African Urban Poverty Alleviation Program
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African Urban Poverty Alleviation Program

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We have a wonderful book about the "African Urban Poverty Alleviation Program" publication from Sister Cities International. The AUPAP is an excellent example of what JSCA and SCI are capable of ...

We have a wonderful book about the "African Urban Poverty Alleviation Program" publication from Sister Cities International. The AUPAP is an excellent example of what JSCA and SCI are capable of achieving with our sister cities that are less developed.

Please feel free to view the digital copy here.

There is also an excerpt about Jacksonville and one of our Sister Cities, Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality!

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African Urban Poverty Alleviation Program African Urban Poverty Alleviation Program Document Transcript

  • Africa Urban Poverty Alleviation Program
  • Table of Contents 2 2 Foreword – Mary D. Kane 3 About Sister Cities International 4 About the Africa Urban Poverty Alleviation Program (AUPAP) 5 AUPAP Projects – Sister City Relationships and Project Descriptions 6 Baltimore, Marlyand - Luxor, Egypt: The construction of a pipeline connecting the potable water source at the village of Nagaa to the village of Gad, to provide clean, reliable water to 6,000 residents. 8 Boulder, Colorado - Kisumu, Kenya: The construction of toilet facilities at the Kudho Primary School benefitting over 1,200 students and the Migosi Market Center serving 3,000 buyers and sellers daily. 10 Chicago, Illinois - Casablanca, Morocco: The renovation and equipping of Al Waha Health Center, benefitting over 60,000 residents in Sidi Moumen. 12 Corvallis, Oregon - Gondar, Ethiopia: The construction of four restroom/shower facilities and a public health clinic, serving over 60,000 residents. 14 Delray Beach, Florida - Moshi, Tanzania: The construction of skip bucket foundations and provision of cleaning tools and equipment in the Majengo Ward, benefitting over 24,000 residents. 16 Fort Worth, Texas - Mbabane, Swaziland: The construction of a community health and social center, serving over 1,500 people. 18 Grand Rapids, Michigan - Ga East/Ga West, Ghana: The renovation of the Mayera Community Health Clinic and the construction of a mechanized borehole to provide water for the clinic in Ga West, benefitting 35,000 people. The construction of a 12-seat community latrine and mechanized borehole for the Taifa community in Ga East, benefitting 11,000 people. 20 Jacksonville, Florida - Port Elizabeth, South Africa: The purchase of a mobile clinic in the Chatty Extension Area benefitting 55,000 residents, and the renovation of school ablution facilities at two schools in the Nelson Mandela Bay Area benefitting 1,763 students. 22 Lansing, Michigan - Akuapem South, Ghana: The construction of toilet facilities benefitting 7,500 people, and the renovation of two health clinics benefitting 18,000 people. 24 Long Beach, California - Mombasa, Kenya: The procurement of a water purification plant and medical equipment for several health clinics in Mombasa. 26 Louisville, Kentucky - Tamale, Ghana: The construction of a sanitation facility for the Tamale Teaching Hospital and the purchase of an ambulance for the hospital. 28 Maryland State - Bong/Maryland County, Liberia: The construction of 34 hand dug wells with hand pumps in Bong County and the restoration and improvement of the water system at the JJ Dossen Memorial Hospital in Maryland County. 30 Milwaukee, Wisconsin - uMhlathuze, South Africa: The installation of water supply—connecting water from the main line to standpipes in the KwaDube community, benefitting 18,000 people. 32 Milwaukee County, Wisconsin - Buffalo City, South Africa: The renovation and expansion of Aspiranza Clinic benefitting 2,000 residents in the Buffalo Flats Area— addition of rooms, purchase of new medical equipment and furniture, installation of storage facility to stock and store equipment and supplies safely.
  • 1 34 Oakland, California - Sekondi-Takoradi, Ghana: The construction of mechanized boreholes and toilet facilities at the Ketan Cluster of Schools benefitting 3,000 people; provision of medical screenings benefitting 1,250 students and teachers; and repair of ambulance for Esikado Hospital. 36 Richmond, Virginia - Segou, Mali: The construction of toilet and washing facilities in Les Poupons Kindergarten, Medine Community Health Center, and Small Water Tower Public Market benefitting over 50,000 residents, and the renovation of Medine Community Health Center benefitting 28,000 people in Segou and surrounding communities. 38 Riverside, California - Obuasi, Ghana: The upgrade of water facilities of Bossman and St. Philip’s neighborhoods benefitting over 6,000 people; purchase of Toyota ambulance for Obuasi Government Hospital and procurement of medical equipment for six hospitals and clinics serving over 200,000 people; and upgrade of the local abattoir. 40 Seattle, Washington - Mombasa, Kenya: The renovation and expansion of Utange Dispensary to include a maternal and dental clinic, benefitting 40,000 residents of the Bamburi division of Mombasa. 42 St. Louis, Missouri - Saint Louis, Senegal: The purchase of trash collection equipment, benefitting over 200,000 residents in Saint Louis; provision of screenings and medical equipment for diabetes care benefitting about 20,000 people with diabetes; and renovation of the Rawane Ngom School. 44 Sonoma, California - Aswan, Egypt: The purchase of lower and upper endoscopes for the Aswan Cancer Center and the purchase of trash collection equipment for the El Nasriya Sanitation Project, a waste management system serving about 80,000 residents. 46 Toledo, Ohio - Tanga, Tanzania: The construction of toilet facilities at Sakarani Garden, Mgandini Market, and Mkwakwani Market serving up to 50,000 people, and the construction of the Duga Maternity Ward serving up to 25,000 women and children. 48 Urbana, Illinois - Zomba, Malawi: The construction of toilet facilities at elementary schools benefitting 5,600 students and an ablution block at Zomba Central Hospital benefitting 200 patients and family members daily. 50 Wilmington, Delaware - Osogbo, Nigeria: The construction of 29 hand pump boreholes throughout all seven Osogbo districts, providing potable water for up to 140,000 residents. 52 Acknowledgements
  • Foreword Mary D. Kane President and CEO Sister Cities International 2 I n 2008, a question was posed to a group of U.S. and African sister city programs – “Can we come together, with a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, to change the lives of thousands of our friends and family members both here in the United States and throughout the continent of Africa?” Ambitious goals such as this are not unfamiliar to our organization. Sister Cities International is a non-profit organization that was started in 1956 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower, and at that time in our history the world was still feeling the effects of two World Wars and the Cold War was heating up. President Eisenhower stated in his address on September 11, 1956 that “Two deeply held convictions unite us in common purpose. First, is our belief in effective and responsive local government as a principal bulwark of freedom. Second is our faith in the great promise of people-to-people and sister city affiliations in helping build the solid structure of world peace.” This citizen network has grown to encompass 550 U.S. cities that have close to 2,000 partnerships in 146 countries. When Sister Cities International received over $7 million to support the Africa Urban Poverty Alleviation Program, which came to be known as AUPAP, we were given the opportunity to once again promote our message of peace and closer relations between peoples, this time through development work. The goal of the program was to complete water, sanitation, and health projects in African cities through sister city programs, where both communities were involved in the identification, planning, and implementation of projects. We held a competitive application process for over 200 U.S. communities that had relationships in Africa, and those that took on this challenge, which encompassed 13 countries throughout the continent, were charged with engaging their partners and developing these projects with only local volunteers and the support of a few dedicated employees of Sister Cities International. On the following pages you’ll find the results of their work. Each program has the components of a great story – there were days of hope, tears, anxiousness, anger, sympathy, frustration and ultimately great joy. I had the privilege of seeing many of these projects in person, and whether it was the young girl in Kisumu, Kenya who could now collect water from the well in her school, or the family whose home was saved from fire because of newly installed water standpipes in uMhlathuze, South Africa, or the community in Ga District, Ghana which now has access to clean toilet facilities, in each case I saw how these projects deepened the connection with their U.S. partners. I don’t think anyone involved in these projects will tell you it was easy, but I do think everyone will tell you that it was worthwhile. AUPAP supported the vibrant mission of Sister Cities International –To promote peace through mutual respect, understanding and cooperation – one individual, one community at a time and when you read the following stories you will understand that the lives of many U.S. citizens and their family members in Africa were changed – each one for the better. Enjoy reading about these incredible accomplishments, and my heartfelt congratulations to the communities who made this work possible.
  • About Sister Cities International 3 S ister Cities International is a nonpartisan 501(c)(3) nonprofit that serves as the national membership organization for individual sister cities, counties, and states across the United States. This network unites thousands of citizen diplomats and volunteers from 522 U.S. communities with over 2,000 partnerships in more than 140 countries. Sister Cities International was created at President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s 1956 White House Summit on Citizen Diplomacy. He envisioned an organization that would be a champion for peace and prosperity by helping citizens foster bonds between people from different communities around the world. President Eisenhower reasoned that if private citizens built partnerships that celebrated and appreciated differences between cultures, and didn’t rely solely on national governments to manage international relations, then it would lessen the chance of new conflicts. For nearly six decades, Sister Cities International has served as a hub for institutional knowledge and best practices in the field of citizen diplomacy. Sister Cities International continues to strengthen the sister cities network through strategic institutional partnerships, grants, programs, and support for its members. Sister Cities International motivates and empowers private citizens, local organizations, and municipal officials to conduct long-term, mutually beneficial sister city, county, or state relationships. The mission of Sister Cities International is just as important today as it was when it was founded. With the advent of the internet and new technologies, the world is becoming smaller, and the relationships and interactions between the U.S. and its foreign counterparts are more complex than ever. Despite this increase in online communication, the face-to-face meetings and personal relationships developed through sister cities are still vital and irreplaceable. What is a Sister City? A sister city, county, or state relationship is a broad-based, long- term partnership between two communities in two countries. A sister city, county, or state relationship is officially recognized after the highest elected or appointed official from both communities sign an official agreement of partnership. A sister city organization may have any number of sister cities, with community involvement ranging from a half dozen to hundreds of volunteers. In addition to volunteers, sister city organizations may include representatives from nonprofits, municipal governments, the private sector, and other civic organizations. Sister city relationships offer the flexibility to form connections between communities that are mutually beneficial and which address issues that are most relevant for partners. They implement projects in a number of areas, including: Cultural Exchange, Youth and Educational Programs, Economic Partnerships, and Municipal Assistance.  
