by Galen GrumanInDesign®CS3FORDUMmIES‰
by Galen GrumanInDesign®CS3FORDUMmIES‰
InDesign®CS3 For Dummies®Published byWiley Publishing, Inc.111 River StreetHoboken, NJ 07030-5774www.wiley.comCopyright © ...
About the AuthorGalen Gruman is the principal at The Zango Group, an editorial andmarketing consulting firm. Currently a r...
DedicationTo Rick, Karen, and Kyle Bull, for many years of wonderful holidays andcordial visits.
Publisher’s AcknowledgmentsWe’re proud of this book; please send us your comments through our online registration formloca...
Contents at a GlanceIntroduction .................................................................1Part I: Before You Begi...
Part VI: Getting Down to Business .............................301Chapter 20: Working with Tabs and Tables...................
Table of ContentsIntroduction..................................................................1How to Use This Book ........
Chapter 2: Making It Work Your Way . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35Setting Document Preferences ....
Working with Objects on Layers ..................................................................84The active layer .........
Part III: Object Essentials ..........................................119Chapter 8: Creating Essential Elements . . . . . ...
Chapter 11: Aligning and Arranging Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .167Precise Positioning with Coordinates ...
Searching and Replacing Text ....................................................................214Replacing text ..........
Skew (false italic) ...............................................................................256Capitalization Optio...
Part VI: Getting Down to Business ..............................301Chapter 20: Working with Tabs and Tables . . . . . . . ...
Part VII: Printing and Output Essentials .....................347Chapter 24: Setting Up for Output . . . . . . . . . . . ....
Reusable saved search queries ........................................................384Lighting effects ...................
IntroductionWhat is Adobe InDesign and what can it do for you? InDesign is a power-ful publishing application that lets yo...
How to Use This BookAlthough this book has information that any level of publisher needs to knowto use InDesign, this book...
How This Book Is OrganizedI’ve divided this book into eight parts, not counting this introduction. Notethat the book cover...
Part IV: Text EssentialsWhen you think about it, text is a big deal when it comes to publishing docu-ments. After all, how...
Icons Used in This BookSo that you can pick out parts that you really need to pay attention to (or,depending on your taste...
6 InDesign CS3 For Dummies
Part IBefore You Begin
In this part . . .You have your copy of InDesign and you’d like somebasic information on how to get started, right? Well,y...
Chapter 1UnderstandingInDesignIngredientsIn This Chapterᮣ The InDesign approachᮣ Understanding global and local controlᮣ B...
Some programs use a free-form metaphor, which means that the method usedto craft a document is based on assembling page el...
structured or partly structured documents, such as newsletters and mag-azines, it is usually easier to set up documents up...
Global tools includeߜ General preferences and application preferences (see Chapter 2)ߜ Master pages and libraries (see Cha...
Choosing the right tools for the jobDepending on what you’re trying to do with InDesign at any given moment,you may or may...
Specifying measurement valuesAnother situation in which you can choose between local or global controlsis specifying measu...
15Chapter 1: Understanding InDesign IngredientsAltered keystrokes: Revised shortcutsInDesign CS3 has changed a few shortcu...
Like all great human endeavors, InDesign comes with its own terminology,much of it adopted from other Adobe products. Some...
The Version Cue pop-up menu lets you see the current status of a documentin a shared workgroup setup. This is an expert fe...
RulersDocument windows display a horizontal ruler across the top and a verticalruler down the left side. As shown in Figur...
You can lock the ruler origin (the zero point), making it more difficult to acci-dentally change it. Control+click or righ...
To change the view without taking your hands off the keyboard, pressOption+Ô+5 or Ctrl+Alt+5, enter a new zoom value, and ...
To open a new window for the active document, choose Window➪Arrange➪New Window. The new window is displayed in front of th...
The small arrow in its lower-right corner of some tools is a pop-out menuindicator. A tool that displays this arrow is hid...
After you’ve selected the Selection tool, here’s how it works:ߜ To select any object on a document page, click it. If you ...
ߜ To select objects placed by a master page, Shift+Ô+click or Ctrl+Shift+click, as with the Selection tool. The Direct Sel...
ߜ To begin typing or editing text, click in a text frame or in any emptyframe and type away.I explain stories and threaded...
Frame and shape toolsInDesign has three frame tools — Rectangle Frame, Ellipse Frame, andPolygon Frame — and three shape t...
Hand toolThe Hand tool lets you move a page around to view different portions of it oranother page entirely. After selecti...
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  1. 1. by Galen GrumanInDesign®CS3FORDUMmIES‰
  2. 2. by Galen GrumanInDesign®CS3FORDUMmIES‰
  3. 3. InDesign®CS3 For Dummies®Published byWiley Publishing, Inc.111 River StreetHoboken, NJ 07030-5774www.wiley.comCopyright © 2007 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Indianapolis, IndianaPublished by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Indianapolis, IndianaPublished simultaneously in CanadaNo part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form orby any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning or otherwise, except as permit-ted under Sections 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act, without either the prior writtenpermission of the Publisher, or authorization through payment of the appropriate per-copy fee to theCopyright Clearance Center, 222 Rosewood Drive, Danvers, MA 01923, (978) 750-8400, fax (978) 646-8600.Requests to the Publisher for permission should be addressed to the Legal Department, Wiley Publishing,Inc., 10475 Crosspoint Blvd., Indianapolis, IN 46256, (317) 572-3447, fax (317) 572-4355, or online athttp://www.wiley.com/go/permissions.Trademarks: Wiley, the Wiley Publishing logo, For Dummies, the Dummies Man logo, A Reference for theRest of Us!, The Dummies Way, Dummies Daily, The Fun and Easy Way, Dummies.com, and related tradedress are trademarks or registered trademarks of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the UnitedStates and other countries, and may not be used without written permission. InDesign is a registeredtrademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States and/or other countries. All other trade-marks are the property of their respective owners. Wiley Publishing, Inc., is not associated with any prod-uct or vendor mentioned in this book.LIMIT OF LIABILITY/DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTY: THE PUBLISHER AND THE AUTHOR MAKE NO REP-RESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES WITH RESPECT TO THE ACCURACY OR COMPLETENESS OF THECONTENTS OF THIS WORK AND SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES, INCLUDING WITHOUTLIMITATION WARRANTIES OF FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. NO WARRANTY MAY BE CRE-ATED OR EXTENDED BY SALES OR PROMOTIONAL MATERIALS. THE ADVICE AND STRATEGIES CON-TAINED HEREIN MAY NOT BE SUITABLE FOR EVERY SITUATION. THIS WORK IS SOLD WITH THEUNDERSTANDING THAT THE PUBLISHER IS NOT ENGAGED IN RENDERING LEGAL, ACCOUNTING, OROTHER PROFESSIONAL SERVICES. IF PROFESSIONAL ASSISTANCE IS REQUIRED, THE SERVICES OF ACOMPETENT PROFESSIONAL PERSON SHOULD BE SOUGHT. NEITHER THE PUBLISHER NOR THEAUTHOR SHALL BE LIABLE FOR DAMAGES ARISING HEREFROM. THE FACT THAT AN ORGANIZATIONOR WEBSITE IS REFERRED TO IN THIS WORK AS A CITATION AND/OR A POTENTIAL SOURCE OF FUR-THER INFORMATION DOES NOT MEAN THAT THE AUTHOR OR THE PUBLISHER ENDORSES THEINFORMATION THE ORGANIZATION OR WEBSITE MAY PROVIDE OR RECOMMENDATIONS IT MAYMAKE. FURTHER, READERS SHOULD BE AWARE THAT INTERNET WEBSITES LISTED IN THIS WORKMAY HAVE CHANGED OR DISAPPEARED BETWEEN WHEN THIS WORK WAS WRITTEN AND WHEN ITIS READ.For general information on our other products and services, please contact our Customer CareDepartment within the U.S. at 800-762-2974, outside the U.S. at 317-572-3993, or fax 317-572-4002.For technical support, please visit www.wiley.com/techsupport.Wiley also publishes its books in a variety of electronic formats. Some content that appears in print maynot be available in electronic books.Library of Congress Control Number: 2007924222ISBN: 978-0-470-11865-8Manufactured in the United States of America10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
  4. 4. About the AuthorGalen Gruman is the principal at The Zango Group, an editorial andmarketing consulting firm. Currently a regular contributor to Macworld,Layers Magazine, CIO, and InfoWorld, he has also been editor of Macworldand M-Business, executive editor of Upside, West Coast bureau chief ofComputerworld, and vice president of content for ThirdAge.com. He is co-author of 20 other books on desktop publishing. Gruman led one of the firstsuccessful conversions of a national magazine to desktop publishing in 1986and has covered publishing technology since then for several publications,including the trade weekly InfoWorld, for which he began writing in 1986,Macworld, whose staff he joined in 1991, and, most recently, Layers Magazine.
