selling everything from YSL toYamamoto). Many stores have their own permanentsales shops, the best of which are Et Vous,Cacharel and Kookaï. At the cheap end of the scale,Guerrisol has more of a whiffy jumble-sale flavour.But this is where designers such as Gaultier trawl forinspiration, and there are real bargains to be had.For further details, see pp221–2.Some small boutiques offer a 13–15% tax refund to non-EU residents who spend more than 175€Antik Batik ethnic fusion18 rue de Turenne, 4ème • 01 44 78 02 00Open 10:30–7 Tue–Sat, 2–7 Sun & MonAntik Batik sells globally inspired somethings thatfollow the season’s trends; from flowery headscarvesand crocheted bikinis for summer, to hand-knittedhats, pullovers and bags for winter. Labels such asOrdinary People, Laura Urbinati and Uniform canalso be found on the shelves.Centre17 C111 C411 C4
  • 64. 68French Chain StoresSeveral international high-street stores are actuallyof French origin: the young of body and heartmake a beeline for branches of Morgan, Etam andKookaï (which now has a capsule up-marketcollection, Creative Lab). Basic, fashion-consciousfootwear can be snapped up at André (which alsoregularly invites guest designers), while PrincesseTam Tam is good for bikinis and underwear (thoughbra sizes often stop at a B-cup). On the beautyfront, Sephora is hard to beat, but Yves Rocheris also worth checking out for all-natural bathand beauty products. Monoprix supermarkets aregreat one-stop shops for (slightly older) fashion,bags, beauty products and home accessories.For further details, see pp221–2.www.eparis.dk.comAbou d’Abi Bazar affordable fashion10 rue des Francs Bourgeois, 3ème • 01 42 77 96 98Open 2–7:15 Mon, 10:30–7 Tue–Sat, 2–7 SunSavvy shoppers pop in here regularly to pick up theseason’s must-have pieces. These include reasonablypriced jeans, dresses and accessories from designerssuch as Vanessa Bruno, Stella Forest and IsabelMarant. Mixing and matching is a breeze, too, as theclothes on display are organized by colour.Galerie Simone designers’ creative lab124 rue Vieille du Temple, 3ème • 01 42 74 21 28Open noon–7 Tue–SatThe city’s coolest boutique for fashion, furniture, jewel-lery and accessories, Galerie Simone showcases one-offs and limited editions by some of the edgiest newdesigners in Paris. Check out Michel Morellini’s drapedleather dresses, conceptual silver jewellery by GeorgesTsak and origami-inspired handbags by Sanja.La Chaise Longue Marais institution20 rue des Francs Bourgeois, 3ème • 01 48 04 36 37Open 11–7 Mon–Sat, 2–7 SunThis tiny, two-storey home-decor boutique has becomesynonymous with design inventiveness and cheerfulkitsch. Specializing in cheap and quirky accessoriesfor bathrooms and kitchens – such as cocktail shakers,retro fans and miniature kitten-shaped frying-pans –LCL is the perfect hunting ground for novelty presents.Shopping17 C117 C111 C4
  • 65. 6911 C4AB33 affordable fashion33 rue Charlot, 3ème • 01 42 71 02 82Open 11–8 Tue–Sun (until 9 on Thu)Located in the heart of the retail hub that hasemerged in the northern Marais, AB33 has an appeal-ing take on both women’s fashion and the shoppingexperience. Dynamic young owner Agathe Buchotte(the AB of the store’s name) revamped an old grocer’sshop with the help of her architect father, giving thespace a lived-in feel with rugs, a magazine-strewncoffee table and a scattering of velvet poufs.You won’t find snooty Parisian vendors here,though; Agathe is an upbeat Marseillaise with a laid-back attitude who extends a friendly welcome to alland encourages browsing and extended trying-onsessions. She takes a highly personal approach toher buying, putting collections together as if theywere her own wardrobe. And while Agathe is keenlyaware of what’s out there on fashion’s cutting-edge,she manages to mix the season’s hottest catwalklooks with clothes that are fun, easy and wearable.These are all arranged on accessible, colour co-ordinated rails, offering an extensive selection ofmainstream lines such as Vanessa Bruno, IsabelMarant, Cabane de Zucca and celebrity jeans ofchoice Notify, showcased alongside delicate Italianlingerie by Kristina Ti and designer knits by risingBelgian star Christian Wijnants.AB33 accessories, which include original jewellerycreations by Marine de Diesbach and luxury leatherbags by up-and-coming Danish designer MalmStrecker, have an edgier look. Agathe also produces herown line of customized suede and leather shoulderbags; clients can choose their own colours and fabriccombinations (thus giving them a stylish one-offcreation for 260€). Allow five days for production.Centre
  • 66. 70 Follow this year’s Paris trends with www.eparis.dk.comComptoir des Cotonniers basic needs33 rue des Francs Bourgeois, 4ème • 01 42 76 95 33www.meresetfilles.comOpen 10–7 Mon–Sat, 1–7 SunFrench women who like stylish clothes but don’t likepaying high prices for them stock up on well-designedwardrobe basics here. The look is modern, casual andurban: easy-to-wear jackets in wool and flannel forwinter, crisp shirts and cool dresses for summer.A-poc instant ready-to-wear47 rue des Francs Bourgeois, 4ème • 01 44 54 07 05Open 11–7:30 Mon–SatA-poc, which stands for “A Piece of Cloth”, is the brain-child of Japanese designer Issey Miyake, and it workslike this: simply cut a piece of cloth from a bolt of hisrevolutionary woven-knit, non-run fabric and voilà, anew top, dress or wrap. Staff in the gallery-style spacewill advise how best to wear your new “poc”.Brontibay bags of style6 rue de Sévigné, 4ème • 01 42 76 90 80Open 11–8 Mon–Sat, 1:30–7:30 SunThe name might be inspired by two Australian coastalhavens (Bronte Beach and Byron Bay), but there’s nota single swimsuit in sight. Instead, it’s wall-to-wallbags in classy flannel, felt, nylon or leather (some-times with gloves to match). They also sell pamperingMOR lotions, plus Neal’s Yard Remedies creams.Azzedine Alaïa a well-kept secret7 rue de Moussy, 4ème • 01 42 72 19 19Open 11–7 Mon–SatNo tempting shop window here; just a discreet buzzerto gain admittance to this cool address. The Tunisianmaestro’s flattering cuts and curve-conscious women’sclothing are showcased in a cavernous space decora-ted by US artist Julian Schnabel. Don’t miss the perm-anent sale area of old stock and samples out back.Shopping11 B517 A111 B517 C1
  • 67. 71Calligrane paper chase4–6 rue du Pont Louis-Philippe, 4ème • 01 48 04 31 89Open 11–7 Tue–SatCalligrane’s three adjoining shops are devoted to the art of calligraphyand paper products. One specializes only in Fabriano, an Italian paperfavoured by Goya and Michelangelo; another sells up-market briefcaseand desk essentials; the third stocks textured paper from India, Brazil,Japan, China and Mexico – and holds occasional shows by artistsworking with paper. Simply sublime gifts for writers and artists.Hervé Gambs man-made flowers9bis rue des Blancs Manteaux, 4ème • 01 44 59 88 88www.hervegambs.fr Open 11–7:30 Tue–Sat, 2–7:30 SunHervé is the man when it comes to artificial flowers. Infact, his silky blooms are so convincing that it’s hardto tell his white orchids, purple calla lilies or trailingbamboo leaves from the real thing. As befits theircouture status, there are two collections a year thatreflect the latest horticultural trends.Yukiko vintage passions97 rue Vieille du Temple, 4ème • 01 42 71 13 41Open 11–7 Tue–SunYukiko is mad about vintage clothes, particularlyfurs. She searches all over the place, uncovering rarepieces that she then customizes to sell in her snugand charming Marais boutique.Set on the quieter end of a bustling thoroughfare,this hole in the wall is crammed with wonderful oldthings, though contemporary gear by Stella Cadente(see p87) is also stocked, as well as lesser-knowndesigners with a penchant for making old thingslike new again. You might be lucky enough tostumble upon an original Dior vanity case, somefunky leather bags from the 1970s, pristine 50spumps or clingy knee-high Barbarella-style boots.There’s lots of retro jewellery too, including flashyrings, overstated bracelets and shiny enamelbrooches. It’s hard to get out of the door withoutfalling for at least one of Yukiko’s treasures.Unlike the majority of shops in Paris, boutiques in the Marais are usually open on Sunday afternoons11 C4Centre17 A211 B5
  • 68. 72 www.eparis.dk.comMartin Grant ladylike elegance44 rue Vieille du Temple, 4ème • 01 42 71 39 49www.martingrantparis.com Open 10–6 Mon–FriAustralian designer Martin Grant has been makingclothes ever since his grandmother taught him to sewat the age of seven. Several years on, he’s stillstitching, but now it’s in a white and airy showroomthat overlooks a 17th-century flagstone courtyard onthe other side of the world. During his years in Paris –he’s been here since 1992 – the low-key Grant hasbuilt up a loyal clientele, including actress CateBlanchett, model Lauren Hutton and socialite LeeRadziwill (sister of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis), aswell as hordes of modern girls all over the world.His clothes are ladylike but sexy, timeless andundeniably elegant. His frocks (calling them dressesjust isn’t right) have a faint echo of the 1950s aboutthem: a strapless gown with wavy chiffon ruffles, abelted black wool sheath with built-in cape, abrocade cocktail dress in which a young Lauren Bacallwould look drop-dead gorgeous. Coats, though, arehis trademark, and Grant cuts them with sculpturalprecision (a skill no doubt gained by a four-year stintstudying the art). Recent designs have included asingle-breasted pony-skin coat with leather trim, aretro-look three-quarter-length tweed and a blackLurex evening trench. Even in summer, there’s alwaysa super-smart coat or three in the collection. Grant’sclothes are made to hug those feminine curves andthere’s just something about the way he does it thatmakes the wearer look très, très chic. And that’s justthe ticket when in Paris.Shopping11 B5
  • 69. 73Sentou cool, contemporary living18 & 24 rue du Pont Louis-Philippe, 4ème01 42 71 00 01 (No. 24), 01 42 77 44 79 (No. 18)29 rue François Miron, 4ème • 01 42 78 50 60www.sentou.fr Open 11–7 Tue–Sat (closed 2–3pm)It describes itself as “the art of living” store and thatpretty much sums it up. Opened in Paris in 1977 as anoutlet for the work of furniture designer Robert Sentou,this Marais store (actually three separate shops) hasmorphed over the years into a quasi gallery thatchampions modern design. Today, Sentou carries avaried selection of contemporary designs, from theethereal bamboo-and-paper lamps of Osamu Noguchito the upright birch chairs of Alvar Aalto, with thesupple vinyl containers of D-sign by O and playfulpicture plates by 100Drine in between.The shop at No. 24, the original boutique, is now atemple to tablewares, including colourful hand-blownglassware by Sugahara, classy Stelton cutlery, coollyelegant silver and gold enamel-dipped china bowls,plates and cups by French design duo Tsé-Tsé, plussalt and pepper shakers, scented candles, containers,lacquered trays and spring vases (old test tubes wiredtogether into snaking shapes). No. 18, meanwhile, isawash with the designs of former newspaper illus-trator and furniture fabric designer 100Drine: vividlycoloured, hand-painted plates with smiling faces andstacks of storage tins and notebooks dominate thespace. In addition, there are roomy plastic shoppingbaskets and cute things for kids. Objects are displayedfor easy, hands-on inspection and staff are helpfuland happy to offer advice. The largest store, a five-minute stroll away on rue François Miron, houses thestriking, modern furniture of Swedish company DavidDesign and Aalto’s classic tables and chairs, as wellas lamps, furniture and textiles from the Sentou line.Centre17 B1
  • 70. 7411 A5www.eparis.dk.comBô modish homewares8 rue St-Merri, 4ème • 01 42 72 84 64www.boutiquebo.com Open 11:30–7:30 Mon–Sat, 2–7:30 SunParisians love the contemporary lines of this store’swell-crafted wares, which run from vases to chairs viaLimoges crockery, table linen and candlesticks. Muchis the work of young designers, including KatsuhiroKinoshita (lacquer storage boxes), Gilles Caffier (sleekfurniture) and Catherine Grandidier (unusual lights).Diptyque haute-couture candles34 boulevard St-Germain, 5ème • 01 43 26 45 27www.diptyqueparis.com Open 10–7 Mon–SatIn business for 41 years, Diptyque is the original andstill the best when it comes to candles of distinction.Devotees include Kristin Scott-Thomas (who favoursShadow in the Water) and Donatella Versace (anadmirer of Fig Tree). This elegant and highly fragrantstore also sells scents and room sprays.A L’Olivier gourmet oils23 rue de Rivoli, 4ème • 01 48 04 86 59www.olivier-on-line.com Open 2–7 Mon, 10–7 Tue–SatOpened in 1822 by a Parisian pharmacist specializingin cod-liver oil, A L’Olivier was relaunched in 1978 asa gourmet food store. The beautiful packaging of theextensive selection of olive oils, flavoured oils andorganic vinegars would grace any shelf, and hampersof Provençal specialities can be made up to order.Hervé Van der Straeten chic designs11 rue Ferdinand Duval, 4ème • 01 42 78 99 99Open 9–1 & 2–6 Mon–Fri, noon–7 SatOnce the creator of jewellery collections for Lacroix,YSL and Gaultier, Hervé Van der Straeten now designshis own furniture and jewellery. Almost exclusivelyproduced in 24-carat gold-plated brass, the latterincludes ornate necklaces and bracelets, and wafer-thin pendant earrings inspired by blades of grass.Shopping17 A317 B117 B1
  • 71. 75Tara Jamon good-looking fashion18 rue du Four, 6ème • 01 46 33 26 60Open 10:30–7:30 Mon–SatStepping into Tara Jamon’s sunny corner shop is likestepping into spring. A Canadian expat with a Frenchheart, she specializes in sophisticated, reasonablypriced clothes. Think pert sundresses, slim-fit sheathdresses with knee-length coats, pleated skirts andsilk cardigans in ice-cream colours with bags to match.Vannina Vesperini outer underwear63 rue des Sts-Pères, 6ème • 01 42 84 37 62www.vesperini.com Open 10:30–12:30 & 2:30–7 Mon–SatVannina Vesperini subscribes to the idea of dessus-dessous, putting underwear on top rather than hidingit beneath clothes. Her dot of a shop brims with silk,satin and lace, from a clingy black teddy with sheerlace sleeves, to a chartreuse petticoat with lacy blackinset, plus silk bras and panties in every hue.Sabbia Rosa lush lingerie73 rue des Sts-Pères, 6ème • 01 45 48 88 37Open 10–7 Mon–SatMme Rosa is renowned for her sumptuous, hand-made and exotic-looking camisoles, corsetry, brasand knickers, all of which are coveted by the likes ofMadonna, Naomi Campbell and Cindy Crawford. Settleinto the seductive sofa, survey the silk, satin andchiffon, and splash out on something custom-made.La Maison du Chocolat choc therapy19 rue de Sèvres, 6ème • 01 45 44 20 40www.lamaisonduchocolat.com Open 10–7 Mon–SatFor those who believe that chocolate is one of thebasic food groups, La Maison du Chocolat is heavenon a plate. Indulge in the handmade ginger-flavouredganache, the cocoa-covered truffles or the potentAndalousie (chocolate cake, with lemon cream andtruffle) by chocolatier Robert Linx.Centre15 D215 C315 D216 E2In the weeks leading up to Christmas, most shops, including department stores, are open on Sundays
  • 72. 7615 D215 D215 D416 E2For companies that deliver long-distance, check out www.eparis.dk.comLes 3 Marches de Catherine B1 & 3 rue Guisarde, 6ème • 01 43 54 74 18www.catherine-b.com Open 10–7:30 Tue–Sat, 2:30–7:30 MonCatherine B is a luxury vintage-clothes sleuth whospecializes in tracking down old Hermès and Chanelbags. Her bijou boutique is packed to the medievalrafters with scarves, jewellery and sought-after Kellybags. The sister store next door sells a small selectionof equally pricey and exquisite vintage clothes.Agnès b Parisian chic6 (women’s) & 12 (men’s) rue du Vieux Colombier, 6ème01 44 39 02 05 (women’s), 01 45 49 02 60 (men’s)www.agnesb.fr Open 10–7 Mon–SatAgnès b is synonymous with quality fabrics, clean linesand quintessential French style. The modern yet classicdesigns – precisely tailored trousers, crisp shirts andmust-have little black dresses – suit all ages andlifestyles and often work over a few seasons.Free Lance sharp shoes30 rue du Four, 6ème • 01 45 48 14 78Open 10–7 dailyWhatever your footwear fancy – dainty, fur-covered,shiny or snakeskin – you’ll find it, or its close kin,here. Free Lance, who have been in the business formore than 100 years, keep up with the shoe trends;often, they’re creating them. Their strappy sandalsand dominatrix heels are particularly hot.APC urban basics3 & 4 rue Fleurus, 6ème • 01 42 22 12 77www.apc.fr Open 10:40–7 Mon–Fri, 11–7:30 SatThe Atelier de Production et Création is something ofan institution among Parisian hipsters who like theirdenim dark, rigid and slightly industrial. The girls’line includes A-line skirts, sweet summer dresses andwinter basics, while boys rule with those dark jeans,sober shirts and simple V-necked sweaters.Shopping
  • 73. 7715 D216 E316 E2Lagerfeld Gallery art & women’s fashion40 rue de Seine, 6ème • 01 55 42 75 51Open 11–7 Tue–SatThis sedate and rather masculine-looking store sellsKarl’s own Lagerfeld Gallery line, selected items fromthe Fendi collection, which he also designs, and hisaccessories, perfumes and fabulously glossy fashionmagazines. There are also regular photo exhibitions,often of Lagerfeld’s own graphic compositions.Paul & Joe for modern men40 rue du Four, 6ème • 01 45 44 97 70www.paulandjoe.com Open 11–7:30 Mon–SatThe shop is named after Sophie Albou’s two youngsons, who are going to have to wait a while to sportthe groovy slimline trousers, see-through shirtsand 1930s-style jackets that their mama turns out.Confident guys go wild for the African-print tracksuitsand the flamboyant pineapple-printed shirts.Vanessa Bruno cross-generational clothes25 rue St-Sulpice, 6ème • 01 43 54 41 04Open 10:30–7:30 Mon–SatBruno’s minimalist yet feminine garments appeal towomen of all ages. They are individual, usually trend-resistant (from shapely coats and jackets to flatteringtrousers), and have a good quality-price ratio. A hugesuccess since it hit the shelves in 1998 is her tote bagin sequins, leather or canvas.Woman erotic pursuits4 rue de Grenelle, 6ème • 01 49 54 66 21www.soniarykiel.fr Open 10:30–7 Mon–SatNathalie, daughter of renowned designer SoniaRykiel, caused quite a stir when she opened her“temple of pleasure” in St-Germain. The boutique’sthree floors offer all manner of seductive treats, fromblack lace lingerie and pashmina dressing gowns todesigner dildos and lipstick-shaped vibrators.Centre16 E1
  • 74. 78 www.eparis.dk.comJamin Puech cheeky handbags43 rue Madame, 6ème • 01 45 48 14 85www.jaminpuech.com Open 11–7 Mon–Fri, noon–7 SatDo you crave a bag with beads, shells, embroidery,leather fringing or crocheted raffia? Designers BenoitJamin and Isabelle Puech have that certain somethingto slip on to your wrist. This dramatic boutique(created by theatre designer Elisabeth Leriche)displays hundreds of their equally theatrical bags.Marie Mercié eccentric hatters23 rue St-Sulpice, 6ème • 01 43 26 45 83Open 11–7 Mon–SatBeautifully finished, handmade hats are the raisond’être of this boutique. Celebrities including CatherineDeneuve are among the fans of Marie’s stylish head-gear, which ranges from flamboyant wedding hats andcute felt cloches to skullcaps sprouting branches.Bespoke hats can be ordered (allow up to one month).Onward avant-garde trends147 boulevard St-Germain, 6ème • 01 55 42 77 55Open 11–7 Mon & Sat, 10:30–7 Tue–FriThis Left-Bank institution has a reputation for show-casing experimental fashion. Clothing by maverickdesigners such as Bernhard Willhelm and quirky Dutchduo Viktor & Rolf are featured here as well as acces-sories that make bold fashion statements, such asteaspoon necklaces and jewelled handcuffs.Loft Design by comfortable chic56 rue de Rennes, 6ème • 01 45 44 88 99www.loft-design-by.com Open 11–7 Mon–SatWith its wood floors, barely there shelves and brickwalls, Loft looks more like its namesake than a clothesshop. In keeping with the minimalist surroundings,designer Patrick Frèche specializes in tasteful urbanbasics for men and women in grey, black and white,with the occasional splash of seasonal colour.Shopping16 E216 E316 E216 E3
  • 75. 79Deyrolle animal, vegetable and mineral46 rue du Bac, 7ème • 01 42 22 30 07www.princejardinier.fr Open 10–7 Mon–Sat (closed 1–2pm Mon)In 1995, Prince Louis-Albert de Broglie traded banking for horticultureand opened his first Paris store (Le Prince Jardinier), selling tomatochutneys and preserves made at his Loire Valley château, plus garden-ing tools and clothes, soaps and seeds. At Deyrolle – Paris’s mostfamous taxidermist, now also owned by the Prince – all of this is forsale, as well as stuffed animals and mounted butterflies for your walls.Christian Tortu designer blooms6 carrefour de l’Odéon, 6ème • 01 43 26 02 56Open 10–8 Mon–SatOne of Paris’s hottest floral designers, Tortu popular-ized purely seasonal arrangements utilizing fruits,grasses, flowers and twigs. He even created a chic,all-green bouquet way back in the showy 80s. Hiscompact boutique now enjoys iconic status andpeople drop by just to see his arresting windowShadé big on style63 rue des Sts-Pères, 6ème • 01 45 49 30 37Open 11–7:30 Mon–SatShadé is proof that size really doesn’t matter. Despiteits miniscule proportions, this shop packs quite asartorial punch. Once inside – no easy task if thereare more than four people already browsing – you’llbe amazed at the array. Time passes quickly whenyou’re picking through such items as fetching, heart-shaped silk bags with beaded appliqués andshimmery tassels, or handmade velvet pouchesembroidered with silk flowers, many by imaginativeBrazilian designer Roberta. But this place is not justabout bags; with feathery hats, scarves, bustiers,frou-frou skirts, Joe jeans and Converse sneakers alsoon sale, women can pick up an entire outfit. Add anumbrella with a flouncy frill, some jewellery – abracelet brimming with charms, a metallic heart on aleather band or a sparkly choker – and voilà, you’reready for any distraction that Paris has to offer.15 D216 F2Centre15 C1Say bonjour and au revoir on entering and leaving a shop; the assistants will be much friendlier
  • 76. 80 www.eparis.dk.comEditions de Parfums Frédéric Malle37 rue de Grenelle, 7ème • 01 42 22 77 22www.editionsdeparfums.com Open 11–7 Tue–Sat, 1–7 MonEditions de Parfums offers scents composed by nineof France’s most legendary “noses”. In this dimly litlabyrinth, filled with books, leather chairs and portraitsof the nine perfumers, you can stop and smell theroses… and the lilacs… from vast glass “sniffingtubes” that keep the perfumes unadulterated.Iris Italian shoe box28 rue de Grenelle, 7ème • 01 42 22 89 81Open 10:30–7 Mon–SatRue de Grenelle is a hot spot for shoe shops; there arejust so many places from which to choose, but this all-white store is the place to visit if Italian-made shoesare what your heart desires. Venice-based Iris manu-factures shoes for Marc Jacobs, Alessandro Dell’Acqua,Chloé and Véronique Branquino. Bellissimo!Carine Gilson luscious lingerie61 rue Bonaparte, 6ème • 01 43 26 46 71www.carinegilson.com Open 10:30–1:30 Tue–Fri, 10:30–7Sat, by appt MonFrench women pay attention to the little things in lifeand this store has plenty of them, from lacey garters toflimsy slips and vampy black satin bras. Each collec-tion has a theme, for example the Russian ballet orKlimt; in Gilson’s hands, lingerie is an art form.La Grande Epicerie culinary temptationsLe Bon Marché, 38 rue de Sèvres, 7ème • 01 44 39 80 00www.lebonmarche.fr Open 8:30–9 Mon–SatAt Bon Marché’s epicurean grocery, you can peruse100-plus varieties of cheese, countless olive oils andvinegars, and international foodstuffs (candy-colouredItalian pasta, Zulu chilli sauce). Alternatively, snap uptake-away gourmet meals and pastries. All in all, atreat for the eyes as well as the taste buds.Shopping15 C316 E115 C215 D2
  • 77. 81Lucien Pellat-Finet cashmere king1 rue Montalembert, 7ème • 01 42 22 22 77www.lucienpellat-finet.com Open 10–7 Mon–Fri, 11–7 SatLucien Pellat-Finet is known for his contemporaryluxury knits in instantly identifiable colours andidiosyncratic patterns. His playful boutique, designedby new-generation architect Christian Biecher, perfectlymatches the mood of his hooded sweaters, barely-there tank tops, bikinis and homewares.Martine Sitbon original chic13 rue de Grenelle, 7ème • 01 44 39 84 44Open 11–7 Mon–SatThis slick, barn-like space, with its colour splashes onthe ceiling, is a fitting backdrop for Sitbon’s original,richly coloured clothes. Encompassing stark, angulartailoring as well as a softer, more romantic approach(panelled velvet and silk or fluttery chiffon dresses),Sitbon’s designs fly off the shelves.Record ShopsWhile the vast emporiums of fnac and Virgin will sateany musical craving (and are open until midnight),Paris possesses other disc dealers for specialistsounds. Sixties vinyl, particularly French chanson,reigns at En Avant La Zizique, while tiny Afric’ Musicshimmies to a different beat: CDs from the Congoto Togo, with a little Caribbean thrown in. Jazzaficionados browse stacks of vinyl, secondhand CDsand old jazz magazines at Paris Jazz Corner, whileWave on rue Keller (electronica) and nearby TechnoImport (techno and trance) are more up to date. Atthe other end of the musical spectrum, Papagenois bliss for opera buffs, with more than 4,000 vinylalbums (pre- and post-war), and rare boxed setsand CDs. For further details, see pp222–3.Paul Smith English class22 & 24 boulevard Raspail, 7ème • 01 42 84 15 30www.paulsmith.co.uk Open 11–7 Mon, 10–7 Tue–SatThe Brit with a penchant for craftsmanship, traditionand humour is a favourite on this side of the Channel,too. His Paris HQ is a magnet for men who are aftera sharp suit, a kimono-print shirt or a silver-and-turquoise bracelet, while women pop in for printedscarves, shoes and expertly cut jackets and dresses.Centre15 D215 D115 D3
  • 78. 82The Best of the GalériesThe city’s covered arcades were built in the 19thcentury as places for elegant ladies to promenadeprotected from the elements. These days, severalare still attractive shopping havens. Stroll throughthe Galérie Vivienne (Map 10 F3), with its vaultedglass roof and mosaic floor, and shop for fashionat Jean-Paul Gaultier and Nathalie Garçon, or forartificial silk flowers at Emilio Robba. Nearby, theGalérie Véro-Dodat (Map 10 F4) houses art galleries,antiques dealers, Italian leatherware at Il Bisonte,and the purple headquarters of couture make-upqueen by Terry (see p60). Farther north, the Passagedu Grand Cerf (Map 10 H3) is a hotbed of creativityboasting everything from hat- and jewellery-makersto ceramic artists and furniture designers.To find markets from flea to gourmet, look up www.eparis.dk.comThomas Boog shell-shocked52 rue de Bourgogne, 7ème • 01 43 17 30 03www.thomasboog.com Open 2–7 Mon, 11–7 Tue–FriFormer shoe designer Thomas Boog is wild aboutshells, and it shows. He began by adorning candle-sticks with them, but now he’s moved on to biggerthings: screens, mirror frames and chandeliers, as wellas chairs made from driftwood. What’s more, there’sno hint of seaside kitsch in any of his creations.Jean-Baptiste Rautureau flashy shoes24 rue de Grenelle, 7ème • 01 45 49 95 83Open 10–1, 2–7 Mon–Fri, 10–7:30 SatMen’s shoes are anything but tedious in the hands of Rautureau, amember of the clan that designs ever-trendy Free Lance shoes (see p76).This is footwear for guys who want to make a statement – usually aloud one. Shoes come in everything from python-print and suede tored-and-white stripes and gold, but if snakeskin mules are not for you,you can also pick up some loafers with a little less attitude.Catherine Arigoni couture collectibles14 rue Beaune, 7ème • 01 42 60 50 99Open 2:30–7:30 Tue–Sat, by appt MonFormer antiques dealer Arigoni is serious about vintageclothing, and couture riches abound in her wardrobe-sized shop. Try a 1960s Pierre Balmain evening dressof silk, satin and pearls, a 1930s beaded purse or1940s black Chanel pumps in mint condition. Beware:opulent items command corresponding prices.Shopping15 A115 D215 D1
  • 79. 83In May and October, the Passage du Grand Cerf hosts the Puces du Design (flea market for designer goods)Department StoresFrom cutting-edge designs to must-have basics, thecity’s department stores cater to all needs andtastes. France’s oldest is the swanky Bon Marché.With its serious men’s and women’s fashion, Paris’sbest lingerie selection, and photo and fashionexhibitions, it is ideal for a bout of relaxed retailtherapy. Over on the Right Bank, Galéries Lafayettehas bigger crowds but offers all the top designers, awater and champagne bar, and the chic LafayetteMaison for homewares. The largest beauty hall ofall Parisian department stores belongs to Printemps:two floors and 200 brands of make-up, fragrancesand skin care. They’ve also got a luxury fashionfloor and a men’s store with the Nickel spa (seep163). For further details, see pp220–21.Renaud Pellegrino handbag maestro14 rue du Faubourg-St-Honoré, 8ème • 01 42 65 35 31Open 10–7 Mon–SatFor over 20 years, Renaud Pellegrino has been mixingfabrics and techniques and turning out exceptionalhandbags: a silk bag in the shape of a matchbox, onedusted with Murano glass pearls, another in multi-coloured leather and linen. Many of his creations areinspired by the canvasses of Matisse and Braque.Iunx exclusive scents48–50 rue de l’Université, 7ème • 01 45 44 50 14Open 10:30–7:30 Mon–SatIunx is a high-tech perfumery with state-of-the artequipment. Despite the rather daunting, minimalistdesign, staff are approachable and knowledgeable.You’ll soon be seduced by the store’s range of creams,gels, scented candles and ten exclusive fragrancescreated by in-house “nose” Olivia Giacobetti.Publicis Drugstore Champs-Elysées icon133 avenue des Champs-Elysées, 8ème • 01 44 43 79 00www.publicisdrugstore.comOpen 8am–2am dailyAfter a recent face-lift, this complex emerged encasedin curved glass screens. Inside are restaurants, bars,a wine cellar, cinemas and stores, including a newskiosk (with international press), a gift shop and apharmacy. It’s the latest hip hang-out.Centre & West9 B28 F115 D1
  • 80. 84 www.eparis.dk.comZadig & Voltaire (de luxe) eclectic18–20 rue François Premier, 8ème • 01 40 70 97 89www.zadig-et-voltaire.com Open 10:30–7 Mon–SatZadig & Voltaire – the French fashion and accessoriesline aimed at 20–45-year-olds – has boutiques allover the city, but this is their most up-market to date.In the light, airy space that is perfumed with thestore’s scented candles, label fans will find the designcollective’s own clothes mixed with choice items byChloé, Diane von Furstenberg, Alberta Ferretti et al aswell as sought-after jeans by Paper Denim.Clothes are displayed on colour-coordinated railsand the staff have a good eye for putting togetheroutfits. Accessories include Marc Jacobs shoes, JaminPuech bags (see p78), Kathy Korvin jewellery andgorgeous high-heeled sandals by hot designer Jean-Michel Cazabat. Downstairs, the Gaïa mini-spa offersa range of relaxing treatments from holistic massagewith essential oils to digitopuncture (energizingcrystals laid on acupuncture points).Charles Jourdan British shoe flair23 rue François Premier, 8ème • 01 47 20 81 28www.charles-jourdan.com Open 10:30–7 Mon–SatLong known for its elegant shoes, the 83-year-oldFrench house decided to update and appointedPatrick Cox as design director in 2003. Cox’s new lookfor Jourdan is sexy, shiny and graphic: a touch of the60s (black patent) and the 70s (pink and perspex),while not forgetting the timeless designs.Erès make a splash2 rue Tronchet, 8ème • 01 47 42 28 82www.eres.fr Open 10–7 Mon–SatIf you cringe at the thought of donning a swimsuit,Erès is a must. This chi-chi shop is one reason why somany Frenchwomen look good on the beach: itsperfectly cut bathing suits in appealing colours areflattering beyond belief, and bikini tops and bottomsare sold separately. They also do a range of underwear.Galerie Noémie face painting92 avenue des Champs-Elysées, 8ème • 01 45 62 78 27www.galerienoemie.com Open 11–9 Mon–Sat, 1–8 SunCreated by young painter Noémie Rocher, this make-up store puts an arty spin on cosmetics. Products arepresented on artist’s palettes and packaged in sweetlittle pots and paint tubes. Book in to have your facepainted by a professional make-up artist or abespoke shade of lip gloss specially mixed for you.Shopping8 F28 F19 C18 G3
  • 81. Make Up For Ever Professional8 rue de la Boétie, 8ème • 01 53 05 93 30www.makeupforever.fr Open 10–7 Mon–SatWhen make-up gurus Dany Sanz and Jacques Wanephcreated this cosmetic range in 1984 it was strictly forshowbiz clients and modelling agencies. Today thebeauty emporium has widened its horizons anddistributes selectively to France’s main departmentstores. However, none can compete with this flagshipboutique, which features their whole range.A veritable Ali Baba’s cave of colour, thisshowroom-cum-shop stocks everything from faketattoos to their signature Pan Cake foundation.Beauty buffs will appreciate best-sellers such asPalette 5 Crèmes de Camouflage, designed to hideblemishes and scars, and Lip Plus Fixateur de Rougeà Lèvres, which helps keep lipstick in place for hours.Sanz and Waneph are also responsible for the latestarrival on Paris’s cosmetic circuit – the nearby MakeUp Forever Academy (8 rue de Liège, 01 53 05 93 43).858 H1Résonances upscale home accessories3 & 5 boulevard Malesherbes, 8ème • 01 44 51 63 70www.resonances.fr Open 10–8 Mon–SatWalking into this bright and airy shop (one in achain), with its aproned staff, is a bit like entering atime warp. However, while it might appear a little old-fashioned, Résonances is anything but. A crossbetween a bookshop, a DIY store and home-interiorsshop, the store carries a wide range of traditionalFrench wares updated for urban sophisticates.There are accessories for every room: pint-sizedcups for that first-of-the-day coffee, ceramic butterdishes and stainless-steel fruit presses for thekitchen; a multitude of soaps, lotions and towels forthe bathroom; and cedar hangers and cushions for thebedroom. In addition to cookbooks, there are interior-design manuals that provide inspiration forrenovations (as well as plenty of DIY gadgets to helpthem along), while wine buffs will appreciate a wall-mounted corkscrew that defies being misplaced.Thursday is late-shopping night: big department stores stay open until 9pm, boutiques until 7–7:30pmWest9 C2
  • 82. 86 www.eparis.dk.comRoger Vivier footwear as art29 rue du Faubourg-St-Honoré, 8ème • 01 53 43 00 85www.rogervivier.com Open 10:30–7 Mon–SatRoger Vivier, the revered French shoe designer famousfor his creations for Dior and YSL, died in 1998. Buthis legend lives on thanks to this boutique created byItalian shoe maestro Bruno Frisoni and his muse, Inèsde la Fressange. Its upper floor resembles a chicParisian apartment, where 18th-century antiques arecleverly mixed with futuristic furniture by Hervé Vander Straeten (see p74) and the walls are hung with art.Rather than simply reproducing classic styles fromthe archives, Frisoni has updated the shoes byintroducing contemporary twists. Vivier’s famouscurving Choc heel thus becomes the Choc-Choc, avertiginous shoe in lime-green crocodile skin. Otherrevamped classics include Zorro, a shoe whose finestraps resemble the classic crusader’s mask, and amore tapered version of the square-toed ballerinasVivier created to go with YSL’s famous Mondrian dress.The Golden TriangleTrawling the three main shopping arteries of theultra-chic 8ème is a quintessential Right Bank expe-rience. Start at couture heartland on avenueMontaigne with a visit to Dior, Chanel and ChristianLacroix and perhaps a stop-off at Louis Vuitton.Alternatively, shop Italian-style, taking in Prada,Emmanuel Ungaro, Valentino, Dolce & Gabbana,Marni and the Gucci mega-store. Avenue George Vis home to Givenchy, Balenciaga and Jean-PaulGaultier’s new Starck-designed HQ. The vibe istrendier and less intimidating on rue du Faubourg-St-Honoré: after Chloé, Lanvin and Bottega Veneta,head down to rue St-Honoré for John Galliano’soutrageous fashions and the mother of Paris conceptstores, Colette. For further details, see pp221–2.Stephane Kélian fancy footwork5 rue du Faubourg-St-Honoré, 8ème • 01 44 51 64 19www.stephane-kelian.fr Open 10–7 Mon–SatSlip your just-pedicured feet into a pair of Kélian’s top-of-the-line shoes if you plan to stroll the streets instyle, before hitting that upscale bar. You’ll findpractical (but never boring) flatties, wedges and loftystilettos; Kélian is a rare soul who can successfullycreate both the classic and the fabulously fashionable.9 B29 C2Shopping
  • 83. 87Stella Cadente canal style93 quai de Valmy, 10ème • 01 42 09 27 00www.stella-cadente.com Open 11–7:30 dailyThe boutique-cum-living-room of Stella Cadente, aliasUkranian-born designer Stanislassia Klein, was one ofthe first to appear on this street that fronts the now-trendy Canal St-Martin. Her dreamy, girly dresses,beaded cardigans and coats lined with flashy coloursfit right in with the local, arty vibe.E2 everything old is new again15 rue Martel, 10ème • 01 47 70 15 14Open by appt onlyHusband-and-wife design team Michèle and OlivierChâtenet buy up classy vintage clothing (think Pucci,Hermès and Dior) and then transform it into modernmust-haves. Imagine embroidered kilts, favoured byGwyneth Paltrow and Madonna, or a whole new made-to-order outfit fashioned from a groovy old kimono.Antoine & Lili colourful kitsch95 quai de Valmy, 10ème • 01 40 37 41 55Open 11–8 Mon–Fri, 10–8 SatThe brightly painted façades of these three adjoiningboutiques give warning of their style. Young designsin vibrant colours are found in the pink house as wellas quirky gifts; fresh flowers, plants, and homewarespopulate the green house; while the yellow househas a funky café with lip-smacking cheesecake.Artazart cult canal bookshop83 quai de Valmy, 10ème • 01 40 40 24 00www.artazart.com Open 10:30–7:30 Mon–Fri, 2–8 Sat &SunArtazart is the place to stock up on books (mostlyFrench) and international magazines that deal witheverything from fashion and interiors to calligraphy.The interior of the store is decorated by French graffitiartist Miss Tic. Artazart is also a great spot to pick upGinger Lyly funky designs33 rue Beaurepaire, 10ème • 01 42 06 07 73Open 11:30–7:30 Tue & Thu–Sat, 2–7:30 Wed, 3–7:30 SunWith its brightly painted frontage, Ginger Lyly drawsa hip crowd on the look-out for groovy clothes andaccessories. Vivid T-shirts and off-the-wall bagsfeature along with chintzy jewellery and raggedy hats.Walls host exhibitions by local artists and there isalways some up-to-the-minute music in the air.11 C2West & North11 C111 C111 C111 A1
  • 84. 88 Seek out small-scale Paris shopping with www.eparis.dk.comViveka Bergström fantasy creations23 rue de la Grange-aux-Belles, 10ème • 01 40 03 04 92www.viveka-bergstrom.com Open 12–7 Tue–SatAfter honing her design skills at Paco Rabanne,innovative Swedish jeweller Viveka set up this cosyboutique, complete with home-from-home coffeetables and sofas. The designer, who works from astudio out back, is renowned for her pieces madefrom leather, precious metals and Swarovski crystals.Lili Perpink Japanese pick-and-mix22 rue la Vieuville, 18ème • 01 42 52 37 24Open 11:30–7:30 Tue–Sat (closed 1:30–2:30)Scarcely bigger than a walk-in wardrobe, Lili’s quirkylittle shop is a treasure trove of vintage fashion mixedwith ultra-modern Japanese creations. Lili also keepsan eye out for up-and-coming European designers,stocking elaborate hand-knits by Irish designer Noand feminine prints by French designer Julie Greux.Patricia Louisor elegant bohemian16 rue Houdon, 18ème • 01 42 62 10 42www.patricialouisor.com Open noon–8 dailyOne of the original boutiques that sparked the buzzabout trendy Abbesses’s alternative fashion scene.Louisor puts her own stylish spin on easy-to-weargarments, such as wide-legged trousers, flowing coatsand jackets, and sweet cache-coeurs (wraparoundtops) in delicate knits. Prices are very reasonable.Coin Canal retro heaven1 rue de Marseille, 10ème • 01 42 38 00 33www.coincanal.com Open 11–2 & 3–7:30 Tue–SatThis corner shop is filled with lovingly selected piecesfrom the 1930s to the present day. Items are arrangedin “rooms” and everything you see is for sale; from theArt-Deco drinks trolley to 1950s vases displayed on a1960s wooden sideboard. Paintings by a Chineseartist, also for sale, add a contemporary touch.Shopping5 D54 F34 F211 C1
  • 85. 89Shine cutting-edge style30 rue de Charonne, 11ème • 01 48 05 80 10Open 11–7:30 Mon–SatThis trendy store (for women and men) stocks clothesfrom young designers mixed in with a sprinkling ofurban sportswear and big-name labels, as well asunusual accessories. Highlights include Cacharel, Seeby Chloé and UK label Preen, and the delicatehandknits of Macedonian designer Lidiya Georgieva.Nuits de Satin antique glamour9 rue Oberkampf, 11ème • 01 43 57 65 05www.nuitsdesatin.com Open 12:30–7:30 Mon–SatAn essential stop for anyone on the look-out forsecond-hand silk and satin lingerie. Choose fromearly 1900s corsets, pointy 1930s satin brassieresand sassy 50s swimsuits and suspenders. There’s agood selection of groovy retro designer threads, too.No wonder this boutique is a favourite of stylists.Spree eclectic concept store16 rue la Vieuville, 18ème • 01 42 23 41 40Open 11–7:30 Tue–Sat, Mon 2–7:30When you first walk past Spree’s window, it’s hard towork out whether this is a retro furniture store, modernart gallery or cutting-edge fashion haven. The interior ispunctuated with original Charles Eames and GeorgeNelson chairs, and hung with Calder-like mobiles and1960s Murano disc chandeliers, all of which can bebought. The warehouse-like space at the back of thestore is devoted to fashion and boasts an excellentselection of international designers, including Commedes Garçons, Eley Kishimoto, Vanessa Bruno andIsabel Marant. Accessories scattered around the storeinclude retro-style bags by Aurélie Mathigot, rings(designed to look as if they pierce your finger) byPièces à Conviction and surreal silver jewellery by hipFrench label Lyie van Rycke. Spree is also the onlyplace in Paris to find handmade ballerina shoes byE Porselli, otherwise available only in Italy.North & East18 F211 D44 F2As a rule, winter sales start the second week of January and summer sales begin in July; both run for a month
  • 86. 90 www.eparis.dk.comIsabel Marant ethnic chic16 rue de Charonne, 11ème • 01 49 29 71 55Open 10:30–7:30 Mon–SatFashion hounds flock to this spacious Bastilleboutique for Marant’s youthful designs with an exoticedge. This is one designer who looks like she hassome fun at her drawing board. Marant’s imaginativedesigns favour natural fibres, often combined to createluxury items with a bohemian feel; a style that hasmade her one of Paris’s top young designers. Clotheshang perfectly, especially fluid jersey dresses; flirty,floral tops and lots of silks and satin. When chillywinds blow, there’s more substantial gear, includingnubbly wool skirts cut on the bias, boiled wool coatswith appliquéd or embroidered details, mohairjumpers and hippy-style bobble hats.Recently, Marant has expanded to add accessoriesto her collection, in the shape of sassy bags andshoes, jewellery (delicate drop earrings and gracefulsilver necklaces) and perky singlets and shorts.Alter Mundi other worlds41 rue du Chemin Vert, 11ème • 01 40 21 08 91www.altermundi.com Open 11–7:30 Tue–Sat, 2–8 SunThis boutique-cum-gallery, housed in a vast loft-likespace, operates on the principles of fair trade andshowcases furniture and objets d’art from thedeveloping world. Highlights include sandalwoodvases from Mozambique, papier-maché sculpturesfrom Burkina Faso and Mexican silver jewellery.La Maison de la Fausse Fourrure34 boulevard Beaumarchais, 11ème • 01 43 55 24 21www.maisondelafaussefourrure.frOpen 10–7 Mon–Sat (Mar–Aug: Mon–Fri )Those who have qualms about following catwalk furtrends can ease their conscience by visiting thisstore. Stock up on everything from fake-fur fabric toimitation leopard-skin bags and tigerskin coats tofurry lampshades and other household accessories.Shopping18 E217 D112 E5
  • 87. 91Bastille Fashion FocusThe 11ème tends to be associated with its nightlifebuzz, but a daytime visit reveals a hive of independentfashion activity. One of the first young designers tomove into the quartier and open her atelier-boutiqueon rue Keller was Gaëlle Barré (see p221). This youngwoman turns out finely tailored collections based onmixing and matching prints. Indeed, her whimsical,feminine creations (50s-style dresses and tailoredtrench coats) frequently fuse polka-dots, stripes andfloral patterns, all on the same garment.Fellow rue Keller pioneer Anne Willi (see p221)works with a much more muted palette of colours, andnatural fabrics such as linen and embroidered cotton.The simplicity of her style and her reversible clotheshave been influenced by Japanese designers such asYohji Yamamoto, but the charm of Willi’s collectionslies in the unusual details: halter-neck dresses tyingwith straps that dangle pebbles down the back orskirts decorated with criss-cross lacing up the side.Continuing along the street, Des Petits Hauts (seep222) is just what its name says – a boutique special-izing in “little tops” of every imaginable shape andcolour. Styles range from casual khaki T-shirts andbasic jumpers to strappy sorbet-coloured shift topsand sophisticated black evening-wear. On nearby rueTraversière, Catherine Magnan’s (see p221)collections have more of an avant-garde feel – thinkstriped men’s shirts recycled into women’s blousesand halter-neck patchwork tops. Her spacious totebags made from recycled leather jackets are asought-after Parisian fashion accessory.East18 F2
  • 88. art &architectureThe city’s great historicmonuments have survived worldwars intact, and its culturaltreasures extend well beyondits enduring landmarks – manylesser known museums are set instunning mansions. But Parisknows better than to rest on itslaurels: new architectural andcultural projects sit next to the old,in harmonious juxtaposition.
  • 89. 94Carte Musées-MonumentsProviding entry to 60 of the city’s biggest sightsand museums, including the Musée Picasso andMusée d’Orsay, this card lets culture aficionadoscut costs and queues. Valid for one, three orfive consecutive days, it is available fromparticipating museums, branches of fnac (seep222), tourist offices and major Métro stations.Find out about current photographic exhibitions at www.eparis.dk.comChez Robert Electron Libre art house59 rue de Rivoli, 1er • no phonewww.59rivoli.org Open 1:30–7:30 Mon–Fri, 1–8 Sat, 2–8 SunThree artists first occupied this dilapidated, six-storeybuilding in 1999. Today, the “squart” (a fusion of“squat” and “art”) houses some 30 artists’ studiosand has become the city’s third most visited centreof contemporary art, attracting around 40,000 fans ofexperimental art each year. Visitors can wander fromstudio to studio, watching artists at work alongsidedisplays of their paintings, sculptures and installa-tions. Most works are for sale. Despite its high profile,the place still has a ramshackle charm that makes apleasant alternative to Paris’s slick gallery scene andmost artists are happy to chat about their work. Lookout for Kalex’s life-size figures – sculpted from oldmetal objects and rocks, and resembling abandonedextras from the Lord of the Rings film trilogy – and thework of Pascal Foucart, who drips bold, colourfulpaint on to canvas in hypnotic patterns.Ste-Chapelle island chapel4 boulevard du Palais, 1er • 01 53 40 60 80www.monum.fr Open 9:30–6 dailyHidden inside the Palais de Justice, this magical two-tiered Gothic chapel was built to house what Louis IXbelieved to be Christ’s crown of thorns. Make straightfor the upper level, which is spectacularly illuminatedby huge, panoramic stained-glass windows, most ofwhich date from the 13th century. AdmArt & Architecture10 G516 G116 H1Tour St-Jacques medieval remnantStanding all alone on the place du Chatelet is a strik-ing Gothic tower, the only remains of the 16th-centurySt-Jacques-La Boucherie church – a stopover point forpilgrims en route to Santiago de Compostela in Spain.Its gargoyle-covered summit witnessed the experi-ments into atmospheric pressure of French mathema-tician Blaise Pascal, whose statue stands outside.Aptly, the tower now serves as a weather station.
