Click to advance
On February 19, 1942, soon after the beginning of World War II, Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066. The eva...
During World War II the U.S. government forced more than 120,000 Japanese Americans to leave their homes and along with fa...
One of those 10 camps was located in Manzanar, CA at the base of the Sierra Nevada mountains. It  opened March 21, 1942 an...
 
Loyalties
 
Persons of Japanese ancestry arrive at the Santa Anita Assembly Center from San Pedro, Ca
Waiting to be relocated.
 
 
 
Construction of Manzanar
 
 
Manzanar Relocation Center, Manzanar, California. Street scene and view of quarters for evacuees of Japanese ancestry at M...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Manzanar Home
Manzanar Dust Storm.
 
  Burning leaves, autumn dawn
  In 1943, renowned photographer Ansel Adams took this photo of a dressmaking  class at the Manzanar Relocation Center in ...
Baseball Field Baseball field
Manzanar - Block. 23 BLDG. 29
Tractor Repair
Potato   Field
Replica of an historic watch tower at the Manzanar National Historic Site, built in 2005. Eight watchtowers, equipped with...
Loading bus, leaving Manzanar for relocation.
Japanese Internment camp cemetery - Manzanar, CA.
Model of Camp Manzanar
Concrete slabs are all that remain to mark the former barracks of the Manzanar Concentration Camp.
Entrance to Manzanar today.
As we leave  the abandoned "Manzanar War Relocation Center" let us ponder  how this happened and could history r...
The  End Winston W Wallace
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Manzanar

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Relocation Camps for the Japanese

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Manzanar

  1. 1. Click to advance
  2. 2. On February 19, 1942, soon after the beginning of World War II, Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066. The evacuation order commenced the round-up of 120,000 Americans of Japanese heritage to one of 10 internment camps—officially called "relocation centers"—in California, Idaho, Utah, Arizona, Wyoming, Colorado, and Arkansas Closed November 21, 1945. Peak population 10,046.
  3. 3. During World War II the U.S. government forced more than 120,000 Japanese Americans to leave their homes and along with farms, schools, jobs, and businesses. In some cases family members were separated. From 1942 to 1945, they lived in internment camps. After the December 7, 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066. This act based on ethnicity permitted the military to bypass the constitutional safeguards of American citizens in the name of national defense. The order excluded persons of Japanese ancestry then living on the West Coast from residing and working in certain locations. This traumatic uprootment culminated in the mass evacuation and incarceration of most Japanese Americans, most of whom were U.S. citizens or legal permanent resident aliens. They were detained for up to 4 years, without due process of law or any factual basis. They were forced to live in bleak, remote camps behind barbed wire and under the surveillance of armed guards. Japanese American internment raised questions about the rights of American citizens as embodied in the first ten amendments to the Constitution.
  4. 4. One of those 10 camps was located in Manzanar, CA at the base of the Sierra Nevada mountains. It  opened March 21, 1942 and was closed November 21, 1945. The peak population of that camp was 10,046. Some memories of that camp by Ansel Adams and others….
  5. 6. Loyalties
  6. 8. Persons of Japanese ancestry arrive at the Santa Anita Assembly Center from San Pedro, Ca
  7. 9. Waiting to be relocated.
  8. 13. Construction of Manzanar
  9. 16. Manzanar Relocation Center, Manzanar, California. Street scene and view of quarters for evacuees of Japanese ancestry at Manzanar reception center. High Sierras in background, April 2, 1942
  10. 28. Manzanar Home
  11. 29. Manzanar Dust Storm.
  12. 31.   Burning leaves, autumn dawn
  13. 32.   In 1943, renowned photographer Ansel Adams took this photo of a dressmaking class at the Manzanar Relocation Center in California.
  14. 33. Baseball Field Baseball field
  15. 34. Manzanar - Block. 23 BLDG. 29
  16. 35. Tractor Repair
  17. 36. Potato Field
  18. 37. Replica of an historic watch tower at the Manzanar National Historic Site, built in 2005. Eight watchtowers, equipped with searchlights and machine guns pointed inward at the prisoners, were positioned around the perimeter of the camp.
  19. 38. Loading bus, leaving Manzanar for relocation.
  20. 39. Japanese Internment camp cemetery - Manzanar, CA.
  21. 40. Model of Camp Manzanar
  22. 41. Concrete slabs are all that remain to mark the former barracks of the Manzanar Concentration Camp.
  23. 42. Entrance to Manzanar today.
  24. 43. As we leave the abandoned "Manzanar War Relocation Center" let us ponder how this happened and could history repeat itself if we are not eternally vigilant. GEORGE SANTAYANA : Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it.
  25. 44. The End Winston W Wallace

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