  5. 5. DedicationTo Rick, Karen, and Kyle Bull, for many years of wonderful holidays andcordial visits.
  6. 6. Publisher’s AcknowledgmentsWe’re proud of this book; please send us your comments through our online registration formlocated at www.dummies.com/register/.Some of the people who helped bring this book to market include the following:Acquisitions, Editorial, andMedia DevelopmentProject Editor: Linda MorrisAcquisitions Editor: Bob WoernerCopy Editor: Linda MorrisTechnical Editor: Jonathan WoolsonEditorial Manager: Jodi JensenMedia Development Manager:Laura VanWinkleEditorial Assistant: Amanda FoxworthSr. Editorial Assistant: Cherie CaseCartoons: Rich Tennant(www.the5thwave.com)Composition ServicesProject Coordinator: Jennifer TheriotLayout and Graphics: Joyce Haughey,Stephanie D. Jumper, Barbara Moore,Alicia B. South, Ronald TerryProofreaders: Debbye Butler, Susan MoritzIndexer: AptaraAnniversary Logo Design: Richard J. PacificoPublishing and Editorial for Technology DummiesRichard Swadley, Vice President and Executive Group PublisherAndy Cummings, Vice President and PublisherMary Bednarek, Executive Acquisitions DirectorMary C. Corder, Editorial DirectorPublishing for Consumer DummiesDiane Graves Steele, Vice President and PublisherJoyce Pepple, Acquisitions DirectorComposition ServicesGerry Fahey, Vice President of Production ServicesDebbie Stailey, Director of Composition Services
  7. 7. Contents at a GlanceIntroduction .................................................................1Part I: Before You Begin ...............................................7Chapter 1: Understanding InDesign Ingredients ............................................................9Chapter 2: Making It Work Your Way .............................................................................35Part II: Document Essentials........................................49Chapter 3: Opening and Saving Your Work ...................................................................51Chapter 4: Discovering How Pages Work ......................................................................65Chapter 5: Layers and Layers .........................................................................................79Chapter 6: The Joys of Reuse..........................................................................................89Chapter 7: Working with Color .....................................................................................103Part III: Object Essentials .........................................119Chapter 8: Creating Essential Elements.......................................................................121Chapter 9: Manipulating Objects..................................................................................137Chapter 10: Organizing Objects....................................................................................155Chapter 11: Aligning and Arranging Objects...............................................................167Part IV: Text Essentials .............................................187Chapter 12: Putting Words on the Page.......................................................................189Chapter 13: The Ins and Outs of Text Editing.............................................................211Chapter 14: The Styles of Text......................................................................................225Chapter 15: Fine-Tuning Paragraph Details ................................................................235Chapter 16: Finessing Character Details .....................................................................249Chapter 17: Tricks with Text.........................................................................................263Part V: Graphics Essentials........................................277Chapter 18: Importing Graphics...................................................................................279Chapter 19: Fitting Graphics and Setting Paths..........................................................291
  8. 8. Part VI: Getting Down to Business .............................301Chapter 20: Working with Tabs and Tables.................................................................303Chapter 21: Working with Footnotes, Indexes, and TOCs.........................................315Chapter 22: Working with Automated Text.................................................................327Chapter 23: Publishing Books.......................................................................................339Part VII: Printing and Output Essentials.....................347Chapter 24: Setting Up for Output................................................................................349Chapter 25: Printing and Other Output Techniques..................................................357Part VIII: The Part of Tens.........................................379Chapter 26: Top Ten New Features in InDesign CS3 ..................................................381Chapter 27: Top Ten (Or So) Resources for InDesign Users.....................................387Chapter 28: Top Ten Must-Knows for QuarkXPress Refugees..................................393Chapter 29: Top Ten Must-Knows for PageMaker Orphans......................................397Index .......................................................................401
  9. 9. Table of ContentsIntroduction..................................................................1How to Use This Book .....................................................................................2How This Book Is Organized...........................................................................3Part I: Before You Begin.........................................................................3Part II: Document Essentials .................................................................3Part III: Object Essentials ......................................................................3Part IV: Text Essentials ..........................................................................4Part V: Graphics Essentials...................................................................4Part VI: Getting Down to Business .......................................................4Part VII: Printing and Output Essentials..............................................4Part VIII: The Part of Tens .....................................................................4Icons Used in This Book..................................................................................5Part I: Before You Begin ................................................7Chapter 1: Understanding InDesign Ingredients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9The InDesign Approach...................................................................................9The frame-based metaphor.................................................................10The free-form metaphor ......................................................................11Understanding Global and Local Control....................................................11Choosing the right tools for the job...................................................13Specifying measurement values .........................................................14Basic InDesign Vocabulary............................................................................14Discovering the Document Window ............................................................16Rulers.....................................................................................................18Zero point..............................................................................................18Pasteboard ............................................................................................19Pages and guides..................................................................................19Zoom field and pop-up menu..............................................................19Page controls ........................................................................................20Opening Multiple Document Windows........................................................20Tooling around the Tools Panel ...................................................................21Using the Selection tools.....................................................................22Using the Type tool ..............................................................................24Using the object-creation tools ..........................................................25Using the navigation tools...................................................................26Working with Panels, Docks, and Workspaces...........................................28Working with panels.............................................................................28Working with docks..............................................................................31Working with workspaces ...................................................................31Surveying the Menus .....................................................................................32
  10. 10. Chapter 2: Making It Work Your Way . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35Setting Document Preferences .....................................................................36Type preferences..................................................................................36Composition preferences ....................................................................40Measurement preferences...................................................................41Document defaults ...............................................................................44Modifying Defaults for Text and Objects.....................................................45Text defaults..........................................................................................46Object defaults......................................................................................46Modifying Defaults for Views........................................................................47Adding Default Colors and Styles.................................................................48Part II: Document Essentials ........................................49Chapter 3: Opening and Saving Your Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51Setting Up a New Publication .......................................................................51Opening documents.............................................................................54Saving documents ................................................................................59Exporting document content..............................................................60Recovering from Disaster..............................................................................63Chapter 4: Discovering How Pages Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65Understanding the Pages Panel....................................................................65Adding pages.........................................................................................66Selecting pages .....................................................................................68Copying pages.......................................................................................68Deleting pages.......................................................................................69Moving pages within documents........................................................69Moving pages among documents.......................................................70Starting documents on a left page .....................................................70Working with Page Numbers.........................................................................71Dividing a document into sections ....................................................72Removing a section start.....................................................................74Navigating Documents and Pages................................................................74Navigating with the Pages panel ........................................................75Navigating with the menus and shortcuts ........................................75Using the Navigator panel...................................................................76Adjusting Page Layouts and Objects...........................................................76Chapter 5: Layers and Layers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79What Layers Can Do for You.........................................................................79Layer Basics....................................................................................................80Working with Layers ......................................................................................82Creating a layer.....................................................................................82Customizing layers...............................................................................82InDesign CS3 For Dummiesx
  11. 11. Working with Objects on Layers ..................................................................84The active layer ....................................................................................84Selecting objects on layers .................................................................85Placing objects on layers.....................................................................85Moving objects to different layers .....................................................86Manipulating Entire Layers...........................................................................86Selecting layers.....................................................................................86Rearranging layers ...............................................................................87Combining layers..................................................................................87Deleting layers ......................................................................................88Chapter 6: The Joys of Reuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .89Building and Using Templates......................................................................89Creating templates ...............................................................................90Modifying templates ............................................................................90Creating documents from templates .................................................91Building and Using Master Pages.................................................................91Creating a new master page................................................................92Importing a master page .....................................................................94Deleting a master page ........................................................................95Applying a master page to document pages.....................................95Changing master items on document pages.....................................96Building and Using Libraries ........................................................................97Creating a library..................................................................................97Putting items into a library .................................................................99Copying library items onto document pages .................................101Managing library panels....................................................................102Chapter 7: Working with Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103Working with Colors ....................................................................................103Creating color swatches....................................................................103Creating mixed colors........................................................................107Defining Tints................................................................................................109Working with Gradients...............................................................................110Creating gradient swatches...............................................................110Understanding the Gradient panel...................................................112Managing Swatches......................................................................................113Editing swatches.................................................................................113Copying swatches ..............................................................................114Deleting swatches ..............................................................................114Importing swatches............................................................................116Exporting swatches............................................................................116Applying Swatches.......................................................................................116xiTable of Contents