  • 90. 95Note that the Carte Musées-Monuments does not grant access to temporary exhibitionsCentreJeu de Paume films and photos1 place de la Concorde, 8ème • 01 47 03 12 50www.jeudepaume.orgOpen noon–7 Wed–Fri, 10–7 Sat & Sun, noon–9:30 TueOnce an indoor court for real tennis, the Jeu de Paumeis now a museum of photography and film. Shows areeither retrospective or thematic, and have includedworks by fashion photographer Guy Bourdin andexperimental films from Jean-Luc Godard. AdmBibliothèque Nationale deFrance Richelieu exhibition space58 rue de Richelieu, 2ème • 01 53 79 59 59www.bnf.fr Galleries open 10–5 Mon–SatStripped of books since the new national library (seep111) opened in 1996, the original is still worth visitingfor its breathtaking domed Salle Labrouse and for thefrescoed galleries that host temporary exhibitions ofmostly modern photography, drawings and engravings.Musée Carnavalet historical collection23 rue de Sevigné, 3ème • 01 44 59 58 58Open 10–6:30 Tue–SunWith a superb setting and exhibits that includepaintings, furniture and personal artefacts, the MuséeCarnavalet’s colossal collection offers an authoritativeand highly engaging history of Paris. Occupying twobuildings, the museum was founded by BaronHaussmann, who had the foresight to preserve some ofthe Paris he was demolishing as he reshaped the cityin the mid-1800s. The 16th-century Hôtel Carnavalet,one of the Marais’ oldest hôtels particuliers, focuseson Paris from prehistoric times up until the 1700s. Itsrooms are furnished with fabulous period furniture andpaintings. The neighbouring hôtel picks up the storyfrom 1789 to the present day and has France’s biggestcollection of Revolutionary exhibits. Check out thepainting of Danton with his gargantuan head; in com-parison, the portrait of fellow revolutionary Robespierreshows a far less powerful and rather prim leader. Adm9 C310 F317 C1
  • 91. 9611 C5View collections online at www.eparis.dk.comMusée National Picasso 100% Pablo5 rue de Thorigny, 3ème • 01 42 71 25 21www.musee-picasso.fr Open 9:30–5:30 Wed–Mon (until 6Apr–Sep)On Picasso’s death in 1973, the French state waivedthe hefty inheritance taxes due in return for primepickings from the artist’s home and studio.Subsequent donations make this one of the mostcomplete collections of Picasso’s works, and one sopopular that there are often long queues to get in.The museum’s exhibits – remarkable for their sheerdiversity – are a chronological record of the artist’slife, from his simple but accomplished teenagesketches, through paintings of the famed Blue andRose periods, to massive sculptures of Cubist heads.Must-sees include a series of little-known paper con-structions; Bull’s Head (a witty bronze combining abicycle saddle and handlebars to resemble theanimal’s head); and tribal masks from Picasso’s owncollection which clearly inspired his work. AdmMusée d’Art et d’Histoiredu Judaïsme celebrating the Jewish diaspora71 rue du Temple, 3ème • 01 53 01 86 60www.mahj.org Open 2–6 Mon–Fri, 10–6 SunIn the heart of the Jewish area, the Marais, this absorb-ing museum traces the history and art of Judaism fromthe Middle Ages to the present day. Look out for EmileZola’s original J’accuse! article that denounced stateanti-Semitism in the 19th-century Dreyfus affair. AdmMusée de la Publicité adverts as art107 rue de Rivoli, 1er • 01 44 55 57 50www.museedelapub.org Open 11–6 Tue–Fri, 10–6 Sat & SunTemporary shows organized by theme (psychedelicposters), artist (Rene Gruau) or brand (Air France),and drawn from a fantastic array of posters, press adsand radio and TV commercials, are held within thiswing of the Louvre. From the kitsch to the stylish, thiscollection acknowledges the power of persuasion. AdmLes Galéries de ParisIn 19th-century Paris, the city’s many galeries andpassages served as fashionable meeting places asmuch as for shopping. With their attractive metalvaulting and glass roofs, they put most modernmalls to shame. Galerie Vivienne (Map 10 F2) isthe most up-market: Passages des Panoramas(Map 10 F3), built in 1800, is the oldest.Art & Architecture11 A510 E4
  • 92. 97St-Eustache hosts regular free organ concertsCentreAtelier Brancusi reconstructed studioPlace Centre Pompidou, 4ème • 01 44 78 12 33www.cnac-gp.fr Open 2–6 Wed–MonPart of the Centre Pompidou (see p99), this spacehouses the reconstructed Parisian studio of influentialRomanian sculptor Constantin Brancusi (1876–1957).Three cosy galleries display examples of his elegant,abstract works, while another hosts temporary showsby modern sculptors such as Richard Deacon. AdmPatrimoine Photographique photos62 rue St-Antoine, 4ème • 01 42 74 47 75www.jeudepaume.org Open Tue–Sun 10–6.30Twinned with the Jeu de Paume at Concorde (see p95)and hidden away in a peaceful garden at the back ofthe 17th-century Hôtel de Sully, this intimate museumis the public exhibition space for the vast nationalphotographic archives. Shows tend to revolve aroundhistorical themes or individual photographers. AdmEglise St-Eustache city landmarkRue du Jour, 1er • 01 42 36 31 05www.st-eustache.orgOpen 9–7:30 dailyThe city’s second-biggest church after Notre Dame,St-Eustache (built 1532–1640) witnessed Louis XIV’sfirst Communion and holds the tomb of his influentialfinance minister, Colbert. Its imposing exterior isGothic, while the interior is decidedly Renaissance.11 A510 G4Musée Cognacq-Jay art museum8 rue Elzévir, 4ème • 01 40 27 07 21Open 10–6 Tue–SunFounders of La Samaritaine department store,Ernest Cognacq and his wife Louise Jay were alsokeen collectors, notably of Rococo artists. Theirpredilection for the 18th century is in evidence here,with pieces that include gorgeous period furnitureand exquisite Saxe and Sèvres ceramics. Adm17 C117 C2
  • 93. 98 Check up on special opening days in Paris museums at www.eparis.dk.comInstitut du Monde Arabe Arab centre1 rue des Fossés St-Bernard, 5ème • 01 40 51 38 38www.imarabe.org Museum open 10–6 Tue–SunJean Nouvel’s acclaimed building mixes modern steeland glass with traditional Arab architecture to stunningeffect. The south-facing windows operate like acamera aperture, automatically regulating light.Inside, a museum houses a wide range of Arabic artand artefacts, as well as temporary exhibitions. AdmMusée National du Moyen Age6 place Paul-Painlevé, 5ème • 01 53 73 78 00www.musee-moyenage.fr Open 9:15–5:45 Wed–MonBuilt into the ruins of Roman baths, this handsome15th-century mansion was formerly home to theAbbots of Cluny; it now houses a vast collection ofmedieval sculpture, ceramics, stained glass, furnitureand tapestries. The baths themselves are a primeexample of Gallo-Roman architecture: the frigidariumis spectacular, with its 15-m- (50-ft-) high vaults andtraces of original mosaics. Key architectural findsfrom around Paris are displayed here, including the“Gallery of Kings”: 21 carved stone heads, depictingthe Kings of Judah, which were housed in Notre Damefor 500 years, but moved here just after the FrenchRevolution. The museum’s showpiece, however, isThe Lady and the Unicorn, a series of six radiantFlemish tapestries. Don’t overlook the museum’sgrounds, landscaped to echo gardening fashionsof the Middle Ages. Adm16 G3Art & Architecture17 B317 B1Maison Européenne de picture perfectla Photographie5–7 rue de Fourcy, 4ème • 01 44 78 75 00www.mep-fr.org Open 11–8 Wed–SunOf all the city’s show spaces dedicated to photography,this one is possibly the best. The venue – with its vast,high-ceilinged rooms – usually organizes severalsimultaneous temporary exhibitions, drawing on itsown and other collections. Adm
  • 94. 99Arènes de Lutèce Roman recreationEntrances on 49 rue Monge & 7 rue de Navarre, 5ème • no phoneOpen summer 8–9 daily; winter 8–5 daily (9–5 Sat & Sun)A rare remnant of the city’s Roman past, this late 1st-century amphitheatre was unearthed in 1869. For 200years, it welcomed up to 17,000 spectators at gladia-torial combats, until the Barbarians invaded Lutèce(Paris). Today, the games played here are less bloody;it’s a favourite with boules players and skateboarders.La Sorbonne long-established centre of learning47 rue des Ecoles, 5ème • 01 40 46 22 11www.sorbonne.fr Visits by appointment: call 01 40 26 23 49Founded as a theology college in the 1200s, La Sorbonne quickly gained areputation as an intellectual stronghold. Classes were taught in Latin,giving rise to the area’s name, Le Quartier Latin. The college was the hubof the student riots of 1968; if you want to get a taste of the more sedatestudent life of today, attend the free lectures open to the public or visitthe the gold-domed 17th-century chapel.Musèe de l’Assistance Publique47 quai de la Tournelle, 5ème • 01 40 27 50 05www.aphp.fr Open 10–6 Tue–SunThis quirky museum traces the history of hospitals inParis. Their social and religious roles are brought to lifeby paintings, manuscripts and a reconstructed pharm-acy. Early surgical instruments also feature, includingsome oversized dental pliers that are a reassuringreminder of just how far medicine has come. AdmEglise Royale du Val-de-Grâce277bis rue St-Jacques, 5ème • 01 40 51 51 92Open noon–5 Tue–Wed, 2–6 Sat, 9–noon & 2–6 SunBuilt as a Benedictine abbey in the 17th century, thisimposing complex includes a fine Baroque chapeland a museum on the history of the French militarymedical service. Gruesome exhibits include casts ofthe faces of disfigured soldiers who were the firstsubjects of maxilo-facial surgery during WWI. AdmOn the first Sunday of each month, entrance to many museums is free17 A517 A316 G320 F1Centre
  • 95. 100 Browse for big-name art collections at www.eparis.dk.comEglise St-Sulpice Left Bank churchPlace St-Sulpice, 6ème • 01 42 34 59 98Open 7:30–7:30 dailySimilar in size and layout to Notre Dame, St-Sulpicedemonstrates an intriguing mix of architectural stylesbecause it took 120 years to build, starting in 1646.Its Italianate façade is topped by two famouslyuneven towers. Inside, there are three notableDelacroix frescoes in the Chapelle des Sts-Anges.Musée National Eugène Delacroix6 rue de Furstenberg, 6ème • 01 44 41 86 50www.musee-delacroix.fr Open 9:30–5 Wed–MonThe former apartment and studio of Romantic painterDelacroix (1798–1863) now house an intimatemuseum displaying his paintings and engravings,and tracing his life via photographs, personalbelongings and letters. Drawings include studies forhis celebrated murals inside nearby St-Sulpice. AdmMusée du Luxembourg art exhibitions19 rue de Vaugirard, 6ème • 01 42 34 25 95www.museeduluxembourg.fr Open 11–10:30 Mon, Fri–Sun,11–7 Tue–ThuThis museum’s popular temporary shows are basedaround two themes: the Italian Renaissance (in tributeto the palace’s founder, Marie de Médici) and 19th-and 20th-century art (a nod to the venue’s previousincarnation as a modern-art museum). AdmArt & Architecture16 E316 E316 E2The Big ThreeJustice cannot be done to the dauntingly large Muséedu Louvre in a single visit, so stick to a specificperiod of art, or to the works of particular countries.Many of the smaller rooms contain gems, such asworks by Dutch Masters that are often overlooked inthe rush to see more famous exhibits. The Muséed’Orsay is synonymous with Impressionism, but thecollection also includes major works by realistpainter Gustave Courbet, Art Nouveau furniture andphotographs – notably Man Ray’s shot of Prouston his deathbed. Worth visiting for its stunningtemporary exhibitions (as well as its architecture),the Centre Pompidou (aka the Centre Beaubourg)also has a splendid permanent collection of modernart. For details, see p224.
  • 96. 101Late-night openings (nocturnes) are held at the Musée d’Orsay (Thu) and the Louvre (Mon & Wed)Musée Maillol –Fondation Dina Vierny muse’s collection59–61 rue de Grenelle, 7ème • 01 42 22 59 58www.museemaillol.com Open 11–6 Wed–MonAt the age of 15, Dina Vierny became the chief modeland creative muse of French sculptor Aristide Maillol(1861–1944). Her subsequent collection of his work –and that of his friends and contemporaries – is show-cased in this grand hôtel particulier. Maillol’s larger-than-life marble sculptures dominate the entrance hall,while his early years are well represented in roomsdedicated to his drawings, Nabi-influenced paintingsand intricate tapestries. Other 20th-century artistsfeatured include Gauguin, a major influence onMaillol, Pierre Bonnard and Maurice Denis (see p106).Works by Picasso, Degas, Cézanne and Odilon Redonare illuminated in darkened drawing rooms, whileconceptual art gets a look in with Marcel Duchamp’sfamed “Ready-Made” art. Note that the frequenttemporary exhibitions can attract long queues. AdmMusée Rodin the sculptor’s former home77 rue de Varenne, 7ème • 01 44 18 61 10www.musee-rodin.frOpen Apr–Sep 9:30–5:45 Tue–Sun (Oct–Mar to 4:45)Along with artists Jean Cocteau and Henri Matisse,sculptor Auguste Rodin rented rooms in this hôtelparticulier in 1908. Smitten with the state-owned pro-perty, he donated all his work, personal archives andbelongings to the government in exchange for thefoundation of a museum here. Inside, the huge bronzeand marble sculptures include his famed Kiss and theheadless Walking Man, as well as a number of worksby Rodin’s student and lover Camille Claudel. Thereare also paintings by Monet, Renoir and van Gogh fromthe artist’s private collection, and furniture from hishouse in Meudon. The museum’s real charm, however,lies outside in the spacious gardens, where TheThinker is framed by the gold-domed Invalides. Nearbyare the triumphant Burghers of Calais and a masterfulmonument to Balzac. One of Paris’s real gems. Adm15 A115 D2Centre & West
  • 97. 102 www.eparis.dk.comEglise de la Madeleine Classical churchPlace de la Madeleine, 8ème • 01 44 51 69 00www.eglise-lamadeleine.com Open 9–7 dailyModelled on a Greek temple, the Madeleine churchtook almost 100 years to build. It was variouslyintended to be a stock exchange, a tribute toNapoleonic glory and a railway station before it wasconsecrated as a church in 1842. The magnificentmarble-and-gilt interior features three stunning domes.Eglise St-Augustin high-rise church46 boulevard Malesherbes, 8ème • 01 45 22 23 12Open 9–7 dailyBuilt in 1860–71, this was the city’s first church toincorporate a metal frame, allowing its dome to riseto 50 m (164 ft). Architect Victor Baltard filled thetriangular site by placing progressively larger chapelsalong the nave. The painted ceilings are the work ofClassicist artist William Bougereau.Musée Jacquemart-André wealthy collectors’ home158 boulevard Haussmann, 8ème • 01 45 62 11 59www.musee-jacquemart-andre.com Open 10–6 daily; nocturne 9:30 MonDutch Masters, Italian Renaissance and 18th-century French artmake the private collection of Edouard André and wife NélieJacquemart seem like a smaller, more manageable version ofthe Louvre. In addition, this purpose-built hôtel particulier’sopulent interior and contents create a fascinating record of19th-century Parisian bourgeois life. AdmMusée Galliéra the story of style10 avenue Pierre 1er de Serbie, 16ème • 01 56 52 86 00Open 10–6 Tue–SunThis museum of sartorial style has a vast collection ofclothing, accessories and photos with which to stagetemporary exhibitions for followers of fashion. Showsrange from displays of 18th-century waistcoats to theglitzy wardrobe of Marlene Dietrich. The museum isclosed for two or three months a year. AdmArt & Architecture8 E32 H53 B59 C2
  • 98. 103Some state buildings open to the public during the Journées du Patrimoine (3rd weekend in Sep)WestAlong the Champs-ElyséesIt’s been sung about, marched on, and plays host eachyear to the Bastille Day parade (see p11), the Tour deFrance climax (see p11) and any other occasion fornational celebration. Running from place de laConcorde up to Napoleon I’s Arc de Triomphe, the3-km- (2-mile-) long avenue, built by Baron Haussmannas part of his grand plan for a new Paris, still exudes acertain grandeur, even though it has suffered from aninvasion of tacky, touristy shops and food outlets.At its lower end, the expansive but traffic-heavyplace de la Concorde is dominated by a 3,300-year-oldgranite obelisk, a gift from the Viceroy of Egypt. Fromhere to the midway roundabout, the Champs-Elyséesis bordered by gardens on both sides. The northernstretch of greenery backs on to the high-security 18th-century presidential residence, the Palais de l’Elysée,while the southern side is dominated by the colossalglass dome of the Grand Palais (see p224) and neigh-bouring Petit Palais (see p224), both remnants of the1900 Exposition Universelle. The former hosts diverse,crowd-pulling temporary shows, while the latter –usually home to the city’s fine-arts collection – isundergoing a massive renovation programme for2006 to improve lighting, increase exhibition spaceand generally restore its former glory.At the back of the Grand Palais, the Palais de laDécouverte (see p225) is a child-friendly sciencemuseum with a planetarium and an array of inter-active exhibits relating to human biology, astronomyand meteorology. The hottest spot at the upper endof the avenue is the Publicis Drugstore (see p83),reopened in 2004 after a daringly modern make-overby architect Michele Saee. The minimalist, curvaceoussteel-and-glass-spiralled frontage sets it apart fromits ornate, 19th-century neighbours.8 G2
  • 99. 1048 E3Check the dates of temporary exhibitions on www.eparis.dk.comMusée d’Art Moderne de laVille de Paris (MAMVP) modern art11 avenue du Président Wilson, 16ème • 01 53 67 40 00Open 10–6 Tue–SunThe city’s impressive 20th-century art collectionoccupies part of the Palais de Tokyo, a vast buildingthat was originally built for the 1937 ExpositionUniverselle. Showpieces include diptychs by HenriMatisse and Raoul Dufy’s La Fée Electricité. AdmPalais de Tokyo contemporary art13 avenue du Président Wilson, 16ème • 01 47 23 90 79www.palaisdetokyo.com Open noon–midnight Tue–SunComplementing the adjoining MAMVP, this venuehosts cutting-edge art shows and installations. Theseare often site-specific, with artists creatively utilizingthe vast proportions of the revamped interior. It’sworth trying the basement restaurant, Tokyo Eat, forits designer good looks and food to match. AdmPalais de Chaillot17 place du Trocadéro, 16èmeMusée de l’Homme • 01 44 05 72 72www.mnhn.frOpen 9:45–5:15 Mon, Wed–Fri, 10–6:30 Sat & SunMusée de la Marine • 01 53 65 69 69www.musee-marine.fr Open 10–6 Wed–MonCité de l’Architecture et du Patrimoine • 01 58 51 52 00The curved twin pavilions of the Palais de Chaillot areseparated by a large terrace that offers spectacularviews of the Tour Eiffel and beyond. In the west wing,the Musée de la Marine features a wealth ofsurprisingly interesting exhibits – such as Napoleon I’sflamboyant imperial barge – that trace the glories ofFrench maritime history. Major redevelopment of thePalais has seen the scaling down of the Musée del’Homme (its amazing ethnographic collection isdestined for the Musée du Quai Branly, due to openin early 2006). In its place, the Cité de l’Architectureet du Patrimoine, a museum of modern architecture,is due to open in early 2006. Adm7 C48 E4Art & Architecture
  • 100. 105WestFondation Le Corbusier modern architectureVilla La Roche, 10 sq du Dr Blanche, 16ème • 01 42 88 41 53www.fondationlecorbusier.asso.fr • q JasminOpen 10–12:30 & 1:30–6 Mon–Fri (to 5pm Fri)Modernist architect Le Corbusier designed this privatehouse in 1923 for his fellow countryman, the Swiss artcollector Raoul La Roche. The adjoining Villa Jeanneretwas built for Le Corbusier’s brother and is now hometo the Foundation’s offices. Originally conceived asMusée Marmottan-Monet Monetsgalore2 rue Louis Boilly, 16ème • 01 44 96 50 33 • q Ranelaghwww.marmottan.com Open 10–6 Tue–SunThe Musée Marmottan-Monet boasts the world’slargest collection of works by Claude Monet – allthanks to a generous donation by the artist’s son.Rich pickings include an early series of Le Havrecaricatures and a flurry of watercolours from travels toLondon, Normandy and Norway. The famous series ofpaintings of Rouen cathedral at different times of theday is also on show here. Don’t miss the purpose-built basement, which displays a number of vibrantwater-lily paintings inspired by the artist’s garden atGiverny. Complementing the Monets are major worksfrom fellow Impressionists Berthe Morisot, Manet,Degas, Renoir, Gauguin and Alfred Sisley. Mostrecently, the museum has added a collection of over300 wonderfully crafted, medieval illuminatedmanuscripts from the English, French, Italian andFlemish schools. AdmMusée Guimet oriental art6 place d’Iéna, 16ème • 01 56 52 53 00www.museeguimet.fr Open 10–6 Wed–MonRecently renovated, the four floors of this excellentmuseum of Asian art contain objets, paintings andsculptures from most of the major Eastern culturesover five millennia. Highlights include exquisiteJapanese wood-block prints, archaeological findsfrom Pondicherry, India, and Chinese ceramics. AdmCheck out the progress of Jean Nouvel’s Musée du Quai Branly (www.quaibranly.fr)part of a larger development, only these two houseswere actually built. Pioneering his now-celebratedfive points of architecture, Le Corbusier harnessednatural light and applied his Purist theory to thecolour scheme. Villa La Roche itself, with its triple-height space, swooping curved gallery and blocks ofcolour, is the star of the show. Its rooms also featuresmall displays of the architect’s paintings, furniture,drawings and sculpture. Adm8 E3
  • 101. 106 www.eparis.dk.com17 D3Musée de l’Erotisme erotic assemblage72 boulevard de Clichy, 18ème • 01 42 58 28 73Open 10am–2am dailyThe city’s only museum that’s open until 2am is, per-haps unsurprisingly, dedicated to erotic art and locatedin the red-light district of Pigalle. Ignore the tacky win-dow displays; this is actually an intriguing collectionwhere sacred objets d’art sit next to temporary exhibitsby artists such as comic-book artist Robert Crumb. AdmChâteau de St-Germain notable châteauPlace Charles de Gaulle, St-Germain-en-Laye • 01 39 10 13 00www.musee-antiquitesnationales.frRER St-Germain-en-Laye Open 9–5:15 Wed–Mon (May–Sep:10–6 Sat & Sun)This imposing castle is set next to the River Seine, ingardens that were designed by Le Nôtre in the 1680s.Most of the building dates from the 1500s and nowhouses an outstanding archaeological collection. AdmMusée DépartementalMaurice Denis “Le Prieuré” Nabi art2bis rue Maurice Denis, St-Germain-en-Laye • 01 39 73 77 87www.musee-mauricedenis.fr • RER St-Germain-en-LayeOpen 10–5.30 Tue–Sun (to 6.30 Sat & Sun)An exceptional collection tracing the birth of early 20th-century avant-garde art, the museum here includesworks by Denis and his fellow Nabi painters. Don’tmiss the pretty sculpture-lined garden and chapel.Art & Architecture4 E3Canal St-Martin Boat Trip Paris from the waterLinking the Seine with the Canal d’Ourcq, the Canal St-Martin offers theopportunity to cruise through northern Paris. Barges (www.canauxrama.com) depart from Bastille’s Port de l’Arsenal (9:45 & 2:30) and take two-and-a-half hours to travel through attractive tree-lined alleys, tunnels(look out for Keiichi Tahara’s entrancing art installations), locks, andunder swing bridges before arriving at Parc de la Villette. This large,modern park is also home to the Cité de la Musique (see p108), Le Zenith(see p124) and Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie (see p108). Adm
  • 102. 107West & NorthMontmartre elevated attractionsThe hill of Montmartre has become even more tourist-struck since the worldwide success of the 2001 filmAmélie. Most visitors previously stuck to the place duTertre, with its hordes of caricaturists and wannabeartists, and the landmark Sacré Cœur church (seep223), from which there are magnificent views of thecity. Now, the tourist trail includes homages to Amélie’slocal greengrocers, re-named Maison Collignon as inthe film, and to her favourite bar, the Café des DeuxMoulins (see p214), the interior of which is hung withpictures of the leading lady, Audrey Tautou.However, the real charm of Montmartre lies in itsromantic, village atmosphere. Reminders of its pastas a working-class, rural community (until absorbedinto Paris in the late 19th century) include two wind-mills, the Moulin de Radet (see p224) and Moulin dela Galette (see p224). Even some vineyards remainhere, like those on the rue des Saules (Map 4 F1),which produce around 1,000 bottles of perfectlydrinkable wine each year.From the 1880s, a bohemian boom attracted writersand artists aplenty: the Bateau-Lavoir (destroyed in the70s) housed the studios of iconic painters Modigliani,Picasso and Braque; and the studios of Renoir andDufy were located in what is now the Musée de Mont-martre (see p225). The museum offers an intriguinginsight into the quartier’s artistic past and containssome original Toulouse-Lautrec posters. Nearby, thesculpture of a man apparently engulfed by the neigh-bouring wall is a tribute to Marcel Aymé’s Le Passe-Muraille, a novel about a government worker whocould walk through walls. A recent local addition is afibre-optic lighting artwork installed in the stairs on ruedu Chevalier de la Barre (Map 4 G1), which illuminatesat night to form the shapes of different constellations.4 F2
  • 103. 108 Surf for stunning architectural sights at www.eparis.dk.comCité des Sciences et de l’IndustrieParc de la Villette, 30 avenue Corentin Cariou, 19ème01 40 05 80 00 • q Porte de Pantinwww.cite-sciences.fr Open 10–6 Tue–SunThis well-planned centre presents science andtechnology in their many forms via exhibits, audio-visualinstallations and interactive displays. The complex alsocontains the huge Géode dome cinema, a 3D filmtheatre with moving seats, and a 1950s submarine. AdmMusée de la Musique music mattersCité de la Musique, 221 avenue Jean Jaurès, 19ème01 44 84 44 84 • q Porte de Pantinwww.cite-musique.fr Open noon–6 Tue–Sat, 10–6 SunWith the benefit of infrared headsets, visitors cansample sounds from Venetian lutes, Flemish harp-sichords and a host of other instruments on display.Each day on the free stage, musicians play everythingfrom 17th-century horns to modern African pipes. AdmBasilique St-Denis royal mausoleum1 rue de la Légion d’Honneur, St-Denis • 01 48 09 83 54q Basilique de St-DenisOpen 10–7 Mon–Sat, noon–7 Sun (Oct–Mar to 5 daily )An industrialized suburb it may be, but St-Denis, withits majestic church, is generally considered the birth-place of Gothic architecture. It is also the resting placefor most the French kings. Look out for the ostenta-tious tombs of François I and Claude de France. AdmStade de France stunning arenarue Francis de Pressensé, St-Denis • 08 92 70 09 00q St-Denis Porte de Pariswww.stadefrance.fr Visits on the hour 10–5 daily (tours inEnglish 10:30, 2:30)The spectacular oval stadium was built for the 1998World Cup. Even the cheapest of its 80,000 seats offersgreat visibility of sports events and rock concerts.Tours visit changing rooms and VIP boxes. AdmArt & Architecture
  • 104. 109Last Resting PlacesTree-lined Cimetière de Père-Lachaise is the largest,best-known cemetery in Paris. After the remains ofdramatist Molière and poet La Fontaine were trans-ferred here in 1817, it began attracting famed“residents” and skilled sculptors. The most visitedgrave is that of singer Jim Morrison; the quirkiest isthe statue of 19th-century journalist Victor Noir:women rub his now-faded crotch to increase theirchances of getting pregnant. The famous dead ofCimetière de Montmartre include the writer Zola,painter Degas and film director François Truffaut.Meanwhile, the small Cimetière de Passy has thehighest density of famous names. Look out for thepainter Manet, composers Debussy and Fauré, andactor Fernandel. For details, see p223.The Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie (see p108) can be reached by boat along the Canal St-Martin (see p106)NorthMusée d’Art et d’Histoirede St-Denis local history22bis rue Gabriel Péri, St-Denis • 01 42 43 37 57q St-Denis Porte de ParisOpen 10–5:30 Mon–Fri (to 8 Thu), 2:30–6:30 Sat & SunSet in a former Carmelite convent, this museum alonemerits a trip out to St-Denis. Highlights include thecramped reconstructed nuns’ cells and a unique col-lection of posters from the 1871 Paris Commune. AdmMusée Gustave Moreau artist’s home14 rue de la Rochefoucauld, 9ème • 01 48 74 38 50www.musee-moreau.fr Open 10–12:40 & 2–5:15 Wed–MonTroubled by the thought of anonymity, theSymbolist painter Moreau (1825–98) established anautobiographical museum in the studio and apartmenthe shared with his parents just before his death.Thousands of Moreau’s often mystical paintings anddrawings are on show, as well as memorabilia. AdmPorte St-Denis & Porte St-MartinThese towering twin gates, just yards apart, wereintended to lend the city a Roman grandeur. They areparticularly striking today, in what has become arather seedy part of north Paris. The larger Porte St-Denis was erected in 1672 and depicts battle scenesmarking the triumph of Louis XIV’s armies along theRhine, while the Porte St-Martin was constructed twoyears later to commemorate the capture of Besançon.11 A24 E4
  • 105. 110 www.eparis.dk.comGare du Nord monumental railway stationOpened in 1864 to cope with the rapidly increasingtraffic on the railways, architect Jacques IgnaceHittorff’s station is a grandiose example of 19th-century iron-and-glass vaulting, often overlooked byrail travellers rushing from A to B. The vast interior isfronted by an imposing, Roman-inspired stone façadelined with statues that personify the north Europeantowns served by the station.Opéra Garnier lavish venuePlace de l’Opéra, 9ème • 08 92 89 90 90www.opera-de-paris.fr Open 10–5 daily (except matinées)Architect Charles Garnier’s national opera house is aglorious monument to Second Empire opulence. Thefaçade is magnificently decorated with friezes andsculptures, while the interior is no less impressivelyembellished. A museum traces opera history via paint-ings, photographs and set models. AdmSeine-side AttractionsFew people know that a scaled-down Statue ofLiberty (Map 13 B3) stands guard on an island inthe Seine in the west of Paris. Donated in 1885 bythe American community in Paris, it also acts as areminder that the New York original was a gift fromthe French. Towards the city centre, on the river’sright bank by the Place d’Alma, the golden LibertyFlame (Map 8 F4) is a return gift from the city of NewYork. Its proximity to the tunnel where Princess Dianawas killed has made it her unofficial memorial.Between these two stands Gustave Eiffel’s world-famous tower, which has long survived its status asa temporary exhibit for the 1889 ExpositionUniverselle. The Tour Eiffel’s (see p224) recentlyadded white lights sparkle on every nocturnal houruntil 2am, and cause almost as much controversytoday as the tower did when it was first erected.Opposite the sculpture-filled Jardin des Tuileries(see p165), the colonnaded Assemblée Nationale(see p224) is the French parliament, which can bevisited on a guided tour. Further east lies the domedhome to the Académie Française (Map 16 E1),protector of the French language. Beyond here, theSeine is divided by the Ile de la Cité (Map 16 G2),the largest of Paris’s two central islands and hometo the city’s iconic Gothic cathedral, Notre Dame(see p223). On the island’s other side, the turretedConciergerie (see p224) was a 14th-century palaceand, more famously, the prison of Marie Antoinetteand family. Visitors here can learn about the FrenchRevolution and view the reconstructed royal cell.Of the 37 Seine bridges, the most spectacular isthe Art Nouveau Pont Alexandre III (Map 9 A4),lined with gilded lamps and cherubs. The Pont desArts (Map 10 F5) is popular for romantic rendezvous.9 D1Art & Architecture5 A4
  • 106. 111North, East & SouthMinistère des Finances landmarkThe new headquarters of the finance ministry is adominating, three-building riverside complex thatwas completed in 1989. Architects Borja Huidobroand Paul Chemetov designed the spectacularlyarched Colbert building – part of which overhangs theSeine to provide boat access for visiting officials – toecho the form of the nearby metro viaduct. The wholepackage is best viewed from the Pont de Bercy.Bibliothèque Nationale de France– François Mitterrand modern library11 quai François Mauriac, 13ème • 01 53 79 59 59www.bnf.fr Galleries open 10–7 Tue–Sat, noon–7 SunA hallmark of Mitterrand’s presidency was his ambi-tious architectural Grands Projets. The last of these, acontroversial library building, consists of four L-shapedtowers, designed to look like half-open books. It hostsregular exhibitions of photographs and drawings.Musée du Cinéma cinema heaven51 rue de Bercy, 12ème • 01 53 65 74 74www.cinemathequefrancaise.comThe former home of the ill-fated American Center wasdesigned by Frank Gehry and renovated in 2005 toaccommodate a mecca for cinephiles. The complexhas four cinemas including the mighty CinémathèqueFrançaise, temporary exhibition space and a museumthat looks back on a century of film-making. AdmGuided tours of the Opéra Garnier can be booked on 01 41 10 08 1022 F322 G222 F112 2HNemo’s Murals public artGraffiti artist Nemo has been stencilling his “ShadowMan” on building façades around Paris since 1990. Thesilhouetted figure with its trademark suitcase pops upin poorer districts, like the 20th arrondissement (mostspectacularly at 36 rue Henri Chevreau). Such isNemo’s notoriety that he now receives commissions,including a project around rue Mouffetard in the 5èmeto commemorate the Bièvre, Paris’s underground river.
  • 107. 112 Find out about art sales in Paris on www.eparis.dk.comLes Frigos warehouse studios19 rue des Frigos, 13ème • 01 44 24 96 96www.les-frigos.comAfter years of struggle, this huge artists’ communityhas won the right to stay in the old refrigeratedwarehouses of the SNCF. Call for details of thetwice-yearly official open days, usually organizedin May and September. Otherwise, impromptuindividual visits are usually permitted.Louise Weiss Galleries art centralThe vibrant art scene on rue Louise Weiss has notlooked back since 1997, when a project was hatched togroup a number of galleries (mostly open 11–7Tue– Sat) on this small street in the developing 13tharrondissement. Try Galerie Praz-Delavallade(www.praz-delavallade.com, at No. 28), with its focuson US artists, or Galerie Emmanuel Perrotin (at No.30), a showcase for European and Japanese talent.Manufacture des Gobelins tapestries42 avenue des Gobelins, 13ème • 01 44 08 52 00Visits Tue–Thu at 2pm & 2:45pmFounded in 1662 to supply Louis XIV with royal furn-ishings, the Gobelins factory still uses 17th-centurytechniques to produce tapestries that are now hungin state buildings and embassies. Conducted inFrench, guided visits take in the factory, the Beauvaistapestry and Savonnerie carpet workshops. AdmArt & Architecture21A321 D322 F4Cité Universitaire campus buildingsBoulevard Jourdan, 14ème • 01 43 13 65 96www.ciup.fr • q Cité UniversitaireThese wildly eclectic residences were built from1925, and still house foreign university students.The Asian and Armenian colleges follow theirrespective national architecture; the Swiss (by LeCorbusier) and Dutch (by Willem Dudok) expressthese notable architects’ individual styles.
  • 108. 113For details of evening events at the Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemporain, see p17SouthCatacombes underground Paris1 place Denfert Rochereau, 14ème • 01 43 22 47 63Open 10–5 Tue–SunIllicit parties are sometimes held in the miles oftunnels beneath Paris, but the Catacombes, anossuary since 1785, are easier to get into. Visitorsstroll through subterranean corridors lined – oftenartistically – with bones and skulls moved here fromovercrowded cemeteries of the period. AdmFondation Cartier pourl’Art Contemporain modern exhibitions261 boulevard Raspail, 14ème • 01 42 18 56 50www.fondation.cartier.fr Open noon–8 Tue–SunJean Nouvel’s spectacular glass building housesregular exhibitions of relatively well-knowncontemporary artists, such as William Eggleston andPierrick Sorin, with an emphasis on art installations,videos and photography. AdmFondation Henri Cartier-Bresson2 impasse Lebouis, 14ème • 01 56 80 27 00www.henricartierbresson.orgOpen 1–6:30 Wed–Fri & Sun (to 8:30 Wed), 11–6:45 SatFounder of the reputed Magnum photo agency, HenriCartier-Bresson intended this centre to house the bulkof his work. At present, the affiliated museum hoststhree shows a year, occasionally including Bresson’swork, but mostly that of exciting younger artists. AdmMémorial du Maréchal Leclerc23 allée de la Deuxième, 15ème • 01 40 64 39 44Open 10–5:40 Tue–SunActually two museums, the exhibits here focus on twoFrench WWII heroes. Projected archive footage showsthe Liberation of Paris under Leclercq, his Free FranceForces and the Allies. Photographs and postersdocument the situation inside occupied France fromthe perspective of Resistance martyr Jean Moulin. Adm20 E319 D219 B219 B1
  • 109. performanceFrom high-brow classical operaand theatre to radical circus actsand chanson, Paris offers a richdiversity of performance arts.Cinephiles are spoilt for choice bythe city’s numerous art-housecinemas, dance aficionados enjoyperformances by both rising andwell-established companies,and music fans can pick fromleading classical orchestras andinternational acts.
  • 110. 116 Check what’s on in music, theatre, sport and more at www.eparis.dk.comTOP CHOICES – performanceNew Morning7–9 rue des Petites-Ecuries, 10èmeAn intimate jazz club that pulls thecrowds for respected playerssuch as Cuban pianist OmarSosa. (See p122)Maison de la Radio France116 avenue Président Kennedy, 16èmeThe home of France’s national radiostation offers regular free concertsof classical music and big-namepopular musicians. (See p122)Bataclan50 boulevard Voltaire, 11èmeIt’s sweaty and it’s smoky, but thiswell-loved spot just oozes atmos-phere. Expect bands such as SigurRos and George Clinton. (See p126)Bouffes du Nord37bis boulevard de la Chapelle, 10èmeThis famously shabby theatre stagesan eclectic programme of plays andmusic, and is the HQ of innovativedirector Peter Brook. (See p122)Elysée Montmartre72 boulevard Rochechouart, 18èmeThis former music hall hosts thekind of international bands (such asTravis and Marillion) that wouldn’tquite fill Le Zénith. (See p123)Cinéma en Plein AirParc de la Villette, 19èmeJoin the chilled-out crowds at thesepopular free film screenings in apark setting. There’s a differenttheme each year. (See p124)Le Zénith211 avenue Jean Jaurès, 19èmeOffering excellent visibility andacoustics, Le Zénith is a huge,hanger-like venue for blockbusteracts. (See p124)In the summer months, Parishosts a string of festivals, many ofwhich include free performancesthat span the musical spectrum(see pp10–11).CUTTING-EDGETOURING BANDS FREEDuc des Lombards42 rue des Lombards, 1erThis laid-back venue is famed foruniting exceptional exponents ofmodern jazz in exciting late-nightjam sessions. (See p118)Cartoucherie de VincennesRoute du Champ de Manœuvre, 12èmeA five-theatre complex located inthe Bois de Vincennes. Each venuehas its own distinct character andartistic agenda. (See p125)La Maroquinerie23 rue de Boyer, 20èmeAn eclectic mix of popular musicalstyles and highbrow literature isperformed here. Some concerts andliterary events are free. (See p126)Centre National de la Danse1 rue Victor Hugo, 93507 PantinThis acclaimed dance centre puts onpublic performances of new work bytalented choreographers. (See p124)
  • 111. 117TOP CHOICES – performanceThere are two KiosqueThéâtres that sell cheap theatre tickets on the day of performance (see p13)Café de la Gare41 rue du Temple, 4èmeDespite straying from its idealistroots, this legendary café-théâtrestill offers quality short plays andone-man shows. (See p119)Opéra GarnierPlace de l’Opéra, 9èmeHome to fiction’s Phantom of theOpera, the sumptuous Garnier isbest known for its excellent balletperformances. (See p122)Théâtre du Châtelet1 place du Châtelet, 1erThe diverse programme hereincludes high-quality opera alongsideprogressive classical music anddance. (See p119)Le Champo Llion51 rue des Écoles, 5èmeDirector Claude Chabrol called thisLeft Bank cinema his “second uni-versity”. The popular retrospectivesoften run for over a year. (See p120)La Pagode57 rue de Babylone, 7èmeIncongruously situated in a verybourgeois quartier, this Japanesepagoda is one of the city’s mosteccentric film venues. (See p118)Le Grand Rex1 boulevard Poissonnière, 2èmeClassified as a HistoricalMonument, this legendary1930s cinema still hosts manya glitzy première. (See p119)MK2 Bibliothèque128–162 avenue de France, 13èmeA multiplex located in a classy Seine-side complex. The tall guy in front isnever a problem thanks to well-spaced, comfortable seats. (See p127)Opéra BastillePlace de la Bastille, 12èmeThe strikingly modern Opéra Bastilleis Paris’s main opera venue. Eventsrange from the conservative to theavant-garde. (See p122)Cirque d’Hiver Bouglione110 rue Amelot, 11èmeTraditional circus acts are given amodern spin here. Expect anythingfrom contortionist choreography totightrope acrobatics (See p125)Studio 2810 rue Tholozé, 18èmeStudio 28 claims to be the first-everavant-garde cinema and upholds itsreputation by screening around tenfilms per week. (See p123)ALTERNATIVEHIGHBROW FILMMany independent cinemas arecheaper on Wednesdays, andsometimes on Mondays too.Théâtre des Champs-Elysées15 avenue Montaigne, 8èmeThis venue earned its place inclassical music history thanks toperformances by such icons asMaria Callas and Debussy. (See p121)Hôtel du Nord102 quai de Jemmapes, 10èmeThe novelty of Anglophonestand-up comedy at a historicParis landmark draws expatsand Parisians alike. (See p123)Comédie Française1 place Colette, 1erEstablished by Louis XIV in 1680,this is still the city’s prime venue forclassical French theatre. (See p119)
  • 112. 118 www.eparis.dk.comDuc des Lombards hot jazz42 rue des Lombards, 1er01 42 33 22 88 Open dailySince opening in 1985, this respected jazz club haspicked up several industry awards and maintained itsultra-cool reputation by attracting some of Europe’sbiggest names. Music ranges from free jazz to hardbop, and artists who have jammed here includetrumpeter Eric Truffaz and bassist Henri Texier.10 H5La Pagode oriental art-house cinema57 rue de Babylone, 7ème01 45 55 48 48 Film times vary: call for detailsShipped over brick-by-brick from Japan in 1895, thisstriking pagoda, complete with an ornamental Japanesegarden, became a cinema in the 1930s. Jean Cocteauchose it for the premiere of his Le Testament d’Orphéein 1959. Now classified a historical monument, it hastwo screens and shows recent independent films.Forum des Images Paris on filmForum des Halles (Porte Eustache), 1er • 01 44 76 62 00www.forumdesimages.net Research room open 1–9 dailyThis centre archives films, documentaries, advertsand newsreels – anything connected with Paris.Visitors can search the database of some 6,500 films(from Lumière brothers shorts to Superman II ) towatch on a personal screen. The cinema also screensseveral films a day in themed programmes. AdmLe Point Virgule small-scale comedy7 rue St-Croix de la Bretonnerie, 4ème • 01 42 78 67 03www.netkiri.com Performances at 8, 9:15 and 10:30pm dailyThis tiny Marais café-théâtre organizes a prolificprogramme of one- and two-man comedy shows. Frompacked rows of slightly uncomfortable benches, spec-tators watch impromptu sketches, humour-spicedsongs and surreal musical acts. Several shows a dayare held during the popular summer Festival d’Humour.Booking TicketsMany venues have booking offices, but mostpeople buy tickets at branches of fnac and VirginMegastores or online at www.ticketnet.fr. Buy half-price theatre tickets in person on the day of per-formance from either of Kiosque Théâtre’s twooutlets. For contact details, see p13. You canbook cinema tickets at Allociné (08 92 89 28 92).15 A210 G417 B1Performance
  • 113. 119At the Comédie Française, 95 reduced-rate seats are reserved for sale one hour before each performanceComédie Française classic theatre1 place Colette, 1er • 08 25 10 16 80www.comedie-francaise.fr Box office open 11–6 dailyFounded by Molière’s troupe in 1680, this statetheatre is famed for its classical French productions(Molière, Racine, Corneille), but an added draw is thesurprisingly intimate 896-seat Italianate auditorium.Adventurous programming now sees regular foraysinto established modern and foreign works.Théâtre du Châtelet historic venue1 place du Châtelet, 1er • 01 40 28 28 00www.chatelet-theatre.com Box office open 10–7 Mon–SatWorld-class ballet, opera and classical musicproductions are the draw at this illustrious theatre. Arecent re-orientation in programming has given a morecontemporary direction (music by Pierre Boulez anddance from Maurice Béjart). Excellent morning concerts(Mon, Wed, Fri) are held in the foyer (entry charged).Café de la Gare rebel humour41 rue du Temple, 4ème • 01 42 78 52 51www.cafe-de-la-gare.fr.stBorn out of post-1968 populism, this, the originalcafé-théâtre, is still Paris’s best for one-man shows,comedy and short plays. The venue brought fame tosatirical comic Coluche, actor Patrick Dewaere andwriter/actor Sotha, all of whose works are stillperformed to a mixed and enthusiastic audience.Le Grand Rex cinematic grandeur1 boulevard Poissonnière, 2ème • 08 92 68 05 96www.legrandrex.com Open daily, tours at regular intervalsOpened in 1932, the city’s largest cinema has anArt Deco façade and splendid Baroque-style decor.Audiences of up to 2,650 come here for blockbustermovies, concerts and the celebrated Christmas-timeson et lumière. Entertaining behind-the-scenes toursfeature Disney-esque special effects.11 A516 H110 H210 E4Centre
  • 114. 120 To find out what’s on now in Paris’s movie-houses, go to www.eparis.dk.comLeft-Bank Cinemas film buff’s heavenBeyond the clusters of chain cinemas around Odéonand Montparnasse, the 5th and 6th arrondissementsarguably offer the richest variety of art-house cinemasin the world. Some 20 – with a total of 39 screensbetween them – are located around boulevard St-Micheland form a cinephile’s paradise. All films are shownin their original language (VO or version originale) withFrench subtitles where necessary, and the diversity istruly staggering. The tiny rue Champollion alone ishome to three such cinemas. Film aficionados have aspecial affection for Le Champo Llion, a regular hauntof Nouvelle Vague directors Jean-Luc Godard andFrançois Truffaut, who nurtured their encyclopedicknowledge of cinema here. The entrance is adornedwith memorabilia dedicated to Jacques Tati, while themain screen has Europe’s only “periscope” projector,so-called because the projection room is situatedbelow the screen. Known for its retrospective seasons(think Alain Resnais and Tim Burton), Le Champo Llionalso organizes debates in the presence of fameddirectors. Just down the road, the Reflet Medicisspecializes in major classics and retrospectives,while the Quartier Latin (which accommodates just70 people) prides itself on exclusive premieres.For classic American films, try the three Actioncinemas. The Grand Action dreams up inventiveseasons that span careers, themes and genres suchas Love-Hate, Gangsters and The 100 Best Films. TheAction Ecole treats viewers to diverse retrospectives(from Buster Keaton to Blake Edwards), while theAction Christine Odeon favours 1950s movies. Otherpopular venues include Images d’Ailleurs (blackcinema), Racine Odeon (legendary all-night sessions),Studio Galande (weekend screenings of The RockyHorror Picture Show) and St-André-des-Arts, wherecontemporary auteurs are just as likely to be in theaudience as they are to be screened.16 G3Performance
  • 115. 121Many Left-Bank cinemas are cheaper on Mondays and WednesdaysThéâtre de la Ville hip dance2 place du Châtelet, 4ème • 01 42 74 22 77www.theatredelaville-paris.comBox office open 11–7 Mon–Sat, 11–8 Tue–SatThis prestigious 1860s-built theatre has become thecity’s leading venue for contemporary dance. The1,000-seat auditorium attracts innovative performerssuch as Pina Bausch and La La La Human Steps.World-music concerts and plays are also staged here.Lucernaire one-stop entertainment53 rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs, 6ème • 01 45 44 57 34www.lucernaire.frConverted from an old factory, this vibrant Left Bankarts centre houses two theatres, three cinemas, anart gallery, a bar and a restaurant. The eclectictheatre programming favours new talent and inno-vative pieces, such as one-man condensed classics,while the cinemas show recent art-house releases.Théâtre des Champs-Elysées15 avenue Montaigne, 8ème • 01 49 52 50 50www.theatrechampselysees.frBox office open 10–noon & 2–6 Mon–FriDescribed by writer Marcel Proust as “a temple tomusic, architecture and painting”, this theatre waswhere the infamous premiere of Stravinsky’s Rites ofSpring (1913) ended in riots and Joséphine Bakerstarred in her ground-breaking Revue Nègre in 1925.Today, the historic 1913 theatre, with its domepainted by Maurice Denis (see p106), still hosts thecrème de la crème of classical music. Concerts arealmost unfailingly excellent: home of the OrchestreNational de France and Orchestre Philharmonique deRadio-France, the venue also attracts top internationalorchestras (Vienna, Berlin), legendary singers (LucianoPavarotti, Cecilia Bartoli) and renowned conductors(Pierre Boulez, Seiji Ozawa). Outstanding balletproductions have included turns by the New York CityBallet and the brilliant choreographer Maurice Béjart.8 G316 H115 D5Centre & West
  • 116. 122 www.eparis.dk.comMaison de la Radio France concerts116 avenue Président Kennedy, 16ème01 42 30 22 22This distinctive circular building is home to Frenchstate radio. The Salle Olivier Messiaen hosts an eclec-tic repertoire of classical music, usually by one of tworesident orchestras. Concerts are often free, includingthose in the music festival Présences (Jan–Feb) andone-off gigs by big names such as Peter Gabriel.Bouffes du Nord dilapidated charm37bis boulevard de la Chapelle, 10ème • 01 46 07 34 50www.bouffesdunord.com Box office open 11–6 Mon–SatAfter years of neglect and with only minimal restoration, this legendaryvaudeville theatre was reopened in 1974 by English director Peter Brook.The ramshackle interior provides a terrific backdrop for its often ground-breaking productions: an exciting menu of modern and reinvigoratedclassic plays, as well as jazz, opera and contemporary music. Perfor-mances here really benefit from the building’s extraordinary acoustics.New Morning no-frills club7–9 rue des Petites-Ecuries, 10ème • 01 45 23 51 41www.newmorning.comLocated on a run-down street with an all-but-hiddenentrance, this is possibly the city’s most famous jazzvenue. Beloved of serious fans and musicians alike,the club was Chet Baker’s favourite and, since open-ing in 1981, has attracted the key exponents of jazz,blues and Latin music from Roy Ayres to Taj Mahal.A Night at the OperaCrowned by Marc Chagall’s gorgeous ceiling frescoes,the stunning auditorium of Opéra Garnier (see p110)is in fact used mostly for quality ballet productionsand some lesser-known operas. The mainly classicalrepertoire is often given a modern slant in terms ofdesign and choreography. The 2,700-capacityOpéra Bastille (see p226), with its vast, curvingglass façade, was commissioned by Mitterrand asan “opera for the people”, but escalatingconstruction costs have inflated the ticket prices(obscured views are, however, still available for just5€). Classical opera is the mainstay here, withoccasional ballet and classical-music concerts.Tickets are always in demand, so advance bookingis well advised. Both venues offer daily guided tours.Performance11 A15 B213 B2
  • 117. 123Cinema programmes change every Wednesday. Check www.allocine.fr or Pariscope for listingsElysée Montmartre concert venue72 boulevard Rochechouart, 18ème • 08 92 69 23 92www.elyseemontmartre.com Box office open 9–7:30 Mon–SatThis large Pigalle venue – now one of the city’s bestfor indie rock and trip-hop – stills bears vestiges ofits past life as a 19th-century music hall. Elaboratecarvings on the walls and ceiling add a certain gran-deur to concerts, salsa nights and the popular twice-monthly balls, which feature cover bands and DJs.Studio 28 quirky and convivial screenings10 rue Tholozé, 18ème • 01 46 06 36 07www.cinemastudio28.comOpened in the 1920s, this popular independent cinemawas once frequented by film icons Luis Buñuel andAbel Gance and, more recently, fictional local residentAmélie. Showing current art-house releases, classicsand pre-releases, it also holds monthly debatesfeaturing leading directors and well-known actors.Cité de la Musique modern music hall221 avenue Jean Jaurès, 19ème • 01 44 84 44 84www.cite-musique.fr • q Porte de PantinDesigned by French architect Christian de Portzamparc,this music-oriented complex at Parc de la Villetteincludes a state-of-the-art oval auditorium that hostseverything from classical to world music and contem-porary jazz. Try to catch one of the classic silent-filmscreenings that are accompanied by live music.Hotel du Nord Anglo stand-up102 quai de Jemmapes, 10ème • 01 53 19 98 88www.anythingmatters.comMade famous by the eponymous 1938 Marcel Carnéfilm, this former hotel now showcases the best inAnglophone stand-up comedy. With a decor that out-classes that of most comedy joints, this intimatevenue attracts big-name performers (Daniel Kitson,Boothby Graffoe) who often try out new material here.11 C14 G34 E2West & North
  • 118. 124 www.eparis.dk.comCinéma en Plein Air picnic and a movieParc de la Villette, 19ème • 01 40 03 75 75 • q Porte de Pantinwww.villette.com Screenings Jul–Aug 10pm Tue–SunOn fine summer evenings, the large lawn at Parc de laVillette is strewn with picnickers and cinephiles enjoy-ing the night’s free film. The huge inflatable screenshows recent blockbusters and classic foreign movies(all in original language) based around a differenttheme each year. Deck chairs are available for hire.Le Zénith giant multipurpose venue211 avenue Jean Jaurès, 19ème • 01 42 08 60 00www.le-zenith.com/paris • q Porte de PantinPurpose built by the state as a venue for popularmusic, Le Zénith benefits from great acoustics and anintimate atmosphere, despite its 6,400 capacity. Theinterior of the tent-like structure can be adapted asrequired, whether for French chanson, a big-namerock concert, ice-skating spectacle or sport event.Come to the CabaretCabaret is alive and kicking in the city where it firstbegan, but it can be an expensive night out. Showsat the iconic Moulin Rouge have the expected formulaof Doriss Girls, clad in feathers, sequins and rhine-stones, dancing the cancan. At the Lido, it’s theBluebell Girls who are centre stage, accompaniedby special laser effects, while at the Paradis Latin,designed by Gustave Eiffel, the dancers are joinedby trapeze artists and a ventriloquist. Crazy Horse,meanwhile, advertises itself as an exponent of “theart of nudity”, though it is more tasteful than the ideaof topless dance routines suggests. To escape thedomain of wealthy tourists, try the gloriously kitschcross-dressing at Chez Michou or the even camperChez Madame Arthur. For contact details, see p225.Centre National de la Danse dance1 rue Victor Hugo, Pantin 93507 • 01 41 83 27 27www.cnd.fr • q Hoche RER PantinThis 1970s concrete office building on the banks ofthe Canal de l’Ourcq was refurbished in 2004 tohouse the HQ of the innovative National DanceCentre. Inside are no fewer than 11 dance studios;three serve as cosy spaces for cutting-edge shows byyoung choreographers from all over the world.Performance
  • 119. 12518 E2Café de la Danse eclectic sounds5 passage Louis-Philippe, 11ème • 01 47 00 57 59www.chez.com/cafedeladanseDespite its name, this intimate venue hosts everythingfrom folk-rock and world music to a cappella, as wellas modern dance. Overlooking the auditorium (whichholds about 450 people) is a small balcony with abar – the best vantage point from which to enjoybands that are normally found playing bigger venues.Cartoucherie de Vincennes radical theatreRoute du Champ de Manœuvre, Bois de Vincennes, 12èmeq Château de Vincennes with free shuttle busThis complex of five small theatres and three work-shops was converted from a disused munitions factoryin the 1970s. The site is off the beaten track and bestreached by taxi, but it’s worth the trek as the theatres’repertoires are prolific and stimulating.Founded after the riots of 1968, the Théâtre du Soleilwas the first to establish itself here and, under thedirection of Arian Mnouchkine, is still turning out polit-ical epics. Philippe Adrien’s energetic troupe stages amix of the avant-garde and the classical at the Théâtrede la Têmpète, while Julie Brochen at the Théâtre del’Aquarium programmes imaginative productions ofChekhov and Tolstoy alongside music-accompaniedpoetry and Japanese butô dance. The Théâtre duChaudron favours young companies, often with womendirectors, while the Théâtre de l’Epée de Bois is knownfor its progressive take on contemporary works.Cirque d’Hiver Bouglione circus110 rue Amelot, 11ème • 01 47 00 28 81www.cirquedhiver.com Performances Oct–late Feb/early MarBuilt in 1852, this spectacular, polygonal circus ring witnessed the birthof the trapeze when Jules Léotard appeared here almost 150 years ago.Each winter, the Bouglione family devise a new, enthralling show thatfeatures trapeze artists, clowns, magicians, contortionists and animalacts from around the world. And every year (Jan–Feb), the venue hostsan international festival featuring the circus stars of tomorrow.11 D4North & East
  • 120. 126 www.eparis.dk.comLa Guinguette Pirate concerts afloatQuai Francois-Mauriac, 13ème • 01 43 49 68 68www.guinguettepirate.comThis three-masted Chinese junk on the Seine hosts anextremely varied programme of music for party-lovingaudiences of up to 200. Feel the narrow boat rock tohip-hop and indie concerts or sway gently to jazz andworld music. Film screenings and improvized theatreshows also make it aboard on occasions.La Maroquinerie eclectic performances23 rue de Boyer, 20ème • 01 40 33 35 05www.lamaroquinerie.fr • q MénilmontantIn an unlikely spot at the top of Ménilmontant, thispopular venue puts on regular rock, pop, funk andjazz concerts, as well as hosting highbrow literatureevenings in the Café Littéraire. The recently addedrestaurant also ensures that art is not enjoyed on anempty stomach. Some concerts are free.Le Regard du Cygne experimental dance210 rue de Belleville, 20ème • 01 43 58 55 93redcygne.free.fr • q TélégrapheThis small and intimate dance space has been hugelyinfluential in promoting new forms of artistic expres-sion. The bare-bones studio is famed for its occasionalSpectacles Sauvages, when artists showcase work inprogress during lively ten-minute slots. Classical- andcontemporary-music concerts are also held here.Bataclan historic venue50 boulevard Voltaire, 11ème01 43 14 35 35This former vaudeville theatre may have lost itsoriginal Chinese pagoda façade, but the sumptuousinterior still provides an enticing setting for the variedconcerts of indie, trip-hop, French chanson and worldmusic. The charming auditorium has a fantastic vibe,but the acoustics can be less than perfect.Performance12 E422 F3
  • 121. 12722 F3The Théâtre de la Cité International is set within the Cité Universitaire (see p113)MK2 Bibliothèque cinema complex128–162 avenue de France, 13ème • 08 92 69 69 96www.mk2.com/bibliotheque/seat.htmlParis’s artiest cinema chain conceived its latest out-post under the slogan “a whole life [centred] aroundcinema”. Located next to the Bibliothèque Nationale(see p111), the stylish mega-complex has 14 screens,four eateries and two shops. Two-person lovers’ seatson every row are an extra draw for couples.Théâtre de la Cité International21 boulevard Jourdan, 14ème • 01 43 13 50 50RER Cité Universitairewww.ciup.fr/culture/theatre.htm Box office open 2–7 Mon–SatThis three-stage theatre is known for its creative andenergetic shows. The Grand Théatre puts on modernplays, dance and circus acts; the Galerie’s movableseating lends itself to cutting-edge theatre; and thetiny Reserre hosts readings and small productions.Spectator SportsMost sports events are within easy reach of the city.One of the big four tennis grand-slam events, thetwo-week French Open, is held at Roland Garros atthe end of May. Apply for tickets two months beforethe tournament; guided tours and the museum areavailable year round. November brings the menback for the Tennis Masters Series at the PalaisOmnisport de Paris-Bercy (POPB), while the leadingwomen return in March for the Open Gazde France (at the Stade Pierre de Coubertin).Although most of France’s leading footballershave been lured abroad, passionate crowds stillcheer on Paris St-Germain at the 50,000-capacityParc des Princes. International games and Cupfinals, however, are hosted at the magnificentStade de France. Major athletics meetings are alsoheld here, as well as home games of the popularSix Nations rugby tournament (tickets for which canbe hard to come by). The highly successful StadeFrançais rugby club plays at Stade Jean-Bouin.For racecourses, head to the edges of Paris’s twowoods. Paris-Vincennes favours trotting (harnessracing), while Longchamp is reserved for flat racing,including Europe’s richest race, the Prix de l’Arc deTriomphe in October. Showjumping tops the bill atPOPB in March, with the Jumping International deParis. In fact, over the year, POPB hosts everythingfrom windsurfing and motocross to internationalgymnastics, basketball and ice-skating.Tickets for most sports fixtures can be purchasedat major ticket agencies (see p118), as well asthrough department stores La Samaritaine and LesGaleries Lafayette (see p220). It is wise to book inadvance for most events and avoid revendeurs(ticket touts). For all contact details, see p226.East & South
  • 122. bars & clubsThe City of Lights comes into itsown after dark, when the bobos(bourgeois bohemians), beautifulpeople, intellectuals and otherParisian tribes set forth on theirseparate drinking trails. Pick yourcrowd, and explore the myriadbars, clubs and cafés scatteredaround the city – you’re bound tofind the cocktail and the companyof your choice.
