Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
  • Like
Oregon Building Code Interpretation 2011
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Now you can save presentations on your phone or tablet

Available for both IPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Oregon Building Code Interpretation 2011

  • 1,036 views
Published

Greg Mockford, AIA, CSI, LEED and …

Greg Mockford, AIA, CSI, LEED and
Art Davis, AIA, CSI, CDT

This presentation was given for the Oregon State Bar Construction Law Series in April of 2012. It seeks to inform professionals on how the Oregon Building Codes are adopted, and give an overall summary of the history of Codes in Oregon.

Published in Design , Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,036
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Through the next 50 minutes, we will guide you through the following 5 questions… How did we end up needing Building Codes? How do they go into effect? How does that happen in Oregon? Once they are in effect in Oregon, how do they apply generally? How do they apply to some specific examples?
  • Happened on a Saturday at 4:00. Almost all the dead were young immigrant women. 146 workers out of about 500. Youngest 14, oldest 48 Contributors to lives lost: The fire itself was thought to be caused by an extinguished match of cigarette thrown into a cutting bin (2 months of cuttings had accumulated) People jumping to their deaths from the 8 th , 9 th & 10 th floors. People locked in because doors were locked to prevent theft & absenteeism.
  • The response was the creation of codes and rules to prevent these issues from happening again. Still the deadliest industrial disaster in New York City 4 th highest loss of life from an industrial accident in US History
  • Current Model Code is developed by the ICC. Others provide input to the ICC.
  • State Code Review Committee Reviews model code changes, existing Oregon amendments, and hears public testimony Recommends changes to Building Codes Division Board. Board recommends to the Administrator If Administrator agrees, the changes are referred to a public rule making hearing; public testimony is heard. If no significant issues arise, the code change administratively adopted.
  • Oregon Adoption State wide code, with Jurisdictions Mid-cycle amendments ONLY for Address emerging issues or potential fire life safety risk, Correct conflicting or unclear provisions of the code, Make necessary updates to referenced standards. Division publishes “amendment proposal period” w/ specific criteria Staff reviews received proposals and makes recommendations to the Board Board recommends to the Administrator Issued for public rule making hearings Changes acted on – i.e., adopted or not.
  • Drawings: Site Plan, Floor Plans, Elevations, Sections, Details. Minimum: enough information that the structure can be completed from the permit set, without special knowledge and meet applicable code requirements.
  • Plan checks are abandoned and invalid if Building Permit is not obtained within 180 days of plan check completion.
  • Required Inspections: Foundations, MEP & Gas, Floodplain, Frame and Masonry, Fire Resistive Construction, Final Inspection Special Inspections (examples): Geotechnical, welding, epoxy anchors, high strength bolting, post-tensioned concrete structures, other complex or unusual components Deferred submittals Often bidder design systems. Some examples include: roof trusses, fire caulking/stopping, curtainwall glazing systems. The Contractor’s overall role on a project is much greater, including supervision, coordination and quality control of the work. Architect’s overall responsibilities under licensure rules include construction period involvement to assure general (not detailed) compliance with the construction documents; including site observations. The observation requirement does not apply to construction regulated under the ORSC. Review of shop drawing submittals may or may not be required per Owner/Architect agreement Engineers and designers have no licensure requirements for observation or administration of construction.
  • Required Inspections: Foundations MEP & Gas Floodplain Frame and Masonry Fire Resistive Construction Final Inspection Review and act upon Deferred Submittals Require compliance with Special Inspection requirement PRIOR to issuing an Occupancy Permit Permits abandoned and invalid if work does not begin within 180 days of issue; or after start of work, if there is a 180 day period of inactivity.
  • On Fire Life Safety Use & occupancy Exiting Combustible materials Fire rated materials and assemblies
  • Work may not be done in the manner that violates the provisions of the code.
  • 10 Primary Occupancy Types With sub-categories
  • Type V: (including wood and engineered wood)
  • based on Specific Occupancy affecting
  • Multi Family Housing was a bit of a question mark as to where it fit Condos and high rise apartments were clearly governed by OSSC 1 and 2 family dwellings were clearly governed by the ORSC
  • Anchorage Per manufacturer’s recommendations and per Figures Window Sill/Pans Not adopted by the State of Oregon Performance Not adopted by the State of Oregon
  • Note that the ban was by legislative action, not by administrative action by the Building Codes Division.
  • Note that the ban was by legislative action, not administrative action by the Building Codes Division.