  12. 12. Part III: Object Essentials ..........................................119Chapter 8: Creating Essential Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121Creating Frames and Shapes ......................................................................121Reshaping Frames and Shapes...................................................................123Creating Lines and Paths.............................................................................124Drawing a straight line.......................................................................124Understanding paths .........................................................................126Drawing your own paths ...................................................................127Applying Strokes ..........................................................................................131Setting stroke appearance.................................................................132Creating stroke styles ........................................................................134Chapter 9: Manipulating Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .137Selecting Objects..........................................................................................137Resizing and Scaling Objects......................................................................140Resizing objects..................................................................................141Scaling objects....................................................................................141Moving Objects.............................................................................................142Deleting Objects...........................................................................................142Preventing Objects from Printing ..............................................................143Transforming Objects..................................................................................143Rotating objects..................................................................................144Shearing objects .................................................................................145Flipping objects ..................................................................................146Repeating transformations................................................................146Replacing Object Attributes .......................................................................147Making Fancy Corners.................................................................................149Using Transparency and Lighting Effects .................................................150Basic transparency.............................................................................150Using drop shadows and inner shadows ........................................152Using feathering and other lighting effects.....................................153Chapter 10: Organizing Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .155Combining Objects into a Group................................................................155Locking Objects............................................................................................156Working with Object Styles.........................................................................157Creating object styles ........................................................................157Managing object styles ......................................................................160Applying object styles .......................................................................161Managing object styles ......................................................................162Managing Links.............................................................................................163InDesign CS3 For Dummiesxii
  13. 13. Chapter 11: Aligning and Arranging Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .167Precise Positioning with Coordinates .......................................................167Lining Up Objects with Guidelines and Grids...........................................168Using ruler guides ..............................................................................169Working with column guides.............................................................172Using document grids........................................................................172Using baseline grids...........................................................................174Aligning Objects to Each Other..................................................................175Stacking Objects...........................................................................................177Creating Inline and Anchored Frames.......................................................178Working with inline frames ...............................................................179Working with anchored frames.........................................................181Part IV: Text Essentials ..............................................187Chapter 12: Putting Words on the Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .189Working with Text Frames ..........................................................................189Creating master text frames..............................................................190Creating individual text frames ........................................................191Making changes to text frames.........................................................192Importing Text..............................................................................................193Import options for Microsoft Word and RTF files ..........................194Import options for Microsoft Excel files..........................................197Pasting text into an InDesign document..........................................198Dragging and dropping text ..............................................................199Threading Text Frames................................................................................200Threading frames manually ..............................................................201Threading frames with the semi-autoflow method........................202Threading frames and automatically adding pages.......................203Breaking and rerouting threads........................................................203Working with Columns ................................................................................204Specifying columns in master frames..............................................204Changing columns in text frames.....................................................205Wrapping Text around Objects ..................................................................205The Text Wrap panel..........................................................................206Setting text-wrap preferences...........................................................209Chapter 13: The Ins and Outs of Text Editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211Editing Text...................................................................................................211Controlling text view..........................................................................212Navigating through text.....................................................................212Highlighting text .................................................................................212Undoing text edits ..............................................................................213Using the Story Editor .......................................................................213xiiiTable of Contents
  14. 14. Searching and Replacing Text ....................................................................214Replacing text .....................................................................................215Replacing formatting..........................................................................217Changing special characters.............................................................218Working with saved queries..............................................................218Checking Spelling.........................................................................................219Checking spelling as you type ..........................................................219Correcting mistakes on the fly..........................................................219Using the Check Spelling dialog box................................................220Changing the spelling and hyphenation dictionaries....................221Chapter 14: The Styles of Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .225Creating Styles..............................................................................................226Managing Styles............................................................................................230Updating styles...................................................................................230Sharing styles with others.................................................................231Using style groups..............................................................................232Other management options ..............................................................232Applying Styles.............................................................................................233Paragraph particulars........................................................................233Character characteristics..................................................................234Chapter 15: Fine-Tuning Paragraph Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .235Applying Paragraph Formats......................................................................235Specifying Alignment and Indents..............................................................237Controlling alignment ........................................................................237Adjusting indent controls..................................................................238Inserting space between paragraphs...............................................239Controlling space between lines ......................................................239Controlling where paragraphs break...............................................240Adding Drop Caps ........................................................................................241Controlling Hyphenation and Justification...............................................242Manual hyphenation ..........................................................................243Automatic hyphenation.....................................................................243Controlling justification.....................................................................245Composing text...................................................................................246Ruling Your Paragraphs...............................................................................247Chapter 16: Finessing Character Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .249Specifying Character Formats ....................................................................249Modifying Font, Type Style, and Size.........................................................251Changing font family and font style .................................................252Changing type size .............................................................................253Using Other Character Formats .................................................................253Horizontal and Vertical Scale options .............................................255Baseline shift.......................................................................................255InDesign CS3 For Dummiesxiv
  15. 15. Skew (false italic) ...............................................................................256Capitalization Options .......................................................................257Superscript and Subscript ................................................................257Underline and Strikethrough ............................................................258Ligatures..............................................................................................258Turning off hyphenation and other breaks.....................................259Controlling Space between Characters and Lines ...................................260Kerning.................................................................................................260Tracking...............................................................................................261Leading ................................................................................................261Chapter 17: Tricks with Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .263Using Bulleted and Numbered Lists ..........................................................263Labeling Paragraphs....................................................................................266Adding Special Type Treatments ...............................................................267Reversing type out of its background..............................................267Creating sidebars and pull-quotes ...................................................269Formatting fractions ..........................................................................269Optical margin alignment..................................................................272Custom underline and strikethrough options ................................273Converting Text into Shapes.......................................................................274Making Text Follow a Path ..........................................................................275Part V: Graphics Essentials ........................................277Chapter 18: Importing Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .279Preparing Graphics Files.............................................................................279Importing and Placing Graphics.................................................................281Specifying Import Options..........................................................................284Import options for bitmap graphics ................................................284Import options for vector file formats.............................................286Import options for placed InDesign files.........................................288Working with image layers ................................................................288Using Other Ways to Import Graphics ......................................................289Chapter 19: Fitting Graphics and Setting Paths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .291Cropping and Repositioning.......................................................................291Figuring out the Fitting Commands ...........................................................292Working with Graphics in Irregular Shapes ..............................................294Using a graphic’s own clipping path................................................295Creating a clipping path in InDesign................................................296xvTable of Contents
  16. 16. Part VI: Getting Down to Business ..............................301Chapter 20: Working with Tabs and Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .303Setting Tabs...................................................................................................303Setting Up Tables..........................................................................................305Adjusting tables..................................................................................307Formatting tables ...............................................................................308Using table and cell styles.................................................................311Modifying and managing table and cell styles................................312Converting Tabs to Tables (and Back) ......................................................313Chapter 21: Working with Footnotes, Indexes, and TOCs . . . . . . . . .315Adding Footnotes.........................................................................................315Creating Indexes...........................................................................................318Choosing an indexing style ...............................................................318Inside the Index panel........................................................................319Adding index items via the Index panel ..........................................320Polishing and generating the index..................................................321Creating Tables of Contents........................................................................323Chapter 22: Working with Automated Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .327Automatic Page Numbers ...........................................................................327Using Section Markers.................................................................................328Using Text Variables ....................................................................................329Creating text variables.......................................................................329Editing and managing text variables................................................331Inserting text variables......................................................................332Using Hyperlinks ..........................................................................................332Creating hyperlinks............................................................................332Modifying and deleting hyperlinks...................................................336Chapter 23: Publishing Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .339Book Basics...................................................................................................339Creating a new book...........................................................................340Opening and closing a book..............................................................340Adding chapters to books.................................................................340Working on Chapters ...................................................................................341Finding out about chapter status.....................................................342Taking advantage of style sources ...................................................342Synchronizing formatting..................................................................342Printing Chapters and Books......................................................................344Working with Sections in Chapters............................................................344Numbering pages consecutively ......................................................345Numbering pages with sections .......................................................345Setting chapter numbers...................................................................345InDesign CS3 For Dummiesxvi