  • About the Africa Urban Poverty Alleviation Program (AUPAP) 4 Sister Cities International worked closely with three partner organizations to promote the sister cities model and twinning throughout different regions of Africa. African Global Sister Cities Foundation (AGSCF), based in Accra, Ghana and operating in West Africa; Africa Sister Cities, based in Casablanca, Morocco and operating in North Africa and francophone countries; and Eastern Africa Sister Cities, based in Nairobi, Kenya, and operating in Eastern Africa. Together they provided programmatic and informational support to existing partnerships as well as worked to promote twinning between African cities and other cities around the world. The sister city partnerships that participated in AUPAP plan to follow up on their respective projects and pursue new projects in the future. Making sure that sanitation facilities and health clinics are sustainable is an important concern for sister city members and many U.S. sister city committees are in the process of returning to their African sister cities, to follow up on the maintenance of their projects. New relationships with local schools, municipalities, and hospitals have also allowed sister city members to build on their relationships and continue taking part in mutually beneficial projects and exchange. The AUPAP projects provided meaningful and worthwhile experiences to the U.S. and African sister cities alike, helping to create friendships and strengthen relationships. AUPAP partners recognized the importance of citizen diplomacy and collaboration, and understood the purpose of the projects—to improve the lives of the people living in their communities—which dovetails with the mission of Sister Cities International: to promote peace through mutual respect, understanding, and cooperation – one individual, one community at a time. S ister Cities International’s Africa Urban Poverty Alleviation Program (AUPAP) was designed to address urban poverty through water, health, and sanitation projects developed collaboratively by U.S. and African sister city programs. This included participation and support from the private sector, non-governmental organizations, community- based organizations, municipal governments and traditional leaders in Africa to provide sustained technical assistance and community development strategies. Beyond these projects, the program has developed a support network for sister cities on the continent of Africa to promote the mission of peace and prosperity through international people-to-people collaboration. In 2010 and 2011, 25 sister city partnerships representing 13 African countries and 16 U.S. states were competitively selected to participate in AUPAP. Through these partnerships, community members in the African cities, along with members of civic, municipal, and private organizations in both the U.S. and Africa, selected projects in the areas of water, sanitation, and health to address local problems in these areas. Together the U.S. and African partners combined their technical expertise and experience to plan, implement, and monitor their projects, with administrative and technical support from Sister Cities International. The program was funded by a generous grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Projects included the construction of toilets and showers, the renovation of health clinics and provision of medical equipment, the construction of water boreholes and hand pumps, and the implementation of a waste management system, among others. These projects were implemented in Egypt, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Morocco, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Swaziland, and Tanzania.
  • AUPAP Projects 5
  • T he sister city relationship between Baltimore and Luxor was formally established in 1982 under the direction of the Baltimore Mayor’s Office. In 1995, Baltimore also paired with Alexandria, Egypt. The Baltimore-Luxor-Alexandria Sister Cities Committee (BLASCC) has done many projects with both of its Egyptian cities, focusing on art and culture, education, health care, humanitarian aid, government and public policy, waterfront development, low-middle income housing, transportation, tourism, science and technology, and the environment. In the past, BLASCC’s health care program in Luxor successfully worked to improve hospitals and the overall health care system in Luxor through modernization of facilities, medical training, and donations of equipment and supplies. In 1988, BLASCC received Sister City International’s Special Achievement Award for Technical Assistance for their health-planning model. Dr. Jean Creek of BLASCC is continuing with her efforts to help prevent and treat diabetes and hypertension, in particular, in Egypt. The bustling city of Luxor is located on the Nile River in Egypt, and includes the ancient Egyptian capital of Thebes within its city limits. Luxor has often been called the “world’s greatest open air museum,” since a number of ancient Egyptian ruins are in Luxor and its surrounding areas. The temples and monuments attract thousands of tourists annually, contributing significantly to Luxor’s economy. In addition to tourism, agriculture is another important part of Luxor’s economy, particularly growing sugarcane. Despite the thriving tourism industry in Luxor, the city faces certain issues as a result of urbanization—mainly the lack of clean water. Residents do not have easy access to clean, safe water for drinking, cooking, and cleaning. The lack of clean water leads to water borne diseases and chronic health conditions, caused by consuming unsafe water. The Luxor Sister City Committee and the Baltimore-Luxor-Alexandria Sister Cities Committee partnered to address this issue and ensure clean water would be provided to the residents of Luxor. Baltimore, Maryland Luxor, Egypt At a glance: Objective: To improve water quality and sanitation for residents who previously had only an unclean and irregular water supply Project(s): The construction of a pipeline connecting the potable water source at the village of Nagaa to the village of Gad, to provide clean, reliable water to 6,000 residents Year sister city relationship was established: 1982 Luxor, Egypt n Population: 487,896 n Area: 161 mi² (416 km²) n Geography: Located in southern Egypt on the Nile River, surround- ed by ancient temple ruins n Economy: Tourism, agriculture Baltimore, Maryland n Population: 621,342 n Area: 92 mi² (238 km2 ) n Geography: Located in north-cen- tral Maryland on the Patapsco River, near the Chesapeake Bay n Economy: Service industry, tourism 6
  • I became friends with their families, and I was always treated like a sister. I really thank God every day for being a part of this. Amy Riolo, former Chair of Baltimore-Luxor-Alexandria Sister Cities Committee “ ” The sister cities addressed the prevalent water issues in Luxor by completing a community water project: the construction of a pipeline connecting the potable water source at the village of Nagaa to the village of Gad Al Kareem. The construction of the pipeline has allowed for easy access to clean, reliable water in Gad Al Kareem, reducing the residents’ waiting time. It will also improve the health of residents, by providing clean, potable water to 6,000 people in the area. Through its strong, lasting relationship with both Luxor and Alexandria, BLASCC has become very familiar with Egypt. After participating in AUPAP, Baltimore’s relationship with Luxor has been strengthened even further. Amy Riolo, then Chair of BLASCC, shared,“I became friends with their families, and I was always treated like a sister.” The relationship ran deeper than simply fixing issues and completing projects—it was about creating friendships and helping the Baltimore-Luxor extended sister city family grow and develop. The project was a success despite the unstable political climate following the Egyptian revolution. The political climate resulted in some issues and delays, but in the end BLASCC was able to work effectively with the Luxor Sister City Committee to complete the construction of the pipeline and provide much needed clean water to the residents of Luxor. The community was very thankful, and so was Amy Riolo. “I really thank God every day for being a part of this,” said Ms. Riolo. It was a powerful moment for her when the project was officially complete, knowing that the people of Gad al Kareem finally had safe, clean water. Baltimore and Luxor plan to pursue more projects in the future, and are excited to continue their close friendship. 7
  • Boulder, Colorado Kisumu, Kenya At a glance: Objective: To improve sanitation and access to toilet facilities Project(s): The construction of toilet facilities at the Kudho Primary School and the Migosi Market Center Year sister city relationship was established: 2009 Kisumu, Kenya n Population: 394,684 n Area: 805 mi² (2,086 km²) n Geography: Located in western Kenya on the border of Lake Victoria, characterized by fertile agricultural land n Economy: Subsistence farming, livestock keeping, fishing, rice farming, sugar cane farming, small scale trading Boulder, Colorado n Population: 97,385 n Area: 26 mi² (67 km2 ) n Geography: Located in northern Colorado, situated in Boulder Valley where the Rocky Mountains meet the Great Plains n Economy: High-technology, electronic, aerospace industries T he sister city relationship between Boulder, Colorado and Kisumu, Kenya was formally established in 2009, after four years of exchanges between a group of high school children in the Interact Program (a Rotary sponsored youth service organization) and the children of the Rabour School in Kisumu. The Interact Program students, along with other local organizations, addressed the water and sanitation issues at the Rabour School. They raised money to build a fresh water well and sanitation facilities, which helped keep students healthy and in the classroom. They also helped fund a self-sustaining orphan feeding program by purchasing chicks, goats, and a local porridge flour-producing company. Kisumu is a port city located in western Kenya, bordering Lake Victoria. It is the third largest city in the country, known historically as a center of trade due to its location. Currently, Kisumu is one of the fastest growing cities in Kenya, with thriving sugar cane and rice farming industries that contribute immensely to the national economy. With its beautiful views of Lake Victoria, Kisumu attracts tourists every year who come to see the Kisumu Museum, Kisumu Impala Sanctuary, and the nearby Kit Mikaye and Ndere Island National Park. As a result of rapid urbanization and population growth, there is a lack of proper sanitation facilities in public areas like markets and schools. Inadequate sanitation leads to poor health conditions of the residents, child mortality, and degradation of the natural environment. Boulder Kisumu Sister City Committee (BKSCC) partnered with the Kisumu Sister City Committee to address these sanitation issues and try to prevent disease from spreading and the environment from degrading. They did so through two sanitation projects: the construction of an ablution block at the Migosi Carwash Market and the construction of a sanitation block at Kudho Primary School. 8