Transcript

  • 1. PINNELL  BUSCH Smith Freed & Eberhard PC OSB Construction Law Brown Bag Lunch Series April 12, 2011 Presented by: Greg Mockford, AIA CSI LEED AP Art Davis, AIA CSI CDT
  • 2. PINNELL  BUSCH
    • Building Codes Origin
    • Building Codes Process
    • Building Codes Evolution (Oregon)
    • Building Codes Application (Oregon)
    • Examples
    INTRODUCTION
  • 3. PINNELL  BUSCH
    • 146 garment workers died within 18 minutes
    • Causes:
      • No building codes
      • Inadequate exits
      • Highly combustible materials
      • No fire sprinklers
    MODERN BUILDING CODES – ORIGIN March 25, 1911 - Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, New York City
  • 4. PINNELL  BUSCH
    • Social Effects
      • Fire / Building Codes
      • Workplace safety rules
      • Labor unions strengthened and emboldened
    MODERN BUILDING CODES – ORIGIN March 25, 1911 - Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire, New York City
  • 5. PINNELL  BUSCH MODERN BUILDING CODES – PROGRESSION
    • 1905 building code recommended by the National Fire Underwriters
    • 1920’s several organizations started developing codes separately
      • Building Officials and Code Administrators International (BOCA)
      • International Conference of Building Officials Inc. (ICBO)
      • Southern Building Code Congress Inc. (SBCCI)
      • They published separate codes
        • BOCA National Building Codes
        • Uniform Building Codes
        • Standard Building Codes
  • 6. PINNELL  BUSCH MODERN BUILDING CODES – PROGRESSION
    • 1994 the major organizations agreed to develop a unified building code
    • Formed the International Code Council (ICC)
    • The first generation of current code was published as the International Building Code (IBC) in 2000.
  • 7. PROCESS – Code Adoption & Enforcement Model Code Development Construction Documents Adoption by State State Admin. Changes Local Building Code Enforcement Construction Period
  • 8. PROCESS – Model Code Development
    • 3-year change cycle
    • A Committee Review & Approval Process
      • Input from:
      • Code Officials
      • Industry Associations
      • Design Professionals
      • Life/Safety Experts
      • Others of the public
    • No force of law
    Model Code Development Construction Documents Adoption by State State Admin. Changes Local Building Code Enforcement Construction Period
  • 9. PROCESS – Adoption by Jurisdiction
    • 3-year change cycle
      • 1-2 year offset from Model Codes
    • Committee Review & Recommendations
      • Input from:
      • Code Officials
      • Industry Associations
      • Design Professionals
      • Others of the public
    • Administrative Adoption
    Model Code Development Construction Documents Adoption by State State Admin. Changes Local Building Code Enforcement Construction Period
  • 10. PROCESS – Jurisdictional Changes (Oregon)
    • Included
      • Mid-cycle Amendments
    • Committee Review Process
      • Input from public
    • Administrative Adoption
    Model Code Development Construction Documents Adoption by State State Admin. Changes Local Building Code Enforcement Construction Period
  • 11.
    • Documents Prepared
      • By:
        • Architects / Engineers
        • Designers
        • Contractors
        • Owners
      • Include:
        • Drawings
        • Specifications
        • Alternate Materials & Methods approval requests
    • Submitted by:
      • Owner (typical)
      • A/E or Designer or Contractor
    Model Code Development Construction Documents Adoption by State State Admin. Changes Local Building Code Enforcement Construction Period PROCESS – Enforcement
  • 12.
    • Agency Enforcement
      • “ Plan Check” Reviews
        • Zoning / Land Use
        • Fire Life Safety
        • Structural
        • MEP & other
      • Action on “appeals”
      • Corrections list(s)
      • Identify additional requirements
        • Special Inspections
        • Deferred Submittals
    • Plan Check Abandonment
      • 180 days
    Model Code Development Construction Documents Adoption by State State Admin. Changes Local Building Code Enforcement Construction Period PROCESS – Enforcement
  • 13.
    • Contractor’s Role (re: Compliance)
      • Obtain Permits (typical)
      • Coordinate Agency Inspections
      • Coordinate Special Inspections
      • Make Deferred Submittals
      • Act on Corrective Notices
    • Architect / Engineer Role (re: Compliance)
      • Architect - Perform Periodic Observations
      • Engineer – Perform Special Inspections
      • Review & accept Deferred Submittals
    Model Code Development Construction Documents Adoption by State State Admin. Changes Local Building Code Enforcement Construction Period PROCESS – Enforcement
  • 14.
