Enterprise Architecture Roles And Competencies V9

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Enterprise Architecture Roles Defined with their competency requirements

Enterprise Architecture Roles Defined with their competency requirements

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  • 1. Enterprise Architecture Roles and Competencies Presented by Paul Johnson 21 September 2009 Delivering pragmatic solutions for a changing world...
  • 2.
    • Enterprise Architecture Role Guiding Questions
    • Enterprise Architecture Roles Defined
    • Aspects of Perspectives and Roles
    • Architecture Scope and Domain
    • Architectural Role Competencies
    • Bloom’s Taxonomy Described
    • Defining the Continuum
    • Role Descriptions
    Overview 09/25/09 Delivering pragmatic solutions for a changing world...
  • 3.
    • What defines the ‘boundaries’ of a particular Enterprise Architecture role in the EA profession?
    • Within each role what knowledge, skills, abilities (competencies), tools, and resources do they need to accomplish their work?
    • Where do certification & qualification requirements fit in?
    • Are methodologies part of this role or does a methodological approach offer other ‘types’ of roles or paths within roles?
    • When, along a continuum, do they need to acquire each competency?
    • By what standards are they measured to be competent?
    Enterprise Architecture Role Guiding Questions Delivering pragmatic solutions for a changing world...
  • 4. Enterprise Architecture Roles Defined
    • There are two primary categories of architecture roles – producers and consumers.
      • Producers could include:
        • Operational or Business
        • System or Information Technology
        • Data or Information
        • Models
        • Analysis
      • Consumer examples may include:
        • Capital Planners (CPIC)
        • Portfolio Managers (PfM)
    Delivering pragmatic solutions for a changing world...
  • 5. Architectural Role Competencies
    • To assess competency of an individual role it is necessary to measure knowledge they possess.
    • To facilitate this measurement we need to use an educational standard “Bloom’s Taxonomy”.
    • Blooms’ (cognitive knowledge) taxonomy is a good fit to describe a role’s knowledge levels.
    Delivering pragmatic solutions for a changing world...
  • 6. Enterprise Architecture Roles Defined Enterprise Architecture Portfolio Managers Capital Planners Enterprise Architects Business Architects System Architects Data Architects Solution Architects Software Architects Compliance Architects Infrastructure Architects Financial Architects Producers Consumers Architectural Analysts Delivering pragmatic solutions for a changing world...
  • 7. Bloom’s Rose Delivering pragmatic solutions for a changing world...
  • 8. Bloom’s Taxonomy Described
    • Using a supportive color scheme (and numbering) to illustrate how Bloom’s Taxonomy applies to the framework will enable visualization of the cognitive knowledge required of a particular role.
    • There are six levels in the taxonomy, for the purpose of defining roles only the first four will be used , moving from lowest order to highest
    1 2 3 4 Knowledge Comprehension Application Analysis 5 6 Evaluation Synthesis Out of scope 1 2 3 4
  • 9.
    • Bloom's is hierarchical; learning at higher levels is dependent on having attained prerequisite knowledge and skills at lower levels.
    • Action ‘verbs’ within each level will be used to construct the grammar of work statements required to achieve competency at each level.
    Bloom’s Taxonomy Described 1 2 3 4
  • 10. Bloom’s Taxonomy Described
    • Knowledge
      • Exhibit memory of previously-learned materials by recalling facts, terms, basic concepts and answers
      • Knowledge of ways and means of dealing with specifics - conventions, trends and sequences, classifications and categories, criteria, methodology
      • Key words: know , label, recognize, relate, recall
    Delivering pragmatic solutions for a changing world... 1
  • 11. Bloom’s Taxonomy Described
    • Comprehension
      • Demonstrate understanding of facts and ideas by organizing, giving descriptions and stating main ideas
      • This may be shown by translating material from one form to another (words to numbers) or by interpreting material (explaining or summarizing).
      • Key words: comprehend , classify, describe, explain, translate.
    Delivering pragmatic solutions for a changing world... 2
  • 12. Bloom’s Taxonomy Described
    • Application
      • Apply new knowledge. Solve problems by applying acquired knowledge, facts, techniques and rules.