  • 123. 130 Check out what’s happenning on the Paris club scene through www.eparis.dk.comTOP CHOICES – bars & clubsFubar5 rue St-Sulpice, 6èmeThe Fubar is all about flavouredMartinis (try the apple, or thesweeter lychee), served with styleand a smile. (See p141)Le Bar du PlazaPlaza Athenée, 25 ave Montaigne, 8èmeA real see-and-be-seen destinationbar: you’ll find sleek design, potentcocktails and the rich-and-famousout on the town. (See p145)Le Café Noir65 rue Montmartre, 2èmeThe furnishings might be traditional,but Le Café Noir is a trendy spot,full of bright young things makingthemselves at home. (See p135)Harry’s5 rue Danou, 2èmeBirthplace of the Bloody Mary andthe haunt of in-the-know cocktailaficionados. Be warned: they neverstint on measures here. (See p136)AZ Bar62 rue Mazarine, 6èmeExpect a lovely setting, amazingfloral displays, beautiful people andexpertly mixed drinks – all in trueConran style. (See p142)Hotel Costes239 rue St-Honoré, 1erDesigned by Jacques Garcia in 1997and still resolutely hip. It’s worthtrying to get a table at the bar ofthe Hotel Costes. (See p132)China Club50 rue Charenton, 12èmeOne of the Bastille’s most suave andsophisticated bars, with low lighting,huge sofas, a well-dressed crowdand serious cocktails. (See p148)Au Petit Fer à Cheval30 rue Vieille du Temple, 4èmeThe old-fashioned decor here was sowell-loved that it was totally recre-ated after a recent fire. The zinc baris the star of the show. (See p138)Le Crocodile6 rue Royer Collard, 5èmeEccentric and fun, Le Crocodile is aplace to come if you love cocktailsbut hate the slick surroundings thatoften accompany them. (See p141)Le Sancerre35 rue des Abbesses, 18èmeFor a slice of old Montmartre andits most exciting café crowd, LeSancerre cannot be beaten. Greatbeer and bonhomie. (See p148)Bar des Théâtres6 avenue Montaigne, 8èmeAn old-fashioned bar-restaurant, withan unusually mixed clientele for suchan up-market address. (See p145)DESIGNER DRINKSCOCKTAILS TRADITIONAL BARSThe bars at any of the palacehotels (see p177) are a goodoption if you’re looking for drinksthat have a certain chichi style.HemingwayRitz Hotel, 15 place Vendôme, 1erThe daddy of Paris’s cocktail bars,and a super-sophisticated place tosip a superb dry Martini or the signa-ture concoction, a Ritz 75. (See p133)
  • 124. 131TOP CHOICES – bars & clubsLe Connetable55 rue des Archives, 3èmeA quintessentially French bar that isfantastic fun after 1am and showsthat Parisians certainly do knowhow to let their hair down. (See p137)Mathi’s3 rue Ponthieu, 8èmeVery hip and hard to get into, Mathi’sonly starts to get exciting around2am. Come before midnight if youwant to try and get a table. (See p145)La Fabrique56 rue de Faubourg St-Antoine, 11èmeHome brew and hipsters often don’tmix, but beer fans love La Fabrique’shoppy brew while designer kids lapup the atmosphere. (See p148)Frog & Princess9 rue Princesse, 6èmeOne of the four Parisian Frog pubs,the Princess is probably the mostfun. It offers a choice of four or fivedifferent home brews. (See p132)O’Neil20 rue de Canettes, 6èmeOne of the quieter pubs in the area,O’Neil pulls in both French and inter-national drinkers attracted by thebeer brewed on the spot. (See p132)La Belle Hortense31 rue Vieille du Temple, 4èmeBookshop, bar and off-licence too,this place is ideal for intellectualswho appreciate their wine. OnlyFrench wines are on offer. (See p139)Le Baron Rouge1 rue Theophile Roussel, 12èmeAttracting a rambunctious crowdand brimming with exceptionallygood red wine, Le Baron Rouge is aParis institution. (See p151)Chai 3333 court St-Emilion, 12èmeThe largest and trendiest of thecity’s bistrots à vins has wine-based cocktails and a superbwine list. (See p150)Juveniles47 rue de Richelieu, 1erBritish-owned and internationallyknown, this bar has an impressiveNew World list, and it also sellswine to take home. (See p133)Le Bar27 rue Condé, 6èmeWhether you come to chat up orchill out, this is a stylish choice forrounding off the night. (See p135)Le Clown Bar114 rue Amelot, 11èmeDespite the clown memorabilia, noteverything is taken lightly here. Cer-tainly not the wine list, which is fullof well-priced choices. (See p149)When you order un demi don’texpect to get half-a-litre of beer; theglass actually contains just half thatamount of amber nectar.AFTER HOURSMICROBRASSERIES WONDERFUL WINEIn Paris, microbrasseries, which brewtheir own beers, are few and far betweenand tend to be popular with English-speaking expats and Anglophones.
  • 125. 132 www.eparis.dk.com9 D310 F5Le Fumoir chic and sleek all-rounder6 rue de L’Amiral de Coligny, 1er • 01 42 92 00 24Open to 2am dailyWith its beautiful, long mahogany bar, well-stockedlibrary and trendy terrace across from the Louvre, LeFumoir is equally perfect for pre-dinner drinks, late-night cocktails, a little light refreshment after some artappreciation or a quiet afternoon with a pot of tea andone of the books borrowed from the groaning shelves.Hotel Costes sexy bar239 rue St-Honoré, 1er • 01 42 44 50 25www.hotelcostes.com Open to 1am dailyThe bar here is a rare creature: a hot spot that haskept its cool, despite the fact that it’s been servingdrinks to the style set since 1996. The plush NapoleonII bordello decor continues to provide a lush, sensualbackdrop for le beau monde, and the intimate nooksand crannies are still likely to hide a celebrity or two.Le Cab posh party place2 place du Palais Royal, 1er • 01 58 62 56 25www.cabaret.fr Open to 3am Mon & Tue, to 6am Wed–SatVery plush and upscale, Cab (formerly Cabaret) hasbeen open for three years, but there’s no such thingas growing old gracefully for a club like this. A make-over in 2003 – all leather wall coverings, squishybanquettes and smooth lines – has kept the beautifulpeople flocking here to pout, preen and party. AdmBrit PubsParisians in search of a pint, anglophiles yearning fora bit of South Kensington-on-Seine and expats pin-ing for a local all gravitate towards one of the city’spubs. Beer aficionados will love the home-brew atO’Neils, the Frog & Princess and Freedom. Trad pubdecor and rowdy drinking can be found at TheCricketer, while a slightly more sedate crowd headsfor the ale at the Bombardier. Pool players and giglovers hang at the Cruiscin Lan, while other Irishpubeen fans swear by the Corcoran for great craic,or Coolin for Celtic cool. Whisky lovers drink at theAuld Alliance while Paris’s other Scottish pub, TheHighlander, is perfect for party animals: at week-ends the bar and dance floor are open late andalways packed. For further details, see pp211, 212 &10 F4Bars & Clubs
  • 126. 1332 C49 D3Hemingway Bar Ritzy experienceRitz Hotel, 15 place Vendôme, 1er • 01 43 16 33 65www.ritzparis.com Open to 2am Mon–SatThe first thing you need to know about the Heming-way Bar is how to find it. This gem of a drinking holeis expertly concealed (no signs) within the Ritz Hotel,but the trek past the reception to the back of thebuilding – taking a right after the overstuffed sofasand roaring fire, and continuing along the carpetedcorridor – is most definitely worth it.The Hemingway is a tiny nook of dark-wood panel-ling, low-lighting, black-and-white photos of Papahimself, fascinating clientele and superb cocktails. Theplace abounds with stories, the most famous being thetale of Hemingway “liberating” the bar at the end ofWWII. Legend has it that the Old Man deemed the barat the Ritz the place to enjoy the first round of “free”drinks after the Allies arrived. A high accolade indeed,given that Hemingway drank in earnest and patronizedalmost every bar around at the time. For further talesof glamour, glitz and alcohol, ask head barman ColinField, who was voted the world’s best bartender forseveral consecutive years and is certainly Paris’s mostcharming host. Colin’s mouthwatering cocktail list isimpressively extensive and includes the delicious RitzChampagne (a wonderful mixture of apples and fizz),the Ritz 75 (a heady mix of gin, champagne and citrusfruits) and the stunning Raspberry Martini (freshraspberries macerated in premium vodka).This clubby den is probably the only place in Pariswhere you can listen to scratchy piano music playedon a wind-up gramophone, watch the bartender sabrea bottle of vintage champagne, sip stunning drinks –which arrive with a flourish for the gentlemen and aflower for the ladies – and slip into a timeless reverie.The captains of industry, trust-fund babes, Lothariosand cocktail aficionados mingling at the bar aren’tperturbed by the prices, and even more ordinary folkon tight budgets tend to think it’s worth the splurgefor a little slice of bar heaven.Juveniles fine wine bar47 rue de Richelieu, 1er • 01 42 97 46 49Open to midnight Mon–SatHere, you’ll have to pick your way past the haphazardlystacked crates of great wine – especially the NewWorld selection – to reach the bar. The staff (who knowtheir wine but won’t patronize you if you don’t) andthe loyal hard-drinking hacks from nearby newspaperoffices make this a top place to savour a bottle or two.10 G3Le Coeur Fou lovely local55 rue Montmartre, 2ème • no phoneOpen to 2am dailySmall but beautiful, Le Coeur Fou is always packedwith friendly thirtysomethings who hit this placestraight from their graphic design studios/artgalleries/Internet start-ups for several rounds ofapéritifs. You’ll find modern art on the walls, a busybar, smiley staff and an irrepressibly sociable vibe.10 F3A pichet (carafe) of house wine is usually perfectly drinkable, and cheaper than ordering à la carteCentre
  • 127. 134 www.eparis.dk.com10 G5Kong manga dream1 rue du Pont Neuf, 1er • 01 40 39 09 00www.kong.fr Open to 2am dailyPhilippe Starck’s Asian-inspired project, Kong, sitsatop Kenzo’s flagship store and offers a riot ofdesigner-kitsch to shoppers and bar-hoppers alike.Kong’s interior is a chaotic jumble of neon lights, acidcolours, Zen-grey pebble rugs, Tokyo street scenesplaying on big screens, life-size images of geishas,rocking chairs, Hello Kitty and manga merchandise,and Pokemon-motif cushions. And that’s all beforeyou’ve headed to the top floor – as everyone does – forthe views over the Seine from the bar’s wrap-aroundwindows. The upper level’s toilets are also worth alook, bedecked with glitter balls and beadedcurtains, and guarded by giant images of sumochildren.This is definitely not the place to be if minimalism isyour mantra. If, however, you like bright lights in yourbig city then the clutter and chaos of Kong is sure totick all the boxes. The clientele is just as colourful asthe backdrop: party puppies andfashionistas clamour for space at the bar, while trust-funders chill out in the rocking chairs. Cocktails areserved in glasses of intense hues by surprisinglyfriendly aspiring models and wannabe actresses, andsipped to an eclectic soundtrack. This is played on aninnovative music system that allows diners to vote fortheir favourite tunes from a menu of ten categories,including Sugar Pop and Glam Chic. A very reasonablypriced happy hour (6–8pm daily) means that this placegets going before most of the city’s other fashionabledrinking destinations. It’s definitely best to get thereearly if you want to get one of the sleek, silver Starck-designed stools in a prime spot at the bar. Anotherway to guarantee a seat is to book a table for dinner.But beware: as in most see-and-be-seen destinations,the food is pricey, average and really not the point.Bars & Clubs
  • 128. 135In clubs, buying a bottle and smiling sweetly is often the best way to get a tableLe Rex superstar DJs, dedicated clubbers5 boulevard Poissonnière, 2ème • 01 42 36 83 98www.rexclub.com Open to 6am Wed–SatBig on famous names and atmosphere, but low onattitude, this place is all about the music. Be preparedto queue for weekend sessions from top DJs (Frenchand international), but other nights are ultimately no-fuss, hardcore dancing sessions led by the next bigthing. Brilliant house music and truly top techno. AdmLe Café Noir bobo spot65 rue Montmartre, 2ème • 01 40 39 07 36Open to 2am Mon–SatA retro-chic café, complete with winking neon signs,formica tables and boozy bonhomie. Le Café Noir ishome from home to countless bourgeois bohemians(bobos), who come to get their creative juices flowingand discuss anything from tonight’s hottest club tothe trainers worn by the bloke behind the bar.Le Next friendly local DJ bar17 rue Tiquetonne, 2ème • 01 42 36 18 93Open to 4am Mon–Fri, to 5am SatThis often-rowdy joint, with its slightly schizophrenicdesign scheme (a nondescript bar at the front,leopard print and red velvet out back), attracts a big-drinking crowd. As its name suggests, Le Next is aperfect stop on a bar crawl, but it also cuts it as adestination drinking haunt or pre-club rendezvous.Somo chic and sleek168 rue Montmartre, 2ème • 01 40 13 08 80www.hip-bars.com Open to 2am Mon–Thu, to 4am Fri & SatSomo’s laid-back vibe attracts both twentysomethingsand financial types from the nearby stock exchange.They come in droves for the great cocktails – try thedelicious champagne-based mixes or the lethal-but-lovely mojitos. Low-slung leather chairs, chill-outmusic and subdued lighting complete the picture.10 G110 G310 G210 H316 F3Le Bar well-kept secret27 rue Condé, 6ème • 01 43 29 06 61Open to 4am Mon–SatLe Bar is a late-night gem: the narrow back bar’s dimlighting and leather benches are perfect for a spot ofseduction, and the gravel floor is certainly unusual.As this is such an insider’s address, people tend tomingle easily. The owners often serve up iced vodkashots when it’s time to stagger out in the early hours.Centre
  • 129. 136 Seek out the old cafés of Paris with www.eparis.dk.comCafé Thoumieux sleek vodka bar4 rue de la Comète, 7ème • 01 45 51 50 40www.thoumieux.com Open to 2am Mon–SatIn the bar-deprived 7th arrondissement, this spot is agood bet for a quiet night spent sipping cocktails.The speciality is flavoured vodka, of which there’s animpressive range behind the colourful tiled bar. Thevelvet banquettes and comfy stools are usually occu-pied by well-heeled expats and young professionals.Harry’s Bar home of the hangover cure5 rue Daunou, 2ème • 01 42 61 71 14www.harrys-bar.fr Open to 3am dailyThe American accents, the saloon-bar look and USand UK college crests lining the walls might give theimpression that this venerable drinking institution islittle more than an ersatz slice of home for expatspining for Uncle Sam or John Bull. Not so. Harry’s is atemple for all who shun temperance, regardless oftheir nationality. The owner’s claim that the firstBloody Mary was invented in the bar comes as nosurprise: given the loyalty of its regulars, the amountof time they spend propping up the bar and theircommitment to all things alcoholic, inventing abrilliant hangover cure must have been a logical step.Harry’s isn’t for the lily-livered or the faint of heart:the measures are vast and it’s a riotous place wherepeople table-hop with gay abandon. But once you’vebeen, you’ll always come back, if only for a meanBloody Mary the morning after the night before.Pulp wild club nights25 boulevard Poissonnière, 2ème • 01 40 26 01 93www.pulp-paris.com Open to 6am Wed–SatExcept for Saturday’s Lesborama – one of Paris’s bestlesbian club nights – this spot also welcomes boys(both gay and straight). Goths, rock chicks, R&B divasand disco queens are all catered for with Pulp’s variedevents – the common denominator being a deep-seated desire to party. Check the web for details. Adm10 G18 H5Bars & Clubs10 E2
  • 130. 13711 B4Boob’s Bourg for ladies26 rue de Montmorency, 3ème • 01 42 74 04 82Open to 2am Tue–SunIt’s worth seeking out this stellar lesbian bar, which isa little off the beaten drinking path. Lovely ladies, oldlushes and straight female friends are guaranteeda warm welcome at Boob’s Bourg. Two floors ofrelaxed girls – gossiping, giggling and giving good barbanter – make for an attitude-free haven of a hang-out.11 A3Andy Wahloo trendy souk-chic69 rue des Gravilliers, 3ème • 01 42 71 20 38Open to 2am dailyCreated by the same team behind Sketch (London) and404 (Paris), Andy Wahloo proves that small can bebeautiful. Empty drums of paint serve as stools for thehipsters who cram in to share a hookah, knock backthe cocktails or sip mint tea. Giant posters and rowsof pop bottles round off the atmospheric clutter.11 A4Le Connetable traditional haunt55 rue des Archives, 3ème • 01 42 77 41 40www.leconnetable.comOpen to 4am Mon–Thu, to 6am Fri & SatThink of all the clichés of the French bon viveur: mous-tachioed and merry, belting out chanson, smilinglasciviously, smoking furiously and getting slowlysoused over several bottles of dubious wine. Thencome and join him and his friends at Le Connetable,a highly idiosyncratic spot that comes into its ownafter midnight, when the volume level rises, the sing-ing kicks off, the couple in the corner start to get frisky,and the groups at the bar freely intermingle. Don’t letthe dusty silk-flower arrangements, dog-hair-coveredsofa and general rowdiness put you off – pretty youngthings and aged rouées play up a storm on the out-of-tune piano, notions of great philosophical importanceare hotly contested over yet another glass of red, andfast friendships are made. One of the city’s best nightsout, and one that almost always goes on until dawn.CentreIn traditional cafés, it’s often better value to get two small glasses of wine than one large one
  • 131. 138 www.eparis.dk.comL’Etoile Manquante great café34 rue Vieille du Temple, 4ème • 01 42 72 48 34Open to 2am dailyThis laid-back café is equally good for afternooncafés, pre-dinner drinks or late nightcaps. Modernlighting and art perk-up the trad café decor, and don’tworry about the video installation in the toilets: thecameras may catch you preening in the mirror, but theimages are only shown in the bathroom area.Chez Richard relaxed chic37 rue Vieille du Temple, 4ème • 01 42 74 31 65Open to 2am Tue–SatElegant but relaxed, Chez Richard is a great place togo for quiet drinks or as a prelude to a big night out.Expect exposed stone, leather banquettes, seatingfor romantic tête-à-têtes, and long tables downstairsfor groups of friends or people who like to strike upconversations with strangers.Au Petit Fer à Cheval venerable zinc bar30 rue Vieille du Temple, 4ème • 01 42 72 47 47www.cafeine.com Open to 2am dailyAdored by many, Au Petit Fer à Cheval sports a hand-some horseshoe-shaped bar (often said to be Paris’sfinest) that is invariably jammed with people sippinggood red wine. Elbow room is hard to find, though,and it’s worth settling for one of the tables for someof the Marais’s finest people-watching opportunities.Amnesia popular gay bar42 rue Vieille du Temple, 4ème • 01 42 72 16 94www.amnesia-cafe.com Open to 1:45am dailyChilled-out by day, Amnesia turns up the tempo afteraperitif-time, when it morphs into a buzzy little barthat is a popular pre-club venue. A Marais institutionand one of the local gay bars that welcomesstraights, this place has a well-deserved reputationas a fun spot for drinks, discussion and delightful17 B117 B1Bars & Clubs17 B117 B1
  • 132. La Belle Hortense bookworms & barflies31 rue Vieille du Temple, 4ème • 01 48 04 71 60www.cafeine.com Open to 2am dailyA quintessentially Parisian mix of alcohol and intellec-tualism can be found at La Belle Hortense, an unusualcombination of bookshop and bar. Serious tomes linethe shelves and the clientele is encouraged to leafthrough the latest Mario Vargas Llosa and indulge ina bit of lit-crit with the clever barflies perched at thezinc bar. The back room is smoke-free and quieter,with art for sale on the walls, leather banquettes,and low tables clustered together to make debatingthe latest hot topics that little bit easier.The strictly French wine list, though relatively short,is well chosen and very well priced, and most of thebottles can be bought to take home. Listen, and youmight hear tall tales from the regulars – who oftenclaim to have been drinking partners with most ofthe 20th-century’s great authors – philosophicalarguments, debates about critical theory, orSorbonne professors scoffing at their colleague’slatest book. However, despite the formidable IQspresent, this place is devoid of pretension, and it’snot unusual for people to suddenly start dancing thetango, or engage in other less-dignified pursuits.For lofty literary minds, posters around the baradvertise plenty of events and meetings. Try themonthly Proust reading group or attend a happeningbook launch. (Catherine Millet’s hit sexual memoir LaVie Sexuelle de Catherine M debuted here.) Or leafthrough the piles of flyers for other cultural eventstaking place in venues across the city.Centre13917 B1
  • 133. 14017 B111 A517 B1www.eparis.dk.comThe Lizard Lounge buzzing bar18 rue Bourg Tibourg, 4ème • 01 42 72 81 34www.hip-bars.com Open to 2am dailyA huge papier-mâché lizard mounted on the walldominates this bar full of eager young professionalsand hipsters getting drunk. Excellent cocktails,scrumptious Sunday brunches, occasional concertsand open-mic jam sessions in the cellar bar arethe draw for a loud, friendly crowd.Les Etages designer grunge35 rue Vieille du Temple, 4ème • 01 42 78 72 00Open to 2am dailyIn this tall, shabby building, magnificent mojitos and asurreal dive-bar ambience awaits. Each floor of thebar – which looks more like a squat than the chic spotit is – has a different mood, though the hobo decorreigns throughout. The top floors are where the fun is,but room-swapping is the way to make new friends.Le Cox gay hot spot15 rue des Archives, 4ème • 01 42 72 08 00Open to 2am dailyAlmost as risqué as its name suggests, Le Cox isalways full of beautifully turned-out boys. The interior– remodelled every three months to keep things look-ing fresh – provides a fitting backdrop. There’s plentyof eye-candy and eye contact at this gay mecca, so besure to wear your best labels and be ready to sparkle.17 B1Le Trésor trendy Marais spot7 rue Trésor, 4ème • 01 42 71 35 17Open to 1:30am dailyThis perennial favourite is always packed with loyalpre-club crowds, kicking off their evening in style –whatever the day of the week. The bar is quitespacious, but it’s best to arrive early as it can bedifficult to get a table after 9pm. Don’t miss the “rock-star” toilets with live goldfish swimming in the tanks.Bars & Clubs
  • 134. 14116 H316 G4Many bars have good-value happy hours, usually 6–8pm dailyLe Pantalon bargain drinks7 rue Royer Collard, 5ème • no phoneOpen to 2am Mon–SatDue to the cheapness of the beer and wine, this barpulls in an unlikely mix of Sorbonne students andpensioners. The bar staff are ebullient and friendly,the decor is bizarre (disco lights and palm trees inthe loos) and there’s always a rack of hard-boiledeggs on the counter, should you fancy a bar snack.Caveau des Oubliettes weird & wacky52 rue Galande, 5ème • 01 46 34 23 09Open to 2am Mon–Thu, to 5am Fri & SatAny place that lays real turf on the floor in thesummer, proudly sports a huge guillotine near thebar, and organizes superb jazz jam sessions onTuesdays in the cellar basement has got to be worth avisit. La Caveau des Oubliettes is utterly barmy,incredibly friendly and thoroughly good fun.Le Crocodile anti-chic cocktail bar6 rue Royer Collard, 5ème • 01 43 54 32 37Open to 5am Mon–SatYes, you do have to hammer on the closed shutters toget in, but, once there, expect a warm welcome and aphenomenal drinks list. This tiny bar offers over 200cocktails, so don’t be fazed if you are given paperand pen and a request to provide the drink’s numberalong with its name when ordering.Fubar small but perfectly formed5 rue St-Sulpice, 6ème • 01 40 51 82 00Open to 2am dailyThough the original owner, Sean, has moved on,regulars of this bar should not panic and newcomersshould still get excited: the cocktails remain potentand the atmosphere outstanding. The minusculedownstairs bar is often packed and rowdy, so headto the upstairs seating area if you want a quiet chat.Centre16 G416 F3
  • 135. 142 To find out how to get across town after-hours, check www.eparis.dk.com16 F2Le 10 Bar faded charm10 rue de L’Odeon, 6ème • 01 43 26 66 83Open to 2am dailyBags of charm and jugs of sangria are the big drawshere. Le 10 Bar is all peeling black-and-white posters,nicotine-stained walls, thick Gauloise smoke, rippedvelvet banquettes, and a boisterous crowd of all agesgetting noisily merry on the house special. The sangriaseems innocent, but beware – it packs a mighty punch.AZ Bar destination drinking62 rue Mazarine, 6ème • 01 53 10 19 99www.alcazar.fr Open to 2am dailySituated above his Alcazar restaurant, TerenceConran’s bar is a swanky, super-fun affair. A long bar,low banquettes, comfy chairs, candles and flatteringlighting provide the perfect backdrop for the prettyPRs, young MDs and moneyed demoiselles who callthe bar home from home. Depending on the night,16 F2Le Bar du Marché popular zinc bar75 rue de Seine, 6ème • 01 43 26 55 15Open to 2am dailyLe Bar du Marché is one of the prime people-watchingspots in St-Germain. Great views of chic Parisiansbustling past and a brilliant buzz – it’s lively and fullof laughter inside the bar, day or night – make this agreat place to while away an afternoon or make pre-dinner drinks last a very long time.16 F3the music ranges from funk to house via lounge andelectro. The drinks, though, are always the same –expertly mixed, smilingly presented and a little on theexpensive side. A perfect view into the “private”dining room is great for the curious, and check out thefabulous transvestite cigarette “girl”, who temptseven non-smokers to buy an overpriced packet. Thecentral pillars are just the spot to lean for those insearch of stiletto-relief or trying to strike a foxy pose.Bars & Clubs
  • 136. 143Bouncers often let foreigners into clubs, assuming that they have money to spend16 F216 E316 F3Café de la Mairie St-Germain institution8 place St-Sulpice, 6ème • 01 43 26 67 82Open to midnight dailyOne of the 6th arrondissement’s “correct addresses”,this chichi café is consequently popular with wealthyParisians. Occupying a prime spot opposite St-Sulpice, the terrace is often full of ladies who lunch,gentlemen of leisure and well-heeled art studentssipping champagne and watching the world go by.Don Carlos Spanish hedonism66 rue Mazarine, 6ème • 01 43 54 53 17Open to 5am Mon–SatOn most nights at Don Carlos, guitarists alternatelyserenade beautiful girls and encourage the table-dancing crowd to indulge in rousing sing-alongs.Expect tequila shots, potent sangria, friendly staffand walls bearing photos of screen-greats who’vedrunk here (from Brigitte Bardot to Kevin Spacey).L’Urgence pre-club theme bar45 rue Monsieur Le Prince, 6ème • 01 43 26 45 69www.urgencebar.com Open 9pm–4am Tue–SatHypochondriacs and medical students alike flock to this popular, if odd,venue that is decked out with medical equipment ranging from syringes andX-rays to biology text-book images of genitalia. Continuing with the theme,the bar is staffed by men in white coats who concoct drinks from a list thatincludes choices such as “Face Lift”, “Suppository” and “Electro-ShockTherapy” – all of which, naturally, are served up in test tubes.16 F2WAGG cool, classy club62 rue Mazarine, 6ème • 01 55 42 22 00Open to 5am Thu–SatLegend has it that this club’s former incarnation, theWhisky A Go-Go, was the last stop on Jim Morrison’sfinal big night out. The party animals who flock heretoday always dress to impress the terrifying physiog-nomiste (style-bouncer), so follow suit. The UK-import70s-groove Carwash is a must on Friday nights. AdmCentre
  • 137. 144 www.eparis.dk.comToi local chill-out joint27 rue Colisée, 8ème • 01 42 56 56 58www.restaurant-toi.com Open to 2am dailyPink-and-orange neon, curvaceous chairs, lava lampsand a looming Buddha set the scene at Toi – popularwith the BCBG (bon chic bon genre) set. The tapedbirdsong may help soothe fevered brows after one toomany Tea Tois, house specials that combine iced tea,vodka, grenadine and peach liqueur to deadly effect.Four Seasons George V hotel bar31 avenue George V, 8ème • 01 49 52 70 00www.fourseasons.com Open to 1am Mon–Thu, to 2am Fri–SatIt’s worth pulling out all the financial and sartorialstops to soak up the atmosphere at this swanky spot.When martinis in individual shakers are poured with aflourish at your table; when fine chocolates and cakesaccompany sweet choices, and nuts in silver salversthe sour ones, the world seems a much better place.Nirvana Lounge pricey posing3 avenue Matignon, 8ème • 01 53 89 18 91Open to 5am dailyAll curvy neon, pricey drinks and hard-to-get tables,the Nirvana Lounge is a must for poseurs and voyeurs.Claude Challe is behind the music, while JonathanAmar dreamed up the decor, which is a mix of space-age motifs and Eastern promise and provides a perfectbackdrop for the lithe and lovely crowd.8 F2La Suite sleek, sexy, elite40 avenue George V, 8ème • 01 53 57 49 49Open to 2am Mon–Wed, to 6am Thu–SatThis is the latest project from the Guettas, the peoplewho made club Les Bains into an international codefor cool. It’s impressively hard to get into (be sure tolook moneyed to stand a chance), but once inside,pose on a low leather stool, marvel at the pristinewhite decor and keep an eye out for big-name celebs.8 F28 H28 H2Bars & Clubs
  • 138. 145Noise pollution is a hot issue: if you are too rowdy outside a late bar, the management can get very irritatedMathi’s insider address3 rue Ponthieu, 8ème • 01 53 76 01 62Open to 2am Sun–Thu, to 5am Fri & SatTucked away in a nondescript hotel, Mathi’s morphsinto a hedonistic haven after midnight. This petite barfills up with super-glamorous folk flirting over thebuzz of rather dire 80s music and under the eagle eyeof the scary leopard-print-clad hostess. Hard to getinto, but most definitely worth a try.Bar des Théâtres unusual mix6 avenue Montaigne, 8ème • 01 47 23 34 63Open all day to 2am dailyPopular with PRs from fashion houses, boys who workon the Bateaux Mouches, actors and audiences fromthe Théâtre du Champs Elysées (see p121) and anyoneelse who hangs out in Paris’s Golden Triangle. A goodspot for coffee or a café lunch, this is an attitude-free,rambunctious zinc bar and a rare find for the area.Le Queen famous clubbers’ favourite102 avenue des Champs Elysées, 8ème • 01 53 89 08 90www.queen.fr Open to 6am dailyA real legend, Le Queen still entices glamorous gaysand hip heteros past the notoriously difficult-to-accessvelvet rope. Disco divas love Monday’s Disco Inferno,and fans of superstar DJs are bowled over by the sets ofthose who play here. Exhibitionists take note: womenshould dress scantily, men should dress tight. AdmLe Bar du Plaza look-at-me barPlaza Athenée, 25 avenue Montaigne, 8ème • 01 53 67 66 65www.plaza-athenee-paris.com Open to 2am dailyFashionistas, advertising executives and assortedbeautiful people flock here to see and be seen. Theinterior offers high-set chairs and tables to perch at formaximum visibility, recessed seating to hide fromprying eyes and flattering lighting to bring out every-one’s best side. Serious cocktails at serious prices.8 G38 F1West8 H28 G3
  • 139. 146 www.eparis.dk.comLa Gare posh, plush cocktail spot19 chaussée de la Muette, 16ème • 01 42 15 15 31q La Muette Open to 1:30am dailyHoused in a former train station, this is the epicentreof the smart and moneyed 16th-arrondissement set.The bar is a large circular room full of red velvet, giltand glitz; the restaurant has food that is better andmore reasonably priced than in similar joints. A goodchoice for an all-inclusive night out in this part of Paris.4 F3La Fourmi all-day hot spot74 rue des Martyrs, 18ème • 01 42 64 70 35Open to 2am Sun–Thu, to 4am Fri & SatA lively spot on the edge of Abbesses, La Fourmi isworth travelling across town for. As busy by day as bynight, it’s the favourite of an arts-and-media crew, whowhile away the hours under a huge chandelier madefrom wine bottles to a backdrop of loud techno music.A fantastic source of flyers for the best clubs.10 H2De la Ville faded grandeur34 boulevard de la Bonne Nouvelle, 10ème • 01 48 24 48 09Open to 2:30am dailyA former brothel, De la Ville has elaborate cornicing, agrand staircase, a massive mural, one toilet that doesnot lock and a resident flock of pigeons (the roof’s a bitdodgy). Bohos come for the squat feel and clubbersmove in when DJs perform warm-up sets (Thu–Sat)before hot nights at the Rex and Vogue, down the road.Le Progres quintessential bobo bar1 rue Yvonne le Tac, 18ème • 01 42 64 07 37Open to 2am dailyIt’s all about atmosphere at Le Progres – little morethan a small space stuffed with a few trestle tables, anelectric heater and some uncomfortable chairs. Oh,and an über-cool art-house crowd. Having said that,it’s a very friendly bar where people flit from table totable flirting and chatting over a demi or three.4 F2Bars & Clubs
  • 140. 147Bars usually charge for club nights, but live-music events are often free9 D1Xtremes extremely good fun10 rue Caumartin, 9ème • 01 44 94 05 61www.xtremes.fr Open to 2am Mon–Sat, to midnight SunA sports bar with a twist, Xtremes has plasma screensthat noiselessly run a series of insane extreme sports –it makes for mesmerizing viewing, whether you’re alifelong fan of ice-jumping et al or not. Popular witha funky, upbeat professional crowd quietly windingdown after a hard day being bright young things.11 C14 E4Project 101 alternative underground club44 rue de la Rochefoucauld, 9ème • no phonewww.project-101.com Open until late Fri–SunAn alternative to expensive, exclusive, soullesssoirées, Project 101 is a collective of artists and DJsthat hosts intimate, friendly gatherings for like-minded people. Video projections, an honesty bar (pay10€, then help yourself), knock-out sets by up-and-coming DJs and a totally different top time. AdmChez Prune dishevelled chic36 rue Beaurepaire, 10ème • 01 42 41 30 47Open to 2am dailyEver-packed Chez Prune is still the hottest spot on theCanal St-Martin. Dress vintage, drink retro (Suze is thecurrent top tipple), ruffle your tousled hair and loudlydiscuss your current favourite art-house film,underground exhibition and esoteric designer – orjust listen to those doing the same around you.La Patache artily distressed60 rue de Lancry, 10ème • no phoneOpen to 2am dailyJust one small step away from being the wrong sideof seedy, La Patache is a big hit with dishevelledcreative types and their hangers-on. Pull up a ricketychair and don’t be surprised if your neighbour startssharing his haiku, bottle of rough red or theories onthe meaning of life.11 C1West & North
  • 141. 148 Follow the Paris music scene with www.eparis.dk.com18 E2China Club seductive cocktail joint50 rue Charenton, 12ème • 01 43 43 82 02www.chinaclub.cc Open to 2am dailyA very sexy take on a colonial-era gentleman’s club,with giant ceiling fans, deep Chesterfields, excellentcocktails (the martinis are superb) and a low buzz ofcivilized conversation pervading the ground floor.Upstairs, the fumoir offers a more romantic setting,while in the jazz cellar there’s live music on weekends.4 E2Le Sancerre boisterous, fun bar35 rue des Abbesses, 18ème • 01 42 58 08 20Open to 2am Sun–Thu, to 4am Fri & SatThe pick of Montmartre’s bistros, full of charm andcharacter. Lovers, clubbers, transvestites and visitorsall squeeze in for a rowdy time, nodding along toone of the frequent Sunday-night jazz concerts orshouting over loud techno, all the while getting throughcarafe after carafe of whatever is on special that day.La Fabrique cool, pre-club bar53 rue du Faubourg St-Antoine, 11ème • 01 43 14 32 32Open to 5am Mon–SatLa Fabrique’s weird and wonderful combination ofmicro-brasserie, eatery and pre-club haunt hosting hotDJs is so successful that they’ve exported the conceptand opened up in Tokyo. It’s easy to see why, too: ifyou’re looking for a quick drink, a good feed or athumping set by an up-and-coming DJ, you can find ithere. It’s always worth checking listings, as specialevents (usually on weekends) abound – La Fabriqueeven lured Pulp frontman Jarvis Cocker to do a set onthe decks once. The music programme varies but isgenerally focused on up-to-the-minute electro, exceptfor Sunday afternoons, when slinky jazz easesbrunchers’ hangovers. Don’t miss their home-brewedbeer (though real-ale enthusiasts need not apply),while the large selection of bottled beers from aroundthe globe should fill any gaps for hard-core hopsfans. There’s a happy hour daily from 6 to 8pm.18 E3Bars & Clubs
  • 142. 149Pop In something for everyone105 rue Amelot, 11ème • 01 48 05 56 11Open to 2am Tue–SunA rather odd mix of grungy local, student haunt andfashionista central, the Pop In is, truly, all things to allpeople. The weeknight indie concerts give way to DJsand dancing at weekends, with music that rangesfrom electroclash to sugar pop. Christian Dior oncethrew a huge party here – it’s more chic than it looks.12 F311 D4Le Clown Bar themed wine bar114 rue Amelot, 11ème • 01 43 55 87 35Open to 1am dailyAll manner of clown-related clutter and big-top bitsand bobs can be found here. If you find Pierrot & Counsettling, calm your nerves with several glasses ofexcellent wine, picked from an interesting and variedlist. Don’t be afraid to ask for guidance – the staff arehappy to discuss the various vintages in depth.Café Charbon living legend109 rue Oberkampf, 11ème • 01 43 57 55 13Open to 2am Sun–Thu, to 4am Fri & SatThe original Oberkampf HQ, Charbon is still goingstrong. The huge mirrors, beautiful antique lightingand Belle Epoque feel keep a loyal crowd coming backfor more. Get there early for the chance of a table orspace at the bar, or go very late to enter the backroomclub (with eclectic music roster), Le Nouveau Casino.Le Lèche-Vin quirky-but-cool bar13 rue Duval, 11ème • 01 43 55 98 91Open to 2am dailyUltra-kitsch, Le Lèche-Vin is stuffed full of iconographyand Virgin Mary-related religious paraphernalia. It’smore than disconcerting, but given that this place isalso a shrine to the vine, don’t feel too guilty aboutknocking back the cheap drinks in the company of theBastille hipsters who hang out here.11 D4North & East17 E1
  • 143. 150 www.eparis.dk.comWax ace club-bar15 rue Daval, 11ème • 01 40 21 16 16www.le-wax.com Open to 2am Tue–Thu, to 5am Fri & SatAll psychedelic swirls, bright colours, hard house andstrong cocktails, Wax sounds migraine-inducing,but it is in fact a top spot for a night out. It worksequally well as a pre-club joint to get you in thegroove or as a one-stop shop where you can hit thebar first and the dance floor later.22 H3Chai 33 hip and happening33 cour St-Emilion, 12ème • 01 53 44 01 01www.chai33.com Open to 2am dailyBercy’s only decent drinking spot, Chai (pronounced“kay”) 33 is a vast converted wine warehouse run bythe people behind Parisian legends Barfly and theBuddha Bar. Expect an industrial look, low lights,hard-core dance music, deck chairs to kick back inand rather special wine-based cocktails.Favela Chic Brazilian party18 rue du Faubourg du Temple, 11ème • 01 40 03 02 66www.favelachic.com Open to 2am Tue–SatDon’t turn up late: the queues here might be a drag,but missing a dancing spot on one of the refectorytables that are leapt upon at the first chance is close totragedy. Fuelled by cracking caipirinhas and crowd-pleasing music (from funk to reggae and R&B), thisplace is hot, exhibitionistic and really good fun.11 D518 E111 D2Le Zero Zero dippy-hippy bar89 rue Amelot, 11ème • 01 49 23 51 00Open to 2am dailyA tiny but intriguing bar that is always busy with anintensely loyal boho-chic clientele. Everyone drinkshard and chats happily: you might arrive on your own,but by the bottom of the first glass, you’ll have a posseof new best friends. Don’t miss the minuscule alcoveout back: the fairy lights are sure to work some magic.Bars & Clubs
  • 144. 151Whatever the vintage, it is not considered chic to drink wine at a posh bar; spirits are more acceptableLe Baron Rouge zinc wine bar1 rue Théophile Roussel, 12ème • 01 43 43 14 32Open to 10pm Mon–Sat, 10am–3pm SunJust around the corner from the marché d’Aligre, this is a jolly, traditionalbistrot à vins that is always full of contented oenophiles slurping and swilling– but never spitting – their way through the impressive wine list. Ask the barstaff for recommendations – their blackboard full of goodies changes regularlyand includes a large choice of wine by the glass. On Sundays, oysters areavailable in season; atmosphere in abundance is on tap all year round.22 F418 E2Limelight exclusive clubbing destination162 avenue de France, 13ème • 01 56 61 44 04Open 6pm–3am Wed–Thu, 6pm–5am Fri, 3pm–5am Sat,3pm–3am SunLocated inside the futuristic MK2 Bibliothèque cinemacomplex, the Limelight is a super-cool club with loftyceilings, minimalist style and a terrace that can take300 people. The management opens for one-off partiesyear-round and more regularly during summer. AdmBarrio Latino Latin quarter46 rue du Faubourg St-Antoine, 12ème • 01 55 78 84 75Open to 2am Sun–Fri, to 3:30am SatA vast, slick, opulent affair, with lots of wrought iron,red velvet, expanses of coloured glass and hoards ofdesigner-clad beautiful people, the Barrio Latino is amust for those keen to see and be seen Latino-style.Don’t bother trying to reach the top floor – only thosewith a special elevator key can ascend to the gods.22 F2Batofar a clubbing beaconOpposite 11 quai François Mauriac, 13ème • 01 53 60 17 47www.batofar.net Open to midnight Mon, to 6am Tue–SatThis scarlet ex-lightship has become a Paris landmarkand clubbers’ institution. Big-name DJs and localunknowns, plus an unpretentious, up-for-it crowd,make it one of Paris’s best nightspots. A great chill-out deck and a fantastic summertime Sunday after-party on the quai round off the picture. AdmEast & South18 F3
  • 145. streetlifeParis has sights aplenty, but thereal spectacle is on the street,whether it’s in the chic 7tharrondissment or the gritty 20th.Year round, the city’s markets over-flow with shoppers searching forchoice seasonal produce, retroclothing and bric-a-brac bargains.And in fine weather, restaurantterraces fill with sun-seekers andpeople-watchers, and café lifespills out onto the pavements.