  17. 17. Part VII: Printing and Output Essentials .....................347Chapter 24: Setting Up for Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .349Checking Your Document before Printing ................................................349Setting Up Booklets......................................................................................353Chapter 25: Printing and Other Output Techniques . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .357Calibrating Color..........................................................................................357Ensuring consistent color .................................................................358Saving color management preferences............................................359Changing document color settings ..................................................360Calibrating output ..............................................................................360Choosing Print Options...............................................................................360Common options ................................................................................361The General pane ...............................................................................362The Setup pane...................................................................................363The Marks and Bleed pane................................................................364The Output pane ................................................................................365The Graphics pane .............................................................................366The Color Management pane............................................................367The Advanced pane ...........................................................................367The Summary pane ............................................................................367Creating a Document Package....................................................................367Exporting PDF Files......................................................................................369Common options ................................................................................370The General pane ...............................................................................371The Compression pane......................................................................373Marks and Bleed pane .......................................................................373The Output pane ................................................................................374The Advanced pane ...........................................................................374Security pane ......................................................................................374The Summary pane ............................................................................376Exporting to the Web...................................................................................376Part VIII: The Part of Tens .........................................379Chapter 26: Top Ten New Features in InDesign CS3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .381Interface Changes.........................................................................................381Collapsing panels ...............................................................................381Page previews .....................................................................................382Faster tool switching..........................................................................382Working with Layout Elements...................................................................383Master-page import............................................................................383Object-level search.............................................................................383xviiTable of Contents
  18. 18. Reusable saved search queries ........................................................384Lighting effects ...................................................................................384Multiple file placement ......................................................................384Text Controls ................................................................................................385Text variables......................................................................................385Style groups.........................................................................................386Chapter 27: Top Ten (Or So) Resources for InDesign Users . . . . . . . .387Web Sites.......................................................................................................387InDesignCentral ..................................................................................387The Adobe Web site ...........................................................................388InDesign User Group ..........................................................................389Creativepro..........................................................................................389Magazine Resources ....................................................................................390InDesign Magazine..............................................................................390Layers magazine.................................................................................390Macworld magazine ...........................................................................390Recommended Books..................................................................................390Chapter 28: Top Ten Must-Knows for QuarkXPress Refugees . . . . .393Opening Those Old QuarkXPress Files .....................................................393Paying Attention to Selection Tool Differences........................................393Using Keyboard Shortcuts for Tools .........................................................394Thinking Panels, Not Dialog Boxes ............................................................395Using Familiar Measurements ....................................................................395Knowing Differences in Documents...........................................................395Working with Objects, Not Items ...............................................................395Approaching Text from a New Perspective ..............................................396Starting with the Direct Selection Tool for Graphics...............................396Paying Close Attention When Printing ......................................................396Chapter 29: Top Ten Must-Knows for PageMaker Orphans . . . . . . . .397Open Those Old PageMaker Files ..............................................................397You Now Have Three Selection Tools........................................................398Switching Your Shortcuts............................................................................398Setting Aside Time to Set Preferences.......................................................399Working with Objects, Not Elements.........................................................399Don’t Worry Much about Text Differences ...............................................399Don’t Worry Much about Graphics, Either ...............................................399A Different Way to Change Pages ...............................................................400Creating Colors Is Different.........................................................................400Using the Command Bar..............................................................................400Index........................................................................401InDesign CS3 For Dummiesxviii
  19. 19. IntroductionWhat is Adobe InDesign and what can it do for you? InDesign is a power-ful publishing application that lets you work the way you want towork. You can use InDesign as a free-form but manual approach to layout, oras a structured but easily revised approach. The fact that you can choosewhich way to work is important for both novice and experienced usersbecause there isn’t a single, correct way to lay out pages. Sometimes (forexample, if your project is a single-instance publication), creating a layoutfrom scratch — almost as if you were doing it by hand on paper — is the bestapproach. And sometimes using a highly formatted template that you canmodify as needed is the way to go: There’s no need to reinvent the wheel fordocuments that have a structured and repeatable format.InDesign can handle sophisticated tasks, such as magazine and newspaperpage layout, but its simple approach to publishing also makes it a goodchoice for smaller projects, such as one-off ads and fliers. InDesign is also agood choice for corporate publishing tasks, such as proposals and annualreports. Plug-in software from other vendors adds extra capabilities.But that’s not all. InDesign was designed from the ground up as an electronicpublishing tool. That means that you can easily send documents to servicebureaus and printing presses for direct output, which saves you lots of timeand money. It also means that you can create documents for electronic distri-bution, particularly using the Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format(PDF). These electronic files can include interactive features, such as buttonsto play sounds or a movie.After you get the hang of it, InDesign is quite easy to use. At the same time,it’s a powerful publishing program with a strong following among the ranks ofprofessional publishers — and the latest InDesign CS3 version is certain toreinforce that position. Part of its success is due to the fact that its interfaceis like that of its sister applications, Adobe Illustrator and Adobe Photoshop,which are also components of the Adobe Creative Suite.If you are just getting started with InDesign, welcome! I hope you’ll find theinformation in these pages to be helpful in getting you started.
  20. 20. How to Use This BookAlthough this book has information that any level of publisher needs to knowto use InDesign, this book is primarily for those of you who are fairly new tothe field, or who are just becoming familiar with the program. I try to takethe mystery out of InDesign and give you some guidance on how to createa bunch of different types of documents. Here are some conventions usedin this book:ߜ Menu commands are listed like this: Window➪Pages.ߜ Key combinations: If you’re supposed to press several keys together, Iindicate that by placing plus signs (+) between them. Thus, Shift+Ô+Ameans press and hold the Shift and Ô keys, and then press A. Afteryou’ve pressed the A key, let go of all the keys. I also use the plus sign tojoin keys to mouse movements. For example, Alt+drag means to hold theAlt key when dragging the mouse.Note that the Macintosh sequence comes first, followed by the Windowsequivalent.ߜ Pointer: The small graphic icon that moves on the screen as you moveyour mouse is a pointer (also called a cursor). The pointer takes on dif-ferent shapes depending on the tool you select, the current location ofthe mouse, and the function you are performing.ߜ Click: This means to quickly press and release the mouse button once.On most Mac mice, there is only one button, but on some there are twoor more. All PC mice have at least two buttons. If you have a multi-button mouse, click the leftmost button when I say to click the mouse.ߜ Double-click: This tells you to quickly press and release the mousebutton twice. On some multi-button mice, one of the buttons can func-tion as a double-click. (You click it once, the mouse clicks twice.) If yourmouse has this feature, use it; it saves strain on your hand.ߜ Right-click: A Windows feature, this means to click the right-hand mousebutton. On a Mac’s one-button mouse, hold the Control key when click-ing the mouse button to do the equivalent of right-clicking in programsthat support it. On multi-button Mac mice, assign one of the buttons tothe Control+click combination.ߜ Dragging: Dragging is used for moving and sizing items in an InDesigndocument. To drag an item, position the mouse pointer on the item, pressand hold down the mouse button, and then slide the mouse across a flatsurface.2 InDesign CS3 For Dummies
  21. 21. How This Book Is OrganizedI’ve divided this book into eight parts, not counting this introduction. Notethat the book covers InDesign on both Macintosh and Windows. Because theapplication is almost identical on both platforms, I only point out platform-specific information when I need to, when I remember to, or both.I have also included some bonus content on the InDesignCentral Web site(www.InDesignCentral.com).Part I: Before You BeginDesigning a document is a combination of science and art. The science is insetting up the structure of the page: How many places will hold text, and howmany will hold graphics? How wide will the margins be? Where will the pagenumbers appear? And so on. The art is in coming up with creative ways of fill-ing the structure to please your eyes and the eyes of the people who will belooking at your document.In this part, I tell you how to navigate your way around InDesign using theprogram’s menus, dialog boxes, panels, and panes. I also explain how to cus-tomize the preferences to your needs.Part II: Document EssentialsGood publishing technique is about more than just getting the words downon paper. It’s also about opening, saving, adding, deleting, numbering, andsetting layout guidelines for documents. This part shows you how to do allthat and a lot more, including tips on setting up master pages that you canuse over and over again. You’ll also find out how to create color swatches foreasy reuse in your documents.Part III: Object EssentialsThis part of the book shows you how to work with objects: the lines, textframes, graphics frames, and other odds and ends that make up a publication.And you’ll discover how to apply some really neat special effects to them.3Introduction
  22. 22. Part IV: Text EssentialsWhen you think about it, text is a big deal when it comes to publishing docu-ments. After all, how many people would want to read a book with nothingbut pictures? In this part, I show you how to create and manipulate text, inmore ways than you can even imagine.Part V: Graphics EssentialsVery few people would want to read a book with nothing but text, so this partis where I show you how to handle graphics in InDesign.Part VI: Getting Down to BusinessInDesign — especially with some of the enhancements in its latest version —is really good at handling the many kinds of documents that tend to be used inbusinesses, such as manuals, annual reports, and catalogs. This part showsyou how to create tables, handle footnotes, create indexes, manage page num-bering across multiple chapters in a book, and use text variables to makeInDesign update text as needed based on the document’s current context.Part VII: Printing and Output EssentialsWhether you’re printing a publication or simply creating a PDF file for read-ers to download from a Web site, you still need to understand the basics ofoutputting an InDesign document. This part is where I show you how to setup your output files, manage color, and work with service bureaus.Part VIII: The Part of TensThis part of the book is like the chips in the chocolate chip cookies; youcould eat the cookies without them, but you’d be missing a really good part.It’s a part that shows you some important resources that will help you makethe most of InDesign. It also gives some pointers on switching to InDesignfrom QuarkXPress and Adobe PageMaker.4 InDesign CS3 For Dummies
  23. 23. Icons Used in This BookSo that you can pick out parts that you really need to pay attention to (or,depending on your taste, to avoid), I’ve used some symbols, or icons, in thisbook.When you see this icon, it means I am pointing out a feature that’s new toInDesign CS3.If you see this icon, it means that I’m mentioning some really nifty point oridea that you may want to keep in mind as you use the program.This icon lets you know something you’ll want to keep in mind. If you forget itlater, that’s fine, but if you remember it, it will make your InDesign life a littleeasier.If you skip all the other icons, pay attention to this one. Why? Because ignor-ing it could cause something really, really bad or embarrassing to happen,like when you were sitting in your second-grade classroom waiting for theteacher to call on you to answer a question, and you noticed that you stillhad your pajama shirt on. I don’t want that to happen to you!This icon tells you that I am about to pontificate on some remote technicalbit of information that might help explain a feature in InDesign. The technicalinfo will definitely make you sound impressive if you memorize it and recite itto your friends.5Introduction
  24. 24. 6 InDesign CS3 For Dummies
  25. 25. Part IBefore You Begin
  26. 26. In this part . . .You have your copy of InDesign and you’d like somebasic information on how to get started, right? Well,you have come to the right place. Read along and, beforeyou know it, you’ll be sailing smoothly through InDesign.This part of the book gives you a general idea of whatInDesign can do. I explain the layout approaches you cantake and how to set up InDesign to work the way youwork. Along the way, you’ll find out how to navigate theplethora of panels, menus, tools, and shortcuts that canseem overwhelming at first but that soon become secondnature as you gain experience using the program.Welcome aboard!