  • The ablution block was constructed in the heart of the Migosi Carwash District due to its central and busy location. Workers and residents in the area can easily access the sanitation facilities while working during the day. The ablution block significantly decreased the amount of human waste in the area, which reduced the foul odor, the number of skin infections among children, and the number of insects in the area. The ablution block also provided an opportunity for additional income for the nonprofit in charge of its management. The project will benefit 15,000 people in the Migosi Market Center area. The sanitation block was constructed at Kudho Primary School in order to make sure students were able to wash their hands and to encourage better hygiene. Promoting better sanitation and hygiene practices in schools has the combined effect of decreasing child mortality rates, increasing access to education, promoting gender equality, and encouraging environmental sustainability. The easy access to toilets and clean water in Kudho Primary School has allowed students to stay in school instead of being forced to return home or go outside to relieve themselves. Through the AUPAP projects, the Boulder-Kisumu sister city relationship has grown stronger and new opportunities have been discovered. Cultural differences and communication were a challenge, but the sister city committees were able to work through them. Going through difficulties and obstacles together during the program helped strengthen their sister city relationship and bring the two cities closer. Darryl Brown, Chair of Boulder Kisumu Sister City Committee, said: “Part of our relationship with being a sister city is that we’ve already done some projects in the community and so we were known to the community—we had a good group in Kisumu.” Darryl Brown shared that his favorite moment during AUPAP was when they were starting to dig into the ground to start a new project. He said, “I felt the widest range of emotions I have ever felt”—from frustration to appreciation, as the kids approached them to express their thanks. Jared Odhiambo, Project Manager of Boulder-Kisumu Sister Cities appreciated the significance of the AUPAP project in the Migosi community and shared that “the Sister Cities grant gave us the opportunity to empower Migosi residents with self confidence in the ability to change their situation for the better.” The Sister Cities grant gave us the opportunity to empower Migosi residents with self confidence in the ability to change their situation for the better. Jared Odhiambo, Project Manager of Boulder-Kisumu Sister Cities “ ” The Boulder Kisumu AUPAP projects are dedicated to our dear friend Maurice Jack Osiro who was a great man, a humanitarian, a husband, and father. Jack passed away the year our projects were completed, but we are eternally thankful that he was able to see their completion. His soft spoken manner, insight, and ethics contributed greatly to these projects. We wish to honor him with this dedication and thank him for his friendship and for his service to humanity.   9
  • Chicago, Illinois Casablanca, Morocco At a glance: Objective: To improve access to health care services Project(s): The renovation and equipping of Al Waha Health Center Year sister city relationship was established: 2002 Casablanca, Morocco n Population: 3,500,000 n Area: 149 mi² (386 km2 ) n Geography: Located on the northern coast of Morocco bordering the Atlantic Ocean, characterized by the Chawiya Plain and the Bouskoura forest n Economy: Manufacturing, tourism, commerce Chicago, Illinois n Population: 2,874,312 n Area: 234 mi² (606.1 km2 ) n Geography: Located in northeastern Illinois on the southwestern shores of Lake Michigan, with the Chicago River and the Calumet River flowing through the city n Economy: A major financial and business center, retail, manufacturing, printing, publishing, and food processing I n 1982, Chicago formed a sister city relationship with Casablanca. Twenty years later in 2002, the Casablanca Chicago Sister Cities Association (CCSCA), headed by Boubker Mazoz, was established as Chicago Sister Cities International’s (CSCI) counterpart organization in Morocco. The sister city relationship recently celebrated its 30 year anniversary, showing the strength and endurance of the relationship. Since 1982, Chicago and Casablanca have participated in many exchanges and projects throughout the years, focusing on medical, humanitarian, and educational exchanges, urban planning, economic development, sports, and youth service learning programs. Some past projects included establishing formal sister school relationships between ten schools in Chicago and Casablanca; collaborating with One-on-One, a basketball training company, to initiate CasaBasket, a youth basketball program in several Moroccan cities; and creating a joint playwright program called Global Voices, which involved students from several Moroccan cities. In 2004, the World Bank awarded the Casablanca Committee of Chicago Sister Cities International (CSCI) a grant for $28,000 to develop a literacy and job readiness skills pilot project. The Casablanca Committee worked with Moroccan literacy experts to develop and implement this program. Casablanca is located on the northern coast of Morocco, bordering the Atlantic Ocean. It is the largest city in Morocco, as well as the main port in the country. Casablanca is now considered the economic and business center of Morocco, while the capital city of Rabat is the political center. The city has become a major tourist destination, contributing to Morocco’s economy. Its other major industries include fishing, fish canning, sawmills, furniture production, building materials, glass, textiles, electronics, leather work, processed food, spirits, soft drinks, and cigarettes. Despite being a major tourist destination and a growing city, Casablanca faces health issues due to the growing population and lack of proper infrastructure. Sidi Moumen is one of the poorest areas of Casablanca, with high unemployment and school dropout rates, pervasive 10
  • drug use among the youth, delinquency, and extremism. It also lacks access to basic health care services. The sister city committees of Chicago and Casablanca worked together to address these health issues and improve the quality of life in Sidi Moumen. The Casablanca Committee of CSCI partnered with CCSCA to complete a health project in order to address the lack of health care services in Casablanca: the renovation and equipping of Al Waha Health Center. The Al Waha Health Center is located in Sidi Moumen and treats tuberculosis and diabetes, and has a special focus on women and children. The Al Waha health center had many problems such as the lack of space for tuberculosis patients and pregnant women—one room was used for both groups, leading to spread of infection and disease. Rooms were expanded to accommodate more patients, corridors and other spaces were utilized efficiently, computers and printers were provided, a kitchen was created for the staff, and a large fridge and air conditioners were provided to store medicines and vaccines. The renovation of the health center was a success—it greatly improved sanitation and prevented the spread of disease within the health center. The Al Waha Health Center now provides easy access to health care services in Sidi Moumen. The community was extremely grateful for the renovation of the health center, and both sister city committees were proud of the work that they accomplished. Mr. Mazoz shared: “We are all proud of this program—it’s the best we’ve ever had.” He and his colleagues enjoyed working on the AUPAP project and really felt that it made a difference in the community. “When I see the smiles of the women in the hospital, the appreciation and thankfulness for the project—that’s what I enjoyed most.” Mr. Mazoz, President of the CCSCA, worked extensively to make sure that the community of Sidi Moumen was able to access health care services. He described Casablanca’s relationship with Chicago as a “good, resourceful, strong partnership.” The AUPAP grant provided the sister cities with the opportunity to not only improve the health care facilities in Casablanca, but also to form new relationships with the Ministry of Health, the governor, and the local community of Casablanca. The CCSCA plans to add health education programs at the Al Waha Health Center, and work with Chicago on more health projects in the future. “There are a lot of things we can do together, and there is still much to be done,” said Mr. Mazoz. The two sister cities continue to strengthen their friendship and build upon their already strong sister city relationship, in order to improve the lives of those living in Casablanca. We are all proud of this program—it’s the best we’ve ever had. There are a lot of things we can do together, and there is still much to be done. Boubker Mazoz, President of Casablanca Chicago Sister Cities Association “ ” 11
  • Corvallis, Oregon Gondar, Ethiopia At a glance: Objective: To improve sanitation in kebeles (neighborhoods) and marketplaces in Gondar Project(s): The construction of four restroom/shower facilities and a public health clinic Year sister city relationship was established: 2005 Gondar, Ethiopia n Population: 252,537 n Area: 16 mi² (40 km2 ) n Geography: Located in northern Ethiopia near Lake Tana, situated on the Lesser Angereb River and southwest of the Simien Mountains n Economy: Tourism, retail and wholesale trade, agriculture, manufacturing, textiles production Corvallis, Oregon n Population: 54,462 n Area: 14 mi² (37 km2 ) n Geography: Located in central western Oregon, situated in the Willamette Valley and 46 miles east of the city of Newport and the Oregon Coast n Economy: Education, health and social services, manufacturing T he sister city relationship between Corvallis and Gondar was formalized in 2005, after Corvallis’s success with their first sister city, Uzhgorod, Ukraine. Interest in Gondar was expressed by Robel Tadesse, a City of Corvallis staff member, who is of Ethiopian heritage and was raised in the Gondar region. In addition to this personal connection to Gondar, there was also a level of cultural understanding due to the involvement of Corvallis’s Ethiopian community in the Corvallis Sister Cities Association (CSCA). Soon after, delegations visited both cities, and long-term planning in terms of water, health, and sanitation projects was underway. Assessments of the water situation were conducted in order to decide which projects to pursue. Gondar is located in northwestern Ethiopia in the Amhara region, just north of Lake Tana and 260 miles from the country’s capital, Addis Ababa. The city is nicknamed “The Camelot of Africa” due to the presence of a group of castles built by Emperor Fasilidas and his dynasty during the 17th century. In addition to attracting tourists, Gondar’s economy is driven by retail and wholesale trade, agriculture, manufacturing, and textiles production. Despite its vibrant history and culture, Gondar lacks proper sanitation facilities and public health services. Fewer than 5% of Gondar households have septic tanks and only 52% have access to pit latrines. Waste from septic tanks is untreated and often disposed in open areas near homes. Untreated human waste accumulates in residential areas, contaminates area wells and streams, and presents a threat to health and well-being. Shower facilities are also very rare in homes. Upkeep of personal cleanliness is an everyday challenge, although residents have learned alternate methods for cleanliness (sponge baths, for example). Medical services are not available to the community, which has proven to be a major issue. Corvallis Sister Cities Association applied for the AUPAP grant in order to address these issues, and both the CSCA and Gondar Sister Cities Committee worked together to construct several toilet and shower facilities, as well as a public health clinic that would benefit the people of Gondar. The objectives of the sanitation projects were to improve the sanitation of the affected kebeles and marketplaces, increase access to improved toilet and shower facilities, provide 12
  • a model for the construction, maintenance, and sustainability of additional toilet/shower facilities in Gondar, and develop a working relationship with kebele councils to plan and implement future projects to improve living conditions and reduce poverty. The restroom facilities at Azezo Ayermarefia, Tseda, Azezo Demaza, and Arbegnoch were all successfully completed, despite some delays due to difficulty of access to the facilities, lack of connection to the city’s electrical grid, and water shortages. The people of Gondar were very excited about the restroom facilities, and seeing them so happy was one of Lee March’s favorite moments. Mr. March, President of CSCA, shared, “We’re lucky to be living in the United States, to have toilets and take them for granted.” Gondar had no sewage system and no sanitation process, so the four restroom and shower facilities had a significant impact on the community. The objective of the health project was to improve access to public health services in the Maraki kebele. The public health clinic was constructed successfully, and will provide particular benefit to women and children. Women now work at the clinic as well, in addition to working at the restroom facilities as paid attendants. Although the sister city relationship was relatively young, it was strengthened by the AUPAP projects. The program widened their scope of interactions, especially increasing their cooperation with different levels of the city government. Members from the Corvallis Sister Cities Association were introduced to kebele leaders and councils, and formed new relationships with them. They had much stronger connections with citizen groups and were able to get more valuable input from the community. Mr. March said, “I enjoyed meeting the people of Gondar face to face—it was a lot of fun getting to know people.” The relationships that were formed were priceless and will be beneficial in implementing future projects in Gondar. The Corvallis Sister Cities Association and Gondar Sister City Committee are planning to continue working together on more sanitation projects in Gondar, with a few in the works already. They are also currently looking to possibly initiate a microfinance program, and are committed to the long-term development of Gondar. Our project team feels as though we have made a lasting difference in Gondar. It was a challenging project with many twists and turns, but our entire team, both in the U.S. and in Gondar, never lost sight of what we were trying to accomplish. The restrooms are now completed and serving the public, and the impact was immediate and very positive. Lee March, President of Corvallis Sister Cities Association “ ” 13