  • 146. 154 To find more sights, eating places and shops in Paris’s quartiers check www.eparis.dk.comStreetlifeBeaubourg and the QuartierMontorgueil hipster hang-outWith its pedestrianized streets, quirky shops, good-value restaurants and eclectic bars and clubs, the areastretching west from the Centre Pompidou to the placedes Victoires is one of the city’s best districts for someretail therapy and just hanging out. Before 10 or 11am,try rue Montorgueil, an atmospheric shopping streetthat also has a variety of cafés – try Les PetitsCarreaux (the most traditional) or Santi (the trendiest).From mid-morning, the area around the Pompidouswings into action: drinks on the terrace at the CaféBeaubourg, opposite its namesake, are a Parisianinstitution, and ideal before or after taking in a show.To the west is Les Halles, a hideous undergroundmall that’s best avoided (especially on Saturdays, whenit’s a magnet for bored suburban youths). Instead,rue Etienne Marcel and rue Tiquetonne (running paral-lel and full of cute little shops) are much more attrac-tive propositions for shoppers. Hightlights are offbeatwomen’s boutique Barbara Bui (see p65); trendysecond-hand store Killiwatch (see p65); Le Shop, afunky warehouse full of designer concessions; andNotsoBig, which sells all kinds of items for cool kids.Further west, everyone who’s anyone heads to theindefinably chic L’Eclaireur (see p63), while around theplace des Victoires, the scene becomes noticeablymore up-market, with plenty of top designers.The area’s night-time scene is buzzing too: trytrendy Le Café or Etienne Marcel or Wine and Bubbles(see p211 for all) for fabulous fizz and the best wines.Other top drinking spots are Le Next (see p135) and LeCafé Noir (see p135), while clubs include one of Paris’sbest jazz spots, Le Duc des Lombards (see p118), and,on rue Bourg l’Abbeye, the once legendary Les Bains,whose slip in status means that mere mortals cannow get through the door. For late-night nibbles,Au Pied du Cochon (see p24) and La Tour deMontlhèry (see p25) both keep serving through theearly hours of the morning after the long night before.10 H4
  • 147. 155Centrerestaurants, such as R’Aliment (see p28).The real heart of the Marais, though, is the ancient,narrow rue des Rosiers, where falafal shops such asL’As du Fallafal (see p29) vie to out-crunch eachother, and chic designer boutiques lure in wealthytrendspotters. Around the corner, rue Vieille duTemple has a high concentration of cool cafés andrestaurants, including Les Petits Marseillais, Au PetitFer à Cheval and Les Etages (see p28). This particularstretch is also a hub for the gay scene.Down towards Bastille, the perfectly symmetrical17th-century place des Vosges was once home toVictor Hugo and is now the playground of beautifullyattired French toddlers, as well as unusually talentedbuskers. Locals gather here on weekends to picnic,watch the little ones frolic and generally take in thescene. Just to the south, the busy rue St-Antoine iswhere the locals do their food shopping in thetraditional shops and supermarkets, while rue St-Paulhosts a notable collection of antiques shops and oneof the city’s best bakeries, Boulangerie Malineau,which sells an exceptional baguette.Le Marais falafal, fashion and funHistorically the city’s Jewish ghetto and an area wheremarket gardens were once cultivated, Le Marais (themarsh) is today one of Paris’s most vibrant quartiers.Thronged by day and by night, it’s a cosmopolitan mix;one where gay bars, kosher restaurants, boutiques,museums and antiques shops comfortably co-exist inbeautiful buildings that have stood here for centuries.The Marais is especially busy on Sunday afternoons,when most shops along rue des Francs Bourgeoisdefy the law by opening their doors. Among the mostpopular boutiques are Abou d’Abi Bazar (see p68),source of affordable bobo (bohemian bourgeois)clothing; the unfailingly fashionable Camper forshoes; Autour du Monde, stocking stylish yet casualclothes; and the hip home accessories store LaChaise Longue (see p68). Heading north, on the wayto the Musée National Picasso (see p96) is rueElzévir, recently colonized by stylish African restau-rants and shops selling clothing and arty importedobjects for the home. Further north, the up-and-coming rue Charlot is home to galleries and trendy17 B1
  • 148. 156Champ de Mars and TrocadéroFor all the formality of its design, the verdant Champde Mars – a former parade ground – is a laid-backplace to watch the world go by in summer, and aprime spot from which to appreciate the engineeringmarvel that is the Tour Eiffel. Over the bridge, atTrocadéro, exhibition-goers mill around the beautifulPalais de Chaillot (see p104), people cool down in thefountains and skateboarders show off their moves.Rue Cler edible eleganceThe sedate 7th arrondissement seems suddenly sexywhen you discover this lively street market (open8am–1pm & 4–7pm Tue–Sat, 8am–1pm Sun) on oneof the few streets in Paris that hasn’t been taken overby chain shops. Extra draws are patisserie Lenôtreand Davoli, a temple to porcine delights. The Café duMarché, is where the locals soak up the scene allyear round thanks to its heated terrace.StreetlifeSt-Germain conspicuous consumptionMuch of St-Germain’s literary soul has been lost asscores of designer boutiques have supplanted book-shops, but the terraces of Café de Flore and Les DeuxMagots, on the boulevard St-Germain, remain haunts ofthe area’s intelligentsia and artists. But the new shopsaren’t all about fashion: rue Bonaparte has some seri-ous antiques stores, while rue de Buci and neighbour-ing rue de Seine are both lined with gourmet foodretailers. The real must for local foodies, however, isPierre Hermé at No. 72 rue Bonaparte, the beauty ofwhose cakes rivals that of the YSL creations opposite.In summer, there is no better place to people-watchthan the terrace of Café de la Mairie (see p143). Infact, as far as bars go, this part of town is spoilt forchoice, especially along nearby rue des Canettes, akarue de la soif (the street of thirst). Heading towards theriver, rue St-Benoît, the jazz hub of Paris in the 1950sand 60s, still has a couple of good jazz clubs and agreat Japanese noodle restaurant, Yen (see p34).16 E214 G114 E1www.eparis.dk.com
  • 149. 157Boulevard des Batignolles marketBelow the Sacré Coeur and seedy place de Clichy, thetree-lined boulevard des Batignolles plays host everySaturday to the city’s best organic market, wheremany of the stallholders sell their own produce (asopposed to food bought from wholesale markets).Producers hawk everything – from perfectly ripecheeses, to giant goose eggs and vegetables galore –to the area’s increasingly trendy population.Canal St-Martin bohemian rhapsodyA hub for Parisian hipsters, this area looks and feelslike nowhere else in the city. A stroll along the leafyquai de Jemmapes or quai de Valmy, on either side ofthe tranquil canal, is a popular weekend pursuit. Thereare plenty of stops to choose from, including the caféChez Prune (see p147), the comedy and music venueHotel du Nord (see p123), and trendy boutiques suchas Stella Cadente (see p87) and Coin Canal (see p89).Les Champs-Elysées broad walkIt may seem clichéd, but “Les Champs” is still a placeto head for, especially on a Sunday, when its shops –mostly flagship stores – are open (unusual for Paris).Wandering up the avenue from place de la Concorde isa popular pastime, not to be missed when the Mairie(city hall) is staging one of its regular cultural events(recent extravaganzas have included TGV trains parkedon the pavement and avant-garde art exhibitions).At night, the lights along the avenue are spectacular,and there are several stores that are open late (seepp18–19), as well as some large multiscreen cinemas.Don’t overlook the avenue’s car showrooms: Toyotaat No. 79 and Renault at No. 53, both of which featurein-store bars and restaurants and are trendy desti-nations for a unique and slightly bizarre combinationof cars, cocktails and cuisine. The latest talking point,however, is the revamped Publicis Drugstore (seep83), which contains a handful of shops and a verycool restaurant overseen by chef Alain Ducasse.Boat trips up the Canal St-Martin are a good way to soak up the local vibe (see p106)8 F15 C53 B3Centre, West & North
  • 150. 158Abbesses having a high old timeThe heart of Montmartre is one of the city’s loveliestdistricts in which to while away some time. Expectwinding cobbled streets, dilapidated old windmills,charm by the bucket-load and interesting company –the local Montmartrois include lots of bohemian typesand artists. While many of the shops, such as thefunky Spree concept store (see p89) and PatriciaLouisor (see p88), are worth crossing town for duringthe day, don’t leave too soon, as it’s in the eveningthat things really start to kick off here.As well as outstanding restaurants – La Famille (seep48), La Mascotte (see p49) and Café Burq (see p46)are all here – the 18th arrondissment has numerousatmospheric bars, such as La Fourmi (see p146) and LeSancerre (see p148). Other diversions come in theshape of eccentric, camp cabaret Chez Michou (seep225), full of lip-synching, cross-dressing divas, andart-house cinema Studio 28 (see p123), with its beergarden that makes for an enchanting pre-film drink.Boulevard de Belleville cultural X-roadsThis broad, leafy boulevard is home to one of thecity’s cheapest and liveliest markets (7:30–2:30 Tue& Fri) and to thriving Chinese, Jewish and Arabcommunities, each with its own shops andrestaurants. Two of the best places to soak up themulticultural buzz are the excellent Jewish-Tunisianrestaurant Benisti (see p49) and the New Nioullaville(see p220), known for its outstanding dim sum.Puces de St-Ouen mother of all flea marketsq Porte de Clignancourtwww.les-puces.com Open 9:30–6 Sat–MonAlso known as Les Puces de Clignancourt, this is thecity’s largest flea market where amid the piles of junk,bargains and beautiful pieces also lurk. There are 12market areas, so if you know what you’re looking for,head to the specific section: Serpette and Biron are topfor antiques, while Malik has great vintage clothing.Check out local events in Paris with www.eparis.dk.com12 F2La Goutte d’Or kaleidoscope of culturesThis is perhaps the most multicultural and edgy area incentral Paris. La Goutte mainly vibrates to an Africanbeat, but other cultures are also in evidence. Head torue de Laghouat for a taste of Algeria, rue Jean FrançoisLépine to absorb Chinese culture and rue Gardes foryoung international fashion designers. For all its colourand vibrancy, this part of Paris is plagued by crime,so keep your wallet close and avoid visiting at night.4 F25 A2Streetlife
  • 151. 159Les Puces de Vanves hagglers’ heavenAvenue Georges Lafenestre and avenue Marc Sangrier, 14èmeq Porte de Vanves Open 7:30–6 Sat & SunVanves regulars swear that this is the best place forhidden treasures. It is smaller and friendlier than theother puces (flea markets), with around 350 stalls sell-ing everything from chipped china to beautiful antiquefurniture, as well as retro jewellery and stacks of col-lectible magazines and books. Haggling is expected.Rue Oberkampf grungy good timesDespite the fact that the area around and including rueOberkampf has been comprehensively gentrified overthe past five years, it still retains a multicultural feeland an urban vibe. But these days its residents aremore likely to be cash-happy creatives than strugglingimmigrants or salt-of-the-earth types. This part of townis essentially a night-time destination and it’s packedwith bars and restaurants that are all either dive-like ordesigner-distressed to varying degrees. The oldest arestill the best: Café Charbon (see p149) and MecanoBar at No. 99 continue to pull in the crowds, just asLa Cithea at No. 112 is still a popular club choice.Running parallel, rue Jean-Pierre Timbaud is a littlemore down to earth, so expect good, cheap andunpretentious food at Astier (see p49), people draw-ing on the paper tablecloths (crayons are provided) atthe Café Cannibale at No. 93, and songs, readings,concerts and free couscous (weekends only) at thewarm and welcoming Café Bleu at No. 83.Rue de la Butte-aux-Cailles old ParisAttracting students from the nearby Cité Universitaire(see p113) with its cheap food and boho bars (try LeTemps des Cerises at No. 18 or Chez Paul at No. 22, aclassy bistro), this street offers a slice of village lifeamong the tower blocks of the 13ème. Another drawis the 1920s-built outdoor pool at the Piscine Butte-aux-Cailles (see p13). But this area really comes intoits own at night, when cheap drinks draw the crowds.20 H512 F3North & East
  • 152. havensLeafy parks and gardens provideessential breathing space in Paris,both literally and metaphorically,but there are other soothingdiversions. When the city’s hurly-burly gets too much and only alife-enhancing massage will do,there are plenty of spas to choosefrom. Or there are tranquil caféshigh on atmosphere and lowon attitude, and chapels andchurches for quiet contemplation.
  • 153. 162Place Dauphine historical squareBuilt in 1607, this delightfully shady spot on the Ile dela Cité is a real slice of old Paris. Its three sides echothe pointed tip of the island and were once lined with32 identical 17th-century houses. Today only two ofthe original buildings remain – they’re the onesfacing the statue of Henry IV atop his trusty steed.Linger over lunch in one of the local bistros, or justfind a bench and take in the picturesque scene.Square du Vert-Galant green peaceThis leafy square, perched on the point of the Ile dela Cité, offers welcome respite from the hubbub ofthe surrounding streets. In summer, sun-seekersbypass the green benches and herbaceous bordersand head for the cobblestoned quays below to workon their tans, have a waterside picnic or just enjoythe views: Seine straight ahead, Louvre to the rightand the Institut de France’s pretty cupola on the left.Palais Royal majestic oasisPlace du Palais Royal, 1erGardens open dawn to dusk dailyThe elegant arcades and quiet garden enclave of the17th-century Palais Royal have long been popular forcontemplation or a promenade, with luxury shops andrestaurants as added draws. Before the Revolution,prostitutes and dissidents gathered in cafés in thearcades to plot the downfall of the old regime, andthe Palais was a favoured haunt of gamblers. Today,the most illicit fun you’re likely to have is devouringan extra dessert at the Restaurant du Palais Royal(see p24) or splashing out in one of the swishboutiques located in the building’s galeries.The garden is a serene oasis in the city’s heart,with striking tree-lined alleyways that harbour rowsof benches. Modern art fans will appreciate PolBury’s steel-ball sculptures and Daniel Buren’s once-controversial black-and-white striped columns, whichecho the regularity of the architecture behind.To find the most luxurious personal makeovers in Paris, check www.eparis.dk.comHavens10 F316 G116 F1
  • 154. 16332 Montorgueil beauty boost32 rue Montorgueil, 1er • 01 55 80 71 40Open 9–7:30 Sat, Mon, Tue, 9–9 Wed–FriThe tiny stream running through this spa whispers“relax” – something that’s instantly achievable with asolar plexus massage followed by a fruit-and-flowersexfoliation, or an acacia honey wrap and a soothingfoot rub. And, for a lavish fee, hairdresser to the starsJohn Nollet will clip your locks into elegant submission.St-Julien-le-Pauvre 12th-century churchRue St-Julien-le-Pauvre, 5ème • 01 43 54 52 16Open 10–7:30 dailyOne of the oldest churches in Paris, St-Julien hasbeen a place of refuge for hundreds of years. Thesedays, it’s weary tourists and workers, rather thanworshippers, who find sanctuary under its barrel-vaulted ceilings and in its Gothic apses. Outsidethere’s a calm little park with shaded benches.L’Imprévu holds poetry readings on the first Tuesday of every month at 8pm16 H2L’Imprévu laid-back living7 rue Quincampoix, 4ème • 01 42 78 23 50Open noon–2am Mon–Sat, 1pm–2am SunPull up an old barber’s chair or plump for a comfyleopard-print couch and kick back with a cocktail (orcreamy coffee) after an afternoon of art appreciationin the nearby Centre Pompidou (see p99). Thelighting is low-key, the vibe relaxed and the mellowjazz soundtrack easy on the ears.Nickel male order48 rue des Francs Bourgeois, 3ème • 01 42 77 41 10www.nickel.fr Open 9:30–7 Mon–Sat (to 9 on Thu)Philippe Dumont opened Nickel in 1996 so that boyswouldn’t have to rub just-waxed shoulders with thegirls when they were in need of a top-to-toe spruce-up.Nickel specializes in old-fashioned wet shaves, as wellas treatments such as manicures and facials. There’salso a range of Nickel beauty products for men.10 H511 B510 H3Centre
  • 155. 164La Grande Mosquée exotic baths39 rue Geoffroy St-Hilaire, 5ème • 01 45 35 97 33www.mosquee-de-paris.org Baths open 2–9 Fri, 10–9Sat–Wed (women only: Mon, Wed, Fri & Sat; men only: Tue &Sun); café open 9am–11pm; restaurant open lunch & dinnerdaily; tours 9–noon & 2–6 Sat–ThuBuilt in the 1920s, the Paris mosque – with itsimmaculate white walls and intricately carved wood-work – was inspired by the famous Alhambra in Spainand the BouInania Mosque in Morocco. It’s an environ-ment where tranquillity reigns, from the grand patioand sunken garden through to the tiled minaret andthe prayer room, all of which (except the latter) canbe visited on a guided tour. The hammam (Turkishbaths) and the tearoom, however, are the main drawshere. And if your idea of relaxation is being steamed,www.eparis.dk.comHavens17 A5 scrubbed and massaged to within an inch of yourlife, then this is definitely the place for you. After asession in the searing sauna, followed by a gommage(body scrub) and then a spirited and oily massage,you can stretch out on a cushion in the lush purple-and-gold rotunda and sip some sweet mint tea asArabic music and hushed voices float around you –a scene straight out of Ingres’s Le Bain Turc.In winter, the hammam’s the thing, but in summer,sipping tea in the shade of the fig tree on the blue-tiledterrace of the Café Maure can be equally appealing.Alternatively, drop on to one of the richly colouredbanquettes inside, under the amazing coffered ceiling,and watch waiters dart about with trays of mint teaand honey-drizzled cakes, or tureens of couscousdestined for the restaurant. It’s another world.
  • 156. 165City Parks and GardensThe Jardin du Luxembourg (Map 16 E4) is one ofthe city’s most beloved parks. Offering everythingfrom fountains to boules pitches and chairs aplenty,it’s basically a backyard for all those without one.If you want something more formal, head for thequintessential French garden, the Jardin desTuileries (Map 9 D4), laid out in the 17th century byroyal gardener Le Nôtre, with a sweeping centralavenue bordered by geometric flower beds andtopiary. Parc Monceau (Map 2 H4) is worlds apartwith its fanciful Roman temple, Egyptian pyramid,Japanese pagoda and Dutch windmill – as well aslawns and islands of flowers. But if flowers are yourpleasure, the rose garden of the Parc de Bagatelle(see p217), with some 1,300 varieties, is truly heaven.Jardins des Plantes floral fancyEntrances on rue Buffon, rue Cuvier, rue Geoffroy St-Hilaire,place Valhubert, 5ème Open summer 7:30–8, winter 7:30–5:30Escape dreary, wintry Paris inside steamy tropicalglasshouses alive with lush cacti, ferns and orchids.In May, cherry trees add a burst of colour between thesweeping shaded avenues. And, for a dose of naturedeep in the city, visit the wild parc écologique, whichis frequented by more than 75 species of birds.Toupary Restaurant bird’s-eye viewLa Samaritaine (5th fl), 2 quai du Louvre, 1er • 01 40 41 29 29www.toupary.com Open 11:45–3, 3:30–6 & 7:30–11 Mon–SatWhen you can shop no more, drag your aching feet upto the fifth floor of the Samaritaine department store.Here, a restorative cup of almond-and-orange tea, ahefty slice of apple tart and stunning panoramic views– from Notre Dame to the Eiffel Tower and beyond –awaits. The 10th-floor terrace is open in fine weather.Mariage Frères historic tearoom13 rue des Grands Augustins, 6ème • 01 40 51 82 50www.mariage-freres.fr Open 10:30–7:30 dailyThe Mariage family have been trading tea for 150years and this tranquil tearoom is the perfect place todiscover their wares. Hardwood floors, high-backedchairs, silver tea services, white-coated waiters and500 kinds of tea imbue this 17th-century building witha distinct aroma of the old East Indies.Hôtel des Invalides war and peaceEsplanade des Invalides, 7ème • 01 44 42 38 77Open summer 10–6 daily; winter 10–5 dailyBuilt by Louis XIV to house his wounded soldiers (partof it remains a hospital today), the Hôtel des Invalidescontains the grandiose tomb of Napoleon I and amassive army museum. Less well known are the restfulgardens, with their perfectly trimmed triangular trees,and flowerbeds overlooking a tinkling fountain.Centre15 A110 F516 F117 B5
  • 157. 166Chapelle Expiatoire fit for a king29 rue Pasquier, 8ème • 01 42 65 35 80Open 10–1, 2–6 Thu–Sat (2–4 in winter)Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette (as well as other vic-tims of the guillotine) were originally buried on thisspot, which prompted Louis XVIII to build a chapel in1815 in their memory. Rest on a bench under 100-year-old trees or peruse the huge stone tombs of the SwissGuards who died defending the luckless Louis XVI.Four Seasons George V sleek spa31 avenue George V, 8ème • 01 49 52 70 00www.fourseasons.com Open 6:30am–10pm dailyThe spa of this five-star hotel oozes style, from theJacuzzi and pool with trompe-l’oeil frescoes, to therelaxation lounge with linen-covered day beds, softmusic and fresh fruit for the taking. Opt for a his-and-hers hot-stone massage, a tequila-based punta mitamassage or a cosseting aromatherapy facial.Cinq Mondes world-class pampering6 square de l’Opéra Louis Jouvet, 9ème • 01 42 66 00 60Open noon–8 Mon–Sat (to 10 Thu)Each of Cinq Mondes’ nine face and body treatmentsbegins with a dreamy head-and-shoulder rub. Then theworld tour begins: Ayurvedic massage with warm oil;a hammam treatment complete with black soap, vigor-ous scrub down and massage; or a soak in a Japanesepetal-strewn o-furo bath, perfumed with essential oils.Parc des Buttes Chaumont wild parkEntrances on rue Manin and rue Boltzaris, 19èmeOpen 7:30am–9pm (in summer to 11pm)Cliffs and gushing waterfalls give this former rubbishtip and quarry an untamed alpine look. But it’s allman-made, from the lake and cave complete withstalactites, to the Temple of Sybil, from which you cansurvey urban Paris – including the distinctive outlineof the Sacré Coeur in the distance.For upcoming events in Paris’s parks and gardens, check www.eparis.dk.comHavens9 D19 C16 G48 F2
  • 158. 16719 C2La Promenade Plantée linear parkEntrances include ave Daumesnil, ave Ledru Rollin and rue Edouard-Lartet, 12èmeOpen 8–6 Mon–Fri, 9–6 Sat & Sun (in summer to 9pm)This green strip running 4.5km (3 miles) atop an old railway viaductstarts off at urbanized Bastille and ends at the verdant Bois deVincennes, to the east of the city. Planted with roses, lavender, shrubsand herbs, the promenade appeals to joggers, strollers and thecurious, as its elevated position makes it easy to gaze down at thestreets below or into the apartments and offices that line the route.Parc André Citroën themed gardensEntrances include quai André Citroën & rue St-Charles, 15èmeOpen from dawn Mon–Fri, 9am Sat & Sun; closing times varyaccording to the time of year and day of the weekLaid out on the site of the old Citroën car factory, this21st-century French garden is a long way from the for-mal, keep-off-the-grass parks dotted around the city.Based on four themes – architecture, artifice, move-ment and nature – the park is characterized by cleanlines and lots of glass, in the shape of two huge glass-house pavilions. There’s a vast lawn, a black gardenand a white garden, five coloured gardens designedto represent the five senses, and a moving garden (fullof grasses blowing in the breeze). Water plays a centralrole, with canals, waterfalls and the dancing fountain– a square that shoots jets of water into the air atrandom heights. It’s a magnet for giggling childrencooling off in summer. Added attractions include leafylabyrinths for quiet contemplation and a tethered hot-air balloon for fabulous views over the city (see p16).West, North, East & SouthCimetière du Montparnasse tombs3 boulevard Edgar Quinet, 14ème • 01 44 10 86 50Open 9–5:30 daily (but times can vary)Reflect on Paris’s artistic and literary past, immortalizedhere. Among the graves are those of Baudelaire, Sartreand companion Simone de Beauvoir, and Frenchcrooner Serge Gainsbourg, whose grave is always cov-ered with fans’ tributes. Brancusi’s superb sculptureKiss commemorates the double suicide of two friends.13 A518 G5
  • 159. hotelsRanging from posh palaces tobohemian bedrooms, hotels inParis come in all styles and caterto all budgets. Charming chintzexplosions are no longer thenorm in decor – minimalism canbe enjoyed in some of the city’sburgeoning boutique hotels.Finding a single bed in the citycan be a challenge, though, sobe prepared for hefty singlesupplements – or bring a friend.
  • 160. 170 For online services that book hotels at all prices, go to www.eparis.dk.comTOP CHOICES – hotelsVilla d’Estrées17 rue Git-le-Couer, 6èmeThe Villa d’Estrées is one of Paris’sbest boutique hotels. Extremelydiscreet and chic, it is known for itsopulent furnishings. (See p174)Hotel Eldorado18 rue des Dames, 17èmeA popular choice with guests wholike flea-market chic and individuallydecorated rooms. (See p179)Hilton Paris Arc de Triomphe51–7 rue des Courcelles, 8èmeThe design of this hotel is inspiredby 1930s ocean liners and is guaran-teed to transport guests back to anera of luxury and elegance. (See p179)Hotel Mayet3 rue Mayet, 6èmeBright and breezy, the upbeat HotelMayet is full of primary colours andfunky furniture. High on style andlow on price. (See p176)At weekends, it is oftenpossible to get cheaper deals inthe more expensive hotels that arepopular with business travellersduring the week.Booking your hotel room onlinewill often get you a better ratethan reserving over the phone.Pershing Hall49 rue Pierre-Charon, 8èmeThe latest Parisian hotel from inte-riors guru Andrée Putman is anultra-chic spot for design junkieswith deep pockets. (See p178)Novotel Tour Eiffel61 quai de Grenelle, 15èmeThe high-rise Novotel is not themost attractive building in Paris,but every room boasts impressiveviews over the city. (See p181)CHEAP CHICDESIGN STATEMENTS ROOMS WITH A VIEWHotel Bourg Tibourg19 rue Bourg Tibourg, 4èmeWith its far-from-minimal, eclecticdesign, this hotel is a huge hit within-the-know design fans in search ofsome luxury. (See p173)Hotel du Quai Voltaire19 quai Voltaire, 7èmeYou’ll pay a premium, but the street-facing rooms here have gorgeouspanoramas of the Louvre and theRiver Seine. (See p176)Royal Fromentin11 rue Fromentin, 9èmeRooms here offer spectacular viewsof Montmartre, which are also beau-tifully framed by Art-Deco windowsin the central stairwell. (See p180)Hotel du Panthéon19 place du Panthéon, 5èmeRooms at the front of this refinedhotel overlook the stunningPanthéon church. (See p175)
  • 161. 171TOP CHOICES – hotelsPavillon de la Reine28 place des Vosges, 3èmeAn oasis of calm situated on aromantic square. The beams andbeautiful beds create a perfecthaven for lovers. (See p172)L’Hotel13 rue des Beaux Arts, 6èmeRooms to match the wildest fanta-sies are found in this hotel. One ofthem recreates Oscar Wilde’s lastresting place. (See p175)Hotel St-Merry78 rue de la Verrerie, 4èmeGothic furnishings (including a con-fessional box in the reception) and achequered history lend the St-Merrya little quirky kudos. (See p173)Hotel du Septième Art20 rue St-Paul, 4èmeStuffed with movie memorabilia,this is an offbeat choice for filmfans. It also has a terrific locationnear the Marais. (See p173)Hotel Square3 rue des Boulainvilliers, 16èmeInside this hotel – itself a work ofmodern art – is a gallery with someinteresting work by renownedFrench artists. (See p179)Artus34 rue de Buci, 6èmeRising and established artists werecommissioned to paint the doorshere, and a graffiti guru was let looseon the staircases. (See p175)Hotel A4 rue d’Artois, 8èmeOne-off works of art grace thedoors, bedrooms and lobby area ofthe Hotel A, and art books line theshelves of its library. (See p177)ROMANTIC HIDEAWAYSWEIRD & WONDERFUL ARTISTIC STYLEThis might be the land of Gitanes andGauloises, but it’s not uncommon formoderate and expensive hotels to havenon-smoking rooms, or even floors.Hotel du Lys23 rue Serpente, 6èmeA hideaway for couples looking fora special stay, the Hotel du Lys hascharm in abundance. (See p174)Hotel du Vigny9–11 rue Balzac, 8èmeDiscreet staff, magnificent roomsand a prevailing sense of eleganceset the tone here. (See p177)
  • 162. 172 Check out the best deals and reserve a room at www.eparis.dk.comHotel Tonic pleasant retreat12 rue du Roule, 1er • 01 42 33 00 71www.tonichotel.comThe central location and elegant rooms are the bigdraws here. Some of the intimate bedrooms revealancient stone walls (the building dates from the 17thcentury) and all come complete with heavy red brocadebedspreads and simple wooden headboards. Superiorrooms have Jacuzzis to soothe aching bones. ModerateHotel Tiquetonne budget beds6 rue Tiquetonne, 2ème01 42 36 94 58It might be around the corner from the unsalubrious –though colourful – rue St-Denis, but this is a great findin the city’s buzzy Montorgueil quartier. The hotel islocated on a cobbled street full of trendy shops andquirky bars, and its airy rooms are simple, functionaland bigger than most in this bracket. CheapPavillon de la Reine 17th-century treat28 place des Vosges, 3ème • 01 40 29 19 19www.pavillon-de-la-reine.comArguably the most romantic hotel in Paris, this placewill transform even the most hard-bitten cynic. Theprime location is just the start; add a divine courtyard,rooms with beams and giant beds, friendly staff and agorgeous sitting room complete with an honesty bar,and you may never want to leave. ExpensiveHotel Roubaix homely spot6 rue Greneta, 3ème • 01 42 72 89 91www.hotel-de-roubaix.comTraditional decor, a rickety lift and delightfully courteous, old-school owners contribute to the Roubaix’s charm. The rooms area little faded and down at heel, but extremely clean. And thewonderful welcome from the staff – who greet first-timers andregulars alike as if they were old family friends – morethan makes up for the odd creaky bed-spring. Cheap10 H3Booking AgenciesThe official tourist office website (www.paris-touristoffice.com) is a useful site for finding andbooking a hotel on the web, though you do notneed to pay online. If you arrive in Paris without ahotel, try branches of the Office du Tourisme (seep231) at the Gare de Lyon and the Gare du Nord.A small commission is usually charged.Hotels10 G517 D110 H4
  • 163. 173Cheap: under 100€ for a double room; moderate: 100–250€; expensive: over 250€Hotel St-Merry memorable nights78 rue de la Verrerie, 4ème01 42 78 14 15Here, a boho vibe and quirky gothic feel set the scene.Formerly part of the neighbouring church and at onepoint a bordello, the St-Merry has cosy rooms, one ofwhich features a flying buttress above the bed. Onlythe suite has a TV, so guests staying in other roomshave to amuse themselves. ModerateHotel du Septième Art on a film theme20 rue St-Paul, 4ème01 44 54 85 00Film fans favour this hotel that pays homage tocinema, the seventh art. The bedrooms (the quietestones face the courtyard), stairwells and bar, full of oldmovie posters and kitsch Hollywood memorabilia, area little dusty. However, the art-house atmosphere andconvenient location are real pluses. CheapHotel Bourg Tibourg eclectic style19 rue Bourg Tibourg, 4ème • 01 42 78 47 39www.hotelbourgtibourg.comThe little-known Bourg Tibourg is popular with designbuffs looking for some lower-price chic. Part of theCostes group, the hotel is just as stylish, but moreaffordable than its more famous siblings.Designed by flash furnishings guru Jacques Garcia(the man behind the decor throughout the Costesempire), the interior here is a sexy mish-mash ofperiods and styles. The lobby is a riot of neo-gothic,offbeat Orientalism and old-school French, and therooms range from stark stripes to nautical blue vialuxuriant red. The dark-wood panelling, fabric-coveredwalls, velvet overload and explosion of gilt, however,feature in every room, as do the bathrooms clad withblack marble. The light-filled interior garden is idealfor escaping the visual overload, and the boutiquesand bars of the Marais are a stone’s throw away forother designer distractions. Moderate17 B117 C217 A1Centre
  • 164. 174 www.eparis.dk.comHotel du Degrés deNotre Dame perennial favourite10 rue des Grands Degrès, 5ème01 55 42 88 88With its beams and wood panelling, helpful staff,wonderful location set back from the Seine and greatvalue for money, this hotel is justly popular. Be sure totry dinner on the terrace or in the candle-filled diningroom, and book your room well in advance. ModerateVilla D’Estrées chic boutique hotel17 rue Git-le-Couer, 6ème • 01 55 42 71 11www.paris-hotel-latin-quarter.comSuch a closely guarded secret that it’s deliberately ex-directory, the Villa D’Estrées is definitely worth know-ing about. With ten beautiful rooms, conceived byYann Descamp (protégé of über-designer JacquesGarcia), the hotel is all warm tones and Empire-stylefurniture. Perfect for a hush-hush weekend. ModerateHotel Esméralda shabby charm4 rue St-Julien-le-Pauvre, 5ème01 43 54 19 20Set on a pretty square across the river from NotreDame, this charming hotel is a perfect base forindulging in some Left Bank pursuits. The 17th-centurybuilding contains 19 slightly run-down – yet romantic –rooms, complete with antique furnishings and unevenfloors. Book ahead (no credit cards accepted). CheapHotel du Lys romantic bargain23 rue Serpente, 6ème01 43 26 97 57The Hotel du Lys is a timeless, typically French hotel,all winding staircases, scrubbed floorboards,tapestries and fading floral arrangements. The roomsare simply furnished and some tend towards the tiny,but if you’re looking for a no-fuss place to hole upwith your beloved, it is ideal. Cheap16 H216 G2need pic boxhereHotels16 H316 G2
  • 165. 175Not all cheap hotels accept credit cards. Call to check whether they do, and if so which onesHotel du Panthéon elegant living19 place du Panthéon, 5ème • 01 43 54 32 95www.hoteldupantheon.comIt’s always wise to book ahead for the Hotel duPanthéon; its prime location and attentive staff havewon it a legion of fans. Booking also increases thechance of getting one of the few rooms with spectacularPanthéon views. All rooms have château-style furnish-ings, including some four-poster beds. ModerateArtus chic on the cheap34 rue de Buci, 6ème • 01 43 29 07 20www.artushotel.comSuperbly located, the Artus has friendly, relaxed staff,a young and hip clientele and decent prices. The artytouch alluded to in the hotel’s name? Check out thebedroom doors, each painted by an up-and-comingartist. If you can, splash out on the duplex room witha truly striking, sumptuous bathroom. ModerateL’Hotel indulgent fantasies13 rue des Beaux Arts, 6ème • 01 44 41 99 00www.l-hotel.comOscar Wilde spent his last days here, famously claim-ing that he was dying beyond his means. There’s noneed to take it quite that far, but a night here is worththe expense. L’Hotel is a temple to opulence, with 20rooms – individually decorated by the ubiquitousJaques Garcia – leading off the circular lightwell. Partthe heavy drapes at the door of the Léopard Room toreveal a riot of purple taffeta, velvet, gilt and leopardprint. There’s also a red marble bathroom with asunken tub. The Roi de Naples Room features a hugebed, a fireplace and impressive chandeliers while theSt Petersburg is an imperial dream of jade, mirrorsand marble. In the basement, the perpetual-wavepool, mosaic steam room and circular chill-out loungeprovide a heaven for hedonists. However, shySybarites will be pleased to discover that this spa areacan only be reserved for private sessions. Expensive16 E116 G416 E2Centre
  • 166. 176 Browse hotels by area on www.eparis.dk.comHotel Mayet funky design3 rue Mayet, 6ème • 01 47 83 21 35www.mayet.comA rare departure from the chintzy interiors usuallyfound in cheaper Parisian hotels, the Mayet’s roomsare a breath of fresh air, especially those on the fifthfloor, which have their own balconies. Expect fuss-freefurniture, primary colours and clean lines, and guestswho expect a little style for their euros. CheapHotel des St-Pères St-Germain star65 rue des St-Pères, 6ème • 01 45 44 50 00www.esprit-de-france.comThe St-Pères is a kind of up-market boarding house forthe bookish. Its rooms – elegant, individually deco-rated and opening onto an interior courtyard – and barare popular with publishers and authors from nearbypublishing houses. Romantics and art-lovers will adorethe painted bathroom ceiling in Room 100. ModerateHotel Lenox updated Art Deco9 rue de l’Université, 7ème • 01 42 96 10 95www.lenoxsaintgermain.comFollow in the footsteps of James Joyce, Ezra Pound andT S Eliot by checking into the Lenox. The Art Deco barand lobby offer a stylish backdrop for cocktails; theexterior glass lift provides an adrenaline kick for thosestaying on the top floors; and the comfortable roomsare a perfect cocoon from the outside world. ModerateHotel du Quai Voltaire room with a view19 quai Voltaire, 7ème • 01 42 61 50 91www.quaivoltaire.frStaying here is really all about location. The roomscan be a little small and the sparse furnishing tendstowards the shabby, so make sure you book a top-floor, river-facing room. These are a little larger thanmost, have less traffic noise and, of course, the mostspectacular views. Moderateve9 D515 D1Hotels15 B415 D2
  • 167. 177The Grandes DamesParis’s palace hotels are temples to the art of highliving, and while gilt, marble, crystal, velvet andshocking room rates are universal to them all, eachhas its own specialities. Le Ritz is perhaps the most(in)famous, and its health club is one of the world’smost beautiful. Le Crillon is the city’s poshest hotel;the quiet, sun-trap courtyard is a well-kept secretfor summer drinks. The Four Seasons George Vboasts an army of staff for each guest and a trendyspa (see p166). Le Meurice is a little hipper than itsrivals, hosting glittering private parties and offeringan amazing personal-shopping service, while LaPlaza Athenée is surrounded by the city’s topdesigner boutiques and has a fabulous bar (seep145). For further details, see p227.Hotel Malar characterful cheapie29 rue Malar, 7ème • 01 45 51 38 46www.hotelmalar.comTucked away in this chic part of town, near the TourEiffel, the Malar is a real gem. The reception area isall wood beams and long-stemmed roses, the interiorcourtyard a delightful place to breakfast, and therooms are simple yet spotlessly clean. The charmingstaff offer a genuinely warm welcome. CheapHotel A urban cool4 rue d’Artois, 8ème • 01 42 56 99 99www.hotel-le-a.comThe A looks like something out of Wallpaper* maga-zine and is a magnet for fashion and media folk. Theall-white bedrooms boast sleek stone bathrooms andoriginal artworks: those on the sixth floor are floodedwith light via skylights. Down in the lobby, recline on achaise longue with a long drink from the bar. ExpensiveHotel de Vigny insider address9–11 rue Balzac, 8ème • 01 42 99 80 80www.relaischateaux.comA palatial, prestigious hotel, the de Vigny is a well-keptsecret among discerning visitors. It’s the only Relais etChateaux hotel in Paris, and offers chic and elegantrooms. A roaring fire in the mahogany-panelled lounge,an Art Deco-style bar with vintage champagne on ice,and discreet staff complete the picture. Expensive8 F1Centre & West8 H18 G5A few hotels in Paris close for two weeks in August and at Christmas