  27. 27. Chapter 1UnderstandingInDesignIngredientsIn This Chapterᮣ The InDesign approachᮣ Understanding global and local controlᮣ Basic InDesign vocabularyᮣ Discovering the document windowᮣ Surveying the top toolsᮣ Becoming familiar with tools and panelsᮣ Surveying the menusStarting to use a new software application is not unlike meeting a newfriend for the first time. You take a long look at the person, maybe ask afew questions, and begin the process of becoming acquainted. Just as it’sworthwhile to learn the likes and dislikes of a new friend, it’s also worth yourtime to wrap your head around InDesign’s unique style and approaches. Whenyou do so, you’ll find it much easier to start using InDesign to get work done.This chapter explains where to look in InDesign for the features and capabilitiesyou need to master. I introduce you to the process that InDesign assumes youuse when laying out documents, explain some of the terms you’ll encounterthroughout the book, describe the unique interface elements in the documentwindow, survey the most commonly used tools, and explain how InDesign pack-ages much of its functionality through an interface element called a panel.The InDesign ApproachPublishing programs have some similarities and some differences in their var-ious approaches to the publishing task. One way to describe a program’sapproach to publishing is to talk about its metaphor, or the overall way that ithandles publishing tasks.
  28. 28. Some programs use a free-form metaphor, which means that the method usedto craft a document is based on assembling page elements as you would if theywere placed on a traditional pasteboard until you were ready to use them. Thisis also called the pasteboard metaphor, which is an imprecise term becausesoftware that uses other metaphors can still include a pasteboard. The now-defunct PageMaker is the best-known example of the free-form approach.Other programs approach page layout by using a frame-based metaphor, inwhich frames (or boxes) hold both the page elements and the attributes thatcontrol the appearance of those elements. QuarkXPress is the best-knownexample of the frame-based approach.InDesign offers the best of both worlds because it incorporates both the free-form and the frame-based metaphors.The frame-based metaphorWhen you work with a frame-based metaphor, you build pages by assembling avariety of frames that will contain your text and graphics. First, you set up thebasic framework of the document — the page size and orientation, margins,number of columns, and so on. You then fill that framework with text, graphics,and lines.These frames and lines need not be straight or square. With InDesign, youcan create frames that are shaped by Bézier curves. (In the 1970s, Frenchengineer Pierre Bézier created the mathematics that make these adjustablecurves work.)Why would you want to use frames? Publishers find several reasons whyframes come in handy:ߜ To create a template for documents, such as newsletters and maga-zines, that use the same basic layout elements across many articles.You create the frames and then add the text and graphics appropriatefor each specific article, modifying, adding, and deleting frames as nec-essary for each article.ߜ To get a sense of how you want your elements to be placed and sizedbefore you start working with the actual elements. This is similar tosketching a rough layout on paper with a pen or pencil before doing aformal layout with InDesign.ߜ To set up specific size and placement of elements up front. You oftenwork with a template or with guidelines that limit the size and placementof elements. In many cases, you can copy an existing frame because itssize is the same as what you use in several locations of your layout. For10 Part I: Before You Begin
  29. 29. structured or partly structured documents, such as newsletters and mag-azines, it is usually easier to set up documents up front so that elementsare sized and placed correctly; the less favorable alternative is resizingelements one at a time later on.Whether you start by creating frames to hold graphics or text or you simplyplace the text and graphics directly on your page, you’re using frames. Whenyou directly place elements on the page, InDesign creates a frame automati-cally for each element. The frame that InDesign creates is based on theamount of text or the size of the graphic, rather than on your specific framespecifications. Of course, in either case, you can modify the frames and theelements within them.The free-form metaphorWorking under a free-form metaphor, you draw a page’s content as if you’reworking on paper. If you’ve been in the publishing business for a while, youmight once have used wax to stick strips of type, camera-ready line drawings,and halftone pictures to a pasteboard. You would then assemble andreassemble all those pieces until you got the combination that looked right toyou. The free-form metaphor encourages a try-as-you-go, experimental layoutapproach, which is particularly well suited to one-of-a-kind documents suchas ads, brochures, annual reports, and some marketing materials.If you use a frame-based approach to page layout, you can experiment withusing the frames as placeholders for actual text and graphics. Visual thinkerslike to work with actual objects, which is why the free-form metaphor worksmuch better for them. With InDesign, you pick the metaphor that works foryour style, your current situation, and your mood. After all, both approachescan lead to the same great design.Understanding Global and Local ControlThe power of desktop publishing in general, and InDesign in particular, is thatit lets you automate time-consuming layout and typesetting tasks while at thesame time letting you customize each step of the process according to yourneeds.This duality of structure and flexibility — implemented via the dual use of theframe-based and free-form layout metaphors — carries over to all operations,from typography to color. You can use global controls to establish generalsettings for layout elements, and then use local controls to modify those ele-ments to meet specific publishing requirements. The key to using global andlocal tools effectively is to know when each is appropriate.11Chapter 1: Understanding InDesign Ingredients
  30. 30. Global tools includeߜ General preferences and application preferences (see Chapter 2)ߜ Master pages and libraries (see Chapter 6)ߜ Character and paragraph styles (see Chapter 14)ߜ Table and cell styles (see Chapter 20)ߜ Object styles (see Chapter 10)ߜ Sections and page numbers (see Chapter 4)ߜ Color definitions (see Chapter 7)ߜ Hyphenation and justification (see Chapter 15)Styles and master pages are the two main global settings that you can expectto override locally throughout a document. You shouldn’t be surprised tomake such changes often because, although the layout and typographic func-tions that styles and master pages automate are the fundamental compo-nents of any document’s look, they don’t always work for all the specificcontent within a publication. (If they did, who’d need human designers?!)Local tools includeߜ Frame tools (see Part III, as well as Chapter 17)ߜ Character and paragraph tools (see Chapters 15 and 16)ߜ Graphics tools (see Part V)12 Part I: Before You BeginKeep your bearings straightA powerful but confusing capability in InDesignis something called a control point. InDesignlets you work with objects from nine differentreference points — any of the four corners, themiddle of any of the four sides, or the center —such as when positioning the object preciselyor rotating the object. You choose the active ref-erence point, or control point, in the Controlpanel or Transform panel, using the grid of ninepoints arranged in a square.By default, InDesign uses the central referencepoint as the control point, which is great forrotating an object, but can lead to confusionwhen you enter in the X and Y coordinates toplace it precisely. That’s because most peopleuse the upper-left corner of an object whenspecifying its coordinates, not the center of theobject. Be sure to change the control point tothe upper-left reference point whenever enter-ing X and Y coordinates in the Control orTransform panels.How do you change the control point? That’seasy: Just click the desired reference point inthat preview grid. The control point will beblack, whereas the other reference points willbe white.
