Scanners Mary Van Court

884 views

Published on

Presentation on optimal scanner settings given by Mary Van Court fo rhte RML Rendezvous, March 10, 2010.

Published in: Technology, Art & Photos
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
884
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Scanners Mary Van Court

  1. 1. Not Through a Glass, Darkly<br />Tips and Tricks forOptimal Scanner SettingsMary Van Court<br />University of WashingtonHealth Sciences Library<br />
  2. 2. Before you start…<br />What do you want to scan?<br />What kind of digital file do you want?<br />Do you have the right software?<br />
  3. 3. Do you want to scan a photo or a multipage document?<br />
  4. 4. Photos are usually scanned asJPEG or GIF files<br />Use JPEG for complex images<br /> > 16 million colors<br /> Not as sharp as GIF<br />Use GIF for line art or logos<br /> Sharper than JPEG<br /> 256 colors<br />
  5. 5. Multipage documents are usually scanned as PDF or TIFF files<br />Most people are more comfortable with PDF <br />Some applications require TIFF (such as Ariel for Interlibrary Loan) <br />Lots of programs to convert between theme.g. DocMorph from the National Library of Medicine (http://docmorph.nlm.nih.gov/docmorph/).<br />
  6. 6. Look at the software<br />The software that came with your scanner will usually do a good job of scanning photos, but will it do what you want?<br />
  7. 7. Every scanner/software combination is different<br />
  8. 8. Some walk you through the process step by step<br />
  9. 9. Some show all your scanningoptions on one screen<br />
  10. 10. Some give you a few optionsand make you look for the rest<br />
  11. 11. Sometimes there are multiple places to look<br />
  12. 12. Select the file format<br />
  13. 13. Select the resolution<br />For web display<br />100 dpi<br />For standard printing<br />240 – 300 dpi<br />For glossy printing or posters<br />Scanner maximum<br />dpi = dots per inch<br />
  14. 14. Sometimes the resolution setting is explicit<br />
  15. 15. Sometimes there are sliders<br />This one shows the relationship between resolution and file size. <br />
  16. 16. Select the image type/mode<br />
  17. 17. Sometimes it’s more cryptic<br />24-bit color<br /> 256 colors<br /> 8 colors<br /> RGB colors<br /> Line drawing<br /> Half tone<br /> Text + photo<br /> Generation<br />
  18. 18. Set the physical parameters<br />It’s often automatic, but sometimes you have to set:<br />Paper size <br />Flatbed scanner vs. document feeder <br />One or two-sided original <br />Scanner accessories <br />
  19. 19. Adjust the image parameters<br />Brightness<br />Threshold<br />Contrast<br />Dithering<br />Despeckle<br />
  20. 20. Sometimes settings are pictures – not words<br />
  21. 21. Settings are not consistent from scanner to scanner<br />Does the scan get lighter or darker when you increase the brightness?<br />
  22. 22. Optical Character Recognition (OCR)<br />A<br />Lots of programs to convert paper image to text<br />Need to scan at 300 – 400 dpi<br />97-99% accurate<br />Can create searchable image<br />
  23. 23. Post scanning editing<br />Variety of software<br />Lots of different features<br />Shop around for what you want<br />
  24. 24. The bottom line is …<br />There are a lot of choices. Keep looking until you find one that works for you.<br />

×