  • 168. 178 If you need a room at the last minute, turn to www.eparis.dk.comPershing Hall happening scene49 rue Pierre-Charron, 8ème • 01 58 36 58 00www.pershinghall.comEven if you do not usually opt for up-market accommo-dation, Pershing Hall, the city’s hippest hotel, is reallyworth the splurge. An unremarkable façade with asmall sign conceals a super-sleek haven created bydesign maven Andrée Putman. The lobby sets the off-beat, modish tone, with fashion photographs, abizarre tree-trunk sculpture “growing” from a pool inthe centre of the room and staff who look as if they’refilling in on their day off from the catwalk. A cascadeof beaded curtains leads to the interior courtyardrestaurant where le beau monde drink in the amazingvista along with their Bollinger; the entire back wallof the courtyard is covered with a stunning verticalgarden. And in summer, the glass roof retracts sothat guests can top up their (real) St-Tropez tans.The rooms are as minimal and chic as one wouldexpect from Putman, featuring white bed linen, ashfurniture, aubergine taffeta drapes and blue-stainedparquet. Interesting extras include suites with slidingpanels that allow the bathroom to become part of thebedroom (some rooms only have showers), state-of-the-art plasma TV/DVDs and a free mini-bar completewith trendy mini-bottles of Pop champagne. Takeadvantage of the freebies before heading to PershingLounge, the upper-level bar/club where the subduedneon lighting, see-and-be-seen balcony area anddove-grey leather sofas all contribute to make thisspot a favourite with Paris’s party people. One of thecapital’s hottest places to do drinks, the Lounge hasa different DJ every night of the week, occasionalfunky-jazz concerts, upscale ladies’ nights completewith speed-dating sessions and tarot-card readings,and an ever hip-and-happy vibe. Expensive8 G2Hotels
  • 169. 179Rates in more expensive hotels can vary wildly from season to seasonHilton Paris Arc de Triomphe51–7 rue des Courcelles, 8ème • 01 58 36 67 00www.hilton.comHilton’s latest Paris hotel harks back to an era ofelegance and sophistication. Star designer JacquesGarcia has decked out the vast 512-room hotel inclassic 1930s style: the sweeping wrought-ironstaircase illuminated by an amazing chandelier is theplace to make a grand entrance, while the courtyardgarden and Purple bar are great chill-out spots. Period-style furnishings dot the hallways and the rooms arefull of ebony, green imitation shark-skin wall coverings,cream leather seating and luxurious bedding.There’s even an Executive floor; the rooms aren’tmuch better, but the swanky VIP lounge with a fullystocked free bar and foie gras nibbles, plus the privatecheck-in and complimentary breakfast, makes it worththe extra euros. Guests who like to be pamperedshould head to the spa; in addition to treatments,there’s a Turkish bath and sauna area. ExpensiveHotel Square tastefully trendy3 rue des Boulainvilliers, 16ème • 01 44 14 91 90www.hotelsquare.comHoused in a curving granite building, this is an idealchoice for lovers of all things minimal and modern.Twenty-two tasteful rooms feature sleek furnishings,impressive hi-fi systems and stacks of arty magazines.The first-floor gallery often hosts temporary exhibi-tions, book launches and private parties. ExpensiveHotel Eldorado hip and happening18 rue des Dames, 17ème01 45 22 35 21The Eldorado’s attractive rooms are bright and airy, andits patio is ideal for lunching and lounging. The triplesand quads are great value, but be sure to book ahead,especially during fashion weeks (Mar and Oct), whenthis place fills with models who aren’t yet superenough to stay at a palace hotel (see p177). Cheap13 A22 G43 C2West
  • 170. 180 Check out reviews of many more Paris hotels through www.eparis.dk.comHotel Langlois atmospheric charm63 rue St-Lazare, 9ème01 48 74 78 24Formerly the Hotel des Croises, this place’s namechanged after it was featured as the Hotel Langlois inthe 2002 movie The Truth about Charlie. The pristineArt Nouveau building hides a rickety lift that takesguests to rooms stuffed with antiques and charm,some of which boast stunning views. CheapHotel Terrass lovely location12–14 rue Joseph de Maistre, 18ème • 01 44 92 34 14www.terrass-hotel.comThe Terrass offers a peaceful night’s sleep in down-to-earth Montmartre. The decor is immaculate, if a littlebland, but the welcome is warm and the trendylocation hard to beat. In summer, the roof-toprestaurant barbecue is very romantic and quite an“in” destination with fashionable folk. ModerateAparthotelsIf you’re after a private pad, aparthotels are the wayto go. The most luxurious is the Carré d’Or complexoff the Champs-Elysées, popular with A-listers fromthe worlds of film, fashion and serious wealth. Lessstratospheric, but still impressive, are the Citadinesbuildings dotted around the city (the best is in St-Germain), which are generally favoured by thosewhose company is picking up the tab. At the HotelRésidence Henri IV, the atmosphere is much moreintimate, with its five apartments located off abeautiful square in the 5ème. The studios run byHotel du Degrès du Notre Dame also offer a LeftBank address, but a more vibrant one. Independentlets (of at least one week) can also be found viaFrance Apartments. For further details, see p226.Royal Fromentin good-value good times11 rue Fromentin, 9ème • 01 48 74 85 93www.hotelroyalfromentin.comIt was a swinging 1930s cabaret spot, and entertainingis still part of this hotel’s soul: it is often the hotel ofchoice for bands playing at the nearby concert halls.The lobby bar’s decor recalls the good old days, whilesome of the agreeable rooms have amazing viewswhich will inspire anyone to get lyrical. CheapHotels4 E34 E23 D5
  • 171. 181Fusac magazine’s website (www.fusac.org) has listings for short-term letsHotel des Arts picture perfect5 rue Tholoze, 18ème • 01 46 06 30 52www.arts-hotel-paris.comThe Hotel des Arts’ location – up a steep little street,opposite one of the city’s best art-house cinemas andjust down from an old windmill – is quintessentialMontmartre. The hotel itself doesn’t disappoint either,with friendly staff and comfortable, floral bedrooms,some of which have cityscape views. CheapHotel Utrillo Montmartre scene7 rue Aristide Bruant, 18ème • 01 42 58 13 44www.hotel-paris-utrillo.comThe simple, spare rooms at the Utrillo are well kept,and the sloping ceilings of the garret rooms lend aromantic feel to this bargain sleep. In contrast, thebreakfast room is much more bright and distinctlycheery. Don’t forget to take advantage of the in-hotelsauna (at a small extra charge). CheapHotel Beaumarchais bargain chic3 rue Oberkampf, 11ème • 01 53 36 86 86www.hotelbeaumarchais.comOne of the first places in Paris to do reasonablypriced, modern designer flair, the Beaumarchais hasa loyal following. Expect bedrooms in primary colours,comfy beds and funky nick-nacks. A rue Oberkampflocation means that all manner of trendy shops, barsand restaurants are just a short stroll away. Cheap13 B3Novotel Tour Eiffel luxury chain61 quai de Grenelle, 15ème • 01 40 58 20 00www.novotel.comThe Novotel has swathes of marble, a chic bar, twonoteworthy restaurants and panoramic views. Roomsare stylish, and the small indoor pool (with retractableroof) is a terrific plus. Depending on the season,prices can be expensive, but the web often haslast-minute deals year-round. ModerateNorth, East & South11 D44 E24 E2
  • 172. 7E6E5E4E1E2E3E9E10E11E19E20E18E17E16E15E14E13E12E8E1 2 3 4 5 67 8 9 10 11 1213 14 15 16 17 1819 20 21 22SeineSeineBLVDST GERMAINBLVDDUMONTPARNASSEMICHELBLVDSAINTAVEDESUFFRENAVEDESCHAMPSELYSEESBOULEVARD HAUSSMANNPLACEDE LACONCORDEAVEDEWAGRAMRUELAFAYETTERUEDERIVOLIBLVDDESEBASTOPOLAVE DE LA REPUBLIQUEBLVDVOLTAIREBLVDDIDEROTAVENUEDAUMESNILBLVDDEL’HOPITALPLACEDE LARÉPUBLIQUEPLACEDE LABASTILLEPLACEDITALIEPLACE DELA MADELEINEPLACECHARLESDE GAULLELA MOTTEPICQUETCHAILLOTPASSY INVALIDESMONTMARTRELA VILLETTEBERCYQUARTIERLATINGOBELINSMONTPARNASSEBELLEVILLEMARAISOPERAST-GERMAINLESHALLES BEAU-BOURGPIGALLEBASTILLEILE DE LACITE01 1miles kmForêt deSt GermainForêt deMarlyBois deBoulogneBois deVincennesSeineSeineASNIÈRESARGENTEUILAUBERVILLIERSMONTROUGEST OUENPUTEAUXCOURBEVOIEMEUDONSÈVRES CHARENTONMONTREUILCLICHYBOULOGNE-BILLANCOURTST-CLOUDVERSAILLESCRETEILNEUILLYNANTERREST-GERMAIN-EN-LAYEST-DENISA13N286A3N2N14A86A14N3N34N6N7N20N118N13A4A6A1A15BOULEVARDPÉRIPHÉRIQUEBLVD PÉRIPHÉRIQUEGreater ParisCENTRALPARIS04 4miles km183qW£4@nA857NhInner Paris is relatively compact and is delineatedby the boulevard Périphérique.Within this ringroad,the city is divided into 20 numbered postal districtsor arrondissements, which spiral outwards fromthe 1st arrondissement located on the Right Bank.The main map below shows the division of theParis Street FinderStreet Finder, along with postcodes, and thesmaller one shows the extent of Greater Paris.Almost every listing in this guide features a(boxed) page and grid reference to the maps inthis section.The few entries that fall outside thearea of these maps give transport details instead.Key to Street FinderSight/public buildingMetro stationRER stationRailway stationRiver boat pierMain bus stopTourist information officeHospital with casualty unitPolice stationChurchSynagoguePost officeCar parkRailway linePedestrian streetMotorwayScale of maps 1–220 metres0 yards250250
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  • 176. «15«116«46«170«11«3980»81»«36«41«50«2«63«47«8045»C I M E T I E R ES T V I N C E N TSQUARES BUISSONSQUAREDANVERSSQUARE DEMONTHOLONSQUARE JRICTUSPLACEST-PIERREPLACEDU TERTREPLACEDU CALVAIRESQUARENADARPLACEC DULLINPLACEBLANCHEPLACE DUCHATEAUROUGEPLACEPIGALLEPLACE G.TOUDOUZEBARBESBOULEVARDBLVDDEMAGENTADDECLICHYR U EL AF A Y E T T ERUE CAULAINCOURTRUEFRANCOEURR U EC U S T I N ERUEC A U L A I N C O U R TR U E B L E U ER UEDEMAUB E UGERUEDHAUTEVILLERUEDABBEVILLERUEDED U N K E R Q U ERUEDEPARADISRUEDUFAUBOURGPOISSONNIEREDOUAIRUEDUFAUBOURGMONTMARTRER U EDURANTINRUEDESMARTYRSR U EV I C T O RM A S S ERUETAITBOUTR U ED EC H A T E A U D U NL A V I C T O I R ERUEL E P I CRUESTGEORGESSERERFSIORTSEDEURR U EL E P I CCAULAINCOURTRUEFONTAINERUENOTREDAMEDELORETTER U ED A U M A L EA V E N U ET R U D A I N ER U E C O N D O R C E TRUEDEMAUBE UGEBOULEVARDDEPLACEDU 8 NOV1942RUEDELACHAUSSEEDANTINR U EL A M A R C KRUEEUGENECARRIERERUEFZIEMRUE AGAUTHIERRUESTEINLENRUETOURLAQUERUE S DEREURERUEDAMREMONTRUE DELABREUVOIRRUE DARWINRUE L GAULARDR U E P A U L F E V A LRUEDESSAULESRUENOBELRUEDELABBEPATUREAURUEGCOUTER U EB E C Q U E R E LA V E N U E J U N O TAVEJUNOTRUEDUMONTCENISRUEDESSAULESR U ES A I N T V I N C E N TRUEGIRARDONRUEMYRHACLIGNANCOURTRUEDERUE CHRISTIANIR U ED ES O F I ARUEBELHOMMERUEBOISSIEURUE BERVICRUECHNODIERRUELIVINGSTONERUELAMARCKRUELAMARCKRUE DE BAIGNEURRUESEVESTERUEDESTEINKERQUER U E P P I C A R DRUEFEUTRIERRAMEYRUER U EM U L L E RRUEFEUTRIERPASSAGEBRIQUETRUEBRIQUETPLACEDANVERSRUEGERANDORUETURGOTRUERODIERRUE THIMONNIERR U EP E T R E L L ER U E D U D E L T ARUELENTONNETSQUAREPETRELLERUEROCHAMBEAUR U ED EB E L L E F O N DRUEDECHANTILLYRUE DES MESSAGERIESRUEPIERRESEMARDCITE CONDORCETD ’ A U V E R G N ERUERIBOUTTERUEPAPILLONR U E D E M O N T H O L O NRUESAULNIERC I T E P A R A D I SRUEATHOMASRUE DEJEANRUEDESISLETTESRUERUER U EL ABATDOUDEAUVILLEPOULETRUEGPATINRUEDEROCROYRUE A DEL SARTECITEDETREVISERUEDO RSELRUEDESPOISSONNIERSRUEDEROCHECHOUARTR U EC O N D O R C E TRUERONSARDRUEDEROCHECHOUARTPAULALBERTRUERUE DE BELZUNCERUEDUFAUBOURGPOISSONNIERENARYAMEURROCHECHOUARTR U EN O R V I N SRUEDESMARTYRSRUEDE SABBE S S E SRUELEPICRUEDELAROCHEFOUCAULDRUE A ZA ISAVENUEFROCHOTR U E L A M A R T I N ER U E Y L E T A CR U E D O R S E LRUECAUCHOISR U EAANTOINERUELALLIERRUE ST RUSTIQUERUE DE LA VICTOIRERUELAFFITTERUEDROUOTRUETAITBOUTCITEG PILONRUE R PLANQUETTER UEVE R ONRUEGERMAINPILONCONSTANCERUEABRUANTRUEBURQRUE PUGETRUEDORCHAMPTRAVIGNANRUETHOLOZÉRUE DELARMEEDORIENTRUE JOSEPH DE MAISTRER U E D E N A V A R I NRUEHMONNIERRUE PESCUDIERRUEPIGALLER U EC H A P T A LCITECHAPTALRUEFROCHOTR U E D U P E R R ÉRUEFROMENTINVILLADEGUELMACITEDUMIDIR U EC L A U Z E LRUE LAFERRIERERUEBOURDALOUERUEDELAMIRERUEDANCOURTRUEHOUDONPLACE DESABBESSESRUE A STEVENSRUEPIGALLER U EL AB R U Y E R ERUERUECOUSTOURUELEPICCITEPIGALLERUE DE LATOUR DES DAMESRUE GARREAURUEAUDRANR U EG A B R I E L L ER U EB E R T H ERUE DE LAVIEUVILLERUEDUCARDGUIBERTRUEFOYATIERRUEANDROUETRUE ABARSAEQRUEDUCALVAIRERUE TARDIEURUECHAPPERUEDANCOURTRUE DEL’AGENT BAILLYRUE MANUELCITECGODONRUEMILTONR U ED EL AT O U RRUERODIERRUE SAYRUECRETETRUEBOCHARTDESARONRUEVLEDUCCITE MALESHERBESRUE HIPPOLYTE LEBASR U EC H O R O NRUEFLECHIERRUEBUFFAULTPGEDESDEUXSŒURSRUECADETRUEMANSARTR U E S T L A Z A R ERUEFALCONETRUELEPELETIERRUEDETREVISERUE DE CHABROLRUEDELABONNERUE D U CHEVALIERDELA BARRELamarckCaulaincourtChateauRougeAbbessesBlanchePigalleAnversBarbèsRochechouartSt GeorgesTrinitéCarrefour deChåteaudunNotre Damede LoretteLe PeletierCadetPoissonnièreMoulinde la GaletteAu Lapin AgileMusée deMontmartreMusée dArt NaïfMax FournyFoliesBergèreMuséeGustaveMoreauSt-Pierre deMontmartreSacré-CœurMoulinRougeBateau-Lavoir56»M O N T M A R T R EP I G A L L E
  • 177. «7623»2»«16«1«2041»148«261»245»«119208»234»219»211»180»168»190»203»«63«129128»127»125»122»174»124»70»«7775»«21SQUARE DUPGE LEONSQUARE STBERNARDSQUAREST VINCENTDE PAULSQUAREA SATRAGNESQUARE DE JESSAINTSQUAREE VARLINJ A R D I NV I L L E M I NCanalSaintMartinPLACE DU 11NOV 1918PLACEFRANZ LISZTPLACE DEROUBAIXPLACE DELA CHAPELLEPLACEDU MAROCBOULEVARDDEMAGENTAAVENURUEMARXDORMOYRUEDUFAUBOURGSTMARTINRUEDUFAUBOURGSTDENISR U EL AF A Y E T T ER U EL AF A Y E T T EPLACE DEVALENCIENNESRUE DU 8 MAI 1945RUE DE VALENCIENNESRUEDHAUTEVILLERUE DES PETITS HOTELSRUEPHILIPPEDEGIRARDRUEPAJOLR U ER I C Q U E TR UER U ED O U D E A U V I L L ERUELOUI SBLANCRUEDEL AQUEDUCQUAIDEVALMYRUEJULIETTEDODURUEDETANGERQUAIDEJEMMAPESRUED’AUBERVILLIERSBLVDDEDENAINR U ED ED U N K E R Q U ERUELOUI SBLANCR U ED EP A R A D I SAVENUECLAUDEVELLEFAUXDEGIRARDRUEPHILIPPERUEDELAGRANGEAUXBELLESRUE DE SUEZM Y R H AR U E C A V ERUECAPLATRUE DE LA CHARBONNIERERUEDECHARTRESRUEDESGARDESRUEAFFRERUE ST MATHIEURUESTJEROMERUE ST BRUNORUEPLERMITER U E D E J E S S A I N TRUELEONRUELEONRUEERNESTINER U E D O R A NR U E D E L A G H O U A TR U E A M B R O I S E P A R ERUESTVINCENTDEPAULRUEDECOMPIEGNERUEFENELONRUEBOSSUETCOUR DE LAFERME ST LAZARERUEDESTQUENTINCITE DE LACHAPELLEPASSAGE RUELLERUEDETOMBOUCTOURUE J KABLERUEPERDONNETR U E C A I LR U E D E M A R Q U A YRUE DES 2 GARESRUEDALSACEAVENUEDEVERDUNIMPASSE BOUTRONR U ED E SR E C O L L E T SR UEB E L L OTRUECAILLIÉRUEDUCHATEAULANDONRUEAP ARODIPASSAGEBARTHELEMYRUERBLACHER U ED UT E R R A G EPLACE RAOULFOLLEREAURUEPDUPONTPGE DELESSERTRUEEVARL I NRUEDEL’HOPITALSTLOUISCITEDHAUTEVILLERICHOMMERUEPASSAGELE ONRUE SIBOURRUEDESECLUSES ST MARTINRUEMARTELQUAIDEVALMYRUE DE LA FIDELITERUEDESGARDESRUEDUCHATEAULANDONRUEPAJOLR U ED UD E P A R T E ME N TRUESTEPHENSONQUAIDEJEMMAPESRUEFJAMMESRUE G F HAENDELR U ERUEDEMAUBEUGER U E D E L A G O U T T E D O RR U ER U ED UMAROCR U EP O L O N C E A URUESTLUCRUECHAUDRONRUEDEBELZUNCERU E ST LAURENTB O U L E V A R D D E L A C H A P E L L E B O U L E V A R DDELAVILLETTEPLACE DESTALINGRADPLACE DUCOLONELFABIENPLACEROBERT DESNOSRUE A CAMUSR U E V I C QRUEERCKMANNCHATRIANRUEFLEURYR U E J F L E P I N ER U ED EC H A B R O LRUEDUFAUBOURGSTDENISSTEPHENSONRUEGare de lEstGare du NordLa ChapelleStalingradLouis BlancJaurésChâteauLandonGare de lEstGare du NordMarx DormoyMuséedu CristalHôpital FernandWidalBORISVIANRUE
  • 178. «2003»30»47»64»79»45»«124«48«55P A R C D E SB U T T E S C H A U M O N TBas s i ndel aVi l l et t eCanaldel Our cqBLVDDELAVILLETTENUEDEFLANDREA V E N U EJ E A NJ A U R È SJEANAVENUEJAURÈSR U E A R M A N D C A R R E LR I C QUE TQUAIDELASEINEAVE NUES E C R E T ANAVENUES ECRETANAVENUES I M O NB O L I V A RRUEMANINRUEDEMEAUXRUEDEMEAUXAVENUESIMONBOLIVARA V E N U ES I MONBOLI VARRUEM A N I NAVENUEDELAUMIÈREDECRIMÉERUECRIMÉERUEDER U EMA N I NRUE DAVIDD’ANGERSR U ED E B E L L E V I L L ERUEB O T Z A R I SPGE DE FLANDREQUAIDELALOIRERUE DESOISSONSRUELALLYTOLLENDALRUECLOVISHUGUESRUEDECHAUMONTRUE SADILECOINTEPASSAGEDE LA BRIECI T EL E P AGERUEBOURETRUEJEANMOINONRUEHFEULARDRUEBOURE TRUEBASTERUEDEROUENRUEDELAMOSELLERUE PIERRE REVERDYRUEVSCOTTOPGEDEMELUNRUEPGEDELAMOSELLEVILLAREMI-BELLEAURUEHMURGERRUE DES CHAUFOURNIERSRUE GEORGESLARDENNOISRUE PH HECHTRUEDEL’ATLASRUEBARRELETDERICOURUELAUZINCITESAINTCHAUMONTALLEE PERNETTEDUGUILLETALLEELOUISELABERUE EDGAR POERUE R DE GOURMONTA V E N U EM A T H U R I NM O R E A UDES A M B R EE TME U S ESIONNEDRALSEGROEGEURR UEE DOUAR DP AI L L E R O NRUEEURYALEDEHAYNINRUEHENRITUROTRUEBURNOUFR U E R E BEVALRUERAMPALCLAVELPRADIERRUERUEPRÉAULTRUEHASSARDR U E D U P L A T E A URUECOMPANSRUECARDUCCIRUE DES SOLITAIRESRUERUEDESDUNESCITÉJANDELLEPASSAGEGAUTHIERRUECAVENDISHRUEJEANMENANSQUAIDEL AMARNEQUAIDEL OI S ERUEDETHI ONVI L L ER U EL É O NG I R A U DRUEDELESSEUXRUEDELUNÉVILLEP E T I TR U ER U EP E T I TRUEDEL’OURCQDELORRAINERUERUEDURHINRUEMEYNADIERRUE GEORGES AURICRUED’HAUTPOULRUEDESARDENNESPASSAGEDETHIONVILLETANDOURUEANDRÉDANJONRUED’HAUTPOULRUEFESSARTRUEDESALOUETTESRUEDELAVILLETTERUEMÉLINGUERUEDEPALESTINERUEDESANNELETSRUELASSUSRUEDUJOURDAINRUEDELOUVAINDARIUS MILHAUDALLÉEPLACE ACARRELD ’ A Z I RLaumièreOurcqButtesChaumontBotzarisJourdainQuai de la LoireJaurésBolivarRiquetColonel FabienL A V I L L E T T ECOURS DU 7ÈME ARTVILLA DESBUTTES CHAUMONT
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  • 181. «3624»12»17»«2«13«23«258«10«43«1«149«82«208«288SQUARELOUISXVIJ A R D I N D E ST U I L E R I E SSQUARES ROUSSEAUL aS ei nePLACE DESSAUSSAIESRUEDUPHOTPLACEVENDOMEPLACE DE LAMADELAINEPLACE DESINVALIDESESPLANADEDES INVALIDESPLACE DUPRESIDENTE HERRIOTPLACE DUPALAISBOURBONPLACE H DEMONTHERLANTPLACE DELA CONCORDEPLACE MBARRÈSPLACEDIAGHILEVSQ. OPÉRAL. JOUVETRUEEDOUARDVIIPLACE JBAINVILLEBOULEVARDMALESHERBESQUAI VOLTAIREQUAIANATOLEFRANCEBOULEVARDSAINTGERMAINQ U A ID E ST U I L E R I E SA V E N U ED E SC H A M P SE L Y S E E SR U ED ER I V O L IQUAI D’ORSAYBOULEVARDDESRUEROYALEB O U L E V A R DH A U S S M A N NRUE DES SAUSSAIESR U EL AR U ED EP E N T H I E V R EFAUBOURGS THONOR ER U E D E P R O V E N C ER UEDURUEDASTORGRUED’ANJOUR U ERUESAI NTRUEDEL ’ UNI V E R S I T ER U E D E L ’ U N I V E R S I T ERUEDEMIROMESNILB O E T I ER U ED ES E Z ERUE DANIELLERUEDELAPAIXRUEDESCAPUCINESRUEDECAUMARTINR U E D E S M A T H U R I N SRUEDECASTIGLIONERUETRONCHETR U ES A I N TH O N O R EBOULEVARD DELA MADELEINET E R R AS S EDE SF E UI L L ANT ST E R R A S S ED UB O R DD EL E A UAVEWCHURCHILLC O U R S L A R E I N EAVENUEDEMARIGNYR U E R O Q U E P I N ERUE CHAUVEAU LAGARDERUEAUBERR U ED E S M A T H U R I N SS A I N TD O MI N I Q U EAVENUEDUMARECHALGALLIENIRUEDUBACRUEDEBELLECHASSEAVEMATIGNONAV E NUEGABR I E LA V E N U EE D WA R DT U C KAVENUEDUTUITRUEDUMARCHESTR U EL A SC A S E SR U ED EL I L L ERUEDEBOURGOGNERUEDEMARTIGNACRUECASIMIRPERIERRUEDECONSTANTINEP O R T D E S C H A M P S E L Y S E E SAVENUE C GIRAULTRUEDUCIRQUEA V E N U EG A B R I E LRUEDEMONDOVIRUESTFLORENTINRUEDELARCADERUEBOISSYDANGLASRUEPASQUIERRUERICHEPANCERUE DE LA VILLE LEVEQUERUEDELELYSEE R U ED ES U R È N ER U EMO N T A L I V E TRUEDEDURASRUED’AGUESSEAURUEGODOTDEMAUROYRUECAMBONRUE DE CASTELLANECITEDURETIRORUE TRONSONDU COUDRAYRUED’ANJOURUECAMBACERESGALERIE DE LAMADELEINEAVENUEDELCASSEAVENUEPERCIERRUE BOUDREAURUEDEMOGADORRUECHARRASRUEDUMONTTHABORRUERUERUE STHYACINTHERUESCRIBERUEVOLNEYRUEDAUNOURUEDU29JUILLETRUEDALGERRUEDEVERNEUILR U ED EL I L L ERUEGREFFULHERUEROUGETDELISLEP O R TD ES O L F E R I N ORUEDESOLFERINORUEDEVILLERSEXELRUEDEPOITIERSRUEDECOURTYRUEABRIANDR U ED EL I L L ERUEDEBEAUNERUEROBERTESNAULTPELTERIERUEVIGNONAVENUEDUGENERALLEMONNIERR UE LAV OISIERChampsElyseesClemenceauMiromesnilHavreCaumartinAuberMadeleineConcordeConcordeTuileriesInvalidesInvalides AssembléeNationalePort deSolférinoMuséedOrsayEsplanade desInvalidesSolférinoOpéraIMP. SANDRIÉPasserelleSolférinoPontRoyalPontdelaConcordePontAlexandreIIIMusée de laLégion dHonneurGrandPalaisUniversitéParis IVPetitPalaisEspacePierre CardinObélisquePalais BourbonAssemblée NationaleMuséeBouilhet-ChristofleGalerie Nationaldu Jeu de PaumeMinistèrede lIntéieurPalais delElysée Ste MarieMadeleineMinistèrede la JusticeMusée delOrangérieOpéraGarnierOlympiaInstitutGéographiqueNationalMuséedOrsayI N V A L I D E S
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  • 183. «6075»40»65»35»«12»1»19»129»«55 «16«29«2«1«112»9»36»«267»25»«490»180»2»26»«113«75SQUAREFLEMAîTRESQUAREJFERRYSQUARE HCHRISTINESQUAREEMILECHAUTEMPSSQUARE DESRECOLLETSSQUARE DUG. MORINSQUAREDU TEMPLEJARDIN STAIGNANSQUAREL. ACHILLECanalSaintMartinPORTEST DENISPLACEGEORGESPOMPIDOUSQUARE STECROIX DE LABRETONNERIEPLACEDE THORIGNYPORTEST MARTINPLACE DUDR A FOURNIERPLACEPASDELOUPBOULEVARDDEMAGENTABOULEVARDDESTRASBOURGBLVD ST DENISBOULEVARDST MARTINBLVDDESFILLESDUCALVAIRERUESTMARTINBOULEVARDDUTEMPLEBLVDBEAUMARCHAISA V E N U ERUEDUFAUBOURGSTMARTINRUEBEAUBOURGBOULEVARDRUEDURENARDR UEDUF AUB OUR GRUEDUTEMP L EBOULEVARDVOLTAI RED ET U R B I G OR U ER E A U M U RR U EMusée dArt etdHistoire duJudaïsmeMusée de la Chasseet de la NatureArchivesNationalMuséede la MusiqueMéchaniqueCentreGeorgesPompidouHôtelGuénégaudMuséePicassoHôtelSoubiseHôtel deRohanHôtelLibéral BruandConservatoiredes Arts etMétiersCarreaudu TempleSt LouisChâteaudEauStrasbourgSt DenisJacquesBonsergentStrasbourgSt DenisRépubliqueRéaumurSébastopolArts etMétiersTempleFilles duCalvaireOberkampfSt Sébastien FroissartRambuteauRUESTEAPOLLINERUE BLONDELPASSAGE LEMOINERUE DE TRACYRUECHENIERR U EM E S L A YRUEDEMAZAGRAN PGE DU DESIRR U E J A R R YR U E D E S V I N A I G R I E R SRUELEGOUVERUEPBULLETRUE HITTORFFRUEPCHAUSSONRUEALBERTTHOMASRUETAYLORCITERIVERINRUEBOUCHARDONPLACE JSTRAUSSPASSAGE DESORGUES PASSAGEMESLAYPGEDUPONTAUXBICHESR U E D E N A N C YAVENUERICHERANDRUE MARIE ET LOUISERUE DE MARSEILLERUEAL I BE RTRUEDI EURUEDEMALTERUED’AIXRUEDELAFOLIEMERICOURTRUEDELAPGEDESPETITESECURIESPASSAGE DUBAILRUE JACQUESRUEMARTELCOUR DES PETITES ECURIESRUEDESPETITESECURIESR U EN O T R ED A M ED EN A Z A R E T HRUEBEAUREPAIRERUEYVESTOUDICR UEYVESTOUDICR U E R E N EB O U L A N G E RRUEJEANPOULMARCHRUEDUFAUBOURGSTDENISPASSAGE BRADYRUE STE CROIXDE LA BRETONNERIERUEVI EI LLEP A S S A G ES TCITEDUPETITTHOUARSNIUODRAHELLIVEURRUEDESBLANCSMANTEAUXRUEDEBELLEYMERUESTSABINRUEDUPETITTHOUARSRUEDEPALESTRORUEVOLTAEIREDROCALEDEURRUE RENEBOULANGERPGE DELANCRERUEVAUCANSONRUE CONTERUEBAILLYPGEBARROISRUE DU BOURGLABBER U ED EM O N T M O R E N C YR U EC H A P ONRUE PAPINPGE DU COMMERCEST MARTINRUE B DECLAIRVAUXPASSMOLIERERUEBORDARUEMONGOLFIERR U ED UV E R T B O I SRUE DES FONTAINES DU TEMPLERUESTEELISABETHRUEDESVERTUSPASSAGEALOMBERTPGEDESGRAVILLIERSIMPBEAUBOURGRUEGRENETARUE CUNINGRIDAINER U EA UM A I R ERUE GEOFFROYLANGEVINRUE SIMONLE FRANCRUEPECQUAYRUE DEBRAQUERUEPASTOURELLERUEPORTEFOINRUE ST MERRIRUE DU PLATRERUECHARLOTRUEBARBETTERUELLESOURDISRUEAUBRIOTRUEDESGUILLEMITESPGEDU MAUREPASSAGEBRANTOMERUEBRISEMICHEPGEDELHORLOGEAAUTOMATESRUE AUBRYLE BOUCHERRUE DES COUTURESST GERVAISRUEELZEVIRRUEPAYENNERUE STE ANASTASERUE DUROI DORERUE DE THORIGNYRUEAMELOTR U EA L L É EPGE STE ANNEPOPINCOURTRUEDEBELLYMEPGE STEELISABETHRUEPERREERUESPULLERRUECAFFARELLIRUEDUPUISPGEVENDOMERUECHARLOTRUEDESAINTONGERUEDEPICARDIERUEDUFOREZRUEDENORMANDIER U E D E P O I T O URUEDESAINTONGEDUTEMPLER U E J P T I M B A U DRUEAMELOTRUE DE CRUSSOLRUEDESARQUEBUSIERSRUEDESFILLESDUCALVAIRERUE COMMINESRUE DU PONT AUX CHOUXRUEDEMALTERUEDEBEAUCERUE DU GRENIER STLAZARERUE DESHAUDRIETTESRUEDELAPERLEPASSAGEST PIERREAMELOTR U ES TRUEAPPERTRUE AUX OURSRUE RAMPONRUEDEMALTERUE DECRUSSOLRUECHARLESLUIZETRUE DU GRANDVENEURRUEDEHESRER U E S T C L A U D ERUE DELECHIQUIERRUEDENGHIENRUE DE METZRUEBICHATAVENUER U EQUAIDEVALMYQUAIDEJEMMAPESQUAIDEVALMYQUAIDEJEMMAPESRUELEONJOUHAUXRUEDUCHATEAUD’EAURUELUCIENSAMPAIXR U EBI CHATRUE ALIBERTAVECVELLEFAUXRUEDELANCRYRUESTDENISDESEBASTOPOLBOULEVARDPLACE DE LAREPUBLIQUERUEDESFRANCSB OURGE OI SR U ED E SG R A V I L L I E R SRUEDEBRE TAGNERUEDES4FI LSRUEDUGRANDPRIEURERUEBERANGERRUEDETURENNERUEDETURENNERUE FROISSARTR UEOB E R KAMP FRUESTMARTINRUEDUTEMPLER U ER A MB U T E A URUEDESARCHIVESRUE MICHEL LE COMTERUEDESARCHIVESRUEDUTEMPLERUE DU PARC ROYALM A R A I SB E A U B O U R G
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  • 191. PLACE DECATALOGNEPARVIS DTEMPLIERPLACE CBRANCUSIPLACEDE L’ABBEJ LEBEUFPLACEDE MOROGIAFFERIPLACEGILBERTPERROYPLACEET SQUAREFERDINANDBRUNOTPLACEVICTORBASCHPLACEP PICASSOPLACER DAUTRYBLVD DE VAUGIRARDBOULEVARDEDGARQUINETBOULEVARDRASPAILDUGENERALLECLERCAVENUEDUMAINEAVENUEB L V DR U E D A L E S I ARUEFALGUIERERUEDIDOTR UED ALESI APONTDESCINQMARTYRSDULYCEEBUFFONR U E J E A N Z A YRUEF ROI DE VAUXRUERAYMONDLOSSERANDRUES ARRETTERUEDIDOTPASTEURBOULEVARDR U ES E V E R ORUED U COMMANDEURRUEMAISON DIEURUEGASSENDIRUEDESSUISSESRUEDUMOULINV E R TRUEHIPPOLYTEMAINDRONRUEDUCHAT E AUR U E D U C O T E N T I NRUEVERCI NGETORI XRUEVERCINGETORIXRUEDEGERGOVIERUED’ARSONVALRUEDEL’ARMORIQUERUE MIZONRUEBSEQUARDRUEDESTHERMOP Y L E SRUE DU MOULINDE LA VIERGERUEDELOUESTRUEDECRESPASSAGEDEGERGOVIERUEAL AI NRUEDEL OUE S TRUEDESPREZRUEPERNETYRUECROCESPINELLIRUE GUILLEMINOTRUEDUTEXELRUEDUCDTRENEMOUCHOTTERUENIEPCERUEDEGERGOVIERUEDEL OUES TRUEPERNETYRUEDUCANGER UEDEP L AI S ANC ERUEBOYERBARRETRUEDELAGAITERUELAROCHELLERUEJGUESDERUELEBOUISIMPASSELEBOUISRUEDUCHAT E AUAVENUEVILLEMAINRUEFRDEPRESSENSECITEBAUERR U EMA U R I C ER I P O C H ERUE DE LEURERUEGSACHER U ED EL AS A B L I E R ERUEBENARDRUELEONIDASR U EL I A N C OU R TPGE DES ARTSRUEEDOUARDJACQUESRUEASSELINEPGE DE LA TOURDE VANVESR U ED A G U E R R ERUEOLIVIERNOYERSQUARE DELAIDE SOCIALERUEDUROUCHOUXR U EM O U T O ND U V E R N E TR U EB R E Z I NRUECHARLESDIVRYR U ED A G U E R R ERUELALANDERUE VICTORCONSIDERANTRUESCHOELCHERRUEBOULARDRUEDANVILLERUESIVELRUEDEGRANCEYRUESAILLARDSQUAREHENRIDELORMELVILLAADRIENNERUEA MIER U EC E L SRUEROGERR U ET H I B A U DPASS RIMBAUTR U E D URUE REMYPASSAGEMONTBRUNRUEMONTBRUNRUEHALLÉRUEEMILERICHARDRUE ERNEST CRESSONR U ED EC H A T I L L O NV I L L AD A L E S I ARUEPAULYRUEPIERRELAROUSSERUEJONQUOYRUEBARDINETVILLACOLLETRUELEDI ONVILLADESHAYESVILLAJAMOTRUEBOULITTERUEDELBETR U EJ A C Q U I E RRUEDESPLANTESRUEDESPLANTESR U E A N T O I N E C H A N T I NRUEDEL ABBÉCARTONR U EL O U I SMO R A R DR UEDEL AB B EC AR T ONR U EVILLADORLÉANSRUEDEBIGORRERUEDE LA SAONERUECOUCHERUEDULOINGRUEDULUNAINRUEMARGUERINRUE LENEVEUXAVENUEJEANMOULINR U ED E L A M B R ERUEHUYGHE NSRUE L ROBERTRUERUEJOLIVETRUEPOINSOTR U E D U M A I N ERUEVANDAMMESQDELAMBRERUE SOPHIE GERMAINRUEBDEVENTADOURTERRASSEMODIGLIANIGareMontparnasseMontparnasseBienvenüeGaîtéRaspailPernetyPlaisanceMoutonDuvernetAlésiaAlésiaEdgar QuinetMuséede la PosteMémorial duMaréchal LeclercHôpital Broussaisla CharitéM O N T P A R N A S S EHôpitalNotre-Damede Bon secoursSQUAREMAXHYMANSSQUAREGEORGESLAMARQUESQUARE CLAUDE -NICOLAS LEDOUXC I M E T I E R E D UM O N T P A R N A S S ESQUAREGASTONBATYLESCOLONNESJARDIN DUMOULIN DELA VIERGE SQUARE STELEONIESQUARE DUCHANOINEVIOLLETSQUAREALESIARIDDERSQUARELOSSERANDSUISSESSQUARE DELASPIRANTDUNANDJARDINATLANTIQUE«54«4161»«2«2222»«2«13175»164»208»201»«81«8068»
  • 192. PLACEL HERRPLACEP LAMPUEPLACEA LAVERANPLACEE DENISPLACECAMILLEJULLIANPLACE DENFERTROCHEREAU PLACEDE L’ILEDE SEINPLACESAINTJACQUESB L V DA U G U S T EB L A N Q U IBOULEVARDSAINTMICHELAVENUEDENFERTROCHEREAUBOULEVARDSAINTJACQUESB O U L E V A R DA R A G OD UM O N T P A R N A S S ER U ED A L E S I AR U ED ET O L B I A CAVENUERENECOTYAVENUERENECOTYP O R TR O Y A LB O U L E V A R DD EB O U L E V A R DA R A G ORUEDUFAUBOURGSAINTJACQUESR U E H A L L ERUEDELATOMBEISSOIRERUEDELASANTERUEDELASANTERUEVERGNIAUDRUEVULPIANRUECLAUDEBERNARDRUEPASCALRUEHENRIBARBUSSERUEDUSAINTGOTHARDR U E M E C H A I NRUESAINTJACQUESRUENOT REDAMEDESCHAMPSRUERATAUDR U ED EL A R B AL E T ERUEBERBIERDUMETSRUEDESCORDELIERESRUECORVISARTRUELEDANTECRUEBARRAULTRUESAMSONRUEDELA BUTTE AUX CAILLESPASSAGEBOITONRUEBROCARUEPGERVAISRUELHOMONDC O U E D I CDUMONCELRUEDAREAUR U E C A B A N I SRUEBROUSSAISR U EJ E A ND O L E N TR U E E M I L E D U B O I SVILLASTJACQUESRUE LECLERCB E Z O U TRUED’ALEMBERTR U E D E L A U D ERUEDELATOMBEISSOIREPGE DAREAUPASSAGEV MARCHANDRUE BOUTINRUEFERRUSRUEDELAGLACIERERUEDELAGLACIERERUE DUCHAMP DE LALOUETTERUEDECROULEBARBER U ED A V I E LRUEWURTZRUEDESCINQDIAMANTSRUEAL P HANDRUEBUOTR U EMI C H A LPASSAGEBARRAULTRUEEDMONDGONDINETRUEDEPOUYRUEDESTANNERIESRUEDELAGLACIERERUE DELEPEE DE BOISSQUARE DEPORT ROYALRUEPNICOLERUE DUVAL DE GRACERUEMOUFFETARDRUEVAUQUEL I NRUEBERTHOLLETRUEDESPATRIARCHESPGEDES POSTESRUE J CALVINSQUAREVERMENOUZERUELAGARDERUEDESLYONNAISRUE FLATTERSAVEDELOBSERVATOIRECAMPAGNE-PREMIEREPASSAGEDENFERRUEPAULSEJOURNERUEBOISSONADER U EC A S S I N IRUE FUSTEL DECOULANGESAVEGEORGESBERNANOSRUE EQUENURUEDEVALENCERUEEMILE DESLANDRESRUEDEBAZEILLESRUEDECANDOLLEDenfert RochereauCorvisartGlacièreSt JacquesDenfert RochereauPort RoyalCensier DaubentonFondationCartierFontaine delObservatoireHôpitalSt-Vincentde PaulObservatoirede ParisVal-de-GrâceHôpitalCochinCatacombsHôpitalBrocaSt-MédardEcoleNormaleSupérieureG O B E L I N SMaternitésPort Royal etBaudelocqueHôpital St-AnneSQ JANTOINESQUAREDE LABBEMIGNE299»«97«67«46«3«70«121«68RUEBROCAR U E S A I N T H I P P O L Y T EHôpitalla Rochefoucauld
  • 193. «75128««221«171«2«44«44«120SQUAREMARIECURIESQUARESCIPIONSQUARE FBLUMENTHALSQUAREG MESUREURSQUAREHELOISE ETABELARDPLACEPINELPLACED’ITALIEPLACEPAULVERLAINEPLACEJEANNE D’ARCPLACENATIONALEPLACESOUHAMPLACE DUDR NAVARREB OUL E V AR DV I NC E NTAURI OLBOULEVARDDEL’HOPITALQUAIBLVDAUGUSTE BLANQUIRUEMONGERUEJEANNED’ARCAVENUEDECHOISYAVENUEDITALIER U ED ET O L B I A CR U ED E T O L B I A CAVENUEDESGOBELINSRUEJEANNED’ARCB OU L E V A R DS A I N TMA R C E LR U EC E N S I E RRUENATIONALERUEDUCHATEAUDESRENTIERSRUEBOBILLOTRUENATIONALERUEPI NELRUERUEGEOFFROYSAINTHILAIREManufacturedes GobelinsHôpital PitiéSalpêtrièreMuséum Nationald’Histoire NaturelleSt MarcelCampoFormioNationaleChevaleretPlaced’ItalieTolbiacLesGobelinsCensier DaubentonGared’AusterlitzRUEBERBIERDUMETSSETTELUCERSEDEURRUED A U B E N T O NR U ED UF E RAM O U L I NRUELEBRUNRUEGGEFFROYRUEABELHOVELACQUERUEDUMOULINDESPRESR U ED UMO U L I N E TRUEV A N D R E Z ANNER U EP O L I V E A URUEJBRETONRUEJENNERR U EB R U A N TRUEBAUDRICOURTRUEDUCHATEAUDE SR E NT I E R SRUEDECROULEBAR B ERUE PAULIN MERYRUEGERARDRUESIMONETRUE PERE GUERINRUE YEOTHOMASRUEALBERTBAYETA V E N U EE D I S O NRUE NICOLASFORTINRUE GEORGE EASTMANRUEDUDOCTEURMAGNANRUERICAUTRUECHARLESMOUREURUE DESDEUX AVENUESRUE TOUSSAINTFERONRUEDUNOISRUECLISSONRUE DUDR C RICHETRUE DUDR VHUTINELR U EJ SB A C HRUECLISSONR U EJ E A NC O L L YRUEBRENARDRUEDUCHEFDELAVILLERUERUERUEHAUTES FORMESRUEAVENUESTEPHENPICHONR U EE DMA N E TR U EF A G O NR U E G O D E F R O YRUELAHIRERUEDERICHEMONTRUEDESFOSSESSTMARCELRUEMPETERRUEDUBANQUI ERRUENICOLASRORETR U EP I R A N D E L L ORUEDUJURARUEOUDRYRUEDELACOLLEGIALERUEVESALEAVENUE DE LASOEUR ROSALIERUE PHILIPPEDE CHAMPAGNER U E C O Y P E LRUEPRIMATICERUERUBENSRUEVERONESERUEDEL’ESSAIRUEDESWALLONSRUERPANHARDRUEDUMÉRILRUEESQUIROLRUEDECAMPOFORMIORUETITIENRUEDELAREINEBLANCHERUESCIPIONRUELOUISEWEISSPORTRUEDELACLEFRUE DEMIRBELRUE DESGOBELINSSQUAREADANSONRUE DUPETIT MOINERUEDUGRILRUESANTEUILRUEDELACLEFRUEBAUDOINRUEWATTEAUHôpitalSainte-Marie
  • 194. 13»1»«16«15«155«2«95P A R CD E B E R C YJARDINJ. JOYCEPLACEJ. VILARLaSeineQUAIPANHARDETLEVASSORQUAIDEBERCYD’AUSTERLITZBLVDDEBERCYQUAIAVENUEDEFRANCEFMAURIACBLVDMASSENABOULEVARDDEBERCYRUEDETOLBI ACRUENEUVETOLBIACRUEDEPATAYRUEDUCHEVALERETRUEJ OSEPHKESSELRUEDEBERCYRUEDECHARENTONDUCHEVALERETPont de BercyPontdeTolbiacPontNationalMinistère delEconomie etMinistèredes FinancesPalaisOmnisportsParis-BercyBibliothèqueNationalede FranceBercyDugommierCour StÉmilionQuai dela GareBibliothèqueFrançois MitterrandGare deParis-BercyRUEGIFFARDRUEDUDESSOUSDESBERGESRUEEDMONDFLAMANDRUEGEORGEBALANCHINERUERAYMONDARONRUEDESFRIGOSRUEBRAUDELRUEDUCHAROLAISRUEDEPOMMARDAVDESTERROIRSDEFRANCERUEBARONLEROYPLACELACHAMBEAUDIERUEGABRIELLAMÉRUEDEL’AMBROISIERUEDELIBOURNERUEFRANÇOISTRUFFAUTRUEDESPIROGUESDEBERCYPLACEDES VINSDE FRANCECHARCOTXAINTRAILLESRUEPGOURDAULTDEDOMREMYRUEDERE I MSRUE LEREDDER U EC A N T A G R E LRUEALBERTD’AUSTERLITZPORTDEBERCYPORTDELAGAREPORTDETOLBIACRUEDEBELLIEVRER U EF U L T ONRUEVILLIOTB E R C YCOURSTEMIL
  • 195. Index of Selected StreetsAAbbaye, Rue de l’ 16 E2Abbesses, Place des 4 F2Abbesses, Rue des 4 F2Aboukir, Rue d’ 10 H2Alésia, Rue d’ 19 B4Alexandre III, Pont 9 A4Aligre, Place d’ 18 F3Alma, Pont de l’ 8 F4Amelot, Rue 11 D3Ancienne Comedie,Rue de l’ 16 F2André Antoine, Rue 4 F3André Citroën, Quai 13 A4André Malraux, Place 10 E4Arago, Boulevard 20 F3Arbalète, Rue de l’ 20 H1Arbre Sec, Rue de l’ 10 G5Archives, Rue des 11 B5Arcole, Rue d’ 16 H2Assas, Rue d’ 15 D3Auber, Rue 9 D1Aubry le Boucher, Rue 11 A5Austerlitz, Quai d’ 21 D1Azaïs, Rue 4 G2BBabylone, Rue de 15 B2Bac, Rue du 15 C1Balzac, Rue 8 F1Bastille, Place de la 17 D2Batignolles, Boulevard des 3 B3Beaubourg, Rue 11 A5Beaujolais, Rue de 10 F3Beaumarchais, Boulevard 17 D1Becquerel, Rue 4 G1Belleville, Boulevard de 12 F1Belleville, Rue de 12 F1Béranger, Rue 11 C3Bercy, Boulevard de 22 G1Bercy, Rue de 18 E5Berger, Rue 10 H5Berri, Rue de 8 G1Berthe, Rue 4 F2Bichat, Rue 11 C1Blanche, Rue 3 D4Blancs Manteaux, Rue des 11 B5Boétie, Rue la 8 H1Boissy d’Anglas, Rue 9 B2Bonaparte, Rue 16 E1Bonne, Rue de la 4 G1Bosquet, Avenue 14 G1Boudreau, Rue 9 D1Bourdonnais, Avenue de la 14 F1Bourdonnais, Rue des 10 G5Bourg Tibourg, Rue du 17 B1Bourse, Place de la 10 F2Boutebrie, Rue 16 G3Branly, Quai 8 E5Bretagne, Rue de 11 C4Breteuil, Avenue de 14 H4Bûcherie, Rue de la 16 H2Buci, Rue de 16 F2Buffon, Rue 17 B5Daumesnil, Avenue 18 E3Daunou, Rue 9 D2Dauphine, Place 16 G1Dauphine, Rue 16 F2Denfert Rochereau, Avenue 20 E2Descartes, Rue 16 H4Diderot, Boulevard 18 E4Dieu, Rue 11 C2Douai, Rue de 3 D3Dragon, Rue du 15 D2Dunkerque, Rue de 4 H3Dupetit Thouars, Rue 11 C3Duphot, Rue 9 C2Durantin, Rue 4 E2Dussoubs, Rue 10 H3EEchaudé, Rue de l’ 16 E2Écoles, Rue des 16 H3Écouffes, Rue des 17 B1Edgar Quinet, Boulevard 19 C1Edmond Michelet, Place 10 H5Elzévir, Rue 11 C5Émile Zola, Avenue 13 B4Épée de Bois, Rue de l’ 20 H1Éperon, Rue de l’ 16 F2Étienne Marcel, Rue 10 G3FFaubourg du Temple, Rue du 11 D2Faubourg Poissonnière,Rue du 4 H5Faubourg St-Antoine, Rue du 18 F3Faubourg St-Denis, Rue du 5 B4Faubourg St-Honoré, Rue du 8 H1Faubourg St-Martin, Rue du 5 C4Fayette, Rue la 4 H5Ferronnerie, Rue de la 10 H5Feydeau, Galerie 10 F2Filles du Calvaire,Boulevard des 11 D4Filles du Calvaire, Rue des 11 C4Foch, Avenue 7 D1Folie Méricourt, Rue de la 12 E4Fontaine, Rue 4 E3Four, Rue du 15 D2Foyatier, Rue 4 G2France, Avenue de 22 E3Francis Poulenc, Square 16 F3François Miron, Rue 17 A1François Premier, Rue 8 G2Francs Bourgeois, Rue des 11 B5Franklin D Roosevelt, Avenue 8 H3Frémicourt, Rue 14 E4Friedland, Avenue de 8 F1GGabriel, Avenue 9 A2Gabrielle, Rue 4 F2Gaîté, Rue de la 19 C1Galande, Rue 16 H2Gambetta, Avenue 12 H4Gay Lussac, Rue 16 G5Général Leclerc, Avenue du 19 D4Geoffroy St-Hilaire, Rue 21 B1George V, Avenue 8 F3Georges Mandel, Avenue 7 B4Georges Pompidou, Place 11 A5Germain Pilon, Rue 4 E3Gesvres, Quai de 16 H1Gobelins, Avenue des 21 A2Godot de Mauroy, Rue 9 C2Gracieuse, Rue 17 A5Grand Cerf, Passage du 10 H3Grande Armée, Avenue de la 1 C5Grande Truanderie,Rue de la 10 H4Grands Augustins, Quai des 16 F1Grands Augustins, Rue des 16 F2Grégoire de Tours, Rue 16 F2Grenelle, Quai de 13 B3Grenelle, Rue de 15 D2Greneta, Rue 10 H3Grenier St-Lazare, Rue du 11 A4Guisarde, Rue 16 E2Gustave Eiffel, Avenue 14 E1HHalles, Rue des 10 H5Harpe, Rue de la 16 G2Haudriettes, Rue des 11 B4Haussmann, Boulevard 2 H5Hautefeuille, Rue 16 G3Havre, Rue du 3 C5Henri IV, Boulevard 17 C2Hôpital, Boulevard de l’ 21 C3Hôtel de Ville, Place de l’ 17 A1Hôtel de Ville, Quai de l’ 17 A1Houdon, Rue 4 F3Huchette, Rue de la 16 G2IIéna, Avenue d’ 8 E2Iéna, Place d’ 8 E3Iéna, Pont d’ 7 D5Innocents, Rue des 10 H5Invalides, Boulevard des 15 A2Italie, Avenue d’ 21 B5Italie, Place d’ 21 A4Italiens, Boulevard des 10 E1JJean Jacques Rousseau, Rue 10 F4Jean Jaurès, Avenue 6 E3Jean Pierre Timbaud, Rue 12 F2Jemmapes, Quai de 11 C1Joseph Kessel, Rue 22 G3Jouffroy, Passage 10 G1Jour, Rue du 10 G4KKeller, Rue 18 F2Kléber, Avenue 7 D2LLacépède, Rue 17 A5Lagrange, Rue 16 H3Lamarck, Rue 4 G2CCambronne, Place 14 F4Cambronne, Rue 14 F4Candolle, Rue de 20 H1Canettes, Rue des 16 E2Capucines, Boulevard des 9 D2Cardinal Lemoine, Rue du 16 H4Carrousel, Place du 10 E4Castiglione, Rue de 9 D3Caulaincourt, Rue 4 E1Caumartin, Rue de 9 D1Célestins, Quai des 17 B2Censier, Rue 21 A1Champs-Élysées, Avenue des 8 G2Champs-Élysées,Rond Point des 8 H2Chapelle, Boulevard de la 5 A2Chappe, Rue 4 F2Charenton, Rue de 18 F3Charles de Gaulle, Avenue 1 A4Charles de Gaulle, Place 8 E1Charonne, Rue de 18 F2Château d’Eau, Rue du 11 A1Château Rouge, Place du 4 H1Châteaudun, Rue de 4 F5Châtelet, Place du 16 H1Chausseé d’Antin, Rue de la 10 E1Chemin Vert, Rue du 12 E5Cherche Midi, Rue du 15 B4Chevalier de la Barre, Rue du 4 G2Choisy, Avenue de 21 B5Christine, Rue 16 F2Cité, Rue de la 16 H1Claridge, Galerie du 8 G1Claude Bernard, Rue 20 G1Clef, Rue de la 17 A5Clément, Rue 16 E2Cléry, Rue de 10 H2Clichy, Boulevard de 4 E3Clichy, Rue de 3 D4Cloche Perce, Rue 17 B1Cloître Notre-Dame, Rue du 16 H2Cloître St-Mérri, Rue du 10 H5Colisée, Rue du 8 H1Colonel Driant, Rue du 10 F4Commerce St-Andre, Cour de 16 F2Concorde, Place de la 9 B3Condé, Rue de 16 F3Conti, Quai de 16 F1Convention, Rue de la 13 A4Cossonnerie, Rue de la 10 H4Cotte, Rue de 18 F3Courcelles, Boulevard de 2 F4Courcelles, Rue de 2 G4Couronnes, Rue des 12 G2Croix des Petits Champs, Rue 10 F4Crozatier, Rue 18 F3Custine, Rue 4 G1DDancourt, Rue 4 F2Dante, Rue 16 H3Danton, Rue 16 F2Daubenton, Rue 21 A1206
  • 196. Lancry, Rue de 11 C1Lappe, Rue de 18 E2Lecourbe, Rue 14 F5Ledru Rollin, Avenue 17 D4Léon Bonnet, Rue 12 F2Lepic, Rue 4 F2Lille, Rue de 9 C5Lobau, Rue de 17 A1Lobineau, Rue 16 E2Lombards, Rue des 10 H5Louis le Grand, Rue 10 E2Louvre, Place du 10 F5Louvre, Quai du 10 E5Louvre, Rue du 10 G4Lyon, Rue de 18 E4MMabillon, Rue 16 E2Madeleine, Place de la 9 C2Magenta, Boulevard de 5 A4Mail, Rue du 10 G3Maillot, Place de la Porte 1 B4Maine, Avenue du 19 C2Malaquais, Quai 10 E5Malesherbes, Boulevard 3 A4Marbeuf, Rue 8 G2Marceau, Avenue 8 F2Marché St-Honoré, Rue du 9 D3Marignan, Rue de 8 G2Marigny, Avenue de 9 A2Marseille, Rue de 11 C1Martyrs, Rue des 4 F3Mathurins, Rue des 9 D1Matignon, Avenue 8 H2Maubert, Place 16 H3Maubeuge, Rue de 4 G4Mazarine, Rue 16 F1Ménilmontant, Boulevard de 12 G3Michel le Comte, Rue 11 A4Michodière, Rue de la 10 E2Mirbel, Rue de 21 A1Monceau, Rue de 2 H4Monge, Place 17 A5Monge, Rue 16 H3Monnaie, Rue de la 10 G5Monsieur le Prince, Rue 16 F3Mont Cenis, Rue du 4 G1Montaigne, Avenue 8 G3Montalembert, Rue 15 D1Montebello, Quai de 16 H2Montmartre, Boulevard 10 F1Montmartre, Galerie 10 G2Montmartre, Rue 10 G3Montmorency, Rue de 11 A4Montorgueil, Rue 10 H3Montparnasse, Boulevard de 15 B4Montpensier, Rue de 10 F3Motte Picquet, Avenue de la 14 H1Mouffetard, Rue 16 H5NNapoléon, Cour 10 E5Neuf, Pont 16 G1Neuve Tolbiac, Rue 22 F4New York, Avenue de 8 E4Nicolas Flamel, Rue 10 H5Norvins, Rue 4 F2Notre-Dame de Lorette, Rue 4 E4OOberkampf, Rue 11 D4Odéon, Place de l’ 16 F3Odéon, Rue de l’ 16 F3Opéra, Avenue de l’ 10 E2Opéra, Place de l’ 10 E2Opéra Louis Jouvet, Square 9 D1Orillon, Rue de l’ 12 E2Orsay, Quai d’ 8 G4Orsel, Rue d’ 4 F2PPaix, Rue de la 9 D2Palais, Boulevard du 16 G1Palais Royal, Place du 10 E4Panoramas, Passage des 10 F2Parcheminerie, Rue de la 16 G2Parmentier, Avenue 12 E3Parvis Notre Dame, Place du 16 H2Passy, Rue de 13 A1Pasteur, Boulevard 19 A1Patriarches, Rue des 20 H1Paul Féval, Rue 4 F1Pereire, Boulevard 1 C4Pernelle, Rue 10 H5Perrée, Rue 11 C4Petit Pont, Rue du 16 H2Petits Champs, Rue des 10 F3Pierre Charron, Rue 8 G2Pierre Lescot, Rue 10 H4Pigalle, Place 4 F3Pigalle, Rue 4 E3Poissonnière, Boulevard 10 G1Poissonnière, Rue 10 H2Pont Neuf, Place du 16 F1Pont Neuf, Rue du 10 G5Ponthieu, Rue de 8 H2Port Royal, Boulevard de 20 F1Présentation, Rue de la 12 F1Président Kennedy,Avenue du 12 B2Président Wilson, Avenue du 8 E3Prêtres St-Severin, Rue des 16 G2Princesse, Rue 16 E2Prouvaires, Rue des 10 G4Provence, Rue de 10 F1QQuatre Septembre, Rue du 10 E2Quatre Vents, Rue des 16 F2Quincampoix, Rue 10 H5RRacine, Rue 16 F3Rambuteau, Rue 10 H4Rapée, Quai de la 17 D5Raspail, Boulevard 15 D3Raymond Losserand, Rue 19 A3Raymond Poincaré, Avenue 7 C3Soufflot, Rue 16 G4Strasbourg, Boulevard de 11 A2Suffren, Avenue de 14 E1Suger, Rue 16 F2Sully, Pont de 17 B3TTardieu, Rue 4 G2Temple, Boulevard du 11 C3Temple, Rue du 11 A5Ternes, Avenue des 1 D4Ternes, Place des 2 E4Tertre, Place du 4 F2Thérèse, Rue 10 E3Tholozé, Rue 4 E2Thorigny, Rue de 11 C5Tiquetonne, Rue 10 H3Tiron, Rue 17 B1Tolbiac, Rue de 21 A5Tour Maubourg,Boulevard de la 8 H5Tournelle, Quai de la 17 A3Tournelles, Rue des 17 D1Tournon, Rue de 16 F3Tourville, Avenue de 14 H2Trémoille, Rue de la 8 G3Trésor, Rue du 17 B1Trocadéro, Place du 7 C4Trois Frères, Rue des 4 F2Tronchet, Rue 9 C1Trousseau, Rue 18 F2Trudaine, Avenue 4 G3Tuileries, Quai des 9 C4Turbigo, Rue de 10 H4Turenne, Rue de 11 C5U, V, W, X, & YUniversité, Rue de l’ 9 C5Valmy, Quai de 11 C1Valois, Rue de 10 F3Varenne, Rue de 15 B1Vaugirard, Boulevard de 19 A1Vaugirard, Rue de 16 F3Vendôme, Place 9 D3Vero Dodot, Galerie 10 F4Véron, Rue 4 E2Verrerie, Rue de la 17 A1Victoire, Rue de la 4 F5Victoires, Place des 10 F3Victor Hugo, Avenue 7 D1Victoria, Avenue 16 H1Vieille du Temple, Rue 17 B1Vieux Colombier, Rue du 15 D2Villette, Boulevard de la 6 E5Villiers, Avenue de 2 H3Vins de France, Place des 22 H3Vivienne, Rue 10 F2Voltaire, Boulevard 12 E5Vosges, Place des 17 C1Wagram, Avenue de 2 E5Washington, Rue 8 G1Winston Churchill, Avenue 9 A3Xavier Privas, Rue 16 G2Yvonne Le Tac, Rue 4 F2Raynuard, Rue 13 B1Réaumur, Rue 10 H3Renard, Rue du 11 A5Rennes, Rue de 15 D3République, Avenue de la 11 D3République, Place de la 11 C3Richard Lenoir, Boulevard 11 D3Richelieu, Rue de 10 F2Rivoli, Rue de 10 H5Rochechouart, Boulevard de 4 G3Rocher, Rue du 3 B5Roi de Sicile, Rue du 17 B1Rome, Rue de 3 C5Roquette, Rue de la 18 E1Rosiers, Rue des 17 B1Roule, Rue du 10 G5Royal, Pont 9 D5Royale, Rue 9 C2SSt-André des Arts, Place 16 G3St-André des Arts, Rue 16 F2St-Antoine, Rue 17 C2St-Benoît, Rue 16 E1St-Charles, Rue 13 C4St-Denis, Boulevard 11 A2St-Denis, Rue 10 H4St-Dominique, Rue 8 G5St-Florentin, Rue 9 C3St-Germain, Boulevard 16 F2St-Gilles, Rue 17 D1St-Honoré, Rue 9 D3St-Jacques, Rue 16 G3St-Lazare, Rue 3 D5St-Marcel, Boulevard 21 A2St-Martin, Boulevard 11 B2St-Martin, Rue 11 A4St-Maur, Rue 12 F3St-Merri, Rue 11 A5St-Michel, Boulevard 16 G3St-Michel, Quai 16 G2St-Paul, Rue 17 C2St-Sabin, Rue 18 E1St-Séverin, Rue 16 G2St-Sulpice, Place 16 E3St-Sulpice, Rue 16 E3St-Vincent, Rue 4 F1Ste-Anne, Rue 10 E3Ste-Croix de laBretonnerie, Rue 11 A5Sts-Pères, Rue des 15 D2Saules, Rue des 4 F1Saxe, Avenue de 14 H3Sébastopol, Boulevard de 10 H4Sedaine, Rue 18 E1Séguier, Rue 16 F2Ségur, Avenue de 14 G3Seine, Rue de 16 F2Serpente, Rue 16 F2Sévigné, Rue de 17 C1Sèvres, Rue de 15 B3Solférino, Passerelle 9 C4Sommerard, Rue du 16 G3Sorbonne, Place de la 16 G3207Index of Selected Streets