  31. 31. Choosing the right tools for the jobDepending on what you’re trying to do with InDesign at any given moment,you may or may not immediately know which tool to use. If, for example, youmaintain fairly precise layout standards throughout a document, usingmaster pages is the way to keep your work in order. Using styles is the bestsolution if you want to apply standard character and paragraph formattingthroughout a document. When you work with one-of-a-kind documents, onthe other hand, it doesn’t make much sense to spend time designing masterpages and styles — it’s easier just to format elements as you create them.For example, you can create drop caps (large initial letters set into a para-graph of type, like the drop cap that starts each chapter in this book) as acharacter option in the Character panel, or you can create a paragraph style(formatting that you can apply to whole paragraphs, ensuring that the sameformatting is applied each time) that contains the drop-cap settings, and thenapply that style to the paragraph containing the drop cap. Which method youchoose depends on the complexity of your document and how often youneed to perform the action. The more often you find yourself taking a set ofsteps, the more often you should use a global tool (like character and para-graph styles) to accomplish the task.Fortunately, you don’t need to choose between global and local tools whileyou’re in the middle of designing a document. You can always create stylesfrom existing formatting later. You can also add elements to a master page ifyou start to notice that you need them to appear on every page.13Chapter 1: Understanding InDesign IngredientsWhat to do when you make a mistakeInDesign is a very forgiving program. If youmake a mistake, change your mind, or workyourself into a complete mess, you don’t have toremain in your predicament or save your work.InDesign offers several escape routes. You canߜ Undo your last action by choosingEdit➪Undo or pressing Ô+Z or Ctrl+Z.(Some actions, particularly actions such asscrolling that do not affect any items or theunderlying document structure, cannot beundone.) You can undo multiple actions inthe reverse order in which they were doneby repeatedly choosing Edit➪Undo orpressing Ô+Z or Ctrl+Z; each time youundo, the previous action is undone.ߜ Redo an action you’ve undone by choosingEdit➪Redo or pressing Shift+Ô+Z orCtrl+Shift+Z. Alternatively, choosing Undoand Redo is a handy way of seeing abefore/after view of a particular change. Aswith undo, you can redo multiple undoneactions in the reverse of the order in whichthey were undone.
  32. 32. Specifying measurement valuesAnother situation in which you can choose between local or global controlsis specifying measurement values. Regardless of the default measurement unityou set (that is, the measurement unit that appears in all dialog boxes andpanels), you can use any unit when entering measurements in an InDesigndialog box. For example, if the default measurement is picas, but you’re newto publishing and are more comfortable with working in inches, go ahead andenter measurements in inches.InDesign accepts any of the following codes for measurement units. Note thatthe x in the items listed below indicates where you specify the value, such as2i for 2 inches. It doesn’t matter whether you put a space between the valueand the code. Typing 2inch and typing 2 inch are the same as far as InDesignis concerned:ߜ xi or x inch or x" (for inches)ߜ xp (for picas)ߜ xpt or 0px (for points)ߜ xc (for ciceros)ߜ xag (for agates)ߜ xcm (for centimeters)ߜ xmm (for millimeters)The ability to specify measurements in agates is new to InDesign CS3. Agatesare typically used in newspaper publishing.You can enter fractional picas in two ways: in decimal format (as in 8.5p) andin picas and points (as in 8p6). Either of these settings results in a measure-ment of 81⁄2 picas (there are 12 points in a pica).Basic InDesign VocabularyNot too long ago, only a few publishing professionals knew — or cared about —what the words pica, kerning, crop, and color model meant. Today, these wordsare becoming commonplace because almost everyone who wants to produce anice-looking report, a simple newsletter, or a magazine encounters these termsin the menus and manuals of their layout programs. Occasionally, the terms areused incorrectly or are replaced with general terms to make nonprofessionalusers feel less threatened, but that substitution ends up confusing professionalprinters, people who work in service bureaus, and Internet service providers.Throughout this book, I define other publishing terms as they come up.14 Part I: Before You Begin
  33. 33. 15Chapter 1: Understanding InDesign IngredientsAltered keystrokes: Revised shortcutsInDesign CS3 has changed a few shortcuts thatusers of previous versions of InDesign shouldknow, so they can adapt accordingly:ߜ Type➪ParagraphStyles:The new shortcut isÔ+F11ontheMac,buttheoldshortcutofF11still works (though the Mac OS X’s Exposéprogramalsousesthisshortcutandthusmayappear instead). In Windows, the shortcutremains F11, but Ctrl+F11 also works.ߜ Type➪Character Styles: The new shortcutis Shift+Ô+F11 on the Mac, but the oldshortcut of Shift+F11 still works. InWindows, the shortcut remains Shift+F11,but Ctrl+Shift+F11 also works.ߜ Type➪Paragraph: The new Windows short-cut is now Ctrl+Alt+T, no longer Ctrl+M, tomatch the Mac’s Option+Ô+T. Adobe letCtrl+Alt+T work as an alternative in InDesignCS2; now the menu has changed to makeCtrl+Alt+T the official shortcut. But the oldCtrl+M continues to work if you want to stilluse it.ߜ View➪Show/Hide Frame Edges: The newshortcut for the Mac only is Control+Ô+H.The Windows shortcut remains Ctrl+H.ߜ View➪Display Performance➪Fast Display:The new shortcut is Option+Shift+Ô+Z orCtrl+Alt+Z, replacing Shift+Ô+0 or Ctrl+Shift+0.ߜ View➪Display Performance➪High QualityDisplay: The new shortcut, for the Mac only,isControl+Option+Ô+H.TheWindowsshort-cut remains Ctrl+Alt+H.ߜ Window➪Effects: The new shortcut to therenamed Transparency panel is Shift+Ô+F10on the Mac, but the old shortcut of Shift+F10still works. In Windows, the shortcut remainsShift+F10, but Ctrl+Shift+F10 also works.ߜ Window➪Pages: The new shortcut isÔ+F12 on the Mac, but the old shortcut ofF12 still works. In Windows, the shortcutremains F12, but Ctrl+F12 also works.ߜ Window➪Stroke: The new shortcut isÔ+F10 on the Mac, but the old shortcut ofF10 still works. In Windows, the shortcutremains F10, but Ctrl+F10 also works.For consistency, this book uses the new short-cut for both Mac and Windows for the newshortcuts involving the F10, F11, and F12 keys,such as Ô+F10 and Ctrl+F10 for opening theStroke panel. They changed to accommodateMac OS X’s Exposé program, which uses theF10, F11, and F12 keys in its shortcuts, causing itto launch when InDesign users entered short-cuts using them. The new InDesign shortcutsdon’t step on Exposé’s toes.New shortcuts include the following:ߜ Type➪Glyphs: Option+Shift+F11 or Alt+Shift+F11.ߜ Type➪Insert Special Character➪QuotationMarks➪Straight Double Quotation Marks:Command+Shift+ or Alt+Shift+.ߜ Type➪Insert Special Character➪QuotationMarks➪Straight Single Quotation Mark(Apostrophe): Command+ or Alt+.ߜ Notes➪Notes Mode: Ô+F8 or Ctrl+F8.ߜ Window➪Automation➪Scripts:Option+Ô+F11 or Ctrl+Alt+F11.