    • Agency Enforcement
      • Perform Required Inspections
      • Require completion of Special Inspections
      • Review and act upon Deferred Submittals
      • Issue Corrective Notices as needed
      • Issue Occupancy Permit
      • Act on Permit Abandonment (180 days of inactivity)
    Model Code Development Construction Documents Adoption by State State Admin. Changes Local Building Code Enforcement Construction Period PROCESS – Enforcement
  • 15.
    • Who interprets For Regulatory Enforcement
    • The Building Official of the Authority Having Jurisdiction
    • Who Uses & Functionally Interprets
      • Agency Plans Examiners and Inspectors
      • Architects / Engineers
      • Designers
      • Contractors
      • Owners & Facility Managers
      • Fire Safety Experts
      • Industry Experts
      • Construction Defect Experts
      • Attorneys
      • Others
    Who Uses and Interprets Building Codes
  • 16.
    • Building Codes
    • Oregon Structural Specialty Code
    • Oregon Residential Specialty Code
    • Oregon Energy Efficiency Specialty Code
    • Oregon Electrical Specialty Code
    • Oregon Mechanical Specialty Code
    • Oregon Plumbing Specialty Code
    • Oregon Elevator Specialty Code
    PROCESS – Laws Applying to Construction in Oregon
    • Other Laws and Rules: (situation dependent)
    • Local Land Use (Zoning)
    • Consumer Product Safely Laws (e.g., safety glass)
    • Environmental regulations (Federal, State, regional and local)
    • Condominium Acts
      • Oregon
      • Washington
    • ADA
  • 17.
    • Building Codes
    • Oregon Structural Specialty Code
    • Oregon Residential Specialty Code
    • Oregon Energy Efficiency Specialty Code
    • Oregon Electrical Specialty Code
    • Oregon Mechanical Specialty Code
    • Oregon Plumbing Specialty Code
    • Oregon Elevator Specialty Code
    • Other Laws and Rules: (situation dependent)
    • Local Land Use (Zoning)
    • Consumer Product Safely Laws (e.g., safety glass)
    • Environmental regulations (Federal, State, regional and local)
    • Condominium Acts
      • Oregon
      • Washington
    • ADA
    PROCESS – Focus of Today’s Presentation
  • 18.
    • Work Requiring Permit
      • New Construction
      • Alterations and Remodels
      • Repairs and Modifications
      • Changes to Use (i.e., Occupancy)
    • Issues & Systems
      • Structural Systems (gravity, wind, seismic)
      • Fire Life Safety (use & occupancy, exiting,etc.)
      • Accessibility, including accessible routes (presumptive ADA compliance)
      • Energy (insulation, glazing performance, lighting & power consumption)
      • Building Envelope
      • [2010 OSSC Section 105.1]
    PROCESS – What do the OSSC & ORSC regulate?
  • 19.
    • Exempt from OSSC & ORSC Permit:
      • Detached structures not exceeding 120 square feet.
      • Retaining walls not over 4-feet high.
      • Walks, drives & platforms not more than 30-inches above grade, not above occupied space, and no on an accessible route.
      • Painting, papering, tiling, carpeting, cabinets, counter tops, and similar work.
      • Non-fixed & movable fixtures, casework, rack, counters and partitions not more than 5-feet 9-inches in height.
      • Other
      • [2010 OSSC Section 1.05.2]
    PROCESS – What do the OSSC & ORSC regulate?
  • 20. PROCESS – What do the OSSC & ORSC regulate?
    • Existing Structures
      • Maintenance
        • “ Maintenance. Not adopted by the State of Oregon.”
        • Maintenance of the building envelope not required.
      • Compliance
        • “ Compliance. Alterations, repairs, additions, and changes of occupancy…comply with Fire Code…and Residential Code… ”
        • [2010 OSSC Sections 3401.2 and 3401.3]
  • 21. PINNELL  BUSCH Oregon Building Codes
  • 22.
      • Contents – 2010 OSSC
        • 1-2 Administration and definitions
        • 3 Use & occupancy classifications
        • 4,31 Special requirements
        • 5-6 Height & area limitations
        • 7-9 Fire protection
        • 10 Evacuation
        • 11 Disability Access
        • 12-13,27-30 Building systems
        • 14-26 Structural components
        • 32 Encroachment
        • 33 Safeguards
        • 34 Existing building allowances
        • 35 Referenced standards
    APPLICATION – Oregon Structural Specialty Code
  • 23.