  • 197. Index by Area208 Click through to restaurant websites across Paris with www.eparis.dk.comBrasserie de l’Ile St-Louis(see p218)La Canaille (p30) €4 rue Crillon(Map 17 C3)Modern FrenchL’Enoteca (p30) €€25 rue Charles V(Map 17 C2)ItalianGeorget (p30) €€64 rue Vieille du Temple(Map 11 B5)BistroMon Vieil Ami (p31) €€69 rue St-Louis-en-l’Ile(Map 17 A2)Modern FrenchL’Osteria (p31) €€10 rue de Sévigné (Map 17 C1)ItalianLe Vieux Bistro (p30) €€14 rue du Cloître Notre Dame(Map 16 H2)Bistro5th arrondissementAnahuacalli (p31) €€30 rue des Bernardins(Map 16 H3)MexicanLe Balzar (see p218)Le Cosi (p32) €€9 rue Cujas(Map 16 G4)RegionalLes Délices d’Aphrodite €€(p32)4 rue de Candolle(Map 20 H1)GreekFogon St-Julien (p32) €€10 rue St-Julien-le-Pauvre(Map 16 H2)SpanishLe Pré Verre (p33) €€8 rue Thénard (Map 16 G3)BistroLe Reminet (p32) €€3 rue des Grands-Degrés(Map 16 H3)BistroRestaurant Marty (p33) €€20 avenue des Gobelins(Map 21 A2)BrasserieLa Tour d’Argent (p33) €€€15–17 quai de la Tournelle(Map 17 A3)Haute cuisine6th arrondissementAbazu (p34) €€3 rue André-Mazet (Map 16 F2)JapaneseAllard (p34) €€41 rue St-André-des-Arts(Map 16 F2)BistroL’Epi Dupin (p34) €€11 rue Dupin (Map 15 C3)BistroLa Maison de la Chine(see p220)Le Salon d’Hélène (p35) €€€4 rue dAssas (Map 15 D3)RegionalLa Table d’Aude (p35) €€8 rue de Vaugirard(Map 16 F3)RegionalLe Timbre (p35) €€3 rue Ste-Beuve (Map 15 D5)BistroYen (p34) €€22 rue St-Benoît (Map 16 E2)Japanese7th arrondissementL’Ami Jean (p36) €€27 rue Malar (Map 8 G5)RegionalL’Arpège (p36) €€€84 rue de Varenne (Map 15 A1)Haute cuisineL’Atelier de €€€Joël Robuchon (p37)5 rue de Montalembert(Map 15 D1)Modern FrenchAu Bon Accueil (p38) €€14 rue de Montessuy (Map 8 F5)Bistro2nd arrondissementCafé Moderne (p25) €€40 rue Notre-Dame-des-Victoires (Map 10 G2)Modern FrenchChez Georges (p26) €€1 rue du Mail (Map 10 G3)BistroLe Grand Colbert (see p218)L’Iode (p26) €€48 rue d’Argout (Map 10 G3)Fish & Seafood3rd arrondissementL’Ambassade d’Auvergne €€(p27)22 rue du Grenier St-Lazare(Map 11 A4)RegionalAnahï (p27) €€49 rue Volta (Map 11 B3)Latin AmericanLes Enfants Rouges (p27) €€9 rue de Beauce (Map 11 C4)Wine barLe Pamphlet (p28) €€38 rue Debelleyme (Map 11 C4)BistroLe Petit Dakar (p26) €6 rue Elzévir (Map 11 C5)AfricanLes Petits Marseillais (p28) €€72 rue Vieille du Temple(Map 11 B5)BistroLe Potager du Marais (p28) €22 rue Rambuteau (Map 11 A5)VegetarianR’Aliment (p28) €€57 rue Charlot (Map 11 C4)Modern French4th arrondissementL’Ambroisie (p29) €€€9 place des Vosges(Map 17 C1)Haute cuisineL’As du Fallafal (p29, p38) €34 rue des Rosiers (Map 17 B1)Middle EasternCentreRestaurants1st arrondissementAngelina (see p220)A Priori Thé (see p220)L’Ardoise (p24) €€28 rue du Mont Thabor(Map 9 C3)BistroAu Pied de Cochon (p24) €€€6 rue Coquillière(Map 10 G4)BistroAux Lyonnais (p25) €€32 rue St-Marc (Map 10 F2)BistroChez Vong (p25) €€10 rue de la Grande Truanderie(Map 10 H4)ChineseL’Espadon (p24) €€€Hôtel Ritz, 15 place Vendôme(Map 9 D2)Haute cuisineHiguma (p26) €32bis rue Ste-Anne (Map 10 E2)01 47 03 38 59JapaneseLaï Laï Ken (p26) €7 rue Ste-Anne (Map 10 E2)JapaneseLe Meurice (p25) €€€Hotel Meurice, 228 rue deRivoli (Map 9 D3)Haute cuisineRestaurant du Palais Royal €€(p24)110 galérie Valois(Map 10 F3)Modern FrenchToupary Restaurant (p165) €€La Samaritaine, 2 quai duLouvre (Map 10 F5)French restaurantLa Tour de Montlhéry (p25) €€5 rue des Prouvaires(Map 10 G4)Bistro
  • 198. 209€ cheap €€ moderate €€€ expensive (Price ranges: Restaurants, see p25, Hotels, see p173)CentreBellota-Bellota (p36) €€18 rue Jean-Nicot (Map 8 G5)SpanishCafé Constant (p38) €€139 rue St-Dominique(Map 8 F5)BistroShops1st arrondissementL’Artisan Parfumeur (p62)2 rue Amiral de Coligny(Map 10 F5)Perfumesby Terry (p60)21 galérie Véro-Dodat(Map 10 F4)BeautyChristian Louboutin (p60)19 rue Jean-Jacques Rousseau(Map 10 F4)ShoesColette (see p220)L’Eclaireur (p63)10 rue Hérold (Map 10 G3)FashionEtam (see p221)Fifi Chachnil (p60)231 rue St-Honoré (Map 9 D3)LingerieFlavie Furst (p64)16 rue de la Soudière(Map 10 E3)AccessoriesHelmut Lang (p61)219 rue St-Honoré (Map 10 E4)FashionJohn Galliano (see p221)Lavinia (p64)3–5 blvd de la Madeleine(Map 9 D2)Food & drinkMadelios (p61)23 blvd de la Madeleine(Map 9 C2)FashionMaria Luisa (p62)2 rue Cambon (Map 9 C3)FashionMartin Margiela (p62)23 & 25bis rue de Montpensier(Map 10 F3)FashionPierre Hardy (p61)156 galérie de Valois (Map 10 F4)ShoesSalons du Palais Royal (p62)25 rue de Valois (Map 10 F3)PerfumeVentilo (p63)13–15 blvd de la Madeleine(Map 9 C2)FashionYves Rocher (see p220)2nd arrondissementBarbara Bui (p65)23 rue Etienne Marcel(Map 10 H4)FashionErik & Lydie (p65)7 passage du Grand Cerf(Map 10 H3)AccessoriesEt Vous Stock (see p221)Killiwatch (p65)64 rue Tiquetonne (Map 10 G3)Second-hand & vintageOdette & Zoe (p63)4 rue des Petits Champs(Map 10 F3)AccessoriesPapageno (see p222)3rd arrondissementAB33 (p69)33 rue Charlot (Map 11 C4)FashionAbou dAbi Bazar (p68)10 rue des Francs Bourgeois(Map 17 C1)FashionLa Chaise Longue (p68)20 rue des Francs Bourgeois(Map 17 C1)InteriorsFood (p67)58 rue Charlot (Map 11 C4)Food & drinkHervé Van der Straeten (p74)11 rue Ferdinand Duval(Map 17 B1)AccessoriesMartin Grant (p72)44 rue Vieille du Temple(Map 11 B5)FashionNodus (p66)22 rue Vieille du Temple(Map 17 B1)FashionSentou (p73)18 & 24 rue du Pont Louis-Philippe (Map 17 B1)29 rue François Miron(Map 17 B1)InteriorsYukiko (p71)97 rue Vieille du Temple(Map 11 C4)Second-hand & vintage5th arrondissementDiptyque (p74)34 boulevard St-Germain(Map 17 A3)InteriorsParis Jazz Corner (see p223)6th arrondissementAgnès b (p76)6 & 12 rue du Vieux Colombier(Map 15 D2)FashionAPC (p76)3 & 4 rue Fleurus(Map 15 D4)FashionChristian Tortu (p79)6 carrefour de l’Odéon(Map 16 F2)InteriorsDépôt-Vente de Buci (see p221)Free Lance (p76)30 rue du Four(Map 15 D2)ShoesJamin Puech (p78)43 rue Madame(Map 16 E3)AccessoriesGalerie Simone (p68)124 rue Vieille du Temple(Map 11 C4)Concept storeGoumanyat & Son Royaume(p66)3 rue Charles François Dupuis(Map 11 C3)Food & drinkKarine Dupont (p67)22 rue Poitou (Map 11 C4)AccessoriesRobert Le Héros (p65)13 rue de Saintonge (Map 11 C4)InteriorsShoe Bizz (p66)48 rue Beaubourg (Map 11 A5)Shoes4th arrondissementA L’Olivier (p74)23 rue de Rivoli (Map 17 B1)Food & drinkAntik Batik (p67)18 rue de Turenne (Map 17 C1)FashionA-poc (p70)47 rue des Francs Bourgeois(Map 11 B5)FashionAzzedine Alaïa (p70)7 rue de Moussy (Map 17 A1)FashionBô (p74)8 rue St-Merri (Map 11 A5)InteriorsBrontibay (p70)6 rue de Sévigné (Map 17 C1)AccessoriesCalligrane (p71)4–6 rue du Pont Louis-Philippe(Map 17 A2)StationeryComptoir des Cotonniers (p70)33 rue des Francs Bourgeois(Map 11 B5)FashionHervé Gambs (p71)9bis rue des Blancs Manteaux(Map 11 B5)Interiors
  • 199. Index by Area210 www.eparis.dk.comCentreShops continued...Lagerfeld Gallery (p77)40 rue de Seine (Map 16 E1)FashionLoft Design by (p78)56 rue de Rennes (Map 16 E2)FashionLa Maison du Chocolat (p75)19 rue de Sèvres (Map 15 C3)Food & drinkMarie Mercié (p78)23 rue St-Sulpice (Map 16 E3)AccessoriesLes 3 Marches de Catherine B(p76)1 & 3 rue Guisarde (Map 16 E2)Second-hand & vintageOnward (p78)147 blvd St-Germain (Map 16 E2)FashionPaul & Joe (p77)40 rue du Four (Map 16 E2)FashionSabbia Rosa (p75)73 rue des Sts-Pères (Map 15 D2)LingerieShadé (p79)63 rue des Sts-Pères(Map 15 D2)FashionTara Jamon (p75)18 rue du Four (Map 16 E2)FashionVanessa Bruno (p77)25 rue St-Sulpice (Map 16 E3)FashionVannina Vesperini (p75)63 rue des Sts-Pères(Map 15 D2)LingerieWoman (p77)4 rue de Grenelle (Map 15 D2)Lingerie7th arrondissementLe Bon Marché (see p220)Carine Gilson (p80)61 rue Bonaparte (Map 16 E1)LingerieCatherine Arigoni (p82)14 rue Beaune (Map 15 D1)Second-hand & vintageDeyrolle (p79)46 rue du Bac (Map 15 C1)InteriorsEditions de Parfums FrédéricMalle (p80)37 rue de Grenelle (Map 15 C2)PerfumesLa Grande Epicerie (p80)Le Bon Marché, 22 rue desSèvres (Map 15 C3)Food & drinkIris (p80)28 rue de Grenelle (Map 15 D2)ShoesIunx (p83)48–50 rue de lUniversité(Map 15 D1)PerfumesJean-Baptiste Rautureau (p82)24 rue de Grenelle (Map 15 D2)ShoesLucien Pellat-Finet (p81)1 rue Montalembert(Map 15 D1)FashionMartine Sitbon (p81)13 rue Grenelle (Map 15 D2)FashionPaul Smith (p81)22 & 24 blvd Raspail(Map 15 D3)FashionRue Cler (p156) (Map 14 G1)MarketsThomas Boog (p82)52 rue de Bourgogne(Map 15 A1)InteriorsArt & Architecture1st arrondissementChez Robert Electron Libre (p94)59 rue de Rivoli (Map 10 G5)Exhibition spaceLa Conciergerie (see p224)Eglise St-Eustache (p97)Rue du Jour (Map 10 G4)ChurchJeu de Paume (p95)1 pl de la Concorde (Map 9 C3)Exhibition spaceMusée du Louvre (see p224)Musée de la Publicité (p96)107 rue de Rivoli (Map 10 E4)MuseumSte-Chapelle (p94)4 blvd du Palais (Map 16 G1)ChurchTour St-Jacques (p94)(Map 16 H1)Historic building2nd arrondissementBibliothèque Nationale deFrance – Richelieu (p95)58 rue de Richelieu (Map 10 F3)Exhibition space3rd arrondissementMusée d’Art et d’Histoire duJudaïsme (p96)71 rue du Temple (Map 11 A5)MuseumMusée Carnavalet (p95)23 rue de Sevigné (Map 17 C1)MuseumMusée National Picasso (p96)5 rue de Thorigny(Map 11 C5)Museum4th arrondissementAtelier Brancusi (p97)Pl Centre Pompidou (Map 11 A5)Exhibition spaceCentre Pompidou (see p224)Maison Européene de laPhotographie (p98)5–7 rue de Fourcy(Map 17 B1)Exhibition spaceMusée Cognacq-Jay (p97)8 rue Elzévi (Map 17 C1)MuseumNotre Dame (p110)Place du Parvis-Notre-Dame(Map 16 H2) 01 42 34 56 10ChurchPatrimoine Photographique(p97)62 rue St-Antoine (Map 17 C2)Exhibition space5th arrondissementArènes de Lutèce (p99)Entrances on 49 rue Monge &7 rue de Navarre (Map 17 A5)Historic buildingEglise Royale du Val-de-Grâce(p99)227 rue St-Jacques(Map 20 F1)MuseumInstitut du Monde Arabe (p98)1 rue des Fossés St-Bernard(Map 17 B3)Exhibition spaceMusèe de l’AssistancePublique (p99)47 quai de la Tournelle(Map 17 A3)MuseumMusée National du Moyen Age(p98)6 pl Paul-Painlevé (Map 16 G3)MuseumSt-Julien-le-Pauvre (p163)Rue St-Julien-le-Pauvre(Map 16 H2)ChurchLa Sorbonne (p99)47 rue des Ecoles (Map 16 G3)Historic building6th arrondissementEglise St-Sulpice (p100)Place St-Sulpice (Map 16 E3)ChurchMusée du Luxembourg (p100)19 rue de Vaugirard(Map 16 E3)Exhibition spaceMusée National EugèneDelacroix (p100)6 rue de Furstemberg(Map 16 E2)Museum
  • 200. 211Centre7th arrondissementAssemblée Nationale (p110)126 rue de l’Université(Map 9 A4) 01 40 63 60 00Historic buildingMusée Maillol – FondationDina Vierny (p101)59–61 rue de Grenelle(Map 15 D2)MuseumMusée d’Orsay (see p225)Musée Rodin (p101)77 rue de Varenne (Map 15 A1)MuseumTour Eiffel (see p224)Performance1st arrondissementComédie Française (p119)1 place Colette (Map 10 E4)TheatreDuc des Lombards (p118)42 rue des Lombards(Map 10 H5)Live musicForum des Images (p118)Forum des Halles (Map 10 G4)CinemaThéâtre du Châtelet (p119)1 place du Châtelet (Map 16H1)Multi-function venue2nd arrondissementLe Grand Rex (p119)1 blvd Poissonnière (Map 10 H2)Cinema4th arrondissementCafé de la Gare (p119)41 rue du Temple (Map 11 A5)ComedyLe Point Virgule (p118)7 rue St-Croix de la Bretonnerie(Map 17 B1)ComedyThéâtre de la Ville (p121)2 place du Châtelet(Map 16 H1)Multi-function venue5th arrondissementAction Ecole (see p225)Le Champo Llion (see p225)Grand Action (see p225)Images d’Ailleurs (see p225)Paradis Latin (see p225)Quartier Latin (see p225)Reflet Medicis (see p225)Studio Galande (see p225)6th arrondissementAction Christine Odeon(see p225)Lucernaire (p121)53 rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs (Map 15 D5)Multi-function venueRacine Odeon (see p225)St-André-des-Arts (see p225)7th arrondissementLa Pagode (p118)57 rue de Babylone(Map 15 A2)CinemaBars & Clubs1st arrondissementCab (p132)2 pl du Palais Royal(Map 10 F4)ClubThe Cruiscin Lan (p132)18 rue des Halles(Map 10 H5)01 45 08 99 15PubLe Fumoir (p132)6 rue de L’Amiral de Coligny(Map 10 F5)BarHemingway Bar (p133)Ritz Hotel,15 place Vendome(Map 9 D3)BarHotel Costes (p132)239 rue St Honoré (Map 9 D3)BarJuveniles (p133)47 rue de Richelieu (Map 10 F3)BarKong (p134)1 rue du Pont Neuf (Map 10 G5)BarWine & Bubbles (p154)3 rue Française (Map 10 H4)01 44 76 99 84Bar2nd arrondissementLe Café (p154)62 rue Tiquetonne (Map 10 G3)01 40 39 08 00BarLe Café Noir (p135)65 rue Montmartre (Map 10 G3)BarLe Coeur Fou (p133)55 rue Montmartre (Map 10 G3)BarEtienne Marcel (p154)34 rue Etienne Marcel(Map 10 G3) 01 45 08 01 03BarHarry’s Bar (p136)5 rue Daunou (Map 10 E2)BarLe Next (p135)17 rue Tiquetonne (Map 10 H3)BarPulp (p136)25 blvd Poissonnière (Map 10 G1)ClubLe Rex (p135)5 blvd Poissonière (Map 10 G1)ClubSomo (p135)168 rue Montmartre(Map 10 G2)Bar3rd arrondissementAndy Wahloo (p137)69 rue des Gravilliers(Map 11 A3)BarBoob’s Bourg (p137)26 rue de Montmorency(Map 11 A4)BarLe Connetable (p137)55 rue des Archives (Map 11 B4)Bar4th arrondissementAmnesia (p138)42 rue Vieille du Temple(Map 17 B1)BarThe Auld Alliance (p132)80 rue François Miron(Map 17 B1)PubAu Petit Fer à Cheval (p138)30 rue Vieille du Temple(Map 17 B1)BarLa Belle Hortense (p139)31 rue Vieille du Temple(Map 17 B1)BarChez Richard (p138)37 rue Vieille du Temple(Map 17 B1)BarLe Cox (p140)15 rue des Archives(Map 11 A5)BarLes Etages (p140)35 rue Vieille du Temple(Map 17 B1)BarL’Etoile Manquante (p138)34 rue Vieille du Temple(Map 17 B1)BarLizard Lounge (p140)18 rue Bourg Tibourg(Map 17 B1)BarLe Trésor (p140)7 rue Trésor (Map 17 B1)Bar5th arrondissementThe Bombardier (p132)2 pl Panthéon (Map 16 G4)Pub€ cheap €€ moderate €€€ expensive (Price ranges: Restaurants, see p25, Hotels, see p173)
  • 201. Index by Area212 Looking for shops near you? Link up via www.eparis.dk.comCentreBars & Clubs continued...Caveau des Oubliettes (p141)52 rue Galande (Map 16 H3)BarLe Crocodile (p141)6 rue Royer Collard (Map 16 G4)BarLe Pantalon (p141)7 rue Royer Collard (Map 16 G4)Bar6th arrondissementAZ Bar (p142)62 rue Mazarine (Map 16 F2)BarLe Bar (p135)27 rue Condé (Map 16 F3)BarLe Bar du Marché (p142)75 rue de Seine (Map 16 F2)BarCafé de la Mairie (p143)8 place St-Sulpice (Map 16 E3)BarCoolin (p132)15 rue Clément (Map 16 E2)PubCorcoran (p132)28 rue St-André des Arts(Map 16 F2)PubDon Carlos (p143)66 rue Mazarine (Map 16 F2)BarFrog & Princess (p132)9 rue Princesse (Map 15 E2)PubFubar (p141)5 rue St-Sulpice (Map 16 F3)BarThe Highlander (p132)8 rue Nevers (Map 16 F1)PubLe 10 Bar (p142)10 rue de L’Odeon (Map 16 F3)BarO’Neils (p132)20 rue Canettes (Map 16 E2)PubL’Urgence (p143)45 rue Monsieur Le Prince(Map 16 F3)BarWAGG (p143)62 rue Mazarine (Map 16 F2)Club7th arrondissementCafé Thoumieux (p136)4 rue de la Comète (Map 8 H5)BarHavens: Parks,Squares & Gardens1st arrondissementJardin des Tuileries (p110, p165)(Map 9 D4)Palais Royal (p162) (Map 10 F3)Place Dauphine (p162)(Map 16 G1)Square du Vert-Galant (p162)(Map 16 F1)5th arrondissementJardins des Plantes (p165)(Map 17 B5)6th arrondissementJardin du Luxembourg (p165)(Map 16 E4)7th arrondissementHôtel des Invalides (p165)Esplanade des Invalides(Map 15 A1)Havens: Spas &Treatments1st arrondissement32 Montorgueil (p163)32 rue Montorgueil (Map 10 H3)3rd arrondissementNickel (p163)48 rue des Francs Bourgeois(Map 11 B5)5th arrondissementLa Grande Mosquée (p164)39 rue Geoffroy St-Hilaire(Map 17 A5)Hotels1st arrondissementHotel Tonic (p172) €€12 rue Roule (Map 10 G5)Le Meurice (see p227)Le Ritz (see p227)2nd arrondissementHotel Tiquetonne (p172) €6 rue Tiquetonne (Map 10 H4)3rd arrondissementHotel Roubaix (p172) €6 rue Grenetta (Map 10 H3)Pavillon de la Reine (p172) €€€28 pl des Vosges (Map 17 D1)5th arrondissementHotel du Degrés de NotreDame (see p226)Hotel Esméralda (p174) €4 rue St-Julien-le-Pauvre(Map 16 H2)Hotel du Panthéon (p175) €€19 pl du Panthéon(Map 16 G4)Hotel Résidence Henri IV(see p226)6th arrondissementArtus (p175) €€34 rue de Buci(Map 16 E2)Citadines (see p226)L’Hotel (p175) €€€13 rue des Beaux Arts(Map 16 E1)Hotel des St-Pères (p176) €€65 rue des St-Pères(Map 15 D2)Hotel du Lys (p174) €23 rue Serpente (Map 16 G2)Hotel Mayet (p176) €3 rue Mayet (Map 15 B4)Villa D’Estrées (p174) €€17 rue Git-le-Couer (Map 16 G2)7th arrondissementHotel Lenox (p176) €€9 rue de l’Université(Map 15 D1)Hotel Malar (p177) €29 rue Malar (Map 8 G5)Hotel du Quai Voltaire(p176) €€19 quai Voltaire (Map 9 D5)WestRestaurants8th arrondissementL’Angle du Faubourg (p39) €€195 rue du Faubourg St-Honoré(Map 2 G5)BistroA Toutes Vapeurs (p41) €7 rue de l’Isly (Map 3 C5)Modern FrenchBe (see p219)Le Bistrot Napolitain (p39) €€18 avenue Franklin D Roosevelt(Map 8 H1)ItalianFlora (p39) €€36 ave George V (Map 8 F2)Modern FrenchGarnier (p39) €€€111 rue St-Lazare (Map 3 C5)BrasserieLadurée (see p220)Lucas Carton (p41) €€€9 pl de la Madeleine (Map 9 C2)Haute cuisineMaison Blanche (p40) €€€15 ave Montaigne (Map 8 G3)Modern FrenchMarket (p40) €€€15 ave Matignon (Map 9 A2)Modern French
  • 202. 213€ cheap €€ moderate €€€ expensive (Price ranges: Restaurants, see p25, Hotels, see p173)Centre – WestSavy (p41) €€23 rue Bayard (Map 8 G3)Bistro16th arrondissementL’Astrance (p42) €€€4 rue Beethoven (Map 7 C5)Modern FrenchLe Cristal Room (p40) €€€La Maison Baccarat, 11 placedes Etats-Unis (Map 8 E2)Modern FrenchLa Grande Armée (p43) €€3 avenue de la Grande Armée(Map 7 E1)BrasserieJamin (p43) €€€32 rue de Longchamp(Map 7 D3)Haute cuisineLe Petit Rétro (p43) €€5 rue Mesnil (Map 7 C2)Bistro17th arrondissementLe Bistrot d’à Côte Flaubert(p44) €€10 rue Gustave-Flaubert(Map 2 F3)BistroL’Entredgeu (p43) €€83 rue Laugier(Map 1 D2)BistroLa Table de Lucullus (p44) €€€129 rue Legendre (Map 3 C1)Fish & seafoodShops8th arrondissementAndré (see p223)Balenciaga (see p221)Bottega Veneta (see p220)Chanel (see p221)Charles Jourdan (p84)23 rue François Premier(Map 8 F2)ShoesChloé (see p221)Christian Lacroix (see p221)Dior (see p221)Dolce & Gabbana (see p221)Emmanuel Ungaro (see p221)Erès (p84)2 rue Tronchet(Map 9 C1)Lingeriefnac (see p222)Galerie Noémie (p84)92 ave des Champs-Elysées(Map 8 F1)BeautyGivenchy (see p223)Gucci (see p220)Jean-Paul Gaultier (see p221)Lanvin (see p221)Louis Vuitton (see p220)Make Up For Ever Professional(p85)8 rue de la Boétie(Map 8 H1)BeautyMarni (see p221)Prada (see p222)Publicis Drugstore (p83)133 ave des Champs-Elysées(Map 8 F1)Music & bookRenaud Pellegrino (p83)14 rue du Faubourg-St-Honoré(Map 9 B2)AccessoriesRésonances (p85)3 blvd Malesherbes(Map 9 C2)InteriorsRoger Vivier (p86)29 rue du Faubourg-St-Honoré(Map 9 B2)ShoesStephane Kélian (p86)5 rue du Faubourg-St-Honoré(Map 9 C2)ShoesValentino (see p222)Virgin Megastore(see p223)Zadig & Voltaire (de luxe) (p84)18–20 rue François Premier(Map 8 G3)Fashion16th arrondissementRéciproque (see p222)Art & Architecture8th arrondissementChapelle Expiatoire (p166)29 rue Pasquier (Map 9 C1)ChurchEglise de la Madeleine (p102)Pl de la Madeleine (Map 9 C2)ChurchEglise St-Augustin (p102)46 blvd Malesherbes(Map 3 B5)ChurchGrand Palais (p103)3 avenue de Général Eisenhower(Map 9 A3)01 44 13 17 30Exhibition spaceMusée Jacquemart-André (p102)158 blvd Haussmann (Map 2 H5)MuseumPalais de la Découverte (p103)Avenue Franklin D Roosevelt(Map 8 H3)01 56 43 20 21www.palais-decouverte.frMuseumPetit Palais (p103)Avenue Winston Churchill(Map 9 A3)01 40 05 56 78Exhibtion space16th arrondissementCimetière de Passy (p109)(Map 7 C4)CemeteryFondation Le Corbusier (p105)Villa la Roche, 10 sq du DrBlanche (Métro Jasmin)MuseumMusée d’Art Moderne de laVille de Paris (MAMVP; p104)11 avenue du Président Wilson(Map 8 E3)MuseumMusée Galliéra (p102)10 avenue Pierre 1er de Serbie(Map 8 E3)MuseumMusée Guimet (p105)6 place d’Iéna(Map 8 E3)MuseumMusée Marmottan-Monet(p105)2 rue Louis Boilly(Métro Ranelagh)MuseumPalais de Chaillot (p104)17 place du Trocadéro(Map 7 C4)MuseumPalais de Tokyo (p104)13 avenue du Président Wilson(Map 8 E3)Exhibition spaceWestern SuburbsChateau de St-Germain (p106)Place Charles de Gaulle(RER St-Germain-en-Laye)MuseumMusée Départemental MauriceDenis “Le Prieuré” (p106)2bis rue Maurice Denis(RER St-Germain-en-Laye)MuseumPerformance8th arrondissementCrazy Horse (see p225)Lido (see p225)Théâtre des Champs-Elysées(p121)15 ave Montaigne(Map 8 G3)Multi-function venue16th arrondissementHippodrome de Longchamp(see p226)
  • 203. Index by Area214 www.eparis.dk.comWestPerformance continued...Maison de la Radio France(p122)116 avenue Président Kennedy(Map 13 B2)Live musicParc des Princes (see p226)Stade Jean-Bouin (see p226)Stade Pierre de Coubertin(see p226)Stade Roland Garros(see p226)Bars & Clubs8th arrondissementLe Bar du Plaza (p145)Plaza Athenée, 25 avenueMontaigne (Map 8 G3)BarBar des Théâtres (p145)6 ave Montaigne (Map 8 G3)BarThe Cricketer (p132)41 rue des Mathurins(Map9 C1)01 40 07 01 45PubFreedom (p132)8 rue de Berri (Map 8 G1)01 53 75 25 50PubFour Seasons George V (p144)31 avenue George V(Map 8 F2)BarMathi’s (p145)3 rue Ponthieu (Map 8 H2)BarNirvana Lounge (p144)3 avenue Matignon (Map 8 H2)BarLe Queen (p145)102 ave des Champs-Elysées(Map 8 F1)ClubLa Suite (p144)40 ave George V (Map 8 F2)BarToi (p144)27 rue Colisée (Map 8 H2)Bar16th arrondissementLa Gare (p146)19 chausée de la Muette(Métro La Muette)BarHavens: Parks,Squares & Gardens8th arrondissementParc Monceau (p165)(Map 2 H4)16th arrondissementParc de Bagatelle (p165)(Métro Boulogne J Jaurès)Havens: Spas8th arrondissementFour Seasons Georges V(p166, p177)31 ave Georges V (Map 8 F2)SpaHotels8th arrondissementLe Crillon (see p227)France Apartments (see p226)Hilton Paris Arc de €€€Triomphe (p179)51–7 rue des Courcelles(Map 2 G4)Hotel A (p177) €€€4 rue d’Artois (Map 8 H1)Hotel de Vigny (p177) €€€9–11 rue Balzac (Map 8 F1)La Plaza Athenée (see p227)Pershing Hall (p178) €€€49 rue Pierre-Charron(Map 8 G2)Residence Carré d’Or(see p226)16th arrondissementHotel Square (p179) €€€3 rue des Boulainvilliers(Map 13 A2)17th arrondissementHotel Eldorado (p179) €18 rue des Dames (Map 3 C2)NorthRestaurants9th arrondissementCasa Olympe (p44) €€48 rue St-Georges (Map 4 F5)BistroCojean (see p219)Kastoori (p44) €4 pl Gustave Toudouze(Map 4 F4)IndianRose Bakery (p45) €46 rue des Martyrs (Map 4 F4)BritishVelly (p45) €€52 rue Lamartine(Map 4 F5)Bistro10th arrondissementBrasserie Flo (see p218)Chez Dom (p45) €€34 rue de Sambre et Meuse(Map 6 E5)AfricanChez Michel (p46) €€10 rue de Belzunce(Map 5 A4)RegionalJulien (see p219)Martel (p45) €€3 rue Martel (Map 11 A1)North AfricanTerminus Nord (p46) €€23 rue de Dunkerque(Map 5 A4)Brasserie18th arrondissementCafé Burq (p46) €€6 rue Burq (Map 4 E2)BistroChez Toinette (p47) €€20 rue Germain-Pilon (Map 4 E2)BistroLa Famille (p48) €€41 rue des Trois-Frères(Map 4 F2)Modern FrenchLa Mascotte (p49) €€52 rue des Abbesses (Map 4 E2)BistroLe Poulbot Gourmet (p47) €€39 rue Lamarck (Map 4 F1)Bistro19th arrondissementLa Cave Gourmande (p47) €€10 rue du Général-Brunet(Métro Botzaris)Modern FrenchLao Siam (p47) €49 rue de Belleville (Map 12 G1)Southeast AsianShops9th arrondissementAnnexe des Créateurs(see p221)fnac (see p222)Galeries Lafayette (see p220)Guerrisol (see p221)Princesse Tam Tam (see p222)Printemps (see p221)Sephora (see p220)Virgin Megastore (see p223)10th arrondissementAntoine & Lili (p87)95 quai de Valmy (Map 11 C1)FashionArtazart (p87)83 quai de Valmy (Map 11 C1)Music & book
  • 204. 215€ cheap €€ moderate €€€ expensive (Price ranges: Restaurants, see p25, Hotels, see p173)West – NorthCoin Canal (p88)1 rue de Marseille (Map 11 C1)InteriorsE2 (p87)15 rue Martel (Map 11 A1)VintageGinger Lyly (p87)33 rue Beaurepaire (Map 11 C2)FashionStella Cadente (p87)93 quai de Valmy (Map 11 C1)FashionViveka Bergström (p88)23 rue de la Grange-aux-Belles(Map 5 D5)Accessories18th arrondissementEn Avant La Zizique (see p222)Lili Perpink (p88)22 rue la Vieuville (Map 4 F2)FashionPatricia Louisor (p88)16 rue Houdon(Map 4 F3)FashionSpree (p89)16 rue la Vieuville (Map 4 F2)Concept storeNorthern SuburbsPuces de St-Ouen (see p158)(Métro Porte de Clignancourt)MarketArt & Architecture9th arrondissementMusée Gustave Moreau (p109)14 rue de la Rochefoucauld(Map 4 E4)Museum10th arrondissementGare du Nord (p110)(Map 5 A4)Historic buildingPorte St-Denis & Porte-StMartin (p109) (Map 11 A2)Historic building18th arrondissementCafé des Deux Moulins (p107)15 rue Lepic (Map 4 E2)01 42 54 90 50Historic buildingCimetière de Montmartre(p109) (Map 3 D1)CemeteryMoulin de la Galette (p107)75 rue Lepic (Map 4 E1)Historic buildingMoulin de Radet (p107)83 rue Lepic (Map 4 F1)Historic buildingMusée de l’Erotisme (p106)72 blvd de Clichy (Map 4 E3)MuseumMusée de Montmartre (p107)12 rue Cortot (Map 4 F1)01 46 06 61 11MuseumSacré Cœur (p107)35 rue du Chevalier de la Barre(Map 4 G2) 01 53 41 89 00Church19th arrondissementCité des Sciences et del’Industrie (p108)Parc de la Villette, 30 aveCorentin Cariou(Métro Porte de Pantin)MuseumMusée de la Musique (p108)Cité de la Musique,221 avenue Jean Jaurès(Métro Porte de Pantin)MuseumNorthern SuberbsBasilique St-Denis (p108)1 rue de la Légion d’Honneur(Métro Basilique de St-Denis)ChurchMusée d’Art et d’Histoire deSt-Denis (p109)22bis rue Gabriel Péri(Métro St-Denis Porte de Paris)MuseumStade de France (p198, 127)rue Francis de Pressensé(Métro St-Denis Porte de Paris)Modern architecturePerformance9th arrondissementOpéra Garnier (see p224)10th arrondissementBouffes du Nord (p122)37bis boulevard de la Chapelle(Map 5 B2)Multi-function venueHotel du Nord (p123)102 quai de Jemmapes(Map 11 C1)ComedyNew Morning (p122)7–9 rue des Petites-Ecuries(Map 11 A1)Live music18th arrondissementBal du Moulin Rouge (see p225)Chez Madame Arthur (see p225)Chez Michou (see p225)Elysée Montmartre (p123)72 blvd Rochechouart (Map 4 G3)Live musicStudio 28 (p123)10 rue Tholozé (Map 4 E2)Cinema19th arrondissementCinéma en Plein Air (p124)Parc de la Villette(Métro Porte de Pontin)CinemaCité de la Musique (p123)221 avenue Jean Jaurès(Métro Porte de Pantin)Live musicLe Zénith (p124)211 avenue Jean Jaurès(Métro Porte de Pantin)Multi-function venueNorthern SuberbsCentre National de la Danse(p124)1 rue Victor Hugo(Métro Hoche, RER Pantin)DanceStade de France (p198, p127)rue Francis de Pressensé(Métro St-Denis Porte de Paris)SportBars & Clubs9th arrondissementProject 101 (p147)44 rue de la Rochefoucauld(Map 4 E4)ClubXtremes (p147)10 rue Caumartin (Map 9 D1)Bar10th arrondissementChez Prune (147)36 rue Beaurepaire (Map 11 C1)BarDe la Ville (p146)34 boulevard de la BonneNouvelle (Map 10 H2)Bar/ClubLa Patache (p147)60 rue de Lancry(Map 11 C1)Bar18th arrondissementLa Fourmi (p146)74 rue des Martyrs (Map 4 F3)BarLe Progrès (p146)1 rue Yvonne le Tac(Map 4 F2)BarLa Sancerre (p148)35 rue des Abbesses (Map 4 E2)BarHavens: Parks,Squares & Gardens19th arrondissementParc des Buttes-Chaumont(p166) (Map 6 G4)Havens: Spas &Treatments9th arrondissementCinq Mondes (p166)6 sq de l’Opéra Louis Jouvet(Map 9 D1)
  • 205. Index by Area216 Connect up with other parts of town via www.eparis.dk.comNorthcontinued...Hotels9th arrondissementHotel Langlois (p180) €63 rue St-Lazare (Map 3 D5)Royal Fromentin (p180) €11 rue Fromentin (Map 4 E3)18th arrondissementHotel des Arts (p181) €5 rue Tholoze (Map 4 E2)Hotel Terrass (p180) €€12–14 rue Joseph de Maistre(Map 4 E2)Hotel Utrillo (p181) €7 rue Aristide Bruant(Map 4 E2)EastRestaurants11th arrondissementAstier (p49) €€44 rue Jean-Pierre Timbaud(Map 12 E3)BistroLe Bistrot Paul Bert (p51) €€18 rue Paul-Bert(Métro Faidherbe-Chaligny)BistroCrêperie Bretonne Fleurie(p50) €67 rue de Charonne (Map 18 F2)RegionalDong Huong (p50) €14 rue Louis-Bonnet(Map 12 F1)Southeast AsianL’Homme Bleu (p50) €€55bis rue Jean-Pierre Timbaud(Map 12 E3)North AfricanJacques Mélac (p50) €€42 rue Léon-Frot(Métro Charonne)Wine BarLe Petit Keller (p51) €€13bis rue Keller(Map 18 F1)BistroLe Souk (p51) €€1 rue Keller (Map 18 F2)African12th arrondissementAu Trou Gascon (p52) €€€40 rue Taine (Métro Daumesnil)RegionalSardegna a Tavola (p52) €€1 rue de Cotte (Map 18 F3)ItalianLe Square Trousseau (p52) €€1 rue Antoine-Vollon (Map 18 F3)BistroLe Train Bleu (p51) €€Gare de Lyon, place Louis-Armand (Map 18 E5)Brasserie20th arrondissementBenisti (p49) €108 boulevard de Belleville(Map 12 F1)AfricanCafé Noir (p49) €€15 rue St-Blaise(Métro Porte de Bagnolet)BistroShops11th arrondissementAlter Mundi (p90)41 rue du Chemin Vert(Map 12 E5)FashionAnne Willi (p91)13 rue Keller (Map 18 F2)01 48 06 74 06FashionGaëlle Barré (p91)17 rue Keller(Map 18 F2)01 43 14 63 02FashionIsabel Marant (p90)16 rue de Charonne(Map 18 E2)FashionLa Maison de la FausseFourrure (p90)34 blvd Beaumarchais (Map 17 D1)InteriorsNuits de Satin (p89)9 rue Oberkampf (Map 11 D4)Second-hand & vintageDes Petits Hauts (p91)5 rue Keller (Map 18 F2)01 43 38 14 39FashionShine (p89)30 rue de CharonneMap 18 F2)FashionTechno Import (see p223)Waves (see p223)12th arrondissementCatherine Magnan (p91)39 rue Charonne (Map 18 F2)01 43 55 56 57Fashion20th arrondissementBoulevard de Belleville (p158)(Map 12 F2)MarketArt & Architecture11th arrondissementCanal St-Martin (p106)(Map 17 D3)Boat trip12th arrondissementMinistère des Finances (p111)(Map 22 F1)Modern architectureMusée du Cinéma (p111)51 rue de Bercy (Map 22 G2)Museum20th arrondissementCimetière de Père-Lachaise(p109; Map 12 H4)CemeteryNemo’s Murals (p111)36 rue Henri Chevreau(Map 20 H1)Public artPerformance11th arrondissementBataclan (p126)50 boulevard Voltaire (Map 12 E4)Live musicCafé de la Danse (p125)5 passage Louis-Philippe(Map 18 E2)Multi-function venueCirque d’Hiver Bouglione(p125)110 rue Amelot (Map 11 D4)Circus12th arrondissementCartoucherie de Vincennes(p125)Route du Champ deManœuvre, Bois de Vincennes(Métro Château de Vincennes)Théâtre de l’Aquarium01 43 74 99 61www.theatredelaquarium.comThéâtre du Chaudron01 43 28 97 04Théâtre de l’Epée de Bois01 48 08 39 74TheatreThéâtre du Soleil01 43 74 24 08www.theatre-du-soleil.frThéâtre de la Têmpete01 43 28 36 36www.la-tempete.frHippodrome de Vincennes(see p226)Opéra Bastille (see p226)Palais Ominsport de Paris-Bercy (POPB) (see p226)20th arrondissementLa Maroquinerie (p126)23 rue de Boyer(Métro Ménilmontant)Live musicLe Regard du Cygne (p126)210 rue de Belleville(Métro Télégraphe)Dance
  • 206. 217€ cheap €€ moderate €€€ expensive (Price ranges: Restaurants, see p25, Hotels, see p173)North – East – SouthBars & Clubs11th arrondissementCafé Charbon (p149)109 rue Oberkampf (Map 12 F3)Bar/ClubLe Clown Bar (p149)114 rue Amelot (Map 11 D4)BarLa Fabrique (p148)53 rue du Faubourg St-Antoine(Map 18 E2)BarFavela Chic (p150)18 rue du Faubourg du Temple(Map 11 D2)ClubLe Lèche-Vin (p149)13 rue Duval (Map 17 E1)BarPop In (p149)105 rue Amelot (Map 11 D4)ClubWax (p150)15 rue Daval (Map 18 E1)Bar/ClubLe Zero Zero (p150)89 rue Amelot (Map 11 D5)Bar12th arrondissementLe Baron Rouge (p151)1 rue Théophile Roussel(Map 18 F3)BarBarrio Latino (p151)46 rue du Faubourg St Antoine(Map 18 E2)ClubChai 33 (p150)33 cour St-Emilion (Map 22 H3)BarChina Club (p148)50 rue Charenton (Map 18 E3)BarHavens: Parks,Squares & Gardens12th arrondissementLa Promenade Plantée (p167)(Map 18 G5)Hotels11th arrondissementHotel Beaumarchais (p181) €3 rue Oberkampf(Map 11 D4)SouthRestaurants13th arrondissementL’Avant Goût (p52) €€26 rue Bobillot (Map 21 A4)BistroLes Cailloux (p53) €€58 rue des Cinq-Diamants(Map 20 H5)ItalianTricotin (p53) €15 avenue de Choisy(Métro Porte de Choisy)Chinese14th arrondissementL’Assiette (p54) €€€181 rue du Château (Map 19 C3)BistroAu Petit Marguery (p53) €€9 blvd de Port-Royal(Map 20 H2)BistroLa Coupole (see p218)Natacha (p53) €€17 bis rue Campagne-Première(Map 19 E1)Bistro15th arrondissementChez Foong (p55) €€32 rue de Frémicourt (Map 14 F4)Southeast AsianL’Os à Moëlle & La Cave €€de l’Os à Moëlle (p54)3 rue Vasco de Gama & 181 rueLourmel (Métro Lourmel)BistroLe Père Claude (p54) €€51 avenue de la Motte-Piquet(Map 14 F3)BistroLe Suffren (p55) €€84 ave de Suffren (Map 14 F3)BrasserieLe Troquet (p55) €€21 rue François-Bonvin(Map 14 G5)BistroShops14th arrondissementAfric’ Music (see p222)Cacharel (see p221)Art & Architecture13th arrondissementBibliothèque Nationale deFrance – François Mitterrand(p111)11 quai François Mauriac(Map 22 F3)Exhibition spaceLes Frigos (p112)rue des Frigos (Map 22 F4)Exhibition spaceLouise Weiss, rue (p112)(Map 21 D3)Exhibition spaceManufacture des Gobelins(p112)42 ave des Gobelins(Map 21 A3)Museum14th arrondissementCatacombes (p113)1 pl Denfert Rochereau(Map 20 E3)Historic buildingCimetière du Montparnasse(p167)3 blvd Edgar Quinet (Map 19 C2)CemeteryCité Universitaire (p112)Boulevard Jourdan(Métro Cité Universitaire)Modern architectureFondation Cartier pour l’ArtContemporain (p113)261 boulevard Raspail(Map 19 D2)Exhibition spaceFondation Henri Cartier-Bresson (p113)2 impasse Lebouis(Map 19 B2)Exhibition space15th arrondissementMémorial du Maréchal Leclerc(p113)23 allée de la Deuxième(Map 19 B1)MuseumPerformance13th arrondissementLa Guinguette Pirate (p126)Quai Francois-Mauriac(Map 22 F3)Live musicMK2 Bibliothèque (p127)128–162 ave de France(Map 22 F3)Cinema14th arrondissementThéâtre de la Cité (p127)21 boulevard Jourdan(RER Cité Universitaire)TheatreBars & Clubs13th arrondissementBatofar (p151)Opposite 11 quai FrançoisMauriac (Map 22 F2)ClubLimelight (p151)162 ave de France(Map 22 F4)BarHavens: Parks,Squares & Gardens15th arrondissementParc André Citroën (p167)(Map 13 A5)Hotels15th arrondissement
  • 207. Index by Type218 www.eparis.dk.comRestaurantsAfricanBenisti (p49) €108 boulevard de Belleville(Map 12 F1)East/20th arrondissementChez Dom (p45) €€34 rue de Sambre et Meuse(Map 6 E5)North/10th arrondissementL’Homme Bleu (p50) €€55bis rue Jean-Pierre Timbaud(Map 12 E3)East/11th arrondissementMartel (p45) €€3 rue Martel (Map 11 A1)North/10th arrondissementLe Petit Dakar (p26) €6 rue Elzévir(Map 11 C5)Centre/3rd arrondissementLe Souk (p51) €€1 rue Keller (Map 18 F2)East/11th arrondissementBistrosAllard (p34) €€41 rue St-André-des-Arts(Map 16 F2)Centre/6th arrondissementL’Angle du Faubourg (p39) €€195 rue du Faubourg St-Honoré(Map 2 G5)West/8th arrondissementL’Ardoise (p24) €€28 rue du Mont Thabor(Map 9 C3)Centre/1st arrondissementL’Assiette (p54) €€€181 rue du Chateau(Map 19 C3)South/14th arrondissementAstier (p49) €€44 rue Jean-Pierre Timbaud(Map 12 E3)East/11th arrondissementAu Bon Accueil (p38) €€14 rue de Monttessuy(Map 8 F5)Centre/7th arrondissementAu Petit Marguery (p53) €€9 boulevard de Port-Royal(Map 20 H2)South/14th arrondissementAu Pied de Cochon (p24) €€6 rue Coquillière (Map 10 G4)Centre/1st arrondissementAux Lyonnais (p25) €€32 rue St-Marc (Map 10 F2)Centre/2nd arrondissementL’Avent Gout (p52) €€26 rue Bobillot (Map 21 A4)South/13th arrondissementLe Bistrot d’à Côté Flaubert €€(p44)10 rue Gustave-Flaubert(Map 2 F3)West/17th arrondissementLe Bistrot Paul Bert (p51) €€18 rue Paul-Bert(Métro Faidherbe-Chaligny)East/11th arrondissementCafé Burq (p46) €€6 rue Burq (Map 4 E2)North/18th arrondissementCafé Constant (p38) €€139 rue St-Dominique(Map 8 F5)Centre/7th arrondissementCafé Noir (p49) €€15 rue St-Blaise(Métro Porte de Bagnolet)East/20th arrondissementCasa Olympe (p44) €€48 rue St-Georges (Map 4 F5)North/9th arrondissementChez Georges (p26) €€1 rue du Mail (Map 10 G3)Centre/2nd arrondissementChez Toinette (p47) €€20 rue Germain-Pilon(Map 4 E2)North/18th arrondissementL’Entredgeu (p43) €€83 rue Laugier (Map 1 D1)West/17th arrondissementL’Epi Dupin (p34) €€11 rue Dupin(Map 15 C3)Centre/6th arrondissementGeorget (p30) €€64 rue Vieille du Temple(Map 11 B5)Centre/4th arrondissementLa Mascotte (p49) €€52 rue des Abbesses(Map 4 E2)North/18th arrondissementNatasha (p53) €€17bis rue Campagne-Première(Map 19 E1)South/14th arrondissementL’Os à Moëlle (p54) €€3 rue Vasco de Gama(Métro Lourmel)South/15th arrondissementLa Cave de l’Os à Moëlle €€(p54)181 rue Lourmel(Métro Lourmel)South/15th arrondissementLe Pamphlet (p28) €€38 rue Debelleyme (Map 11 C4)Centre/3rd arrondissementLe Père Claude (p54) €€51 avenue de la Motte-Piquet(Map 14 F3)South/15th arrondissementLe Petit Keller (p51) €€13bis rue Keller (Map 18 F1)East/11th arrondissementLe Petit Retro (p43) €€5 rue Mesnil (Map 7 C2)West/16th arrondissementLes Petits Marseillais (p28) €€72 rue Vieille du Temple(Map 11 B5)Centre/3rd arrondissementLe Poulbot Gourmet (p54) €€39 rue Lamark (Map 4 F1)North/18th arrondissementLe Pré Verre (p33) €€8 rue Thénard (Map 16 G3)Centre/5th arrondissementLe Reminet (p32) €€3 rue des Grands-Degrés(Map 16 H3)Centre/5th arrondissementSavy (p41) €€23 rue Bayard (Map 8 G3)West/8th arrondissementLe Square Trousseau (p52) €€1 rue Antoine-Vollon(Map 18 F3)East/12th arrondissementLe Timbre (p35) €€3 rue Ste-Beuve (Map 15 D5)Centre/6th arrondissementLa Tour de Montlhéry (p25) €€5 rue des Prouvaires(Map 10 G4)Centre/1st arrondissementLe Troquet (p55) €€21 rue François-Bonvin(Map 14 G5)South/15th arrondissementVelly (p45) €€52 rue Lamartine (Map 4 F5)North/9th arrondissementLe Vieux Bistro (p30) €€14 rue du Cloître Notre Dame(Map 16 H2)Centre/4th arrondissementBrasseriesLe Balzar (p29)49 rue des Ecoles (Map 16 G3)01 43 54 13 67Centre/5th arrondissementBrasserie Flo (p29)7 cour des Petites-Ecuries(Map 11 A1) 01 47 70 13 59North/10th arrondissementBrasserie de l’Ile St-Louis (p29)55 quai Bourbon (Map 17 A2)01 43 54 02 59Centre/4th arrondissementLa Coupole (p29) €€€102 blvd de Montparnasse(Map 15 D5)01 43 20 14 20South/14th arrondissementGarnier (p39) €€€111 rue St-Lazare (Map 3 C5)West/8th arrondissementLa Grande Armée (p43) €€3 avenue de la Grande Armée(Map 7 E1)West/16th arrondissementLe Grand Colbert (p29)2–4 rue Vivienne (Map 10 F3)01 42 86 87 88Centre/2nd arrondissement