  34. 34. Like all great human endeavors, InDesign comes with its own terminology,much of it adopted from other Adobe products. Some general terms to knowinclude the following:ߜ Frame: The container for an object. A frame can hold text, a graphic, ora color fill.ߜ Link: The connection to a file that you import, or place (defined below),into an InDesign document. The link contains the file’s location and itslast modification date and time. A link can reference any graphics or textfile that you have imported into a layout. InDesign can notify you when asource text or graphics file has changed so you can choose whether toupdate the version in your layout.ߜ Package: The collection of all files needed to deliver a layout for printing.ߜ PDF: The Adobe Portable Document Format, which has become the stan-dard for sharing electronic documents. No matter what kind of computerit is viewed on (Windows, Macintosh, Palm, or Unix), a PDF documentdisplays the original document’s typography, graphics representation,and layout. With InDesign, you can place PDF files as if they were graph-ics, and you can also export its InDesign pages to PDF format.ߜ Place: To import a graphics or text file.ߜ Plug-in: A piece of software that loads into, and becomes part of,InDesign to add capabilities to the program.ߜ Stroke: The outline of an object (whether a graphic, line, or individualtext characters) or frame.ߜ Thread: The connections between text frames that let a story flow fromone frame to another.Discovering the Document WindowIn InDesign, you spend lots of time working in document windows — the“containers” for your documents. Each document, regardless of its size, iscontained within its own document window.The best way to get familiar with the InDesign document window is by open-ing a blank document. Simply choosing File➪New➪Document, or pressingÔ+N or Ctrl+N, and clicking OK opens a new document window. Don’t worryabout the settings for now — just explore.Figure 1-1 shows all the standard elements of a new document window. I won’tbore you by covering interface elements that are standard to all programs.Instead, the rest of this section focuses on InDesign-specific elements.16 Part I: Before You Begin
  35. 35. The Version Cue pop-up menu lets you see the current status of a documentin a shared workgroup setup. This is an expert feature you can ignore.Control panelScroll buttonsScroll barsPasteboard Size boxVersion Cuepop-up menuVersion CuestatusPagefieldPage-turningbuttonsPage pop-upmenuZoom pop-upmenuZoom fieldShow/HideStructure buttonPage boundaryPasteboardPage marginsTools dockReference pointsTools panelZero point (ruler origin)Close button Minimize buttonRestore buttonTitle barRulersPanel tabPanel flyout menuMain dockPanelPanelgroupFigure 1-1:Thedocumentwindow iswhere youwork ondocuments.17Chapter 1: Understanding InDesign Ingredients
  36. 36. RulersDocument windows display a horizontal ruler across the top and a verticalruler down the left side. As shown in Figure 1-1, the horizontal ruler measuresfrom the top-left corner of the page across the entire spread, and the verticalruler measures from the top to the bottom of the current page. These rulersare handy for judging the size and placement of objects on a page. Even expe-rienced designers often use the rulers while they experiment with a design.Both rulers display increments in picas unless you change the measurementsystem for each ruler in the Units & Increments pane of the Preferences dialogbox. Choose InDesign➪Preferences➪Units & Increments or press Ô+K on theMac, or choose Edit➪Preferences➪Units & Increments or press Ctrl+K inWindows, to open the Preferences dialog box. Your choices include inches,picas, points, decimal inches, ciceros, agates, millimeters, and centimeters. Ifyou change the ruler measurement system when no documents are open, therulers in all new documents will use the measurement system you selected. If adocument is open when you make the change, the rulers are changed only inthat document.You can also create your own measurement system by choosing Custom.Most people should ignore this option, but sometimes it can make sense,such as setting the ruler to match the line spacing, so you can measurenumber of lines in your ruler.If your computer has a small monitor and the rulers start to get in your way,you can hide them by choosing View➪Hide Rulers or by pressing Ô+R orCtrl+R.Zero pointThe point where the rulers intersect in the upper-left corner of the page iscalled the zero point. This is the starting place for all horizontal and verticalmeasurements. If you need to place items in relation to another spot on thepage (for example, from the center of a spread rather than from the left-handpage), you can move the zero point by clicking and dragging it to a new loca-tion. Notice that the X: and Y: values in the Control panel update as you dragthe zero point so you can place it precisely. If you change the zero point, itchanges for all pages or spreads in the document. You can reset the zeropoint to the upper-left corner of the left-most page by double-clicking theintersection of the rulers in the upper-left corner.If you move the zero point, all the objects on the page display new X: and Y:values even though they haven’t actually moved. Objects above or to the leftof the zero point will show negative X: and Y: values, and the X: and Y: valuesof other objects will not relate to their actual position on the page or spread.18 Part I: Before You Begin
  37. 37. You can lock the ruler origin (the zero point), making it more difficult to acci-dentally change it. Control+click or right-click the ruler origin and chooseLock Zero Point from the menu that appears. (The Unlock Zero Point com-mand is right there as well, so you can just as easily unlock it.) Locking thezero point is a good idea because it will remind anyone working on your doc-ument that you prefer that they not fiddle with the zero point.PasteboardThe white area that surrounds the page is called the pasteboard. It is a work-space for temporarily storing objects. Above and below each page or spreadis about an inch of pasteboard, and on the left and right a pasteboard spaceas wide as a page. For example, a spread of two 8-inch-wide pages will have 8inches of pasteboard to the left and 8 inches of pasteboard to the right.Pages and guidesPages, which you can see onscreen surrounded by black outlines, reflect thepage size you set up in the New Document dialog box (File➪New➪Document,or Ô+N or Ctrl+N). If it looks like two or more pages are touching, you’re look-ing at a spread.InDesign uses nonprinting guides, lines that show you the position of marginsand that help you position objects on the page. Margins are the spaces at theoutside of the page, whereas columns are vertical spaces where text is sup-posed to go by default. Magenta lines across the top and bottom of each pageshow the document’s top and bottom margins. Violet lines show left and rightcolumns (for single-page documents) or inside and outside columns (forspreads).You can change the location of margin and column guides by choosingLayout➪Margins and Columns. You can create additional guides — such asto help you visually align objects — by holding down your mouse button onthe horizontal or vertical ruler and then dragging a guide into the positionyou want.Zoom field and pop-up menuAt the lower-left corner of the document window dwells the Zoom field,which shows the current zoom percentage. You can type in a new value anytime. Immediately to its right is the Zoom pop-up menu, which also lets youchange the document’s view. The view can be between 5 percent and 4,000percent in 0.01-percent increments.19Chapter 1: Understanding InDesign Ingredients
  38. 38. To change the view without taking your hands off the keyboard, pressOption+Ô+5 or Ctrl+Alt+5, enter a new zoom value, and press Return orEnter. Or press Ô+= or Ctrl+= to zoom in, or Ô+– or Ctrl+– to zoom out.Page controlsIf you feel like flipping through pages of the document you are creating,InDesign makes it easy with page-turning buttons and the Page field and pop-up menu. Controls for entering prefixes for the page numbers of sections, andfor indicating absolute page numbers in a document that contains multiplesections, are also handy. (An absolute page number indicates a page’s posi-tion in the document, such as +1 for the first page, +2 for the second page,and so on.)Next to the Zoom pop-up menu is a combined page-number field and pop-upmenu encased by two sets of arrows. These arrows are page-turning buttonsthat take you to, from left to right, the first page, the previous page, the nextpage, and the last page. Just click an arrow to get where you want to go.You can also jump directly to a specific page or master page. To jump to a spe-cific page, highlight the current number in the page number field (by selectingit with your cursor, or by pressing Ô+J or Ctrl+J), enter a new page number,and press Return or Enter. (To jump to a master page, select the Page Numberfield and enter the first few characters of the master page’s name.)Opening Multiple Document WindowsIf you like to work on more than one project at once, you’ve come to the rightprogram. InDesign lets you open several documents at once. It also lets youopen multiple windows simultaneously for individual documents. A largemonitor (or having multiple monitors connected) makes this multi-windowfeature even more useful. By opening multiple windows, you canߜ Display two (or more) different pages or spreads at once. You still haveto work on the documents one at a time, but no navigation is required —you have only to click within the appropriate window.ߜ Display multiple magnifications of the same page. For example, youcan work on a detail at high magnification in one window and display theentire page — and see the results of your detail work — at actual size inanother window.ߜ Display a master page in one window and a document page based onthat master page in another window. When you change the masterpage, the change is reflected in the window in which the associated doc-ument page is displayed.20 Part I: Before You Begin