      • Chapter 1
        • “… to promulgate a state building code to govern the construction, reconstruction, alteration and repair of buildings…and to require correction of unsafe conditions…establish uniform performance standards…”
      • [2010 OSSC Section 101.2]
    APPLICATION – Oregon Structural Specialty Code
  • 24.
      • Occupancy Type (i.e. Use)
        • Assembly: Groups A (1-5)
        • Business: Group B
        • Educational: Group E
        • Factory/Industrial: Group F (1-2)
        • High Hazard: Group H (1-5)
        • Institutional: Group I (1-4)
        • Mercantile: Group M
        • Residential: Group R (1-4)
        • Special and Utility: Group SR (1-4), Group S (1-2), and Group U
      • [2010 OSSC Section 302.1]
    APPLICATION – Oregon Structural Specialty Code
  • 25.
      • Construction Type
        • Types I & II
          • All Building Elements are Non-Combustible (i.e., steel, concrete, masonry)
        • Type III
          • Exterior Walls are Non-Combustible
        • Type IV
          • Heavy Timber
        • Type V
          • Any Permitted Material
      • [2010 OSSC Section 602]
    APPLICATION – Oregon Structural Specialty Code
  • 26. APPLICATION – Oregon Structural Specialty Code
      • Allowances
        • Construction Type
          • A or B (Fire Resistance Rating)
        • Occupancy (i.e., Use)
        • Size
          • Maximum Heights
          • Maximum Square Footage
      • [2010 OSSC Table 503]
  • 27. APPLICATION – Oregon Structural Specialty Code
    • Detailed Provisions
      • Structural Components
        • [2010 OSSC Chapters 12-30]
        • Gravity
        • Seismic
        • Wind
      • Exterior Wall Construction
        • [2010 OSSC Chapter 14]
        • Allowable Materials
        • Weather Resistive
        • Other
      • Means of Egress
      • [2010 OSSC Chapter 10]
        • Doors
        • Corridors
        • Stairs
      • Accessibility
      • [2010 OSSC Chapter 11]
        • Presumptive compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act
  • 28. APPLICATION – Oregon Structural Specialty Code
    • Detailed Provisions
      • Occupancy
        • [2010 OSSC Chapter 3]
        • Fire Resistance
        • Means of Egress
      • Interior Environment
        • [2010 OSSC Chapter 12]
        • Ventilation
        • Light
      • Fire Resistance of Materials
        • [2010 OSSC Chapters 7-8]
        • Location on Property
        • Distance to Public Way
        • Distance to Other Structures
      • Fire Protection
        • [2010 OSSC Chapter 9]
        • Fire Alarm
        • Fire Sprinklers
        • Installation Under NFPA
  • 29. APPLICATION – Oregon Structural Specialty Code
    • Detailed Provisions
      • Energy Conservation
        • Before 2010: Regulated by OSSC
        • 2010: Regulated by 2010 OEESC
      • Primarily regulates
        • Wall, floor & roof insulation
        • Glazing & fenestration thermal performance.
  • 30. APPLICATION – Oregon Residential Specialty Code
      • Contents – 2008 ORSC
        • 1-2 Administration and definitions
        • 3-10 Building Planning and Construction
        • 11 Energy Conservation
        • 12-23 Mechanical
        • 24 Fuel Gas (Gas Fireplaces, etc.)
        • 43 Reference Standards
        • Appendices A-R
  • 31.
      • Chapter 1
        • “ The provisions of this code shall apply to the construction, alteration, movement, enlargement, replacement, repair, equipment, use, occupancy and location of detached one- and two-family dwellings and townhouses not more than three stories above grade in height with a separate means of egress and their accessory structures”
        • [2008 ORSC R102.2]
    APPLICATION – Oregon Residential Specialty Code
  • 32.
      • Occupancy
        • Detached one- and two-family dwellings & townhouses: Group R-3
        • Family Daycare or Foster care
        • Detached Congregate Residences
        • [2008 ORSC R102.2]
    APPLICATION – Oregon Residential Specialty Code
  • 33.
      • Construction Type
        • “ The requirements of this code are based on platform and balloon-frame construction for light-frame buildings…Other framing systems must have equivalent detailing to ensure force transfer, continuity, and compatible deformations.”
        • [2008 ORSC R301.2]
      • Size
        • Maximum Height – 3 Stories
        • Maximum Square Footage – Not Regulated
    APPLICATION – Oregon Residential Specialty Code
  • 34.