  • 208. Restaurants219€ cheap €€ moderate €€€ expensive (Price ranges: Restaurants, see p25, Hotels, see p173)Julien (p29) €€16 rue du Faubourg St-Denis(Map 11 A2)01 47 70 12 06North/10th arrondissementRestaurant Marty (p33) €€20 avenue des Gobelins(Map 21 A2)Centre/5th arrondissementLe Suffren (p55) €€84 avenue de Suffren(Map 14 F3)South/15th arrondissementTerminus Nord (p46) €€23 rue de Dunkerque(Map 5 A4)North/10th arrondissementLe Train Bleu (p51) €€Gare de Lyon, place Louis-Armand (Map 18 E5)East/12th arrondissementBritishRose Bakery (p45) €46 rue des Martyrs (Map 4 F4)North/9th arrondissementChineseChez Vong (p25) €€10 rue de la Grande Truanderie(Map 10 H4)Centre/1st arrondissementTricotin (p53) €15 avenue de Choisy(Métro Porte de Choisy)South/13th arrondissementFish & SeafoodL’Iode (p26) €€48 rue d’Argout (Map 10 G3)Centre/2nd arrondissementLa Table de Lucullus (p44) €€€129 rue Legendre(Map 3 C1)West/17th arrondissementFood to GoBe (p38)73 boulevard de Courcelles(Map 2 F4)01 46 22 20 20West/8th arrondissementLa Grande Epicerie (see p210)Cojean (p38)4 rue de Sèze(Map9 C2)01 40 06 08 80North/9th arrondissementGreekLes Délices d’Aphrodite €€(p32)4 rue de Candolle(Map 20 H1)Centre/5th arrondissementHaute CuisineL’Ambroisie (p29) €€€9 place des Vosges(Map 17 C1)Centre/4th arrondissementL’Arpège (p36) €€€84 rue de Varenne(Map 15 A1)Centre/7th arrondissementL’Espadon (p24) €€€Hôtel Ritz, 15 place Vendôme(Map 9 D2)Centre/1st arrondissementJamin (p41) €€€32 rue de Longchamp(Map 7 D3)West/16th arrondissementLucas Carton (p41) €€€9 place de la Madeleine(Map 9 C2)West/8th arrondissementLe Meurice (p25) €€€Hotel Meurice, 228 rue deRivoli (Map 9 D3)Centre/1st arrondissementLa Tour d’Argent (p33) €€€15–17 quai de la Tournelle(Map 17 A3)Centre/5th arrondissementIndianKastoori (p44) €4 place Gustave Toudouze(Map 4 F4)North/9th arrondissementItalianLe Bistrot Napolitain (p39) €€18 avenue Franklin D Roosevelt(Map 8 H1)West/8th arrondissementLes Cailloux (p53) €€58 rue des Cinq-Diamants(Map 20 H5)South/13th arrondissementL’Enoteca (p30) €€25 rue Charles V (Map 17 C2)Centre/4th arrondissementL’Osteria (p31) €€10 rue de Sévigné (Map 17 C1)Centre/4th arrondissementSardegna a Tavola (p52) €€1 rue de Cotte (Map 18 F3)East/12th arrondissementJapaneseAbazu (p34) €€3 rue André-Mazet(Map 16 F2)Centre/6th arrondissementHiguma (p26) €32bis rue Ste-Anne(Map 10 E2)01 47 03 38 59Centre/1st arrondissementLaï Laï Ken (p26) €7 rue Ste-Anne (Map 10 E2)Centre/1st arrondissementYen (p34) €€22 rue St-Benoît (Map 16 E2)Centre/6th arrondissementLatin AmericanAnahï (p27) €€49 rue Volta (Map 11 B3)Centre/3rd arrondissementMexicanAnahuacalli (p31) €€30 rue des Bernardins(Map 16 H3)Centre/5th arrondissementMiddle EasternL’As du Fallafal (p29, p38) €34 rue des Rosiers(Map 17 B1)Centre/4th arrondissementModern FrenchL’Astrance (p42) €€€4 rue Beethoven(Map 7 C5)West/16th arrondissementL’Atelier de Joël Robuchon €€€(p37)5 rue de Montalembert(Map 15 D1)Centre/7th arrondissementA Toutes Vapeurs (p41) €7 rue de l’Isly (Map 3 C5)West/8th arrondissementCafé Moderne (p25) €€40 rue Notre-Dame-des-Victoires (Map 10 G2)Centre/2nd arrondissementLa Canaille (p30) €4 rue Crillon (Map 17 C3)Centre/4th arrondissementLa Cave Gourmande (p47) €€10 rue de Général-Brunet(Métro Botzaris)North/19th arrondissementLe Cristal Room (p40) €€€La Maison Baccarat, 11 placedes Etats-Unis (Map 8 E2)West/16th arrondissementLa Famille (p48) €€41 rues des Trois-Frères(Map 4 F2)North/18th arrondissementFlora (p39) €€36 avenue George V(Map 8 F2)West/8th arrondissementMaison Blanche (p40) €€€15 avenue Montaigne(Map 8 G3)West/8th arrondissementMarket (p40) €€€15 avenue Matignon(Map 9 A2)West/8th arrondissementMon Vieil Ami (p31) €€69 rue St-Louis-en-l’Ile(Map 17 A2)Centre/4th arrondissementR’Aliment (p28) €€57 rue Charlot(Map 11 C4)Centre/3rd arrondissementRestaurant du Palais Royal €€(p24)110 galérie Valois(Map 10 F3)Centre/1st arrondissement
  • 209. Index by Type220 For links to fashion shops large and small across Paris, check www.eparis.dk.comRestaurantscontinued...RegionalL’Ambassade d’Auvergne €€(p27)22 rue du Grenier St-Lazare(Map 11 A4)Centre/3rd arrondissementL’Ami Jean (p36) €€27 rue Malar (Map 8 G5)Centre/7th arrondissementAu Trou Gascon (p52) €€€40 rue Taine(Métro Daumesnil)East/12th arrondissementChez Michel (p46) €€10 rue de Belzunce (Map 5 A4)North/10th arrondissementLe Cosi (p32) €€9 rue Cujas (Map 16 G4)Centre/5th arrondissementCrêperie Bretonne Fleurie €(p50)67 rue de Charonne (Map 18 F2)East/11th arrondissementLe Salon d’Hélène (p35) €€€4 rue dAssas(Map 15 D3)Centre/6th arrondissementLa Table d’Aude (p35) €€8 rue de Vaugirard(Map 16 F3)Centre/6th arrondissementSalons de ThéAngelina (p55)266 rue de Rivoli(Map 9 C3)Centre/1st arrondissementA Priori Thé (p55)35-37 galérie Vivienne(Map 10 F3)01 42 97 48 75Centre/2nd arrondissementLa Grande Mosquée (see p212)Ladurée (p55)16 rue Royale (Map 9 C2)01 42 60 21 79West/8th arrondissementLa Maison de la Chine (p55)76 rue Bonaparte(Map 16 E2)01 40 51 95 00Centre/6th arrondissementMariage Frères (p165)13 rue des Grands Augustins(Map 16 F1)Centre/6th arrondissementSpanishBellota-Bellota €€(p36)18 rue Jean-Nicot(Map 8 G5)Centre/7th arrondissementFogon St-Julien (p32) €€10 rue St-Julien-le-Pauvre(Map 16 H2)Centre/5th arrondissementVegetarianLe Potager du Marais (p28) €22 rue Rambuteau(Map 11 A5)Centre/3rd arrondissementSoutheast AsianChez Foong (p55) €€32 rue de Frémicourt(Map 14 F4)South/15th arrondissementDong Huong (p50) €14 rue Louis-Bonnet(Map 12 F1)East/11th arrondissementLao Siam (p47) €49 rue de Belleville(Map 12 G1)North/19th arrondissementNew Nioullaville (p158) €32 rue de l’Orillon(Map 12 F2)East/11th arrondissementWine BarsLes Enfants Rouges (p27) €€9 rue de Beauce(Map 11 C4)Centre/3rd arrondissementJacques Mélac (p50) €€42 rue Léon-Frot(Métro Charonne)East/11th arrondissementShopsAccessoriesBottega Veneta (p86)14 rue du Faubourg-St-Honoré(Map 9 B2) 01 42 65 59 70www.bottegaveneta.comWest/8th arrondissementBrontibay (p70)6 rue de Sévigné (Map 17 C1)Centre/4th arrondissementErik & Lydie (p65)7 passage du Grand Cerf(Map 10 H3)Centre/2nd arrondissementFlavie Furst (p64)16 rue de la Soudière(Map 10 E3)Centre/1st arrondissementGucci (p86)60 ave Montaigne (Map 8 H2)01 56 69 80 80www.gucci.comWest/8th arrondissementHervé Van der Straeten (p74)11 rue Ferdinand Duval(Map 17 B1)Centre/4th arrondissementJamin Puech (p78)43 rue Madame (Map 16 E3)Centre/6th arrondissementKarine Dupont (p67)22 rue Poitou (Map 11 C4)Centre/3rd arrondissementLouis Vuitton (p86)22 ave Montaigne(Map 8 G3)08 10 81 00 10www.vuitton.comWest/8th arrondissementMarie Mercié (p78)23 rue St-Sulpice (Map 16 E3)Centre/6th arrondissementOdette & Zoe (p63)4 rue des Petits Champs(Map 10 F3)Centre/2nd arrondissementRenaud Pelligrino (p86)14 rue du Faubourg St-Honoré(Map 9 B2)West/8th arrondissementViveka Bergström (p88)23 rue de la Grange-aux-Belles(Map 5 D5)North/10th arrondissementBeautyby Terry (p60)21 galérie Véro-Dodat (Map 10 F4)Centre/1st arrondissementGalerie Noémie (p84)92 ave des Champs-Elysées(Map 8 F1)West/8th arrondissementMake Up For Ever Professional(p85)8 rue de la Boétie (Map 8 H1)West/8th arrondissementSephora (p68)70–72 avenue des Champs-Elysées (Map 8 G2)01 53 93 22 50www.sephora.frWest/8th arrondissementYves Rocher (p68)104 rue de Rivoli (Map 10 G5)01 40 28 41 67www.yves-rocher.frCentre/1st arrondissementConcept StoresColette (p86)213 rue St-Honoré (Map 9 D3)01 55 35 33 90www.colette.frCentre/1st arrondissementGalerie Simone (p68)124 rue Vieille du Temple(Map 11 C4)Centre/3rd arrondissementSpree (p89)16 rue la Vieuville (Map 4 F2)North/18th arrondissementDepartment StoresLe Bon Marché (p80, p83)24 rue des Sèvres (Map 15 C3)www.lebonmarché.frCentre/7th arrondissementLes Galeries Lafayette (p83)40 blvd Haussmann(Map 9 E1)01 42 82 34 56www.galerieslafayette.comNorth/9th arrondissement
  • 210. Restaurants – Shops221€ cheap €€ moderate €€€ expensive (Price ranges: Restaurants, see p25, Hotels, see p173)Monoprix (p68)50 rue de Rennes (Map 16 E2)01 45 48 18 08www.monoprix.frCentre/6th arrondissementPrintemps (p83)64 boulevard Haussmann(Map 9 D1)01 42 82 50 00www.printemps.frNorth/9th arrondissementFashionAB33 (p69)33 rue Charlot (Map 11 C4)Centre/3rd arrondissementAbou dAbi Bazar (p68)10 rue des Francs Bourgeois(Map 17 C1)Centre/3rd arrondissementAgnès b (p76)6 (women’s) & 12 (men’s) ruedu Vieux Colombier(Map 15 D2)Centre/6th arrondissementAlter Mundi (p90)41 rue du Chemin Vert(Map 12 E5)East/11th arrondissementAnne Willi (see p91)13 rue Keller (Map 18 F2)01 48 06 74 06East/11th arrondissementAnnexe des Créateurs (p67)19 rue Godot de Mauroy(Map 9 C2)01 42 65 46 40North/9th arrondissementAntik Batik (p67)18 rue de Turenne(Map 17 C1)Centre/4th arrondissementAntoine & Lili (p87)95 quai de Valmy (Map 11 C1)North/10th arrondissementAPC (p76)3 & 4 rue Fleurus(Map 15 D4)Centre/6th arrondissementA-poc (p70)47 rue des Francs Bourgeois(Map 11 B5)Centre/4th arrondissementAzzedine Alaïa (p70)7 rue de Moussy (Map 17 A1)Centre/4th arrondissementBalenciaga (p86)10 avenue George V (Map 8 F3)01 47 20 21 11www.balenciaga.comWest/8th arrondissementBarbara Bui (p65)23 rue Etienne Marcel(Map 10 H4)Centre/2nd arrondissementCacharel (see p67)114 rue d’Alésia (Map 19 C4)01 45 42 53 04www.cacharel.comSouth/14th arrondissementCatherine Magnan (see p91)44 rue Traversière (Map18 F3)01 43 55 56 57East/12th arrondissementChanel (p86)42 ave Montaigne (Map8 G3)01 47 23 74 12www.chanel.comWest/8th arrondissementChloé (p86)54–56 rue du Faubourg-St-Honoré (Map 9 B2)01 44 94 33 00www.chloe.comWest/8th arrondissementChristian Lacroix (p86)73 rue du Faubourg-St-Honoré(Map 9 B2)01 42 68 79 00www.christian-lacroix.comWest/8th arrondissementComptoir des Cotonniers (p70)33 rue des Francs Bourgeois(Map 11 B5)Centre/4th arrondissementDépôt-Vente de Buci (p67)4–6 rue Bourbonle Château(Map 16 E2)01 46 34 45 05Centre/6th arrondissementDior (p86)30 ave Montaigne(Map8 G3)01 40 73 53 01www.dior.comWest/8th arrondissementDolce & Gabbana (p86)22 ave Montaigne (Map 8 G3)01 42 25 68 78www.dolcegabbana.comWest/8th arrondissementL’Eclaireur (p63)10 rue Hérold (Map 10 G3)Centre/1st arrondissementEmmanuel Ungaro (p86))2 ave Montaigne (Map 8 F3)01 53 57 00 22www.emmanuelungaro.frWest/8th arrondissementEtam (p68)67 rue de Rivoli (Map 17 A1)01 44 76 73 73www.etam.comCentre/1st arrondissementEt Vous Stock (p67)17 rue de Turbigo (Map 10 H4)01 40 13 04 12Centre/2nd arrondissementGaëlle Barré (p91)17 rue Keller (Map 18 F2)01 43 14 63 02East/11th arrondissementGinger Lyly (p87)33 rue Beaurepaire(Map 11 C2)North/10th arrondissementGuerrisol (p67)17bis blvd de Rochechouart(Map 4 H3)01 45 26 13 12North/9th arrondissementHelmut Lang (p61)219 rue St-Honoré (Map 10 E4)Centre/1st arrondissementIsabel Marant (p90)16 rue de Charonne(Map 18 E2)East/11th arrondissementJean-Paul Gaultier (p86)44 avenue George V (Map8 F2)01 44 43 00 44www.jeanpaulgaultier.comWest/8th arrondissementJohn Galliano (p86)384 rue St-Honoré(Map9 C3)01 55 35 40 40www.johngalliano.comCentre/1st arrondissementKookaï (p67, p68)82 rue Réamur(Map 11 A3)01 45 08 93 69www.kookai.frCentre/2nd arrondissementLagerfeld Gallery (p77)40 rue de Seine (Map 16 E1)Centre/6th arrondissementLanvin (p86)15 rue du Faubourg-St-Honoré(Map19 B2)01 44 71 31 25www.lanvin.frWest/8th arrondissementLili Perpink (p88)22 rue Vieuville (Map 4 F2)North/10th arrondissementLoft Design by (p78)56 rue de Rennes (Map 16 E2)Centre/6th arrondissementLucien Pellat-Finet (p81)1 rue Montalembert(Map 15 D1)Centre/7th arrondissementMadelios (p61)23 boulevard de la Madeleine(Map 9 C2)Centre/1st arrondissementMaria Luisa (p62)2 rue Cambon (Map 9 C3)Centre/1st arrondissementMarni (p86)57 ave Montaigne (Map 8 H2)01 56 88 08 08West/8th arrondissementMartine Sitbon (p81)13 rue Grenelle (Map 15 D2)Centre/7th arrondissementMartin Grant (p72)44 rue Vieille du Temple(Map 11 B5)Centre/4th arrondissementMartin Margiela (p62)23 & 25bis rue deMontpensier (Map 10 F3)Centre/1st arrondissementMorgan (p68)16 rue Turbigo (Map 10 H4)01 44 82 02 00www.morgan.frCentre/2nd arrondissement
  • 211. Index by Type222 www.eparis.dk.comShopsFashion continued...Nodus (p66)22 rue Vieille du Temple(Map 17 B1)Centre/4th arrondissementOnward (p78)147 boulevard St-Germain(Map 16 E2)Centre/6th arrondissementPatricia Louisor (p88)16 rue Houdon (Map 4 F3)North/18th arrondissementPaul & Joe (p77)40 rue du Four (Map 16 E2)Centre/6th arrondissementPaul Smith (p81)22 & 24 boulevard Raspail(Map 15 D3)Centre/7th arrondissementDes Petits Hauts (see p91)5 rue Keller (Map 18 F2)01 43 38 14 39East/11th arrondissementPrada (p86)10 ave Montaigne (Map 8 G3)01 53 23 99 40www.prada.comWest/8th arrondissementRéciproque (p67)93–95, 101 & 103 rue de laPompe (Métro Rue de la Pompe)01 47 04 30 28www.reciproque.frWest/16th arrondissementShadé (p79)63 rue des Sts-Pères(Map 15 D2)Centre/6th arrondissementShine (p89)30 rue de Charonne(Map 18 F2)East/11th arrondissementStella Cadente (p87)93 quai de Valmy(Map 11C1)North/10th arrondissementTara Jamon (p75)18 rue du Four (Map 16 E2)Centre/6th arrondissementValentino (p86)17 ave Montaigne(Map 8 G3)01 47 23 64 61www.valentino.itWest/8th arrondissementVanessa Bruno (p77)25 rue St-Sulpice (Map 16 E3)Centre/6th arrondissementVentilo (p63)13–15 boulevard de laMadeleine (Map 9 C2)Centre/1st arrondissementZadig & Voltaire (de luxe) (p84)18–20 rue François Premier(Map 8 G3)West/8th arrondissementFood & DrinkA L’Olivier (p74)23 rue de Rivoli (Map 17 B1)Centre/4th arrondissementFood (p67)58 rue Charlot (Map 11 C4)Centre/3rd arrondissementGoumanyat & Son Royaume(p66)3 rue Charles-François Dupuis(Map 11 C3)Centre/3rd arrondissementLa Grande Epicerie (p80)Le Bon Marché, 22 rue desSèvres (Map 15 C3)www.lebonmarché.frCentre/7th arrondissementLavinia (p64)3–5 boulevard de la Madeleine(Map 9 D2)Centre/1st arrondissementLa Maison du Chocolat (p75)19 rue de Sèvres(Map 15 C3)Centre/6th arrondissementInteriorsBô (p74)8 rue St-Merri(Map 11 A5)Centre/4th arrondissementLa Chaise Longue (p68)20 rue des Francs Bourgeois(Map 17 C1)Centre/3rd arrondissementChristian Tortu (p79)6 carrefour de l’Odéon(Map 16 F2)Centre/6th arrondissementCoin Canal (p88)1 rue de Marseille(Map 11 C1)North/10th arrondissementDeyrolle (p79)46 rue du Bac (Map 15 C1)Centre/7th arrondissementDiptyque (p74)34 boulevard St-Germain(Map 17 A3)Centre/5th arrondissementHervé Gambs (p71)9bis rue des Blancs Manteaux(Map 11 B5)Centre/4th arrondissementLa Maison de la FausseFourrure (p90)34 boulevard Beaumarchais(Map 17 D1)East/11th arrondissementRésonances (p85)3 boulevard Malesherbes(Map 9 C2)West/8th arrondissementRobert Le Héros (p65)13 rue de Saintonge(Map 11 C4)Centre/3rd arrondissementSentou (p73)18 & 24 rue du Pont Louis-Philippe (Map 17 B1)29 rue François Miron(Map 17 B1)Centre/4th arrondissementThomas Boog (p82)52 rue de Bourgogne (15 A1)Centre/7th arrondissementLingerieCarine Gilson (p80)61 rue Bonaparte (Map 16 E1)Centre/6th arrondissementErès (p84)2 rue Tronchet (Map 9 C1)West/8th arrondissementFifi Chachnil (p60)231 rue St-Honoré (Map 9 D3)Centre/1st arrondissementPrincesse Tam Tam (p68)79 rue St-Lazare (Map 3 D5)01 48 78 63 31www.princessetam-tam.comNorth/9th arrondissementSabbia Rosa (p75)73 rue des Sts-Pères(Map 15 D2)Centre/6th arrondissementVannina Vesperini (p75)63 rue des Sts-Pères(Map 15 D2)Centre/6th arrondissementWoman (p77)4 rue de Grenelle(Map 15 D2)Centre/6th arrondissementMarketsBoulevard des Batignolles(p156; Map 3 B3)North/18th arrondissementPuces de St-Ouen (p158)(Métro Porte de Clignancourt)North/Northern suburbsPuces de Vanves (p159;Métro Porte de Vanves)South/14th arrondissementMusic & BooksAfric’ Music (p81)3 rue des Plantes (Map 19 C3)01 45 42 43 52South/14th arrondissementArtazart (p87)83 quai de Valmy (Map 11 C1)North/10th arrondissementEn Avant la Zizique (p81)8 rue Baudelique(Métro Simplon)01 42 62 01 02www.la-zizique.comNorth/18th arrondissementfnac74 ave des Champs-Elysées(Map 8 G2) 01 53 53 64 64www.fnac.com.West/8th arrondissementPapageno (p81)1 rue de Marivaux (Map 10 F1)01 42 96 56 54www.papageno.frCentre/2nd arrondissement
  • 212. Shops – Art & Architecture223Paris Jazz Corner (p81)5&7 rue de Navarre(Map 17 A5)01 43 36 78 92www.parisjazzcorner.comCentre/5th arrondissementPublicis Drugstore (p83)133 avenue des Champs-Élysées (Map 8 F1)West/8th arrondissementTechno Import (p81)16–18 rue Taillandiers(Map 18 F2)01 48 05 71 56East/11th arrondissementVirgin Megastore52–60 ave des Champs-Elysées(Map 8 G2)01 49 53 50 00www.virginmega.frWest/8th arrondissementWave (p81)36 rue Keller(Map18 F1)01 40 21 86 98East/11th arrondissementPerfumesL’Artisan Parfumeur (p62)2 rue Amiral de Coligny(Map 10 F5)Centre/1st arrondissementEditions de Parfums FrédéricMalle (p80)37 rue de Grenelle(Map 15 C2)Centre/7th arrondissementGivenchy (p86)3 avenue George V(Map 8 F3)01 44 31 50 00www.givenchy.comWest/8th arrondissementIunx (p83)48–50 rue de lUniversité(Map 15 D1)Centre/7th arrondissementSalons du Palais Royal (p62)25 rue de Valois(Map 10 F3)Centre/1st arrondissementSecond-hand &VintageCatherine Arigoni (p82)14 rue Beaune (Map 15 D1)Centre/7th arrondissementE2 (p87)15 rue Martel (Map 11 A1)North/10th arrondissementKilliwatch (p65)64 rue Tiquetonne (Map 10 G3)Centre/2nd arrondissementLes Nuits de Satin (p89)9 rue Oberkampf (Map 11 D4)East/11th arrondissementLes 3 Marches de Catherine B(p76)1 & 3 rue Guisarde (Map 16 E2)Centre/6th arrondissementYukiko (p71)97 rue Vieille du Temple (Map11 C4)Centre/4th arrondissementShoesAndré (p68)2 rue Isly (Map 3 C5)01 44 69 32 63West/8th arrondissementCharles Jourdan (p84)23 rue François Premier(Map 8 F2)West/8th arrondissementChristian Louboutin (p60)19 rue Jean-Jacques Rousseau(Map 10 F4)Centre/1st arrondissementFree Lance (p76)30 rue du Four (Map 15 D2)Centre/6th arrondissementIris (p80)28 rue de Grenelle(Map 15 D2)Centre/7th arrondissementJean-Baptiste Rautureau (p82)24 rue de Grenelle(Map 15 D2)Centre/7th arrondissementPierre Hardy (p61)156 galérie de Valois(Map 10 F4)Centre/1st arrondissementRenaud Pellegrino (p83)14 rue du Faubourg-St-Honoré(Map 9 B2)West/8th arrondissementRoger Vivier (p86)29 rue du Faubourg-St-Honoré(Map 9 B2)West/8th arrondissementShoe Bizz (p66)48 rue Beaubourg (Map 11 A5)Centre/3rd arrondissementStephane Kélian (p86)5 rue du Faubourg-St-Honoré(Map 9 C2)West/8th arrondissementStationeryCalligrane (p71)4–6 rue du Pont Louis-Philippe(Map 17 A2)Centre/4th arrondissementArt &ArchitectureCemeteriesCimitière du Montmartre(p109; Map 3 D1)North/18th arrondissementCimitière du Montparnasse(p167; Map 19 C2)South/14th arrondissementCimitière du Passy (p109;Map 7 C4)West/16th arrondissementCimitière du Père-Lachaise(p109; Map 12 H4)East/20th arrondissementChurchesBasilique St-Denis (p108)1 rue de la Légion d’Honneur(Métro Basilique de St-Denis)North/Northern suburbsChapelle Expiatoire (p166)Rue Pasquier (Map 9 C1)West/8th arrondissementEglise de la Madeleine (p102)Pl de la Madeleine (Map 9 C2)West/8th arrondissementEglise St-Eustache (p97)Rue du Jour (Map 10 G4)Centre/1st arrondissementEglise St-Augustin (p102)46 blvd Malesherbes (Map 3 B5)West/8th arrondissementEglise St-Sulpice (p100)Place St-Sulpice (Map 16 E3)Centre/6th arrondissementNotre Dame (p110)Place du Parvis-Notre-Dame(Map 16 H2)01 42 34 56 10Centre/4th arrondissementSacré Coeur (p107)35 rue du Chevalier de la Barre(Map 4 G2)01 53 41 89 00North/18th arrondissementSt-Chapelle (p94)4 blvd du Palais(Map 16 G1)Centre/1st arrondissementSt-Julien-le-Pauvre (p163)Rue St-Julien-le-Pauvre(Map 16 H2)Centre/5th arrondissementExhibition SpacesAtelier Brancusi (p97)Pl Centre Pompidou (Map 11 A5)Centre/4th arrondissementBibliothèque Nationale deFrance – François Mitterand(p111)11 quai François Mauriac(Map 22 F3)South/13th arrondissementBibliothèque Nationale deFrance – Richelieu (p95)58 rue de Richelieu(Map 10 F3)Centre/2nd arrondissementChez Robert Electron Libre(p94)59 rue de Rivoli(Map 10 G5)Centre/1st arrondissementFondation Cartier pour l’ArtContemporain (p113)261 blvd Raspail(Map 19 D2)South/14th arrondissement
  • 213. Index by Type224 Click through to Paris’s art venues via www.eparis.dk.comArt &ArchitectureExhibition Spacescontinued...Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson (p113)2 impasse Lebouis(Map 19 B2)South/14th arrondissementLes Frigos (p112)rue des Frigos(Map 22 F4)South/13th arrondissementGrand Palais (p103)3 avenue du GénéralEisenhower (Map 9 A3)01 44 13 17 30West/8th arrondissementInstitut du Monde Arabe (p98)1 rue des Fossés St-Bernard(Map 17 B3)Centre/5th arrondissementJeu de Paume (p95)1 pl de la Concorde(Map 9 C3)Centre/1st arrondissementLouise Weiss. rue (p112)(Map 21 D3)South/13th arrondissementMaison Européene de laPhotographie (p98)5–7 rue de Fourcy (Map 17 B1)Centre/4th arrondissementMusée du Luxembourg (p100)19 rue de Vaugirard(Map 16 E3)Centre/6th arrondissementPalais du Tokyo (p104)13 avenue du Président Wilson(Map 8 E3)West/16th arrondissementPatrimoine Photographique(p97)62 rue St-Antoine (Map 17 C2)Centre/4th arrondissementPetit Palais (p103)Avenue Winston Churchill(Map 9 A3)01 40 05 56 78West/8th arrondissementHistoric BuildingsArènes de Lutèce (p99)Entrance on 49 rue Monge &7 rue de Navarre(Map 17 A5)Centre/5th arrondissementAssemblée Nationale (p110)126 rue de l’Université01 40 063 60 00(Map 9 A4)Centre/7th arrondissementCatacombes (p113)1 pl Denfert Rochereau(Map 20 E3)South/14th arrondissementChateau de St-Germain (p106)Place Charles de Gaulle(RER St-Germain-en-Laye)West/Western SuburbsLa Conciergerie (p110)1 quai de l’Horloge(Map 16G1)01 53 73 78 50Centre/1st arrondissementGare du Nord (p110) (Map 5 A4)North/10th arrondissementMoulin de la Galette (p107)75 rue Lepic(Map 4 E1)North/18th arrondissementMoulin de Radet (p107)83 rue Lepic(Map 4 F1)North/18th arrondissementOpéra Garnier (p110, p122)Place de l’Opéra(Map 9 D1)08 92 89 90 90www.opera-de-paris.frNorth/9th arrondissementLa Sorbonne (p99)47 rue des Ecoles(Map 16 G3)Centre/5th arrondissementTour Eiffel (p110)Champs de Mars01 44 11 23 23www.tour-eiffel.frCentre/7th arrondissementTour St-Jacques (p94)Place du ChâteletCentre/1st arrondissementModern ArchitectureCité Universitaire (p112)Boulevard Jourdan(Métro Cité Universitaire)South/14th arrondissementMinistère des Finances (p111)(Map 22 F1)East/12th arrondissementStade de France (p198, p127)rue Francis de PressenséSt-Denis (Métro St-Denis Portede Paris)North/Northern suburbsMuseumsCentre Pompidou (p100)Rue Beaubourg (Map 11 A5)01 44 78 12 33www.centrepompidou.frCentre/4th arrondissementCité des Sciences et del’Industrie (p108)Parc de la Villette, 30 aveCorentin Cariou (Métro Porte dePantin)North/19th arrondissementEglise Royale du Val-de-Grâce(p99) 277bis rue St-Jacques(Map 20 F1)Centre/5th arrondissementFondation Le Corbusier (p105)Villa la Roche, 10 square du DrBlanche (Métro Jasmin)West/16th arrondissementManufacture des Gobelins(p112)42 avenue des Gobelins(Map 21 A3)South/13th arrondissementMémorial du Maréchal Leclerc(p113)23 allée de la deuxième(Map 19 B1)South/15th arrondissementMusée d’Art et d’Histoire duJudaïsme (p96)71 rue du Temple (Map 11 A5)Centre/3rd arrondissementMusée d’Art et d’Histoire deSt-Denis (p109)22bis rue Gabriel Péri (MétroSt-Denis Porte de Paris)North/Northern suburbsMusèe de l’AssistancePublique (p99)47 quai de la Tournelle(Map 17 A3)Centre/5th arrondissementMusée Carnavalet (p95)23 rue de Sevigné (Map 17 C1)Centre/3rd arrondissementMusée du Cinéma (p111)51 rue de Bercy (Map 22 G2)East/12th arrondissementMusée Cognacq-Jay (p97)8 rue Elzévi (Map 11 C5)Centre/4th arrondissementMusée Départemental MauriceDenis "Le Prieuré" (p106)2bis rue Maurice Denis(RER St-Germain-en-Laye)West/Western suburbsMusée d’Erotisme (p106)72 blvd de Clichy (Map 4 E3)North/18th arrondissementMusée Galliéra (p102)10 avenue Pierre 1er de Serbie(Map 8 E3)West/16th arrondissementMusée Guimet (p105)6 place d’Iéna (Map 8 E3)West/16th arrondissementMusée Gustave Moreau (p109)14 rue de la Rochefoucauld(Map 4 E4)North/9th arrondissementMusée Jacquemart-André(p102)158 blvd Haussmann(Map 2 H5)West/8th arrondissementMusée du Louvre (p100)Cour Napoléon (Map 10 E5)01 40 20 53 17www.louvre.frCentre/1st arrondissementMusée Maillol – FondationDina Vierny (p101)59–61 rue de Grenelle(Map 15 D2)Centre/7th arrondissementMusée Marmottan-Monet (p105)2 rue Louis Boilly(Métro Ranelagh)West/16th arrondissement
  • 214. 225Art & Architecture – PerformanceMusée de Montmartre (p107)12 rue Cortot (Map 4 F1)01 46 06 61 11North/18th arrondissementMusée de la Musique (p108)Cité de la Musique,221 ave Jean Jaurès(Métro Porte de Pantin)North/19th arrondissementMusée National d’Art Moderne(MAMVP) (p104)11 ave du Président Wilson(Map 8 E3)West/16th arrondissementMusée National EugèneDelacroix (p100)6 rue de Furstemberg(Map 16 E2)Centre/6th arrondissementMusée National du Moyen Age(p98)6 pl Paul-Painlevé (Map 16 G3)Centre/5th arrondissementMusée Nationale Picasso (p96)5 rue de Thorigny (Map 11 C5)Centre/3rd arrondissementMusée d’Orsay (p100)1 rue de la Légion d’Honneur(Map 9 C5) 01 45 49 48 14Centre/7th arrondissementMusée de la Publicité (p96)107 rue de Rivoli (Map 10 E4)Centre/1st arrondissementMusée Rodin (p101)77 rue de Varenne (Map 15 A1)Centre/7th arrondissementPalais de Chaillot (p104)17 pl du Trocadéro (Map 7 C4)West/16th arrondissementPalais de la Découverte (p103)Avene Franklin D Roosevelt(Map 8 H3) 01 56 43 20 21www.palais-decouverte.frWest/8th arrondissementPerformanceCinemaAction Christine Odeon (p120)4 rue Christine (Map 16 F2)01 43 25 85 78Centre/6th arrondissementAction Ecole (p120)23 rue des Ecoles (Map 16 H3)01 43 25 72 07Centre/5th arrondissementLe Champo Llion (p120)51 rue des Ecoles (Map16 H3)01 43 54 51 60www.lechampo.comCentre/5th arrondissementCinéma en Plein Air (p124)Parc de la Villette(Métro Porte de Pontin)North/19th arrondissementGrand Action (p120)5 rue des Ecoles(Map 17 A4)01 43 54 47 62Centre/5th arrondissementLe Grand Rex (p119)1 blvd Poissonnière(Map 10 H2)Centre/2nd arrondissementForum des Images (p118)Forum des Halles (PorteEustache; Map 10 G4)Centre/1st arrondissementImages d’Ailleurs (p120)21 rue de la Clef(Map 21 A1)01 45 87 18 09Centre/5th arrondissementMK2 Bibliothèque (p127)128–162 avenue de France(Map 22 F3)South/13th arrondissementLa Pagode (p118)57 rue de Babylone(Map 15 A2)Centre/7th arrondissementQuartier Latin (p120)9 rue Champollion (Map 16 G3)01 43 26 84 65Centre/5th arrondissementRacine Odeon (p120)6 rue de lEcole de Médecine(Map16 F3)01 46 33 43 71Centre/6th arrondissementReflet Medicis (p120)3 rue Champollion (Map 16 G3)01 46 33 25 97Centre/5th arrondissementSt-André-des-Arts (p120)30 rue St André des Arts(Map 16 F2), 01 43 26 48 18Centre/6th arrondissementStudio Galande (p120)42 rue Galande (Map 16 H3)01 43 54 72 71www.studiogalande.frCentre/5th arrondissementStudio 28 (p123)10 rue Tholozé (4 E2)North/18th arrondissementCircus & CabaretBal du Moulin Rouge (p124)82 blvd de Clichy (Map 4 E2)01 53 09 82 82www.moulinrouge.comNorth/18th arrondissementChez Madame Arthur (p124)75bis rue des Martyrs (Map 4 F3)01 42 54 40 21North/18th arrondissementChez Michou (p124)80 rue des Martyrs(Map 4 F3)01 46 06 16 04www.michou.comNorth/18th arrondissementCirque d’Hiver Bouglione(p125)110 rue Amelot (Map 11 D4)East/11th arrondissementCrazy Horse (p124)12 avenue George V(Map 8 F3)01 47 23 97 90www.lecrazyhorseparis.comWest/8th arrondissementLido (p124)116bis avenue des Champs-Elysées (Map 8 F1)01 40 76 56 10www.lido.frWest/8th arrondissementParadis Latin (p124)28 rue du Cardinal Lemoine(Map 17 A4)01 43 25 28 28Centre/5th arrondissementComedyCafé de la Gare (p119)41 rue du Temple(Map 11 A5)Centre/4th arrondissementHotel du Nord (p123)102 quai de Jemmapes(Map 11 C1)North/10th arrondissementLe Point Virgule (p118)7 rue St-Croix de la Bretonnerie(Map 17 B1)Centre/4th arrondissementDanceCentre National de la Danse(p124)1 rue Victor Hugo, Pantin(Métro Hoche RER Pantin)North/Northern SuburbsLe Regard du Cygne (p126)210 rue de Belleville(Métro Télégraphe)East/20th arrondissementLive MusicBataclan (P126)50 blvd Voltaire(Map 12 E4)East/11th arrondissementCité de la Musique (p123)221 avenue Jean Jaurès(Métro Porte de Pantin)North/19th arrondissementDuc des Lombards (p118)42 rue des Lombards(Map 10 H5)Centre/1st arrondissementElysée Montmartre (p123)72 blvd Rochechouart(Map 4 G3)North/18th arrondissementLa Guinguette Pirate (p126)Quai Francois-Mauriac(Map 22 F3)South/13th arrondissement
  • 215. 226PerformanceLive Music continued...Maison de la Radio France(p122)116 avenue Président Kennedy(Map 13 B2)West/16th arrondissementLa Maroquinerie (p126)23 rue de Boyer(Métro Ménilmontant)East/20th arrondissementNew Morning (p122)7–9 rue des Petites-Ecuries(Map 11 A1)North/10th arrondissementLe Zénith (p124)211 avenue Jean Jaurès(Métro Porte de Pontin)North/19th arrondissementMulti-function venuesBouffes du Nord (p122)37bis boulevard de la Chapelle(Map 5 B2)North/10th arrondissementCafé de la Danse (p125)5 psg Louis-Philippe (Map 18E2)East/11th arrondissementLucernaire (p121)53 rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs (Map 15 D5)Centre/6th arrondissementOpéra Garnier (p110, p122)Place de l’Opéra (Map 9 D1)08 92 89 90 90www.opera-de-paris.frNorth/9th arrondissementThéâtre des Champs-Elysées(p121)15 ave Montaigne(Map 8 G3)West/8th arrondissementThéâtre du Châtelet(p119)1 pl du Châtelet(Map 16 H1)Centre/1st arrondissementThéâtre de la Ville (p121)2 pl du Châtelet(Map 16 H1)Centre/4th arrondissementOperaOpéra Bastille (p122)2–6 place de la Bastille(Map 18 E2)01 92 89 90 90www.opera-de-paris.frEast/12th arrondissementSportHippodrome de Vincennes(p127)2 route de la Ferme(RER Maisons-Alforts)01 49 77 17 17East/12th arrondissementHippodrome de Longchamp(p127)Routes des Tribunes, Bois deBoulogne(Métro Boulogne J Jaurès)08 21 21 32 13West/16th arrondissementPalais Ominsport de Paris-Bercy (POPB) (p127)8 blvd de Bercy (Map 22 F1)01 40 02 60 60www.bercy.frEast/12th arrondissementParc des Princes (p127)24 rue du CommandantGuilbaud (Métro Porte St-Cloud)08 11 65 25 25www.psg.frWest/16th arrondissementStade de France (p127, p198)rue Francis de Pressensé(Métro St-Denis Porte de Paris)North/Northern suburbsStade Jean-Bouin (p127)26 avenue du Général-Sarrail(Métro Porte de St-Cloud)01 46 51 55 40www.stade.comWest/16th arrondissementStade Pierre de Coubertin (p127)82 avenue Georges Lafont(Métro Porte de St-Cloud)01 45 27 79 12West/16th arrondissementStade Roland Garros (p127)2 avenue Gordon Bennett(Métro Porte d’Auteuil)www.fft.fr/rolandgarros/fr01 47 43 48 00West/16th arrondissementTheatreCartoucherie de Vincennes(p125)Route du Champ deManœuvre, Bois de Vincennes(Métro Château de Vincennes )Comédie Française (p119)1 place Colette(Map 10 E4)Centre/1st arrondissementThéâtre de l’Aquarium01 43 74 99 61www.theatredelaquarium.comThéâtre des Champs-Elysées(p121)15 avenue Montaigne (8 G3)West/8th arrondissementThéâtre du Chaudron01 43 28 97 04Théâtre de la Cité (p127)21 boulevard Jourdan(RER Cité Universitaire)South/14th arrondissementThéâtre de l’Epée de Bois01 48 08 39 74East/12th arrondissementThéâtre du Soleil01 43 74 24 08www.theatre-du-soleil.frThéâtre de la Têmpete01 43 28 36 36www.la-tempete.frHotelsAparthotelsCitadines (p180)08 25 33 33 32www.citadines.comFrance Apartments (p180)97 ave des Champs-Elysées(Map 8 F1)01 56 89 31 00www.parisrentapart.comWest/8th arrondissementHotel du Degrès de NotreDame (p174, p180)10 rue des Grands Degrés(Map 16 H3)Centre/6th arrondissementHotel Résidence Henri IV (p180)50 rue Bernadins (Map 16 H3)01 44 41 31 81www.residencehenri4.comCentre/5th arrondissementResidence Carré d’Or (p180)46 ave George V (Map 8 F1)01 40 70 05 05West/8th arrondissementCheapHotel des Arts (p181)5 rue Tholoze (Map 4 E2)North/18th arrondissementHotel Beaumarchais (p181)3 rue Oberkampf (Map 11 D4)East/11th arrondissementHotel Eldorado (p179)18 rue des Dames (Map 3 C2)West/17th arrondissementHotel Esméralda (p174)4 rue St-Julien-le-Pauvre(Map 16 H2)Centre/5th arrondissementHotel Langlois (p180)63 rue St-Lazare (Map 3 D5)North/9th arrondissementHotel du Lys (p174)23 rue Serpente(Map 16 G2)Centre/6th arrondissementHotel Malar (p177)29 rue Malar (Map 8 G5)Centre/7th arrondissementIndex by Typewww.eparis.dk.com
  • 216. 227Hotel Mayet (p176)3 rue Mayet (Map 15 B4)Centre/6th arrondissementHotel Roubaix (p172)6 rue Greneta (Map 10 H3)Centre/3rd arrondissementHotel Tiquetonne (p172)6 rue Tiquetonne(Map 10 H4)Centre/2nd arrondissementHotel Utrillo (p181)7 rue Aristide Bruant(Map 4 E2)North/18th arrondissementRoyal Fromentin (p180)11 rue Fromentin (Map 4 E3)North/9th arrondissementModerateArtus (p175)34 rue de Buci (Map 16 E2)Centre/6th arrondissementHotel Lenox (p176)9 rue de l’Université(Map 15 D1)Centre/7th arrondissementHotel du Panthéon (p175)19 pl du Panthéon(Map 16 G4)Centre/5th arrondissementHotel du Quai Voltaire(p176)19 quai Voltaire (Map 9 D5)Centre/7th arrondissementHotel des St-Pères(p176)65 rue des St-Pères (Map 15 D2)Centre/6th arrondissementHotel Terrass (p180)12–14 rue Joseph de Maistre(Map 4 E2)North/18th arrondissementHotel Tonic (p172)12 rue du Roule(Map 10 G5)Centre/1st arrondissementNovotel Tour Eiffel (p181)61 quai de Grenelle (Map 13 B3)South/15th arrondissementVilla D’Estrées (p174)17 rue Git-le-Couer (Map 16 G2)Centre/6th arrondissementExpensiveLe Crillon (p177)10 pl de la Concorde (Map 9 B3)01 44 71 15 00www.crillon.comWest/8th arrondissementHilton Paris Arc de Triomphe(p179)51–57 rue des Courcelles(Map 2 G4)West/8th arrondissementL’Hotel (p175)13 rue des Beaux Arts (Map 16 E1)Centre/6th arrondissementHotel A (p177)4 rue d’Artois (Map 8 H1)West/8th arrondissementHotel Square (p179)3 rue des Boulainvilliers(Map 13 A2)West/16th arrondissementLe Meurice (p177)228 rue de Rivoli (Map 9 D3)01 44 58 10 10www.meuricehotel.comCentre/1st arrondissementPavillon de la Reine (p172)28 pl des Vosges (Map 17 D1)Centre/4th arrondissementPershing Hall (p178)49 rue Pierre-Charron(Map 8 G2)West/8th arrondissementLa Plaza Athenée (p177)25 ave Montaigne (Map 8 G3)01 53 67 66 67www.plaza-athenee-paris.comWest/8th arrondissementRitz Hotel (p177)15 pl Vendôme (Map 9 D3)01 43 16 30 70www.ritzparis.comCentre/1st arrondissementHotel de Vigny (p177)9–11 rue Balzac (Map 8 F1)West/8th arrondissementPerformance – Hotels€ cheap €€ moderate €€€ expensive (Price ranges: Restaurants, see p25, Hotels, see p173)
  • 217. 228 www.eparis.dk.comTravel InformationArrivalParis has two airports: Roissy Charlesde Gaulle is the largest and handlesinternational flights; Orly servesnational and European destinations.Roissy Charles de GaulleThe most popular public-transport linkis RER B (via the Roissyrail bus), with ajourney time of around 30 minutes intocentral Paris. Alternatively, Roissybuswill drop you at Opéra, taking 50 min-utes. Both services run approximately6am–11:30pm. Air France also runstwo bus services: to Porte Maillot andEtoile (5:45am–11pm) and to Garede Lyon and Montparnasse (7am–9:30pm). For details of times andticket prices, check the ADP website.Bus de Nuit bus services run throughthe night. For hassle-free transfers,you can book a shuttle bus (try ParisAirports Service or Airport Connection)direct to your hotel. The price dependson the number of passengers (usuallyabout 16–25€ per person) but ischeaper than taking a taxi (around50€). Limousine transfers are offeredby companies such as AirportLimousine Service (around 100€).OrlyTo get into town by train, there arethree options: catch the Orlyval shuttletrain that connects with RER B, theOrlyrail bus for RER C, or the Jetbus toget on to the Métro. Alternatively, youcan travel direct to Denfert-Rochereauon the Orlybus service, which takesaround 30 minutes. Air Francecoaches take around 30 minutes toreach Montparnasse and Invalides.Check the ADP website for details.Taxi, shuttle bus and limousineservices are also available from Orly –check the websites of PariShuttle,Airport Connection and AirportLimousine Service for more details.By TrainParis has six long-distance trainstations, each serving a differentregion. All train stations are centrallylocated and have Métro stations, busstops and taxi ranks nearby. High-speed services between the UK,Germany and Benelux are provided byEurostar and Thalys; within France,the railway network is run by SNCF.Getting AroundCentral Paris is compact and easy totackle on foot, but the excellent publictransport system is a pleasure to use.Public TransportParis’s Métro system is one of the bestin the world, and still improving – mostParis’s public transport network (RATP) comprises the Métro, theRER (suburban train service), buses and trams, and is both efficientand reasonably priced.Taxis and the Batobus (water bus) serviceprovide alternatives, but visitors often find that it is easier, quickerand more rewarding to explore the heart of Paris on foot.Thefollowing information covers the key aspects of getting aroundParis; for further details, see www.eparis.co.uk.recently with the addition of hi-techdriverless trains on the new line 14.The Métro runs from 5:30am to 1am,and is the quickest and most reliableway of getting across town. Shorthops (especially those involvingtransfers) are not recommended,however, as they often take longer –and involve more legwork – thansimply walking from A to B.Buses are faster than the Métro overshort distances, with the added bonusof being able to see where you’regoing, but it is at night-time that thebus network really comes into its own:Noctambuses (see the RATP website)are the only form of public transportin operation between 1 and 5am.These are very user-friendly and amust for night owls who don’t want totake taxis – they operate outwardsfrom the centre, leaving Châtelethourly on the half hour and leavingtheir end stops hourly on the hour totravel back into town. Travel passesare valid, but single tickets (seebelow) are not. Fares start at 2.30€.Single tickets, valid on all publictransport, cost 1.40€ each, or 10.50€for a carnet (book) of ten. A Métro tripuses one ticket – including transfers,as long as you don’t leave the Métrosystem. (Inattentive travellers beware:it is not always possible to changedirection without exiting the station.)Bus and tram journeys within centralParis also use one ticket each, buttransfers are not permitted.The Carte Mobilis (5.30€ for zones 1and 2) allows you to travel on all bus,Métro, RER and tram lines all day; ifyou are staying longer than a few days,
  • 218. 229Buses with two-digit numbers stay within central Paris; suburban services have three digitsTravel InformationDirectoryADP (Aéroports de Paris)01 48 62 19 12 (CDG),01 49 75 15 15 (Orly)www.adp.frAirport Connection01 43 65 55 55www.airport-connection.comAirport Limousine Service01 40 71 84 62AlloVisit04 95 04 95 32 or 08 92 68 33 14www.allovisit.comBus de Nuit08 10 02 02 02City Segway Tours01 56 58 10 54www.citysegwaytours.comEdible Pariswww.edible-paris.comEurostar08 92 35 35 39www.eurostar.frFat Tire Bike Tours01 56 58 10 54www.fattirebiketoursparis.comFrance Montgolfières08 10 60 01 53Helifrance Paris01 48 35 90 44Paris Airports Service01 55 98 10 80www.parisairportservice.comParis à Velo c’est Sympa01 48 87 60 01www.parisvelosympa.comPariShuttle01 53 39 18 18www.parishuttle.comRATP08 92 68 77 14 • www.ratp.frSNCF36 35 • www.sncf.comThalys35 36 or 08 92 35 35 36www.thalys.comCarte Orange (with photo ID) offers thesame deal on a weekly (Mon–Sun only;15.40€) or monthly (calendar monthonly; 50.40€) basis. The tourist optionis the Paris Visite ticket – available for1, 2, 3 or 5 days. As well as unlimitedtravel, this offers discounts on toursand some shops (such as Les GaleriesLafayette), but at 8.35€ for the 1-dayversion, you really do have to use thediscounts to get your money’s worth.Tickets (but not passes) must bevalidated at the start of your journey –either in station turnstiles (Métro andRER) or as you board buses and trams.When travelling by bus, you shouldalso show your ticket to the driver.TaxisThe best way to get a taxi is to queueat one of the city’s many taxi ranks.This is often quicker and cheaper thancalling for a cab, and easier than hail-ing one on the street (they never stopnear a rank). You’ll find taxi ranks atrailway stations and at bigger Métrostops (for a full list and more tips onParisian taxis, see www.paris-taxi.com).DrivingThere is really little benefit to drivingin Paris: the city is well known for itsaggressive drivers and if you musttake to the road, you will need nervesof steel and an up-to-date map of thecity’s labyrinthine one-way systems.Drivers from outside the EU shouldalso carry an international licence.The city speed limit is 50 km/h(31 mph) – though many driversignore this – and parking spaces areas sparse as they are expensive.Bicycles & Roller BladesBicyle hire is possible (try Paris à Veloc’est Sympa) and cycle maps areavailable from major Métro stations.Hiring roller blades is also an option(see p18), but the streets of Paris arenot the place for novices. Take care –drivers have scant respect for anyother road users’ rights or safety.ToursThere are plenty of guided walks, bustours and river cruises to choose from– full listings can be found on theOffice du Tourisme de Paris website(see p231) and at http://paris.city-discovery.com. For a low-key boat trip,take to the canal (see p106). Some ofthe less obvious tour options aredetailed below.Fat Tire Bike Tours offers day- andnight-time bicycle tours around Paris.Tours take 4 hours or more but are notstrenuous, and children are cateredfor with tandems and child seats.If you prefer posing to pedalling,join a City Segway Tour. These offer aunique opportunity to experience Parisby electric scooter – and you do get topractise before you hit the streets.For stunning aerial views, take ahelicopter tour with Helifrance Paris,or see the city the romantic way froma hot-air balloon (try one of the tripsrun by France Montgolfières).The flexible option is AlloVisit’s tour– this can be taken at your leisure,guided only by your mobile phone. Or,if you’re feeling self-indulgent, order atailor-made itinerary from EdibleParis: anything goes on this tour, aslong as it is food-related.