  39. 39. To open a new window for the active document, choose Window➪Arrange➪New Window. The new window is displayed in front of the original window.To show both windows at once, choose Window➪Arrange➪Tile. When youchoose the Tile command, all open windows are resized and displayed sideby side. (If you choose Window➪Arrange➪Cascade, all open windows are dis-played stacked and staggered on top of each other. The front-most documentwindow is visible; the title bars of the other windows are visible above thefront-most document.)When multiple windows are open, you activate a window by clicking on awindow’s title bar or anywhere within the window. Also, the names of allopen documents are displayed at the bottom of the Window menu. Choosinga document name from the Window menu brings that document to the front.If multiple windows are open for a particular document, each window is dis-played (they’re displayed in the order in which you created them) in theWindow menu.To close all windows for the currently displayed document, press Shift+Ô+Wor Ctrl+Shift+W. To close all windows for all open documents, pressOption+Shift+Ô+W or Ctrl+Alt+Shift+W.Tooling around the Tools PanelYou can move the InDesign Tools panel — the control center for 32 ofInDesign’s 33 tools, as well as for 13 additional functions — by clicking anddragging it into position. The Tools panel usually appears to the left of a doc-ument (see Figure 1-2).The one tool not directly accessible from the Tools panel is the Marker tool.But you can switch to it from the Eyedropper tool by holding Option or Alt.(Chapter 7 explains its use.)To discover each tool’s “official” name, hover the mouse pointer over a toolfor a few seconds, and a Tool Tip will appear, telling you the name of thattool. If the Tool Tips do not display, make sure that the Tool Tips pop-upmenu is set to Normal or Fast in the Interface pane of the Preferences dialogbox (choose InDesign➪Preferences➪Interface or press Ô+K on the Mac, orchoose Edit➪Preferences➪Interface or press Ctrl+K in Windows).The Interface pane is new to InDesign CS3. In previous versions, the Tool Tipscontrol was in the General pane of the Preferences dialog box.InDesign gives you one — and only one — tool for each specific job. TheTools panel includes tools for creating and manipulating the objects thatmake up your designs. The tools in the Tools panel are similar to those inother Adobe products (such as Photoshop, Illustrator, and Dreamweaver). Icover what each tool does in the following sections.21Chapter 1: Understanding InDesign Ingredients
  40. 40. The small arrow in its lower-right corner of some tools is a pop-out menuindicator. A tool that displays this arrow is hiding one or more similar tools.To access these “hidden” tools, click and hold a tool that has the pop-outmenu indicator, as shown in Figure 1-3. When the pop-out displays, click oneof the new tools. (Figure 1-2 shows all the pop-out tools.)You don’t need to worry about all the tools, so I highlight just those thatyou’ll need to know to start using InDesign. You’ll likely come across theothers as you work on specific tasks, so I cover those in the chapters thatintroduce those functions.Using the Selection toolsTo work with objects, you have to select them. InDesign provides three toolsto do that, letting you select different aspects of objects.Selection toolThis is perhaps the most-used tool in InDesign. With the Selection tool, youcan select objects on the page and move or resize them. You might want tothink of this tool as the Mover tool because it’s the only tool that lets youdrag objects around on-screen.Selection toolPen toolPanel display toggle buttonPencil toolRectangular Frame toolButton toolRotate toolGradient toolNote toolHand toolFill buttonDefault Fill and Stroke buttonFormat Affects Container buttonApply Color buttonApply Gradient buttonNormal View Mode buttonDirect Selection toolType toolLine toolRectangle toolApply None buttonFree Transform toolScale toolEyedropper toolZoom toolSwap Fill and Stroke buttonFormat Affects Contents buttonStroke buttonScissors toolPreview Mode buttonFigure 1-2:TheInDesignTools panel.22 Part I: Before You Begin
  41. 41. After you’ve selected the Selection tool, here’s how it works:ߜ To select any object on a document page, click it. If you can’t seem toselect it, the object might be placed by a master page (a preformattedpage used to format pages automatically), or the object might be behindanother object.ߜ To select an object placed by a master page, press Shift+Ô or Ctrl+Shiftwhile you click.ߜ To select an object that is completely behind another object, Ô+click itor Ctrl+click it.Direct Selection toolThe Direct Selection tool is what you use to work on the contents of a frame,not the frame itself. For example, you can use the Direct Selection tool toselect individual handles on objects to reshape them, or to move graphicswithin their frames.Here’s how the Direct Selection tool works:ߜ To select an object to reshape it, click the object to display anchorpoints on the edges (the anchor points are hollow handles that you canselect individually, as shown in Figure 1-4). You can drag the anchorpoints to reshape the object.Figure 1-3:If a smalltriangleappears inthe lower-right cornerof a tool,click andhold it todisplay pop-out tools.23Chapter 1: Understanding InDesign Ingredients
  42. 42. ߜ To select objects placed by a master page, Shift+Ô+click or Ctrl+Shift+click, as with the Selection tool. The Direct Selection tool lets you easilyselect objects behind other objects and select items within groups.ߜ To move a graphic within its frame, click inside the frame and drag thegraphic.ߜ To move a frame but leave the graphic in place, click an edge of theframe and drag it.Position toolMeant to mimic PageMaker’s Crop tool to help former PageMaker usersadjust to InDesign, the Position tool, which you access from the pop-outmenu in the Direct Selection tool, combines some aspects of the Selectiontool with some aspects of the Direct Selection tool:ߜ As with the Selection tool, you can resize an object’s frame by draggingits handles.ߜ As with the Direct Selection tool, you can click a graphic and repositionit within the frame by dragging — and that has the effect of cropping thegraphic.Using the Type toolA very frequently used tool, the Type tool lets you enter, edit, and formattext. The Type tool also lets you create rectangular text frames.Here’s how the Type tool works:ߜ To create a rectangular text frame, click and drag; hold the Shift key tocreate a perfect square.Figure 1-4:Reshape anitem withthe DirectSelectiontool byclicking anddragging ananchorpoint.24 Part I: Before You Begin
  43. 43. ߜ To begin typing or editing text, click in a text frame or in any emptyframe and type away.I explain stories and threaded text frames in Chapter 12.Using the object-creation toolsInDesign has a bunch of tools for creating shapes. Part V covers them in moredepth, but you should know about a few of them now because they createobjects that can contain either text or graphics. Plus, you can also use themto draw your own shapes that you then color or otherwise embellish in yourlayout.Pen toolWith the Pen tool, you can create simple illustrations. You use the Pen tool,which is modeled after the pen tools in Illustrator and Photoshop, to createpaths (both open, such as lines, and closed, such as shapes) consisting ofstraight and curved segments. Give it a try — it’s fun!Here’s how the Pen tool works:ߜ To create straight lines, click to establish an anchor point, and then movethe mouse to the next location, click again, and so on. To move an anchorpoint after clicking, press the spacebar and drag the anchor point.ߜ To create curved lines, click and drag, and then release the mousebutton to end the segment.ߜ To close a path and create a frame, click the first anchor point created(the hollow one).ߜ To leave a path open and create a line, Ô+click or Ctrl+click away fromthe path or select another tool.Type toolThe Type tool lets you draw rectangular text frames, as well as type textinside them.Line toolThe Line tool lets you draw freestanding lines (paths) on your page. Afterselecting this tool, simply click and drag the mouse to draw the line. Holdingthe Shift key while you click and drag constrains the line angle to 45-degreeincrements, which is useful for creating straight horizontal and vertical lines.25Chapter 1: Understanding InDesign Ingredients
  44. 44. Frame and shape toolsInDesign has three frame tools — Rectangle Frame, Ellipse Frame, andPolygon Frame — and three shape tools — Rectangle, Ellipse, and Polygon.The frame and shape tools are redundant because both frames and shapescan hold text or graphics or be empty.Because the frame and shape tools really do the same thing, you might usethe frame tool when creating frames that will have their content added later.Why? Because they display with a big X through them, making them easier tospot when looking for frames to fill. The shape tools create frames withoutthat X, so it’s easier to overlook them.To create a rectangle or ellipse, choose the appropriate tool, click somewherein the document window, and drag the mouse to another location. The rec-tangle or ellipse fills the area. But creating a polygon works differently:1. Double-click the Polygon or Polygon Frame tool to display thePolygon Settings dialog box, shown in Figure 1-5.2. Enter a value between 3 and 100 in the Number of Sides field to spec-ify the number of sides on your polygon.3. To create a star shape, use the Star Inset field to specify the size of thespikes.The percent value specifies the distance between the polygon’s bound-ing box and the insides of the spikes (for example, entering 50% createsspikes that are halfway between the bounding box and the center of thepolygon).4. Click OK to close the Polygon Settings dialog box.The settings are saved with the active document for the next time youuse the Polygon or Polygon Frame tool.5. Click and drag to create the polygon, using the rulers or theTransform panel or Control panel to judge the size and placement.To create a symmetrical polygon in which all the sides are the same size,press the Shift key while you click and drag the Polygon or PolygonFrame tool.Using the navigation toolsSeveral tools help you navigate your document, which means moving aroundyour pages, moving your pages around the screen, and changing the degreeof magnification to see just part of a page or to see several pages at once.26 Part I: Before You Begin
  45. 45. Hand toolThe Hand tool lets you move a page around to view different portions of it oranother page entirely. After selecting the Hand tool, click and drag in anydirection. You can access the Hand tool temporarily without actually switch-ing tools by pressing Option+spacebar or Alt+Spacebar.Zoom toolWith the Zoom tool, you increase and decrease the document view scale. Youcan highlight a specific area on a page to change its view or you can click on-screen to change the view scale within InDesign’s preset increments, which isthe same as pressing Ô+= or Ctrl+= to zoom in.View buttonsThe very bottom of the Tools panel has two view buttons: Normal View Modeand Preview Mode. The first shows the document’s pasteboard, margins, andguidelines; the second hides those so you can get a better idea of how thedocument will look when it’s printed or saved as a PDF.A pop-up menu in the Preview Mode button has two preview options: Bleedmode and Slug mode. Bleed mode shows any objects that bleed (extend)beyond the page boundaries, whereas Slug mode shows the space reservedfor information such as crop marks and color separation names used in finaloutput. You can read more about these in Chapter 3. You set these optionswhen you create new documents or by choosing File➪Document Setup.Figure 1-5:Double-clicking thePolygon orPolygonFrame tooldisplays thePolygonSettingsdialog box,which youcan use tospecify thenumber ofsides on apolygon.27Chapter 1: Understanding InDesign Ingredients

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