      • Use methods, concepts, theories in new situations
      • Key words: apply , illustrate, interpret, demonstrate, examine
    Delivering pragmatic solutions for a changing world... 3
  • 13. Bloom’s Taxonomy Described
    • Analysis
      • Examine & break information into parts by identifying motives or causes.
      • Make inferences & find evidence to support generalizations.
      • Identify parts, analyze relationships between parts, & recognize organizational principles involved.
      • Key words: analyze , appraise, calculate, compare, contrast
    Delivering pragmatic solutions for a changing world... 4
  • 14. Defining the Continuum
    • Entry - A person who is beginning to learn an activity or who is school trained with little to no hands-on experience.
    • Beginner - A person who may have a basic knowledge of the trade, and may have practical experience to perform proficiently on an independent basis.
    • Intermediate - A person considered experienced who has proven practical proficiency in a trade or skill and completed all entry level requirements. The individual should be expected to perform work independently with limited supervision.
    • Advanced - A person considered to have mastered a trade or skill who may be an overseer or foreman. A worker qualified to teach others and carry on the craft independently.
    • Continuum - A continuous nonspatial whole or extent or succession in which no part or portion is distinct or distinguishable from adjacent parts
    • Banding - Segmenting information along a continuum.
  • 15. Baseline Definitions
    • Knowledge - Familiarity, awareness, or understanding committed to memory that was gained through experience or study.
    • Skills - Developed capacities that facilitate learning or the more rapid acquisition of knowledge or that facilitate performance of activities.
    • Abilities - Enduring attributes of the individual that influence performance and enable the performance of tasks.
    • Resources - Informational sources or reference materials used to locate information or that house information about processes that support or describe task execution.
    • Tools - Implements used in the practice of a vocation or to perform a task.
    • Work Context - The set of facts or circumstances that surround a situation or w ork (the totality of surrounding conditions).
  • 16. Baseline Definitions
    • Competency – The combination of skills, abilities, and knowledge needed to perform a specific task consistent with conditions or standards.
    • Competency Standard - The set of critical elements and performance criteria which describe the means of measuring a competency and the standard by which it is judged.
    • Competency Band - Segmenting competencies along a continuum. e.g., entry, beginner, intermediate, advanced
    • Conditions of Performance - The set of resources and tools which support a specific competency.
    • Performance Criteria - Measure of competence specified by band.
    • Task - Any piece of work that is undertaken or attempted.
  • 17. Career Continuum
    • Distinguishes when, along a career continuum, a competency might be expected to be achieved
  • 18. Assumptions
    • All following roles are assumed to be at intermediate level using following as a career growth continuum
    1 2 3 4
  • 19. Role: Enterprise Architect
    • Primary focus is on the context of entire architecture.
    • Must understand conceptual enterprise and be able to bridge the gap between context and concept.
    Why What How Where Who When Purpose Substance Causality Place Human Time (contextual) strategy information activity location organization cycle (conceptual) business plan conceptual data process logistic system work flow process timing (logical) process rule logical data sub process distributed system human interface process structure (physical) process rule design physical data system design infrastructure presentation control structure (elemental) process rule specification data definition program network access timing definition (atomic) rule database code operating system authentication availability
  • 20. Role: Business Architect
    • Primary focus is on the entire spectrum of the “human” or business areas of the architecture shown in green.
    • Note the individual elements are prefaced with ‘human’ where applicable
    Why What How Where Who When Purpose Substance Causality Place Human Time (contextual) human strategy human information human activity location organization human cycle (conceptual) human plan conceptual data human process locality work flow human process timing (logical) human rules logical data human sub-process infrastructure human-system interface human processing structure (physical) human rule design physical data system design network presentation human control structure (elemental) human process rule specification data definition program network access human timing definition (atomic) human process rule database code operating system role availability
  • 21. Role: System Architect
    • Primary focus is on the entire spectrum of the “system” areas of the architecture
    • Note the difference in the elements – they are all prefaced with ‘ system ’
    Why What How Where Who When Purpose Substance Causality Place Human Time (contextual) system strategy system information system activity location organization system cycle (conceptual) system plan conceptual data system process logistic system work flow system schedule (logical) system rules logical data system sub-process distributed system human-system interface system process structure (physical) system rule design physical data system design infrastructure presentation system control structure (elemental) system process rule specification data definition program network access system timing definition (atomic) system logic database code operating system role system availability
  • 22. Role: Data Architect
    • Primary focus is in the information and data areas.