  • 219. 230Practical Informationwww.eparis.dk.comDisabled TravellersUnfortunately, much of Paris’s public-transport network is inaccessible towheelchair- (and pram-) users, thoughwheelchair-friendly buses are graduallyreplacing the old stock. On the Métro,only line 14 has stair-free access at allstations. Station staff rarely go out oftheir way to help, but leaflets aboutdisabled facilities are available at mainstations, and there is a Compagnonsdu Voyage service which provideshelpers to accompany disabledpeople on public transport (25€ perhour). Guide dogs can ride on publictransport, but owners must pay 50%of the fare for them.Taxi drivers are bound by law toassist disabled passengers and acceptguide dogs, but not all cabs areequipped to carry wheelchairs.The French Tourisme & Handicapsassociation has a list of disability-friendly accommodation, restaurants,cultural sites and leisure facilities,which is also posted on the Office duTourisme de Paris website. There areseparate criteria for those cateringto physical, mental, hearing andvisual disabilities.There are several organizations thatspecialize in guided tours of the cityfor disabled people – check with thetourist office for information.Emergencies & HealthFrench pharmacists are highly trainedand therefore authorized to sell somemedicines that are not available overthe counter at home. As they can alsousually direct you to the nearestdoctor, they are always a good firstport of call for minor ailments. Afterhours, a note on the door will directyou to the nearest late-opening phar-macy; alternatively, try Pharmacy desChamps – one of the few that stayopen all night. Paris’s hospitals allhave A&E departments, but if yourFrench isn’t up to scratch, you mayprefer to try the American Hospital inParis or the Hertford British Hospital.Both are private, so check beforehandthat your insurance will cover the cost.Check www.magicparis.com for a listof English-speaking doctors.Gay and Lesbian TravellersThe legal age of sexual consent is 16and Parisians are generally very toler-ant of same-sex relationships. Themost openly gay areas, with lots ofgay bars and clubs, are in the 1st–4tharrondissements. The Lesbian & GayCentre Paris is on hand for support.Left LuggageParis’s six main stations all have left-luggage facilities. The airports do not.Paris is not a difficult city for most visitors, although people withspecial needs can find it tricky to access information and get around.The city’s Office du Tourisme has an excellent website packed withuseful information and suggestions, and several welcome centresdotted around the city, which increase significantly in number over thesummer months.The following is some essential practical inform-ation; for further tips and information, check www.eparis.dk.com.Listings/What’s OnPariscope and Officiel des Spectaclesare well-known, comprehensivelistings magazines. The tourist officealso publishes a free monthly guidecalled Where: Paris, available frominformation kiosks across town. Thewebsite www.novaplanet.com gives amore underground perspective onwhat the city has to offer.MoneyIf you need to exchange cash, banksusually offer a better rate of exchangethan the bureaux de change that areclustered around the tourist hotspotsand along the Champs-Elysées, evenonce you have taken commission intoaccount. Withdrawing cash from anATM is a much simpler – and usuallycheaper – way of getting your euros.Your bank will usually offer a competi-tive exchange rate, but may chargemore commission for small transac-tions, so it is best to withdraw largerrather than smaller amounts. Checkwith your bank before you leave home.Opening HoursMost restaurants close between lunchand dinner, while cafés typically stayopen from the morning until the endof the afternoon, when restaurants re-open. Brasseries often remain openuntil very late. Bars (and bar-like cafés)tend to open from mid-afternoon untilthe early hours. Some late bars stayopen until around 6am.Shops and restaurants are generallyclosed on Sundays – though someshops (typically tobacconists andgeneral stores) open briefly on Sunday
  • 220. 231Practical InformationThe Town Hall (Mairie de Paris) website (www.paris.fr) has lots of handy informationDirectoryAmbulance (SAMU)15American Hospital in Paris63 bd Victor Hugo, Neuilly-sur-SeineMétro Pont de Levallois-Bécon01 46 41 25 25www.american-hospital.orgCafé Psycho13 rue de Médicis, 6ème01 43 25 21 81Compagnons du Voyage01 53 11 11 12www.compagnons.comDentist (SOS Dentaire)01 43 37 51 00Directory Assistance12Doctor on Call (SOS Médécin)01 47 07 77 77English-language Help (SOS Help)01 46 21 46 46Fire Brigade (Pompiers)18Hertford British Hospital3 rue Barbès, Levallois-PerretMétro Anatole France01 46 39 22 22www.british-hospital.orgLesbian & Gay Centre Paris3 rue Keller, 11ème01 43 57 21 47 • www.cglparis.orgOffice du Tourisme de Pariswww.parisinfo.comParis-Cy8 rue de Jouy, 4ème01 42 71 37 37 • www.paris-cy.comPharmacy Des Champs84 ave des Champs-Elysées, 8ème01 45 62 02 41Police17Tourisme & Handicaps01 44 11 10 41tourisme.handicaps@club-internet.frYellow Pages (Pages Jaunes)www.pagesjaunes.frmorning. The exceptions to this ruleare generally found in the Marais andalong the Champs-Elysées. Late-nightshopping is on Thursdays until 9pm.Most museums and many shops areclosed on Mondays. Small shops mayalso close for lunch, as do many localbank and post office branches. Parkstend to open from dawn to dusk daily.Public holidays are 1 Jan, 1 May, 8May, 14 Jul, 15 Aug, 1 Nov, 11 Nov, 25Dec, Easter Monday, Ascension andWhit Monday. Paris closes down onthese days, and anywhere that doesopen will usually keep Sunday hours.The city also practically shuts down inAugust for the summer break; duringthis month, it is always best to phoneahead to check that your restaurant,bar or boutique of choice is open.Phones andCommunicationsMany public telephone boxes arefalling into disrepair and, given therise in use of mobile phones, they areoften left unrepaired. If they do work,you will most likely need to use aphonecard (available from Métro sta-tions and tabacs). Some cafés andbars have public phones.Non-residents cannot buy a FrenchSIM card, though if you know a resi-dent, they can buy one on your behalf.Phone-hire companies advertise atairports, but they rarely offer signifi-cant savings over a roaming contract.Internet cafés are springing up allover the city – especially along theChamps-Elysées. Small local placesoffer good deals but little availability,and have a habit of closing down atshort notice. Visit www.pidf.comfor an up-to-date list of internetcafés, or try Café Psycho or Paris-Cy if you’re having trouble gettingonline elsewhere.Stamps are sold by many tabacs,some hotels and most postcardvendors. Post boxes are yellow andare marked “La Poste”.SecurityEveryone must carry ID (passport or EUidentity card) at all times. Police may– and in the case of ethnic minorities,frequently do – ask to see it. Certainareas in the north of Paris – La Goutted’Or (see p158) in particular – are bestavoided after dark.TippingIn restaurants, cafés and bars, serviceis usually included, but most Parisianswill round up their drinks bill to thenearest euro, and leave a couple ofeuros for good service in a restaurantor café. Where service is not included,you should leave around 15%. Taxidrivers and hairdressers expect asimilar percentage, and in hotels youshould tip porters a couple of eurosper item, and other hotel staff thesame amount per day.Tourist InformationThe main Office du Tourisme de Parisis at 25 rue des Pyramides, 1er (Map10 E3) and is one of seven permanentwelcome centres. In addition, thereare numerous seasonal welcomecentres that are open from Junethrough August. Check the website(see directory) for details.
  • 221. General Index1st arrondissementart and architecture 210bars and clubs 211hotels 212performance 211restaurants 208shops 2092nd arrondissementart and architecture 210bars and clubs 211hotels 212performance 211restaurants 208shops 2093rd arrondissementart and architecture 210bars and clubs 211hotels 212restaurants 208shops 2094th arrondissementart and architecture 210bars and clubs 211performance 211restaurants 208shops 2095th arrondissementart and architecture 210bars and clubs 211hotels 212performance 211restaurants 208shops 2096th arrondissementart and architecture 210bars and clubs 212hotels 212performance 211restaurants 208shops 2097th arrondissementart and architecture 211bars and clubs 212hotels 212performance 21114th arrondissement (cont.)shops 21715th arrondissementart and architecture 217hotels 217restaurants 21716th arrondissementart and architecture 213bars and clubs 214hotels 214performance 213restaurants 213shops 21317th arrondissementhotels 214restaurants 21318th arrondissementart and architecture 215bars and clubs 215hotels 216performance 215restaurants 214shops 21519th arrondissementart and architecture 215performance 215restaurants 21420th arrondissementrestaurants 216shops 216AA L’Olivier 74A-poc 70A Priori Thé 55A Toutes Vapeurs 41AB33 58, 69Abazu 23, 34Abbesses 158Abou d’Abi Bazar 68, 155Académie Française 110Action Christine Odeon 120Action Ecole 120Afric’ Music 81Agnès b 59, 76airports 228transport from/to 228Alaïa, Azzedine 70Allard 34Alleno, Yannick 25Allociné 118Alter Mundi 90alternative entertainment 117L’Ambassade d’Auvergne 27L’Ambroisie 23, 29ambulances 231L’Ami Jean 36Amnesia 138Anahï 27André 68Andy Wahloo 15, 137Angelina 55L’Angle du Faubourg 39Annexe des Créateurs 67Antik Batik 58, 67antiques fairs 14Antoine & Lili 87Anuhuacalli 31aparthotels 180APC 76apéritifs 16Les Apéros de Jeudis 16Apollo 16Arabic venues 19arcades 82architecture 15, 92–113L’Ardoise 24Arènes de Lutèce 15, 99Arigoni, Catherine 58, 82L’Arpège 36art and architecture 92–113churches 223exhibition spaces 223historic buildings 224modern architecture 224museums 224art galleries 15Artazart 87L’Artisan Parfumeur 62Artus 171, 1757th arrondissement (cont.)restaurants 208shops 2108th arrondissementart and architecture 213bars and clubs 214hotels 214performance 213restaurants 212shops 2139th arrondissementart and architecture 215bars and clubs 215hotels 216performance 215restaurants 214shops 21410th arrondissementart and architecture 215bars and clubs 215performance 215restaurants 214shops 21411th arrondissementart and architecture 216bars and clubs 217hotels 217performance 216restaurants 216shops 21612th arrondissementart and architecture 216bars and clubs 217performance 216restaurants 216shops 21613th arrondissementart and architecture 217bars and clubs 217performance 217restaurants 21714th arrondissementart and architecture 217performance 217restaurants 217232
  • 222. L’As du Fallafel 23, 29, 38, 155Assemblée Nationale 110L’Assiette 54Astier 49, 159L’Astrance 42Atelier Brancusi 97L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon17, 37athletics 127Au Bon Accueil 22, 38Au Petit Fer à Cheval 130,138, 155Au Petit Marguery 53Au Pied de Cochon 18, 23,24, 154Au Trou Gascon 52Auchan 127auctions 13Auld Alliance 132Autour du Monde 155Aux Lyonnais 23, 25L’Avant Goût 52AZ Bar 130, 142Azzedine Alaïa 70Bbags, shopping 59Les Bains 154Les Bains du Marais 14Balenciaga 86ballet 124balloon trips 16Le Balzar 29, 218Le Bar 19, 131, 135Bar des Théâtres 130, 145Le Bar du Marché 142Le Bar du Plaza 130, 145Barbara Bui 65Le Baron Rouge 131, 151Barré, Gaëlle 91Barrio Latino 151bars and clubs 128–51late bars 19opening hours 230pubs 132bars and clubs (cont.)tipping 230Basilique St-Denis 108Bastille Fashion Focus 91Bataclan 116, 126Bateau-Lavoir 107Batofar 19, 151Be 38Beaubourg 154beauty treatments 13beer 131, 132La Belle Hortense 19, 131,139Bellota-Bellota 36Benisti 49, 158Bensimon 63Bergström, Viveka 88Bibliothèque National deFrance - François Mitterand111Bibliothèque National deFrance Richelieu 95Le Bistrot d’à Côte Flaubert 44Le Bistrot Napolitain 39Le Bistrot Paul Bert 51Bô 74boat trips, Canal St-Martin106Bombardier 132Bon Marché 83Boob’s Bourg 137Boog, Thomas 58, 82booking agenciesentertainments 118hotels 172Bottega Veneta 86Bouffes du Nord 117, 122Boulangerie Malineau 155Boulevard de Batignolles 157Boulevard de Belleville 158boutiques 58Brasserie Flo 29Brasserie de l’Isle St Louis 29brasseries 29opening hours 230canal boat tours 106, 229Canal St-Martin 106, 157Carine Gilson 80Carré d’Or 180Carrefour 127cars, driving in Paris 229Carte Musées-Monuments 94Cartier-Bresson, Henri 113Cartoucherie de Vincennes117, 125Casa Olympe 44Catacombes 113Catherine Arigoni 58, 82La Cave Gourmande 47Le Cave de l’Os à Moelle 54Caveau des Oubliettes 141cemeteries 109Centre National de la Danse117, 124Centre Pompidou 100, 154Chai 33 131, 150chain stores 68La Chaise Longue 68, 155Le Champo Llion 117, 120Le Champs-Elysées 103, 157Champs de Mars 156Chanel 86Chao Ba 19Chapelle Expiatoire 166Charles Jourdan 59, 84Château de St-Germain 106Chez Dom 45Chez Foong 55Chez Georges 26Chez Madame Arthur 117,124Chez Michel 46Chez Michou 124, 158Chez Paul 159Chez Prune 147, 157Chez Richard 138Chez Robert Electron Libre 94Chez Toinette 47Chez Vong 23, 25China Club 130, 148breakfast 12brocantes 14Brontibay 70brunch 22Bruno, Vanessa 58, 68, 69,77, 89Bui, Barbara 65, 154bureaux de change 231buses 16, 228Butte-aux-Cailles, Rue de la159by Terry 60CLe Cab 19, 132Cabane de Zucca 69cabaret 124Cacharel 67, 89Le Café 154Café Beaubourg 154Café Blue 159Café Burq 46, 158Café Cannibale 159Café Charbon 149, 159Café Constant 38Café de la Danse 125Café des Deux Moulins 107Café Egyptien 19Café de Flore 156Café de la Gare 117, 119Café de la Mairie 143, 156Café du Marché 156Café Marly 12Café Moderne 25Le Café Noir 22, 49, 130,135, 154Café Thoumieux 136cafésinternet 230opening hours 230tipping 230Les Cailloux 53Calligrane 71Camper 155La Canaille 30233A – C
  • 223. Chloé 80, 84, 86, 89Christian Lacroix 86Christian Louboutin 60Christian Tortu 58, 79Cimitière de Montmartre 109Cimitière de Montparnasse167Cimitière de Passy 109Cimitière de Père-Lachaise109cinema 111, 116–27all-night festivals 19left-bank 120morning cinema 13Cinéma en Plein Air 116, 124Cinq Mondes 166Cirque d’Hiver Bouglione117, 125Citadines 180Cité de l’Architecture et duPatrimoine 104Cité de la Musique 123Cité des Sciences et del’Industrie 108Cité Universitaire 112, 159Cithea 159Claude de France 108Le Clown Bar 131, 149Club Madeleine Plaza 19clubs and bars 17, 19,128–51Le Coeur Fou 133Coin Canal 58, 88, 157Cojean 38Colette 86Coluche 119Comédie Française 116, 119Comme des Garçons 89communications 230Communist Party 15Compagnons du Voyage 231Comptoir de Cotonniers 70concerts 114–27Conciergerie 110Le Connetable 19, 131, 137Ducasse, Alain 25, 35, 66,157EE2 87E-Leclerc 127L’Eclaireur 59, 63, 154Ecole Ritz Escoffier 13Edible Paris Itineraries 229Editions de Parfums FrédéricMalle 80Eglise de la Madeleine 102Eglise Royale du Val-de-Grâce99Eglise St-Augustin 102Eglise St-Eustache 97Eglise St-Sulpice 100Eiffel, Gustave 110, 124Eiffel Tower 110Elyfleur 18, 19Elysée Montmartre 116, 123emergencies 230En Avant La Zizique 81Les Enfants Rouges 27L’Enoteca 30L’Entredgeu 43L’Epi Dupin 34Erès 84Erik & Lydie 65L’Espadon 23, 24Et Vous 67Les Etages 140, 155Etam 68Etienne Marcel 154L’Etoile Manquante 138Eurostar 229evening choices 16–17FLa Fabrique 131, 148La Famille 48, 158Farrow, Linda 63fashion shows 13Fauchon 14Favela Chic 150Fernandel 109Ferretti, Alberta 84Festival d’Automne 11Festival de St-Denis 10festivals 10–11Fête de la Musique 10La Fête des Tuileries 10Fifi Chachnil 60film see cinemafire service 231Flora 39FNAC 81, 118Fogon St-Julien 23, 32Foire du Trône 10Fondation Cartier pour l’ArtContemporain 17, 113Fondation Dina Vierny 101Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson 113Fondation Le Corbusier105foodmarkets 12picnics 14takeaway 38see also restaurantsFood 67food to go 219football 127Forum des Images 118Four Seasons George V 144,166, 177La Fourmi 146, 158France Apartments 180Free Lance 76Freedom 132Les Frigos 15, 112Frog & Princess 131, 132Fubar 130, 141Le Fumoir 16, 132Furst, Flavie 64GGalerie Noémie 84Galerie Simone 68cooking courses 13Coolin 132Corcoran 132Le Cosi 32Costes brothers 43La Coupole 18, 29Le Cox 140Cox, Patrick 84Crazy Horse 124Crêperie Bretonne Fleurie50The Cricketer 132Le Crillon 177Le Cristal Room 40Le Crocodile 19, 130, 141Cruiscin Lan 132currency exchange 231cycling 12, 229Ddance 117, 124–6dancing 17, 19Davoli 156De la Ville 146Les Délices d’Aphrodite 32Demeulemeester, Ann 62Denis, Maurice 101, 106, 121department stores 83Dépôt-Vente de Buci 67dépôt-ventes 67Des Petits Hauts 91Les Deux Magots 156Deyrolle 79Diesel 61Dior 61, 86Diptyque 74disabled travellers 230–1doctors 230Dolce & Gabbana 86Don Carlos 143Dong Huong 50driving in Paris 229Drouot Richelieu 13Duc des Lombards 116, 118,154234General Index
  • 224. Galerie Véro-Dodat 82Galerie Vivienne 82, 96Galeries Lafayette 13, 17, 38,83, 127galleries 82, 96Galliano, John 86Gambs, Hervé 71games 15Garcia, Jacques 43, 173, 174,179gardens and parks 162,165–7opening hours 230La Gare 146Gare du Nord 110Garnier 29, 39Gas 66Gauguin, Paul 101, 105Gaultier, Jean-Paul 62, 86gay and lesbian travellers231Gehry, Frank 111Georget 30Gilson, Carine 80Ginger Lyly 87Givenchy 61, 86global cuisine 23Gobelins factory 112Godard, Jean-Luc 95, 120Golden Triangle 86Goumanyat & Son Royaume66La Goutte d’Or 158Grand Action 120Le Grand Colbert 29Grand Palais 103Le Grand Rex 117, 119Grande Arche de la Défense15La Grande Armée 23, 43La Grande Epicerie 14, 38,80La Grande Mosquée 55,164Grant, Martin 59, 72Gucci 86Guerrisol 67La Guingette de l’Ile duMartin Pecheur 14La Guinguette Pirate 126Hhairdressers, tipping 230Les Halles 154Hammam 14Hardy, Pierre 59, 61Harry’s Bar 130, 136Haussmann, Baron 95, 103haute cuisine courses 13havens 160–7Haynes, Jim 16health care 230Hediard 14Helmut Lang 59, 61Hemingway Bar 130, 133Hermé, Pierre 156Hervé Gambs 71Hervé Van der Straeten 74The Highlander 19, 132Hilton Paris Arcde Triomphe 170, 179holidays, public 230homeware shops 58L’Homme Bleu 50horse racing 127hospitals 230L’Hotel 171, 175Hotel A 171, 177Hotel des Arts 181Hotel Beaumarchais 181Hotel du Bourg Tibourg 170,173Hotel Costes 130, 132Hotel du Degrès du NotreDame 180Hotel Eldorado 170, 179Hotel Esméralda 174Hotel des Grands Degrès deNotre Dame 174Hôtel des Invalides 165Jacques Mélac 50Jamin 43Jamin, Benoit 78Jamin Puech 59, 78, 84Jardin du Luxembourg 14, 15,165Jardin desTuileries 110, 165Les Jardins d’Alexandrie 19Jardins des Plantes 165Jazz à la Villette 11Jean-Baptiste Rautureau 82Jeu de Paume 95La Johnson 19Jourdan, Charles 59, 84Julien 29Juveniles 131, 133KKalex 94Karine Dupont 59, 67Kastoori 22, 44Kélian, Stephane 86Killiwatch 58, 65, 154Kiosque Théâtre 13, 118Koi 63Kong 16, 134Kookai 67, 68LLacoste 61Lacroix, Christian 86Ladurée 15, 55Lagerfeld Gallery 59, 77Lang, Helmut 59, 61Lanvin 86Lao Siam 47Laplante-Collins, Patricia 16Latina Café 19Lavinia 64Le 10 Bar 142Le Corbusier 15, 105, 113Le Héros, Robert 65Le Leche-Vin 149lectures 16–17Hotel Langlois 180Hotel Lenox 176Hotel du Lys 171, 174Hotel Malar 177Hotel Mayet 170, 176Hôtel du Nord 117, 123, 157Hotel du Panthéon 170, 175Hotel du Quai Voltaire 170,176Hotel Raphael 16Hotel Residence Henri IV 180Hotel Roubaix 172Hotel St-Merry 171, 173Hotel des St-Pères 176Hotel du Septième Art 171,173Hotel Square 171, 179Hotel Terrass 180Hotel Tiquetonne 172Hotel Tonic 172Hotel Utrillo 181Hotel de Vigny 171, 177hotels 168–81aparthotels 226cheap 226expensive 227moderate 227romantic 171tipping 230Iidentity cards 231Ile de la Cité 110Images d’Ailleurs 120L’Imprevu 163Institut du Monde Arabe 15,98Internet cafés 230L’Iode 22, 26Iris 80Isabel Marant 58, 90Iunx 83JJacob, Marc 80, 84235C – L
  • 225. left luggage 231Lenôtre 156Lesbian & Gay Centre Paris 231Liberty Flame 110Lido 124Lili Perpink 88Limelight 151listings magazines 231The Lizard Lounge 140Loft Design by 59, 78Longchamp 127Louboutin, Christian 60Louis Vuitton 86Louise Weiss Galleries 112Louisor, Patricia 88, 158Louvre, Musée du 16–17, 100Lucas Carton 41Lucernaire 121Lucien Pellat-Finet 81Lumière brothers 118MMadelios 59, 61Magnan, Catherine 91Maillol, Aristide 101Maison Blanche 22, 40La Maison de la Chine 55La Maison du Chocolat 75Maison Européene de laPhotographie 98La Maison de la FausseFourrure 90Maison de la Radio France116, 122La Maison Rouge 15Make Up For EverProfessional 85Manet, Edouard 105, 109Manufacture des Gobelins112Le Marais 155Marant, Isabel 58, 68, 69, 89,90La Marche des Fiertés LGBT(Gay Pride) 11Musée d’Art Moderne de laVille de Paris (MAMVP) 104Musée de l’AssistancePublique 99Musée Carnavalet 95Musée du Cinema 111Musée Cognacq-Jay 97Musée DépartementalMaurice Denis “Le Prieuré”106Musée de l’Erotisme 106Musée Galliéra 102Musée Guimet 105Musée Gustave Moreau 109Musée de l’Homme 104Musée Jacquemart-André 102Musée du Louvre 16–17, 100Musée du Luxembourg 100Musée Maillol 101Musée de la Marine 104Musée Marmottan-Monet 105Musée de Montmartre 107Musée de la Musique 108Musée National EugèneDelacroix 100Musée National du MoyenAge 98Musée National Picasso 96Musée d’Orsay 100Musée de la Publicité 96Musée Rodin 101museums 12opening hours 230musicperformance arts 114–27record shops 81summer music festivals 10NNatacha 53Nemo’s Murals 111New Morning 116, 122New Nioullaville 158Le Next 135, 154Nickel 163night choices 18–19night clubs 17, 19Nirvana Lounge 144Nodus 66Nolita 66Notify 69Notre Dame 110NotsoBig 154Novotel Tour Eiffel 170, 181Nuit Blanche 11Nuits de Satin 89OOberkampf, Rue 159Odette & Zoe 63Office du Tourisme de Paris231O’Neil 131, 132Onward 78opening hours 230opera 122Opéra Bastille 116, 122Opéra Garnier 110, 116, 122Ordinary People 67Orly airport 228L’Os à Moelle 54L’Osteria 31PLa Pagode 117, 118palace hotels 177Palais de Chaillot 104Palais de la Découverte 103Palais Omnisport de Paris-Bercy 127Palais Royal 162Palais de Tokyo 18, 104Le Pamphlet 28Le Pantalon 130, 141Papageno 81Paradis Latin 124Parc André Citroën 167Parc de Bagatelle 165Parc des Buttes-Chaumont166Margiela, Martin 62Maria Luisa 62Mariage Frères 165Marie Mercié 78Market 22, 40markets 12Marni 86La Maroquinerie 116, 126Martel 45Martin Grant 59, 72Martin Margiela 62Martine Sitbon 59, 81La Mascotte 49, 158Mathi’s 131, 145Matisse, Henri 83, 101Mecano Bar 159Mémorial du Maréchal Leclerc113men’s shops 59Mercié, Marie 78Métro 228–9Le Meurice 25, 177microbrasseries 131Ministry of Finance 111Miyake, Issey 70MK2 Bibliothèque 117,127mobile phones 230Modigliani, Amedeo 107Mon Vieil Ami 31Monet, Claude 101, 105money 231Monoprix 19, 68Montmartre 107, 158Montorgeuil, 32 163Moreau, Gustave 109Morgan 68morning choices 12–13Moulin de la Galette 107Moulin de Radet 107Moulin Rouge 124Musée d’Art et d’Histoire duJudaïsme 96Musée d’Art et d’Histoire deSt-Denis 109236General Index
  • 226. Parc Monceau 165Parc des Princes 127Paris Jazz Corner 81Paris Jazz Festival & FestivalClassique au Vert 10Paris sur Glace 11Paris-Vincennes 127Parks, squares and gardens162, 165–7Hôtel des Invalides 165Jardin du Luxembourg 165Jardins des Plantes 165Jardin des Tuileries, 1 110,165opening hours 230Palais Royal 162Parc Monceau 165Place Dauphine 162La Promenade Plantée 167Square du Vert-Galant 162Passage du Grand-Cerf 82Passage de Retz 15passages 96Passages des Panoramas 96passports 231La Patache 147Patricia Louisor 88Patrimoine Photographique 97Paul & Joe 59, 77Paul Smith 81Pavillon de l’Arsenal 15Pavillon Noura 18, 19Pavillon de la Reine 171, 172Pellat-Finet, Lucien 81Pellegrino, Renaud 83Le Père Claude 54performance 114–27circus and cabaret 225cinema 225comedy 225free 116live music 225opera 226sport 226theatre 226performance arts 114–27Perpink, Lili 88Pershing Hall 16, 170, 178Le Petit Dakar 26Le Petit Keller 51Petit Palais 103Le Petit Rétro 43Les Petits Carreaux 154Les Petits Marseillais 28, 155pharmacies 230phones 230Picasso, Pablo 96, 101, 107picnics 14, 17Pièces à Conviction 89Pierre Hardy 59, 61Piscine Butte-aux-Cailles 13,159Place Dauphine 162La Plaza Athenée 177Point Virgule 118police 231Pont Alexandre III 110Pont des Arts 17, 110Pop In 149Porte St-Denis 109Porte St-Martin 109Portes Ouvertes 10Portzamparc, Christian de 123postal services 230Le Potager du Marais 28Le Poulbot Gourmet 47Pourcel twins 40Prada 86Le Pré Verre 33Preen 89Princesse Tam Tam 68Printemps 83Le Progres 146Project 101 19, 147La Promenade Plantée 167Promenades Gourmandes 13public holidays 230public transport 228–9Publicis Drugstore 19, 83,103, 157restaurants (cont.)Middle Eastern 219Modern French 219opening hours 230regional 220romantic 23salons de thé 220Spanish 220takeaway 38tipping 230Vegetarian 220Vietnamese 23wine bars 220Le Réveillon 11Le Rex 19, 135Le Ritz 177Robert Le Héros 65Robuchon, Joël 37, 42, 43, 66Rocher, Yves 68Rodin, Auguste 101Roger Vivier 86Roissy Charles de Gaulleairport 228Roland Garros 127roller blades 12, 18, 229Rosa, Sabbia 75Rose Bakery 22, 45Royal Fromentin 170, 180Rue Cler 156Rue Ste-Anne 26rugby 127SSabbia Rosa 75Sacré Cœur 107St-André-des-Arts 120Ste-Chapelle 94St-Germain 156St-Julien-le-Pauvre 163Le Salon d’Hélène 35salons 16Salons du Palais Royal 62salons de thé 55La Samaritaine 127La Sancerre 130, 148, 158pubs 132Puces de St-Ouen 158Puces de Vanves 159Pulp 136QQuartier Latin 120Quartier Montorgeuil 154La Quatorze Juillet 11Le Queen 19, 145Rracecourses 127Racine Odeon 120R’Aliment 28, 155Rautureau, Jean-Baptiste 82Réciproque 67record shops 81Reflet Medicis 120Le Regard du Cygne 117, 126Le Reminet 32Renaud Pellegrino 83Renault 157Renoir, Pierre Auguste 101,105, 107Résonances 85Restaurant du Palais Royal22, 24Restaurant Marty 33restaurants 20–55African 218alfresco 22bistro 218brasserie 218British 219Chinese 23fish and seafood 219Greek 219haute cuisine 219Indian 219Italian 219Japanese 219late-night 18, 23Latin American 219Mexican 219237L – S
  • 227. Sanja 68Santi 154Sardegna a Tavola 23, 52Savy 41La Scala 19security 231Seine, River 110Sentou 58, 73Sephora 19, 68Seven 2 One 17Shadé 79Shine 89Shoe Bizz 66shoe shops 59Le Shop 154shopping 15, 56–91late-night 18–19opening hours 230singles’ supermarket night17showjumping 127singles’ supermarketnight 17Sitbon, Martine 59, 81Smith, Paul 61, 81Soirées Nomades 17Somo 135La Sorbonne 99Sotha 119Le Souk 23, 51Spas 163, 164, 16632 Montorgueil 163Cinq Mondes 166Four Seasons Georges V166, 177La Grande Mosquée p164Nickel p163sports events 127Spree 89, 158Le Square Trousseau 22, 52Stade de France 108, 127Stade Jean-Bouin 127Stade Pierre de Coubertin127Statue of Liberty 110Le Timbre 35tipping 230Toi 144Tokyo Eat 18Tortu, Christian 58, 79Toulouse-Lautrec, Henri de107Toupary Restaurant 165La Tour d’Argent 22, 33La Tour de France 11La Tour de Montlhéry 18, 23,25, 154Tour Eiffel 110Tour St-Jacques 94touring bands 116Tourisme & Handicaps 231tourist information 231tours 229Toyota 157traditional bars 130Le Train Bleu 51trains 228transport 228–9disabled travellers 230–1Le Trésor 140Tricotin 53Trocadero 156Les 3 Marches de Catherine B76Le Troquet 55Turkish baths 14UUndercover 63Ungaro 86Uniform 67L’Urgence 143VVagnon, Nicolas 44Valentino 86Van der Straeten, Hervé 74,86Van Gogh, Vincent 101Vanessa Bruno 58, 77Vannina Vesperini 75Velly 23, 45Ventilo 63Vert-Galant, Square du 162Vesperini, Vannina 75Le Vieux Bistro 22, 30viewshotels with 170restaurants with 22Viktor & Rolf 78Villa D’Estrées 170, 174Villa La Roche 15, 105vintage clothes 58Virgin Megastores 19, 81,118Viveka Bergström 88Vivier, Roger 86Vuitton, Louis 86WWAGG 143Wave 81Wax 150Westwood, Vivienne 66wheelchair access 230–1Willi, Anne 91Wine and Bubbles 154wine bars 131Woman 77Work in Ze City 17XXtremes 147YYen 34Yukiko 58, 71Yves Rocher 68ZZadig & Voltaire (de luxe) 84Le Zénith 116, 124Le Zero Zero 150Le Ziryab 15Stella Cadente 58, 71, 87, 157Stephane Kélian 86streetlife 152–9Studio 28 117, 123, 158Studio Galande 120Le Suffren 22, 55La Suite 144summer music festivals 10sunbathing 13Sunday lunch 14swimming 13TLa Table d’Aude 35La Table de Lucullus 44Tara Jamon 75taxis 229disabled travellers 230tipping 230tea 15salons de thé 55Techno Import 81telephones 230Le Temps des Cerises 159tennis 127Terminus Nord 46Thalys 229Théâtre de l’Aquarium 125Théâtre des Champs-Elysées116, 121Théâtre du Châtelet 116, 119Théâtre du Chaudron 125Théâtre de la CitéInternational 127Théâtre de l’Epée de Bois 125Théâtre du Soleil 125Théâtre de la Têmpete 125Théâtre de la Ville 121theatre tickets 13theatres 114–2732 Montorgeuil 163Thomas Boog 58, 82ticketsentertainment 118public transport 228–9238General Index
  • 228. 239ContributorsMaryanne Blacker, a Paris-based journalist specializingin food and travel, has written for magazines includingAustralian Gourmet Traveller, Qantas magazine, Vacations& Travel and Elle Cuisine, and is a regular reviewer forthe Paris Time Out Eating & Drinking Guide. For thisguide she co-wrote the chapters on Restaurants andShopping, and contributed the Havens and Top Choices– Morning, Afternoon and The Year chapters.Rosa Jackson has been writing about Paris’s restau-rants, markets and food shops since 1993, and is theeditor for the Paris Time Out Eating & Drinking Guide.She offers custom-designed food itineraries withwww.edible-paris.com, and teaches cooking classes inNice (www.petitsfarcis.com). For this guide she co-wrotethe Restaurants and Streetlife chapters.Britta Jaschinski was born in Bremen, Germany and haslived and worked in London since 1993, after complet-ing her photography degree. She has received severalphotography awards and her work features in news-papers (such as The Sunday Times), magazines (such asTime Out) and books – including her own titles, Zoo(Phaidon Press) and Wild Things (Thames & Hudson).From cocktails to concerts via strikes, shopping andsingles nights, Katherine Spenley writes about allaspects of the Parisian experience. She is a regularcontributor to several guidebooks and her work hasbeen published in newspapers around the world. Forthis guide she co-wrote the Streetlife chapter, and wasthe sole contributor for the chapters on Bars & Clubs,Hotels and Top Choices – Evening and Night.Based in Paris since 1989, Julie Street has written forWallpaper*, Elle, The Guardian and The Independent. Shealso works as a presenter and producer at Radio FranceInternationale and writes a regular Paris shoppingcolumn for Where magazine. Julie co-wrote the Shoppingchapter for this guide.British-born Richard Woodruff moved to Paris in 1999.Ever more at home in France, he now lives in the up-and-coming 13th arrondissement, and works as acopywriter and journalist, specialising in film, cultureand travel. For this guide he contributed the chapterson Art & Architecture and Performance.Produced by Departure LoungeEditorial Director Naomi PeckArt Director Lisa KoskyAssistant Editor Debbie WoskaDesigner Bernhard WolfProofreader Sylvia Tombesi-WaltonResearcher Laurie GabayIndexer Hilary BirdPublished by DKPublishing Managers Jane Ewart, Vicki Ingle andAnna StreiffertSenior Editor Christine StroyanSenior Designer Marisa RenzulloCartographic Editor Casper MorrisSenior Cartographer Uma BhattacharyaCartographer Kunal SinghDTP Designer Jason LittleProduction Coordinator Shane HigginsRevisions Fact-checker Anna BrookeRevisions Editors Helen Foulkes, Victoria Heyworth-Dunne and Dora WhitakerPHOTOGRAPHY PERMISSIONSThe publishers would like to thank all the churches,museums, hotels, restaurants, bars, clubs, shops,galleries and other sights for their assistance and kindpermission to photograph at their establishments.
  • 229. 240Placement Key: t = top; tc = top centre; tca = top centreabove; tcb = top centre below; tl = top left; tr = topright; c = centre; ca = centre above; cl = centre left; cla= centre left above; clc = centre left centre; cr = centreright; crc = centre right centre; crb = centre right below;b = bottom; bl = bottom left; br = bottom right; l = left;r = right.The publishers would like to thank the followingcompanies and picture libraries for permission toreproduce their photographs:32 Montorgueil: 163clAero Paris/Olivier Roux: 16brBrontibay/Jérémy Fournier: 70blChristophe Cazarre: 126craCinéma en Plein Air 116c, 124caCinq Mondes: 166brDK Picture Library: 12tr, 94cl, 113trFondation Cartier pour lart contemporain/FabienCalcavechia: Nomadic Nights, Suicide 2002: 16trFour Seasons Georges V: 166clHelmut Lang: 61tlHilton Arc de Triomphe Paris 179tBritta Jachinski: 154bl/cl, 156brKong/Patricia Bailer: 34bl/brLa Bistrot d à Côte Flaubert: 44clLa Canaille: 30trLa Fabrique 131cLa Suite: 144clLavinia: 64blLEspandon: 24brLimelight 151cbMake Up For Ever Professional: 85tlM.A.N. de Saint-Germain-en-Laye: 106tlMusée départmental Maurice Denis “Le Prieuré”: 106clNickel: 163trNodus Shirt Shop: 66trNovotel Tour Eiffel 181bPalais de Tokyo, floor, Michael Lin 104crParis Tourist Office: Catherine Balet/10br/tr, 12cr,16cr,19cl/tr, 116b; Angélique Clément: 157cr;Henri Garat: 17tl; David LeFranc: 8–9, 11tr, 18tr/cr,156trRAliment: 28clRenaud Pellegrino/Béatrice Drumlewiez 83clRitz Paris: 13brMaison Blanche: 40tlVentilo: 63crZefa Visual Media/G. Rossenbach: 1c, 6–7Jacket images Front: Getty Images/Philip Lee Harvey(cr & spine); Steven Rothfeld (crc); Photolibrary.com/Bragg John (cl); Topfoto.co.uk (clc); Zefa VisualMedia/G. Rossenbach (background).Back: Steven Rothfeld (tr); Zefa Visual Media/G. Rossenbach (c).AcknowledgementsDK Travel Guides can be purchased in bulk quantities atdiscounted prices for use in promotions or as premiums.We are also able to offer special editions and personalizedjackets, corporate imprints, and excerpts from all of ourbooks, tailored specifically to meet your own needs.To find out more, please contact:(in the United States) SpecialSales@dk.com(in the UK) Sarah.Burgess@dk.com(in Canada) DK Special Sales at general@tourmaline.ca(in Australia) business.development@pearson.com.auSpecial Editions of DK Travel Guides
  • 230. Paris Metro and Regional Express Railway (RER)There are 14 metro lines serving Paris, each identified by a number.The five RER express lines are identified by the letters A, B, C, Dand E and run between the city and outlying areas.Find the station nearest to your destination, then trace the linein the direction you wish to travel. At the end of the line you willsee its number and the name of the terminus. Remember these,and look out for both the terminus name and number on signsin the station.
  • 231. Jacket design Nicola PowlingJacket editorial Caroline Reed1 4053 1398 6guideseThe best cities, thelatest choices – 24/7Available nowBarcelonaBerlinChicagoLondonNew YorkParisRomeSan FranciscoThere are DK travel guides to over 100 ofthe world’s most fascinating destinations.The guides are available from all goodbookshops, and the full range of titlescan be seen at www.dk.com
  • 232. Experience the best thatParis has to offer withthis unique combination ofguidebook and websiteParis edguide links to an exclusive websitethat is always up-to-date to provide you witheverything you need to get the most out of your visitFind out where to eat, stay, shop, and drinkMake bookings via the websiteEnjoy the latest entertainmentPlan your trip, whatever your budget, tastes, and interestsYour personal guide to discovering whateveryou want in Paris, whenever you are thereDiscover more atwww.dk.comThe hottest places to eat,drink, and shop – 1,000 links allcontinually checked and updatedBypass booking agencies – go directlyto the websites of individual hotels