  • Delray Beach, Florida Moshi, Tanzania At a glance: Objective: To improve general sanitation conditions in Majengo Ward through increased solid waste collection Project(s): The construction of skip bucket foundations and provision of cleaning tools and equipment in the Majengo Ward Year sister city relationship was established: 2001 Moshi, Tanzania n Population: 206,728 n Area: 23 mi² (59 km²) n Geography: Located in northern Tanzania near the border of Kenya, situated on the lower slopes of Mt. Kilimanjaro n Economy: Tourism, manufacturing, coffee, sugar cane, maize, beans Delray Beach, Florida n Population: 64,112 n Area: 16 mi² (41 km2 ) n Geography: Located in southern Florida directly north of Boca Raton and south of Boynton Beach, characterized by four miles of beach along the Atlantic Ocean n Economy: Tourism D elray Beach formed a sister city relationship with Moshi in 2001, due to an interest expressed by Tanzania’s former First Lady Anna Mkapa in forming a relationship between the two cities. Several residents of Delray Beach had either lived in Moshi or conducted business there, and both cities’ economies are largely tourism-based. Due to the similarities between the two cities and the familiarity with Moshi, delegations from Moshi and Delray Beach visited each other and started building a relationship. Delray Beach has focused on sustainability in Moshi through education. Sister Cities of Delray Beach has purchased children’s books for the Moshi Regional Library and established an internet café with new computers and internet services. With the AUPAP grant, Moshi wanted to expand its solid waste collection and disposal for residents outside of its Central Business District. Moshi is located in northern Tanzania, close to the border with Kenya. The scenic city is situated on the lower slopes of Mt. Kilimanjaro, a dormant volcano that is the highest mountain in Africa. Since Mt. Kilimanjaro is a popular tourist attraction, many climbers use Moshi as a base for their expeditions, staying at nearby hotels and employing local residents as guides, porters, and cooks. In addition to tourism, there are also several manufacturing industries and a few crops are grown in Moshi such as sugar cane and coffee. The outskirts of Moshi is known for its extensive farms of maize and beans. Moshi faces a variety of issues associated with urban poverty, the main one being sanitation. There is a lack of a proper waste management system in Moshi, leading to health and environmental issues. By addressing this sanitation issue, residents of Moshi will be able to lead cleaner, healthier lives. Sister Cities of Delray Beach worked with the Moshi Sister Cities Committee to complete a significant sanitation project: the construction of skip bucket foundations and provision of cleaning tools and equipment in the Majengo Ward (one of 15 wards in Moshi Municipality). 14
  • The project focused on improving waste collection from households and centralized collection centers on the six streets of Shaurimoyo, Makange, Sokoni, Arabika, Miembeni, and Mji mwema. Each street received skip buckets, equipment, and tools for waste collection. The use of skip buckets has made waste collection more efficient and sanitary, and has decreased environmental degradation, since there is less scattered waste. In terms of health, this project has reduced the spread of disease and improved the safety of children. The improved sanitation system has impacted the community significantly, allowing residents to live in a clean, healthy environment. David Schmidt, President of Sister Cities of Delray Beach and former mayor, was pleased by the results: “What I enjoyed most was being able to see some tangible change—it gave me some satisfaction.” The bonds and friendships made during the project will provide the foundation for future projects between the two communities. The sister cities worked well together on the sanitation project and had an open and honest relationship. Mr. Schmidt shared: “We couldn’t have done it without the support of Sister Cities International—it was a great program and had a great impact.” The collaboration and support allowed the AUPAP projects to be successful and have an impact on the community. The sister cities plan to pursue more development projects together in the future and continue to build on their strong relationship. What I enjoyed most was being able to see some tangible change—it gave me some satisfaction. We couldn’t have done it without the support of Sister Cities International—it was a great program and had a great impact. David Schmidt, President of Sister “ ” 15
  • Fort Worth, Texas Mbabane, Swaziland At a glance: Objective: To improve accessibility of health and social services to the community of Nkwalini Zone 4 Project(s): The construction of a community health and social center Year sister city relationship was established: 2004 Mbabane, Swaziland n Population: 95,000 n Area: XXXX n Geography: Located in north- central Swaziland, situated on the Mbabane River in the Mdimba Mountains n Economy: Tourism, sugar exports, tin, iron Fort Worth, Texas n Population: 741,206 n Area: 349 mi² (904 km2 ) n Geography: Located in north- central Texas, part of the Cross Timbers region characterized by flat prairie land n Economy: Manufacturing, construction, mining, tourism, transportation T he sister city relationship between Fort Worth and Mbabane was formally established in 2004, during Sister Cities International’s Annual Conference in Fort Worth, Texas. Since then, Mbabane and Fort Worth have enjoyed a strong and mutually beneficial relationship, collaborating on programs focusing on education, leadership, municipal government operations, performing arts, and public health. Fort Worth Sister Cities International has partnered with the City of Fort Worth, local non-profits, and organizations such as Rotary International and Wheelchairs of Peace to develop programs that have provided cultural experiences, as well as humanitarian assistance to Mbabane. Throughout the years, Fort Worth has provided computers and training materials to urban schools in Mbabane, wheelchairs, books, and more. The two cities have participated in student exchanges and cultural exchanges, and have focused especially on addressing the issue of HIV/AIDS in Mbabane. Mbabane is the capital of Swaziland, located in the north-central area of the country. Swaziland is a nation that is surrounded by South Africa on all sides with the exception of the east, which borders Mozambique. Mbabane is the second largest city in Swaziland and is located on the Mbabane River. The vibrant city is known as a commercial hub in the region, but its main economic activities are tourism and sugar exports. Tin and iron are mined in the surrounding areas as well. Mbabane faces many issues that are a result of urban poverty—health issues being one of the main concerns. The country of Swaziland is greatly challenged by the HIV/AIDS pandemic, which further exacerbates the poverty that is prevalent there. One in four Swazi adults lives with HIV/AIDS and their life expectancy is 48.7 years, the lowest in the world. The increasing number of AIDS related deaths has resulted in a population where more than a third is 14 years of age or younger. Nkwalini Zone 4 is an impoverished area in Mbabane, 16
  • characterized by poor housing structures and lack of infrastructure. Fort Worth Sister Cities International partnered with Mbabane Sister Cities Committee to address the health issues in Nkwalini Zone 4. The sister cities worked together to take on the HIV/AIDS epidemic that was plaguing the community and help alleviate the issues that result from HIV/AIDS deaths by constructing a community health and social center. The Nkwalini Zone 4 Community Health and Social Center was constructed successfully and has allowed easier and better access to health and social services to the 1,530 residents living in Nkwalini Zone 4. The center provides voluntary counseling and testing services, immunization services, and neighborhood care for orphaned and vulnerable children. Additionally, the center also provides pre-natal and post-natal care for both mothers and children, which will reduce the spread of disease due to unsanitary conditions and decrease infant and maternal mortality rates. The community center is a source of hope and pride for the community of Nkwalini Zone 4. It is a testament to Sister City International’s goal of peace and understanding between different cultures, and has truly cemented the bond between Fort Worth and Mbabane. Although Fort Worth and Mbabane are thousands of miles apart, Fort Worth Sister Cities International was able to work with the Mbabane Sister Cities Committee to make a difference and a lasting impact on the lives of those living in Mbabane. “That’s what the project was all about—it was about empowering people,” said Mae Ferguson, President of Fort Worth Sister Cities International. The AUPAP project benefitted the community, and the residents of Nkwalini Zone 4 were appreciative of the work completed by Fort Worth Sister Cities and Mbabane Sister Cities. Benedict Gamedzi, Director of Mbabane Sister Cities Committee, shared: “It’s not about us at the end of the day—it’s about the community. To see the joy in their faces, it just fires you up, you just want to do better and achieve more things.” Through AUPAP, the sister city relationship became stronger and the partnerships were sustained. New relationships were made with the local community, based on community pride and a sense of accomplishment for the work that was done. The sister city committees were touched and proud when the community center was completed. “We are so happy, we are so inspired. We have come a long way in this project,” expressed Mr. Gamedzi. Fort Worth and Mbabane plan to continue strengthening their relationship and pursue more development projects in the future. It’s not about us at the end of the day—it’s about the community. To see the joy in their faces, it just fires you up, you just want to do better and achieve more things. Benedict Gamedzi, Director of Mbabane Sister Cities Committee   “ ” 17
  • Grand Rapids, Michigan Ga East and Ga West, Ghana At a glance: Objective: To improve access to primary health care services, provide clean, potable water, and improve sanitation Project(s): The renovation of the Mayera Community Health Clinic and the construction of a mechanized borehole to provide water for the clinic in Ga West; the construction of a 12-seat community latrine and mechanized borehole for the Taifa community in Ga East Year sister city relationship was established: 1994 Ga District, Ghana n Population of Ga District: over 500,000 n Area of Ga East: 64 mi² (166 km²) n Area of Ga West: 274 mi² (710 km²) n Geography: Located in south- central Ghana, near the Gulf of Guinea n Economy: Agriculture, tourism Grand Rapids, Michigan n Population: 188,040 n Area: 45 mi² (117 km2 ) n Geography: Located in central Michigan on the banks of the Grand River, approximately 30 miles east of Lake Michigan n Economy: Furniture, automobile, aviation manufacturing T he city of Grand Rapids, Michigan reached out to the Ga District in Ghana to form a sister city relationship in 1994. Since then there have been several exchanges, including a delegation led by the Ga District Chief Executive to learn about the culture and resources of Grand Rapids and delegations from the Grand Rapids Area Center for Ecumenism (GRACE) and the Ga District Area Center for Ecumenism establishing partnerships with Grand Rapids churches. These visits involved the exploration of business opportunities, agriculture partnerships, and waste management techniques. In 2003, Grand Rapids Sister Cities International was one of seven sister cities selected by Sister Cities International to receive a grant to implement an HIV/AIDS educational program in Ghana. The AUPAP grant was the second grant they received from Sister Cities International, giving them the opportunity to work on development projects in Ga East and Ga West. The sister cities worked effectively and continued to strengthen their relationship through AUPAP. Mary Edmond, Chair of Ga District Committee of Grand Rapids Sister Cities International, believed that through the AUPAP projects, “the U.S. was able to show its value” and build a positive reputation in the Ghanaian community. Ga East and Ga West are two of ten districts in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana, located in south-central Ghana near the Gulf of Guinea. Known for tourism and agriculture, the Ga District grows pineapples and food staples and is becoming a tourist attraction due to historical remnants of Dutch colonial influence in the region. The population of Ga District has grown from 170,000 people in 1994 to over 500,000 in 2009, and continues to grow rapidly. The increasing population has put a strain on Ga District and its ability to support the basic needs of residents. There is a lack of easy access to primary health care and clean, potable water, forcing residents to travel far for medical services and drinking water. Water, health, and sanitation facilities are much needed for communities in Ga East and Ga West. 18