      • OSSC & ORSC
        • Oregon Added Language in the OSSC 2004 Adopted Code to deal with the confusion.
        • “ Exception: Detached one- and two-family and multiple single family dwellings (town homes) not more than three stories above grade plane in height with a separate means of egress and their accessory structures shall comply with the ORSC .”
        • What does in NOT Regulate
        • [ 2004 OSSC Section 101.2 ]
    APPLICATION – MULTI-FAMILY
  • 35. ORSC (Before 2004) OSSC (Before 2004) APPLICATION – MULTI-FAMILY OSSC (After 2004) ORSC (After 2004) ? ?
  • 36.
      • Other Resources
        • Commentary
    INTERPRETATION TOOLS
  • 37.
      • Other Resources
        • Illustrated
    INTERPRETATION TOOLS
  • 38.
      • Residential Windows
      • Rain Screen
      • EIFS
    EXAMPLES
  • 39.
    • Manufacturer’s Design
      • Wind Design Pressure criteria
        • Tested per AAMA / ANSI
      • Labeling per AAMA 506, or ASTM E1886 & E1996
    • Waterproof Integration
      • “ Windows and sliding doors shall be installed in accordance with the fenestration manufacture’s written installation instructions.”
      • [2008 ORSC Section R613.1]
    • Emergency Escape
    EXAMPLES – RESIDENTIAL WINDOWS
  • 40.
    • R703.1 General
    • The exterior wall envelope to be designed and constructed
      • to prevent the accumulation of water within the wall by providing
        • a water resistant barrier behind the exterior veneer
        • a minimum 1/8” space between WRB & veneer
        • integrated flashings
    • Exceptions
      • Cladding over concrete or masonry if other conditions are met.
      • Walls tested to show resistance against wind driven rain
    • [2008 ORSC Section R703 Exterior Covering]
    EXAMPLES – RAINSCREEN
  • 41. EXAMPLES – RAINSCREEN
    • R703.2 Weather resistive barrier (WRB)
    • (1) Layer 15# felt complying with ASTM D226 or other approved
    • Laps
      • Upper layer over lower– 2”
      • End laps – 6”
    • Continuous top to bottom
    • Terminated per R703.1
    • Proscriptive requirements – does not refer to manufacturer’s installation requirements
    • [2008 ORSC Section R703 Exterior Covering]
  • 42. EXAMPLES – RAINSCREEN
    • R703.3 Wood, hardboard & wood structural panel siding
    • R703.4 Attachments
      • Corrosion resistant fasteners
    • R703.5 Wood shakes & shingles
    • R703.6 Exterior plaster (aka stucco)
    • R703.7 Stone and masonry veneer
    • [2008 ORSC Section R703 Exterior Covering]
  • 43. EXAMPLES – RAINSCREEN
    • R703.8 Flashing
    • Applied to prevent
      • Entry of water into the wall cavity
      • Or penetration into framing components
    • Required at
      • Windows and doors extending to surface of the exterior finish or to the WRB for drainage
      • Continuously above projecting wood trim
      • Where decks or porches attach to walls or floors
      • Other locations
    • [2008 ORSC Section R703 Exterior Covering]
  • 44. EXAMPLES – RAINSCREEN
    • R703.9 Exterior Insulation Finish System
      • Shall be installed in accordance with manufacturer’s installation instructions
      • WRB
        • installed between water-sensitive elements
        • and shall have a means of draining water to the exterior
      • Flashing per R703.8
      • 2007 Barrier EIFS Ban republished
    • [2008 ORSC Section R703 Exterior Covering]
  • 45.
    • 2007 Oregon Barrier EIFS Ban
      • New barrier EIFS installations banned in 2007
      • No affect on “drainage” (water managed) EIFS
      • Allows repair of existing barrier EIFS systems
      • Allows replacement of existing barrier EIFS systems with new barrier EIFS
      • Allows barrier EIFS installation over concrete or masonry
      • Allows architectural features not protecting an interior space
    EXAMPLES – EIFS
  • 46.
    • 2008 Statewide Interpretation
    • Confirms
      • Water managed EIFS is allowed
      • Repair or replacement of existing barrier EIFS is allowed
      • Barrier EIFS application over concrete or masonry is allowed
    • Clarifies
      • Barrier EIFS is allowed on architectural features not protecting an interior space
        • For example: Porte-cochere, and the like.
    EXAMPLES – EIFS
  • 47. PINNELL  BUSCH END