    • Knowledge of How and Who is using the data to provide context is critical as well.
    Why What How Where Who When Purpose Substance Causality Place Human Time (contextual) strategy information activity location organization cycle (conceptual) business plan conceptual data process logistic system work flow process timing (logical) process rule logical data sub process distributed system human interface processing structure (physical) process rule design physical data system design infrastructure presentation control structure (elemental) process rule specification data definition program network access timing definition (atomic) rule database code operating system authentication availability
  • 23. Role: Solution Architect
    • Primary focus is on the physical and logical across all interrogatives with a blended human-system approach.
    • Knowledge of the logical and conceptual use of solution is important as well.
    Why What How Where Who When Purpose Substance Causality Place Human Time (contextual) strategy information activity location organization cycle (conceptual) objective conceptual data process logistic system work flow process timing (logical) rule logical data process distributed system human-system interface processing structure (physical) rule design physical data design infrastructure presentation control structure (elemental) rule specification data definition program network access timing definition (atomic) logic database code operating system authentication availability
  • 24. Role: Software Architect
    • Primary focus is on the elemental and atomic across all interrogatives
    • Knowledge of the logical and physical use of solution is of importance as well.
    Why What How Where Who When Purpose Substance Causality Place Human Time (contextual) system strategy system information system activity location organization system cycle (conceptual) system plan conceptual data system process logistic system work flow process timing (logical) system rule logical data system process distributed system human-system interface processing structure (physical) system rule design physical data system design infrastructure presentation control structure (elemental) system rule specification data definition program network system access timing definition (atomic) rule database code operating system authentication availability
  • 25. Role: Compliance & Financial Architect
    • Knowledge of and influence on all aspects of the architecture with respect to compliance to standards and financial attributes.
    Why What How Where Who When Purpose Substance Causality Place Human Time (contextual) strategy information activity location organization cycle (conceptual) business plan conceptual data process logistic system work flow process timing (logical) process rule logical data sub process distributed system human interface processing structure (physical) process rule design physical data system design infrastructure presentation control structure (elemental) process rule specification data definition program network access timing definition (atomic) rule database code operating system authentication availability
  • 26. Role: Infrastructure Architect
    • Primary focus is on the WHERE of the architecture
    • Knowledge of the HOW and WHO is important to the infrastructure areas also.
    What How Where Who When Why Substance Causality Place Human Time Purpose (contextual) information activity location organization cycle strategy (conceptual) conceptual data process logistic system work flow process timing business plan (logical) logical data sub process distributed system human interface process structure process rule (physical) physical data system design infrastructure presentation control structure process rule design (elemental) data definition program network access timing definition process rule specification (atomic) database code operating system authentication availability function
  • 27. Role: Architecture Analyst
    • Primary focus on the relationships between any or all the blocks of the architecture framework.
    • Knowledge of the content underlying the framework is critical.
    Why What How Where Who When Purpose Substance Causality Place Human Time (contextual) strategy information activity location organization cycle (conceptual) business plan conceptual data process logistic system work flow process timing (logical) process rule logical data sub process distributed system human interface processing structure (physical) process rule design physical data system design infrastructure presentation control structure (elemental) process rule specification data definition program network access timing definition (atomic) rule database code operating system authentication availability
  • 28. Contact Information Paul W. Johnson CEO 757-575-5243 [email_address] 09/25/09 Delivering pragmatic solutions for a changing world... Visit us on the Web at http:// www.pragmatica-innovations.com
  • 29. Backup slides
    • Following slides are backup and supporting information
    09/25/09 Delivering pragmatic solutions for a changing world...