  • Grand Rapids partnered with Ga District to work on several water, sanitation, and health projects: the renovation of the Mayera Community Health Clinic and the construction of a mechanized borehole to provide water for the clinic in Ga West, and the construction of a 12- seat community latrine and mechanized borehole for the Taifa community in Ga East. In Ga West, the Mayera Health Clinic was renovated and an additional two-unit bedroom quarters for nurses was completed. The mechanized borehole was successfully installed, which now supplies water to the health clinic and provides clean drinking water to the surrounding communities. The clinic will provide 24- hour health care services to Mayera residents and serve 35,000 residents. The increased availability of health care and shortened travel distance to access health care services has made a significant impact on the Mayera community. In Ga East, the 12-seat toilet facility and mechanized borehole were constructed successfully and will serve 11,000 residents in the Taifa community. These important facilities will lead to improved health and well-being of children and their families. Mary Edmond enjoyed seeing pictures of the finished product: “My favorite was a picture of the young boys getting water—that just touches me. It just moves me, to know that they have water right there in the community.” The Grand Rapids sister city committee and the local committee in the Ga District were proud of the work they did. The residents of Ga East and Ga West were incredibly appreciative of the projects and were excited throughout the whole process. Benjamin Amponsah, Co-Chair of Grand Rapids AUPAP Committee enjoyed “visiting the construction sites and seeing the excitement on the residents’ faces as the construction was going on.” Grand Rapids Sister Cities International and the Ga District Sister Cities Committee plan to work on the sustainability of the Mayera Health Clinic and provide more medical supplies. The sister cities look forward to further strengthening their relationship and working on more development projects in the future.   The fact that the planned services have been completed is rewarding. Equally rewarding is that the AUPAP initiatives have encouraged our Sister City Municipal leaders to seek additional help to address health, clean water and sanitation issues. In spite of a few problems in the beginning, this was a worthwhile endeavor. Mary Edmond, Chair of Ga District Committee of Grand Rapids Sister Cities International “ ” 19
  • Jacksonville, Florida Port Elizabeth, South Africa At a glance: Objective: To provide greater access to improved primary health care services for residents in the Chatty Extension area and to improve hygiene for children attending schools in the Nelson Mandela Bay area Project: The purchase of a mobile clinic in the Chatty Extension Area benefitting 55,000 residents, and the renovation of school ablution facilities at two schools in the Nelson Mandela Bay Area benefitting 1,763 students Year sister city relationship was established: 2000 Port Elizabeth, South Africa n Populationt: 1,050,930 n Area: 756 mi² (1,959 km2) n Geography: A major port city located in the south of South Africa, bordering the Indian Ocean n Economy: Motor industry, tourism, trade Jacksonville, Florida n Population: 1,345,596 n Area: 875 mi² (2,265 km2 ) n Geography: Second largest port on the East coast, located in northeast Florida, on the banks of St. Johns River and the Atlantic Ocean n Economy: Manufacturing, transportation, distribution, financial services, biomedical technology T he sister city relationship between Jacksonville, Florida and Port Elizabeth, South Africa was established in 2000. The two cities share important characteristics: both are major sea ports and both rely on tourism. Since 2000, there have been many exchange programs for conferences and research, focusing on areas including cultural exchange, economic development, public education, and workforce initiatives. Public health in particular has always been one of Jacksonville’s and Port Elizabeth’s mutual interests, resulting in two major projects: the collaborative distribution of dental health supplies to more than 2,000 children and the distribution of 280 wheelchairs to disabled citizens in Nelson Mandela Bay. The projects successfully improved health care services, and with the AUPAP grant, health care continued to improve and was made more accessible to marginalized communities in Port Elizabeth. Port Elizabeth is located in the Eastern Cape Province and is one of the largest cities in South Africa. Nicknamed “The Friendly City” or “The Windy City,” Port Elizabeth’s sandy beaches and rich history attract thousands of tourists every year. The city is known as a major sea port, in addition to a tourist destination, and is also South Africa’s center for their motor industry. Although the city’s economy has been growing, there are still health issues that need to be addressed. Life threatening diseases like HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis are prevalent in Port Elizabeth, weakening many communities. The city of Jacksonville partnered with Port Elizabeth to work on health and sanitation projects in the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality, particularly in the Chatty Extension area. Starting from 2006, many residents were forced to relocate from informal settlements in the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality to the new, low-cost, formal settlements in Chatty Extension. Since the relocation was hurried, many public services were not in place in Chatty Extension. There were no health and education facilities in the area—residents were expected to travel long distances to receive any medical care and health services or rely on a single mobile clinic that visited the area once a week. The schools’ infrastructure for water and sanitation was old and in major need of repairs, forcing many schools to cut down on classroom hours given the inadequate ablution facilities. 20
  • In order to address these issues, the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality and the Jacksonville Sister Cities Association decided to apply for funding through AUPAP. Their relationship was strengthened by the AUPAP projects, as they worked together to provide much needed health care services to the communities in Nelson Mandela Bay. “Our sister city was charged and energetic,” said Ron Johnson, Jacksonville Sister Cities Association (JSCA) Board Member and Vice President of Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality Committee. “We worked directly—we went out to various communities with our sister city partners and actually engaged with them.” Throughout the program, new relationships were discovered and maintained: relationships with the municipality councilmen, the educators, and the engineers who assisted with procurement and contracting. JSCA worked with the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality to purchase a Mercedes van and convert it into a mobile clinic as well as renovate school ablution facilities at Joe Slovo Primary School and Phakamisa Secondary School. The mobile clinic provides medical care for the 55,000 residents living in 11,000 households of Chatty Extension, which has greatly improved access to health care services especially for women and children. Women and their children are now treated at the clinic and are educated about proper sanitation hygiene practices. Since the majority of patients are children and babies, women have a crucial role in making sure that their children are healthy by bringing them to the clinic when treatment is needed. Ron Johnson says: “When you educate a man, you educate an individual. When you educate a woman, you educate a family.” As women are educated about the importance of health, education, and sanitation, their families and the rest of the community are being educated as well. The ablution facilities at Joe Slovo Primary School now serve 1,113 students between the ages of 5 and 14, and the facilities at Phakamisa Secondary School serve 650 students between the ages of 13 and 19. Children learned about proper hygiene practices, which will keep students healthy and in school. Both projects were a success and are now being sustained by the municipality. Committee members felt a sense of accomplishment, and Ron Johnson shared what he enjoyed the most: “I really enjoyed the camaraderie and relationships with our partners, as well as seeing the kids happy and smiling. I was satisfied with the job we did—every milestone was a good moment.” JSCA plans to pursue more school related projects in Port Elizabeth. The two cities are currently in the process of facilitating and establishing a sister school relationship between a school in Jacksonville and a school in Port Elizabeth. The sister cities are also interested in continuing to work together on future projects that address sanitation issues in schools and further strengthening their sister city relationship. When you educate a man, you educate an individual. When you educate a woman, you educate a family. Ron Johnson, Jacksonville Sister Cities Association (JSCA) Board Member and Vice President of Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality Committee   “ ” 21
  • Lansing, Michigan Akuapem, Ghana At a glance: Objective:To improve sanitation, hygiene, and quality of health care in Akuapem South Project(s): The construction of toilet facilities and the renovation of two health clinics Year sister city relationship was established: 1997 Akuapem, Ghana n Population:133,604 n Area: 194 mi² (503 km²) n Geography: Located in the Eastern Region of Ghana, characterized by hills and a tropical climate n Economy: Agriculture, commerce, tourism Lansing, Michigan n Population: 114,297 n Area: 37 mi² (95 km2 ) n Geography: Located in the south central part of the lower peninsula where the Grand River meets the Red Cedar River, characterized by the two rivers flowing through the city and Lake Lansing and Park Lake in the area n Economy: Government, education, insurance, healthcare, automobile manufacturin T he sister city relationship between Lansing, Michigan and Akuapem, Ghana began in 1997. Since then, they have established a strong, long-term relationship and have worked with the district government and the area’s traditional leadership in Ghana to provide sustainable support in the areas of health, education, and economic development. The Lansing Regional Sister Cities Commission (LRSCC) has provided around $1,500,000 worth of medical supplies and equipment over the years, as well as partnered with local hospitals and organizations in Lansing to support business, education, and medical missions to the Akuapem South district. Akuapem South is one of 26 districts in the Eastern Region of Ghana, situated among hills near Lake Volta, a man-made lake. Once a kingdom state, Akuapem is now a municipality with almost 135,000 residents. Agriculture is the main sector of Akuapem’s economy, followed by commerce and tourism. Agricultural-based industries are the most prosperous, which include wood, timber, fruit processing, paper products, mineral water, pharmaceuticals, and disinfectants. Urban poverty is prevalent throughout the municipality, due to high unemployment rates and lack of access to clean water, waste disposal, a secure electrical supply, and adequate public health services. The lack of sanitation facilities, clean drinking water, and health facilities have caused illnesses and led to deaths in the communities. When Lansing Regional Sister Cities Commission (LRSCC) partnered with the Akuapem South Municipality Sister Cities Committee, they focused on addressing sanitation, health, and hygiene issues in Akuapem. LRSCC worked with Akuapem South Municipality Sister Cities 22
  • Committee to complete several sanitation and health projects in the villages of Pokrom, Ahodjo, and Sakyikrom and Aburi: the construction of toilet facilities in each village and the renovation of the Pokrom clinic and the Aburi Presbyterian Clinic buildings. In each of the three villages, one 8-stall Kumasi Ventilated Improved Pit (KVIP) latrine unit was constructed. Each unit was equipped with electrical lighting and a rooftop water collection storage tank for hand washing and facility maintenance. These toilet facilities benefit 7,500 people who lack access to a hygienic means of waste disposal. In addition to the latrines, the Pokrom Clinic and the Aburi Presbyterian Clinic were renovated, the electrical installations and water systems were upgraded, and a borehole was drilled to provide access to clean water. These renovations will improve hygiene and help prevent the spread of disease, benefitting approximately 18,000 people. William Brewer, a member of LRSCC, enjoyed going to Ghana and developing and maintaining relationships with the people in Akuapem. He describes his favorite moment: “Once I saw tangible evidence of the projects moving forward and the people’s reactions to the new facilities—it was exciting.” Through AUPAP, their sister city relationship strengthened, though the projects were challenging and communication was frustrating at times. The political issues and changes in leadership in Ghana were difficult to deal with, often straining the relationship and delaying the projects’ progress. But the difficulties were worthwhile in the end. “It’s not about benefactors and takers—it was about talking as friends and getting to know each other.” Mr. Brewer and his colleagues valued the relationships they built with the people of Akuapem, and are looking forward to working on more meaningful projects in the future. It’s not about benefactors and takers—it was about talking as friends and getting to know each other. William Brewer, member of Lansing Regional Sister Cities Commission   “ ” 23
  • Long Beach, California Mombasa, Kenya At a glance: Objective: To improve access to safe, clean water; to enhance the capacity of health clinics; to address pre-natal and post-natal needs of women and children Project(s): The procurement of a water purification plant and medical equipment for several health clinics in Mombasa Year sister city relationship was established: 2007 Mombasa, Kenya n Population: 939,370 n Area: 114 mi² (295 km²) n Geography: Located partly on the southern coast of Kenya and on Mombasa Island, characterized by flat topography and a tropical climate n Economy: Trade, tourism Long Beach, California n Population: 462,257 n Area: 51 mi² (133 km2 ) n Geography: Located in southern California on the Pacific Ocean, characterized by a Mediterranean climate n Economy: International trade through the industrial port, high technology, aerospace, tourism T he partnership between Long Beach and Mombasa was formalized in 2007, after the Los Angeles Kenyan Consulate expressed an interest to form a sister city relationship between Los Angeles and Mombasa. Later it was decided that the sister city partnership with Mombasa would be brought to Long Beach instead. Since then, there have been many exchanges and intercultural community events. The Mombasa-Long Beach Sister Cities Association (MLBSCA) focused their sister city efforts on a single core goal—public education of AIDS. Although their relationship is young, Long Beach and Mombasa have sent delegations to each other and developed meaningful partnerships over the past 6 years. MLBSCA has donated more than 600 books to the Kenyan National Library; provided 700 AIDS testing kits donated by Orasure Technologies for World AIDS day activities in Mombasa; and hosted Kenya’s Minister of Tourism. Within a short amount of time, MLBSCA has developed meaningful partnerships with both U.S. and Kenyan community and civic organizations. Mombasa is the second largest city in Kenya, located on the east coast along the Indian Ocean. Due to its coastal location and its prominent seaport, Mombasa has been known as a historical trading center as well as a regional center for tourism. Mombasa has a unique culture that still has colonial influences from the Portuguese, British, and Omani. Despite the growth in tourism many services for local residents are still insufficient. There is a lack of proper health care and clean drinking water in Mombasa, affecting the well-being of its residents. Basic medical equipment for diagnosing, monitoring, and evaluating patient health conditions is severely lacking at all of Mombasa’s 19 public health clinics. Diagnostic testing cannot be done on-site, forcing clinics to send test samples to the national hospital 8 miles away and wait for weeks, or even months, for test results and diagnoses. Additionally, Mombasa has no maternity clinic to provide pre-natal and post-natal care to mothers and children. Water is another issue in Mombasa—70% of the population must rely on water from boreholes and wells, which yield primarily salt water from the Indian Ocean. Because the sewage system does not serve the whole community, many residents are forced to use septic tanks and pit latrines. Often times the water from drinking wells and boreholes and water from pit latrines mix and lead to contaminated water. As a result, water-borne diseases 24
  • like diarrhea and cholera are prevalent in Mombasa. MLBSCA partnered with the local Mombasa Sister Cities Committee to address water and health issues by completing two different projects: the purchase of medical equipment for public health clinics and a water purification plant. The health project focused on three primary clinics in heavily populated areas: Kaberbhoy, Shiku Adabu, and Gangoni. These clinics received most of the major medical equipment, while other clinics in the area received smaller equipment and supplies. The medical supplies were procured from Project C.U.R.E., a nonprofit humanitarian organization whose goal is to improve health care infrastructure in developing countries by providing medical equipment, supplies, and services. The clinics received birthing beds, wheelchairs, crutches, examination tables and chairs, a microscope and other laboratory supplies, x-ray machines, EKG machines, and much more. The water purification project involved the purchase of a potable water purification plant with the capability to filter out fecal materials and salt. The water plant was installed at Ganjoni Clinic in the Kilindini District of Mombasa Island, bringing clean site-generated water, which addressed the issue of the high cost of water. The Ganjoni Clinic now has clean, potable water on site and will no longer need to purchase water for operations. The clinic will also be able to sell water to the surrounding community, allowing the clinic to afford proper maintenance of the water plant using the proceeds from the sales. Both projects had a great impact on the community in Mombasa—clean water helps prevent water-borne diseases and proper medical supplies allow quick on-site diagnosis. The residents appreciated the projects and were excited when they were completed. The Treasurer of MLBSCA, Phyllis Venable’s favorite moment was the water demonstration after the water purification project was completed. Her most enjoyable moment always involved working with the local community. The community was completely engaged with the water project and was grateful for the medical supplies for the clinics. Completing the projects was a testament to Long Beach’s commitment to Mombasa. The sister cities worked together effectively, despite cultural differences. MLBSCA got the opportunity to meet and interact with the Seattle-Mombasa Sister Cities Association as well— the other sister city program between a U.S. city and Mombasa. As Ms. Venable shared, “I enjoy the people—they were the reason I kept coming back. Working so closely with the Local Community Committee created some special bonds that I feel will last a lifetime!” MLBSCA is intent on pursuing more development projects in Mombasa, especially projects involving access to clean water. Lack of clean water is still a significant issue, but one that can be addressed with a strong sister city relationship and effective collaboration. There are no words for the elation that I felt when the last container of medical equipment arrived and cleared customs. Even though some pitfalls remained to be dealt with, I knew at that moment that we would successfully complete the project. Phyllis Venable, Treasurer of MLBSCA “ ” 25
  • Louisville, Kentucky Tamale, Ghana At a glance: Objective: To improve health care facilities in Tamale Project(s): The construction of a sanitation facility for the Tamale Teaching Hospital and the purchase of an ambulance for the hospital Year sister city relationship was established: 1979 Tamale, Ghana n Population: 537,986 n Area: 290 mi2 (750 km2 ) n Geography: Located in northern Ghana near the Sahara desert, characterized by mostly flat terrain and extreme changes in temperature n Economy: Tourism, agriculture, hunting, forestry Louisville, Kentucky n Population: 746,906 n Area: 399 mi² (1,032 km2 ) n Geography: Located in northern Kentucky in the Bluegrass region, characterized by a wide, flat plain surrounded by rolling hills n Economy: Shipping and cargo industries, healthcare and medical sciences T he sister city relationship between Louisville and Tamale was formally established in 1979 at Sister Cities International’s Annual Conference. Since then, Episcopalian churches in Louisville have maintained a strong relationship with Anglican churches in Tamale as a Companion Diocese. The African Cultural Center in Louisville has organized several programs with Sister Cities of Louisville such as sending books to the Northern Regional Library in Tamale, and the Rotary Club in Louisville also worked together with Sister Cities of Louisville to send medical supplies to Tamale. Delegations from both cities have visited each other throughout the years to exchange ideas and build friendships. In 1995, Dr. Susan Herlin was recognized for her work in Tamale and was installed as Zo- Simli-Naa, “Chief of Friendship.” This was a great honor and an important milestone in the sister city relationship between Louisville and Tamale. Tamale is located in northern Ghana, 373 miles north of Accra, the capital of Ghana. It is the capital of the Northern Region of Ghana and is the third most populous settlement in Ghana. Tamale is a hub for administrative and commercial activities in the region, with many regional branches of financial institutions and international non-governmental organizations—so much so that Tamale is often referred to as the NGO capital of Ghana. Agriculture, hunting, and forestry are the main economic activities in the region, in addition to the growing tourism industry. As a result of rapid growth and urbanization, Tamale has faced health, sanitation, and water issues due to the lack of proper infrastructure in the city. Water-related diseases such as typhoid, diarrhea, and dysentery are prevalent in Ghana. Access to clean water at schools and hospitals is essential and will help keep children in school and prevent the spread of disease. Hospitals and clinics often lack proper medical equipment for treating patients, resulting in inadequate health care services for the community. Louisville and Tamale worked together to address sanitation and health issues by completing two projects: the construction of a sanitation facility for the Tamale Teaching Hospital and the purchase of an ambulance for the hospital. The toilet and shower facilities at the Tamale Teaching Hospital were successfully constructed and will benefit patients, families of patients, staff, and visitors. The facilities26
  • will allow people at the hospital to conveniently use the toilets and showers in a safe, clean environment and help reduce the spread of disease among patients, staff, and visitors. The purchase of the ambulance will allow the community access to emergency health care and even improve health care services overall. Many residents cannot travel far to the hospital when they are sick, making the impact of a single ambulance incredibly significant. Both projects were completed successfully due to the efforts of those involved and the personal relationships between members of Sister Cities of Louisville and Sister Cities of Tamale. As Steve Hubbs, member of the Tamale Committee and water expert, said, “The sister city to sister city route is the best way possible to provide aid.” Working with the local communities directly to get their input is crucial. “We as donors shouldn’t identify and control the projects—communities themselves should identify the projects that they value and need,” explained Mr. Hubbs. The nature of the relationship between Louisville and Tamale is unique, since the Sister Cities of Tamale is a registered NGO. This status gives Tamale a separate operational base with a core team of volunteers that have been active over the years. A huge part of AUPAP’s success in Tamale was due to the efficiency and high capacity of Sister Cities of Tamale. AUPAP strengthened an already strong sister city relationship—as Susan Herlin said about the community in Tamale, “They’re friends of mine; I respect them and know them really well.” Both sister cities had a memorable experience working on the AUPAP project together; meeting each other and working with one another was incredibly rewarding. Seeing two chiefs meeting in Tamale was one of Mr. Hubbs’ favorite experiences: “Witnessing Susan and another chief meet was unbelievable—we returned with two chickens and two yams in the back of our van. It was an incredible experience.” Mr. Hubbs, along with the rest of the Tamale Committee, enjoyed working with Sister Cities of Tamale and look forward to working on more development projects in the future. The sister city to sister city route is the best way possible to provide aid. We as donors shouldn’t identify and control the projects—communities themselves should identify the projects that they value and need. Steve Hubbs, member of the Tamale Committee at Sister Cities of Louisville “ ” 27
  • Maryland State Bong County and Maryland County, Liberia At a glance: Objective: To improve access to clean, potable water in Bong County and Maryland County Project(s): The construction of hand dug wells with hand pumps in Bong County and the restoration and improvement of the water system at the JJ Dossen Memorial Hospital in Maryland County Year sister city relationship was established: 2007 Bong County, Liberia n Population: 328,919 n Area: 3,387 mi² (8,772 km2 ) n Geography: Located in the north central part of Liberia, characterized by mostly flat to rolling coastal plains that contain mangroves and swamps n Economy: Mining Maryland County, Liberia n Population: 136,404 n Area: 887 mi² (2,297 km²) n Geography: Located in the southeastern part of Liberia, bordered by Côte d’Ivoire to the east and the Atlantic Ocean to the south n Economy: Farming T he sister state relationship between Maryland State and Bong County and Maryland County was established in 2007 as a result of an extensive historical relationship between Maryland State and Liberia. Many of the members of the executive committee and the subcommittees of Maryland Sister States Program have personal ties that strengthen their commitment and dedication to developing programs that will strengthen both Liberia and the state of Maryland. In 2008, Sharon Pinder, Executive Chair of the Maryland-Liberia Sister State Committee (MLSSC), led a fact finding mission to Liberia to explore opportunities and mutual interests with Liberia. She had said, “This trip symbolizes more than a mission, it is a historic journey for us.” Since then, Ms. Pinder and the other members of MLSSC have worked with the local communities in Maryland County and Bong County to form meaningful partnerships between Liberia and the state of Maryland. Bong County and Maryland County are two of fifteen counties in Liberia. Bong County is located in the north-central part of Liberia, while Maryland County is located in the southeastern area of Liberia. Named after the U.S. state of Maryland, Maryland County borders the nation of Côte d’Ivoire, separated by the Cavalla River. Farming is the main economic activity in Maryland County, with rice and cassava being the main crops raised. Bong county, named after Mount Bong in southern Liberia, borders Guinea and is the third most populous county in the country. Coal mining is its main industry. Both counties have faced water and health care issues, which have caused water-borne diseases and poor health conditions. There is a lack of water for cleaning, bathing, cooking and sanitation. Access to clean, potable water and sanitation are priority needs for the people of Bong County and Maryland County. MLSSC partnered with Bong County and Maryland County Sister City Committees to address these water and health issues through AUPAP. 28
  • MLSSC worked with Bong County and Maryland County Sister City Committees to complete water and health projects in both counties: the restoration and improvement of the water system at the JJ Dossen Memorial Hospital in Maryland County, and the construction of hand dug wells with hand pumps in Gbarnga, Bong County. In Maryland County, the water system was restored at the JJ Dossen Memorial Hospital, which greatly improved access to running water for the staff at the hospital. The easy access to clean water will greatly benefit those who come to the hospital for treatment and help prevent water borne diseases and germs from spreading. Sanitary conditions have been improved, which will better the lives of the 4,000 patients who rely on the hospital facilities every month. In Bong County, 34 hand dug wells with hand pumps were constructed, providing clean, potable water to the people of Gbarnga. This has reduced the distance people have to travel in order to get clean water for their families. The lack of safe, drinking water in the past had caused serious public health problems. The increased access to clean water will benefit over 30,000 residents. The water and health projects in Bong County and Maryland County were quite an experience for the members of MLSSC, as Joe Isaac shared: “It was eye opening to all of us.” He enjoyed working with local committees and local schools in Liberia. Mr. Isaac echoed the local communities’ appreciation for the projects and added: “As a native of Liberia, I am forever grateful to this project and honored to serve the community.” AUPAP proved to be challenging yet worthwhile, bringing Maryland State and Bong County and Maryland County closer, and they are ready to take on new endeavors in the future. As a native of Liberia, I am forever grateful to this project and honored to serve the community. Joe Isaac, member of the Maryland-Liberia Sister State Committee “ ” At a glance (cont’d): Maryland State n Population: 5,884,563 n Area: 12,407 mi² (32,133 km²) n Geography: Located in eastern U.S., characterized by a variety of topography, ranging from sandy dunes dotted with sea grass in the east, to low marshlands teeming with wildlife and large bald cypress near the Chesapeake Bay, to gently rolling hills of oak forest in the Piedmont Region, and pine groves in the mountains to the west n Economy: Service sector, transportation industry, manufacturing, food production 29
  • Milwaukee County, Wisconsin Buffalo City, South Africa At a glance: Objective: To improve health facilities and services for the community Project: The renovation and expansion of Aspiranza Clinic in the Buffalo Flats Area—addition of rooms, purchase of new medical equipment and furniture, installation of storage facility to stock and store equipment and supplies safely Year sister city relationship was established: 1997 Buffalo City, South Africa n Population: 755,200 n Area: 979 mi² (2,536 km2 ) n Geography: Located on the east coast of the Eastern Cape Province South Africa, named after the Buffalo River n Economy: Manufacturing, auto industry Milwaukee County, Wisconsin n Population: 947,735 n Area: 1,190 mi² (3,082 km²) n Geography: Located on the shores and bluffs of Lake Michigan, with the three rivers of Menomonee, Kinnickinnic, and Milwaukee all flowing through n Economy: Home to the international headquarters of 5 Fortune 500 companies: Johnson Controls, Northwestern Mutual, Manpower, Rockwell Automation and Harley-Davidson; fast growing service and managerial industry T he sister city relationship between Milwaukee County, Wisconsin and Buffalo City, South Africa began in 1997. It began after apartheid ended in 1994, when several African American supervisors on the Milwaukee County Board felt compelled to build a relationship with South Africa and get involved in Buffalo City. The shared purpose of the relationship was to link the two cities through shared information, skills and experience aimed at improving the quality of life for residents in both metropolitan areas and encouraging greater understanding between their populations. The relationship grew stronger through various economic, health, and cultural exchanges. A mutual interest in nursing, health sciences education, and HIV/AIDS developed after Mark Anderson, then President and CEO of the Center for International Health (CIH), visited Buffalo City and initiated discussions with the Buffalo City Ministry of Health. Food security is an important goal between Milwaukee County and Buffalo City, one that was met through a grant awarded to the Center for International Health by the U.S. Agency for International Development Office of Food for Peace. The grant provided four million meals to Buffalo City’s malnourished and orphaned children, people with HIV and their affected households, poverty stricken neighborhoods, the elderly, people with chronic diseases and disabilities, and households headed by single females or a child. This program has been one of Milwaukee County’s and Buffalo City’s partnership’s most successful endeavors. Buffalo City is a metropolitan municipality located on the east coast of the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. With a coastline on the Indian Ocean, Buffalo City boasts beautiful, sandy beaches that attract thousands of tourists every year who visit to enjoy the sun and sand and the many sights that Buffalo City has to offer. The city is named after the Buffalo River, home to South Africa’s only river port—Port of East London. Buffalo City includes the towns of Bhisho, East London, King William’s Town, as well as the townships of Mdantsane and Zwelitsha. In addition to tourism, Buffalo City also has a well-developed manufacturing base, with the auto industry playing a large role. As Buffalo City goes through rapid urbanization, one of the main issues that the city faces is lack of access to health care, which is linked to poverty and poor living conditions. Many people deal with diarrheal diseases, acute respiratory tract infections and diseases, 30
  • malnutrition, tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS. Milwaukee County partnered with Buffalo City to address these urgent health issues and help alleviate poverty. Terrence Cooley, Chief of Staff for the Milwaukee County Board of Supervisors, worked extensively with Darby Gounden, Manager of Development, Cooperation and International Relations of Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality on upgrading and renovating Aspiranza Clinic in the Buffalo Flats Area. The clinic specializes in maternal health care, family planning, and HIV/AIDS treatment, with the majority of the patients being single mothers and children. AUPAP provided the opportunity for the two cities to become closer and strengthen their relationship on a personal and professional level. Ms. Gounden shared, “It was great working with counterparts in Milwaukee, and I really enjoyed the consultations with the community.” Engaging the community and working with partners was essential, and even the most enjoyable part of the process. Mr. Cooley said, “I really enjoyed the relationships we had and the connections we made.” The two sister cities embodied the values of citizen diplomacy, friendship, and cooperation during AUPAP and worked towards the successful completion of their project together. The Aspiranza Clinic will benefit 2,000 residents in the Buffalo Flats area and leave a lasting impact especially for women and children. “Just seeing the fruits of this project, to see the clinic all complete, was incredible,” expressed Mr. Cooley. It was a fulfilling experience for everyone, and as Emily Schmidlkofer, Program Manager of the Center for International Health, shared, “I feel really good about what we’ve accomplished.” As a result of Milwaukee County and Buffalo City’s hard work and collaboration, the Aspiranza Clinic will be able to provide easy access to health care services and better serve the community of Buffalo Flats. Milwaukee County plans to build upon the AUPAP project and work on the sustainability of the clinic, eventually increasing its role as a teaching facility. Milwaukee looks forward to working with the Department of Health in Buffalo City on future health initiatives and continuing to improve the lives of the people of Buffalo City. I really enjoyed the relationships we had and the connections we made. Just seeing the fruits of this project, to see the clinic all complete, was incredible. Terrence Cooley, Chief of Staff for the Milwaukee County Board of Supervisors “ ” 31
  • Milwaukee, Wisconsin uMhlathuze, South Africa At a glance: Objective: To improve access to clean, potable water to the KwaDube community Project(s): The installation of water supply–connecting water from the main line to standpipes in the KwaDube community Year sister city relationship was established: 2008 uMhlathuze, South Africa n Population: 334,459 n Area: 306 mi² (793 km2 ) n Geography: Located on the northeast coast of South Africa bordering the Indian Ocean, characterized by sugarcane fields, timber plantations, wetlands, and freshwater lakes n Economy: Aluminum, eucalyptus pulp, phosphoric acid-based products, titanium, sugar cane Milwaukee, Wisconsin n Population: 594,833 n Area: 97 mi² (250 km2 ) n Geography: Located in southern Wisconsin, on the shores and bluffs of Lake Michigan, with the three rivers of Menomonee, Kinnickinnic, and Milwaukee all flowing through the city n Economy: Home to the international headquarters of 5 Fortune 500 companies: Johnson Controls, Northwestern Mutual, Manpower, Rockwell Automation and Harley-Davidson, banks, service companies, and one of the country’s ten largest insurance firms T he sister city relationship between uMhlathuze and Milwaukee was formally established in 2008, after interest was expressed by the Consul General in Chicago for the City of Milwaukee to consider a sister city relationship with the South African city. The City of Milwaukee had built strong relationships with the Mayor of uMhlathuze and the Zululand Chamber of Commerce before establishing a formal sister city relationship. Since 2008, the City of Milwaukee Sister Cities Committee has celebrated South African culture with their sister city, and created a relationship between the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and the University of Zululand. Milwaukee and uMhlathuze have also participated in a joint business venture—a Milwaukee area business worked with an uMhlathuze business to create a company that deals with organic waste and repurposes it as fertilizer. Named after the Mhlathuze River, the city of uMhlathuze is located on the northeast coast of the province of KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa. It incorporates Richards Bay, Empangeni, Eslkhawini, Ngwelezane, Enseleni, Felixton, Vulindleia, and the tribal areas of Amakhosi Dube, Mkhwanazi, KwaKhoza and Zunga-Madlebe. Surrounding Empangeni and Richards Bay are sugarcane fields, timber plantations, wetlands, and fresh water lakes. Richards Bay is considered to be the industrial hub of the area, and Empangeni is considered to be the commercial hub. The main industries of uMhlathuze are aluminum, eucalyptus pulp, phosphoric acid-based products, titanium, and sugar cane. The bustling city of uMhlathuze faces water and sanitation issues due to the size of the municipality and lack of clean water and sanitation facilities. These issues affect the entire community, especially women and children, who must travel long distances for potable water. The City of Milwaukee Sister Cities Committee partnered with uMhlathuze to complete an essential water project in uMhlathuze: the construction of a connection from the main water supply line to standpipes in the KwaDube community. The installation in the KwaDube community was a success and the standpipes will now provide clean water to 18,000 residents in the area. Water service was brought to a traditional area of uMhlathuze, which will leave a lasting impact. Having clean, safe water 32
  • readily accessible will help the community immensely, since it was previously unsafe for women and children to travel for water. Joe Davis, Chair of the City of Milwaukee Sister Cities Committee, shared a story about a grandmother living in the KwaDube community, who had overturned a candle accidentally in her home. Her hut caught fire and posed an immediate danger to her and her home. She was able to quickly get a bucket of water from the pipe nearby and douse the fire. She was very grateful for the water supply that helped save her house. After hearing this story, Mr. Davis was humbled and proud of the difference that he and the sister city committees could make and the impact that the AUPAP project had on the community. Through AUPAP, the relationship between Milwaukee and uMhlathuze strengthened and the two cities became closer. The two sister cities worked together to provide technical support and engage the community in the project. There was open dialogue, despite the difficulty in communication that involved time differences and language barriers. Mr. Davis, shared: “I learned about working together and really listening to each other—dialogue and communication are important to make sure things are getting done.” “There is a lot of opportunity for change,” said Mr. Davis. “This experience was humbling and a pleasure to be a part of.” Milwaukee and uMhlathuze look forward to continuing to strengthen their sister city relationship and work on more development projects in the future. I learned about working together and really listening to each other—dialogue and communication are important to make sure things are getting done. Joe Davis, Chair of the City of Milwaukee Sister Cities Committee “ ” 33
  • Oakland, California Secondi-Takoradi, Ghana At a glance: Objective: To provide access to clean water, toilet facilities, and medical screenings to students at the Ketan Cluster of Schools and improve emergency health care at Esikado Hospital Project(s): The construction of mechanized boreholes and toilet facilities at the Ketan Cluster of Schools; provision of medical screenings; repair of ambulance for Esikado Hospital Year sister city relationship was established: 1975 Secondi-Takoradi, Ghana n Population: 335,000 n Area: XXXX n Geography: Located on the southern border of Ghana, on the coast of the Gulf of Guinea n Economy: Industries of timber, plywood, shipbuilding, railroad repair, oil Oakland, California n Population: 390,724 n Area: 78 mi² (202 km2 ) n Geography: Located in western California, on the San Francisco Bay, it is a major port city in the state n Economy: Marine cargo transport, retail, high-tech and green energy companies T he sister city relationship between Oakland and Secondi-Takoradi was formalized in 1975. Both cities have ports and are centers of regional government, similarities that have fed the sister city relationship over the years. The initiative was led by the late Alderman Van Lewis, who established the African Sister City Cultural Center, Inc. to support the sister city relationship with Secondi-Takoradi. Over the years, delegations have visited both cities for educational and cultural exchanges. In 2003, their relationship became stronger after receiving an Africa HIV/AIDS Prevention and Education Grant from Sister Cities International. Through this grant, the sister cities participated in three exchanges, during which members of both sister city committees learned about the challenges each community faces in working to stop the spread of HIV/AIDS. Secondi-Takoradi is comprised of the twin cities of Secondi and Takoradi, and is the capital of the Western Region of Ghana. It is the fourth largest city in Ghana, and is a major commercial and industrial center. Located on the coast of the Gulf of Guinea, Secondi- Takoradi has many beautiful beaches that attract tourists every year. Its main industries are timber, plywood, shipbuilding, railroad repair, and oil. It is a major port city, Ghana’s first, and has recently been known as the Oil City of Ghana due to the massive discovery of oil in the western region of Ghana. Despite the vibrant trade and discovery of oil in Secondi-Takoradi, there are still significant water, health, and sanitation issues that need to be addressed. Many schools do not have access to water for drinking or hand washing, forcing students to leave school grounds to fetch water and wasting class time. There are no adequate toilet facilities, so teachers and students simply relieve themselves in the foliage on the school grounds. Providing water and toilets would help prevent the spread of disease and improve the students’ self- esteem. The Oakland and Secondi-Takoradi Sister City Committees had another opportunity to work on 34
  • development projects in Secondi-Takoradi, through AUPAP. AUPAP raised the relationship to a new level—the committees worked effectively together and became closer as a result. The sister city committees received widespread coverage in the area and became well known to the community. New relationships were built with the Department of Health and the school administration and community. The new mayor of Secondi-Takoradi was also involved and was very impressed with the projects. The community was passionate about the projects and worked hard to make changes. Gail Berkley-Armstrong, President of the African Sister City Cultural Center, said, “I was impressed with their dedication.” The African Sister City Cultural Center in Oakland worked with the Secondi-Takoradi Sister City Committee to complete several water, sanitation, and health projects: toilet facilities, mechanized boreholes, and health screenings at the Ketan Cluster of five schools, and restoration and repair of an ambulance at Esikado Hospital. At the Ketan Cluster of schools, two ten-seat toilet facilities and two buildings with 2-bay urinals were constructed for approximately 3,000 students. The toilet facilities will not only keep the students and teachers healthier, but will improve morale and save class time. Two mechanized boreholes were drilled and 45 hand washing basins were provided, finally giving students and teachers access to water for drinking and hand washing. Students will no longer have to travel far to fetch water, and can spend that time instead learning in the classroom. Free medical screenings for vision, hearing, malaria, worm infestation, diabetes, hypertension, and dental health are also being provided for 1,250 students and teachers, allowing for quick diagnosis and referral for follow up care. Many students that have vision problems have now received eyeglasses, allowing them to be able to better read the blackboards and books. At the Esikado Hospital, the ambulance was in major need of repair and restoration. The interior was restored, the engine was repaired, and the van was painted. The newly renovated ambulance helps provide the town with emergency health care. All the projects were successful and incredibly beneficial to the community in Secondi- Takoradi. Seeing the final products for many sister city members, including Mr. Berkley- Armstrong, was the best part of the whole program. He shared, “I really enjoyed seeing the kids happy and smiling. The whole experience was very worthwhile.” He felt that their work really made an impact on people. Both the African Sister City Cultural Center in Oakland and the Secondi-Takoradi Sister City Committee look forward to working on more development projects together in the future and building more worthwhile experiences. I really enjoyed seeing the kids happy and smiling. The whole experience was very worthwhile. Gail Berkley-Armstrong, President of the African Sister City Cultural Center “ ” 35
  • Richmond, Virginia Segou, Mali At a glance: Objective: To improve sanitation and hygiene in three public areas in Segou Project(s): The construction of toilet and washing facilities in Les Poupons Kindergarten, Medine Community Health Center, and Small Water Tower Public Market, and the renovation of Medine Community Health Center Year sister city relationship was established: 2009 Segou, Mali n Population: 130,690 n Area: 14 mi² (37 km2 ) n Geography: Located in southern Mali on the Niger River, characterized by a semi-arid climate n Economy: Agri-business, cattle farming, fishing Richmond, Virginia n Population: 208,833 n Area: 63 mi² (162 km2 ) n Geography: Located in central Virginia in the Piedmont region, characterized by low, rolling hills, and lies between the low, sea-level Tidewater region and the Blue Ridge Mountains n Economy: Commerce, law, finance R ichmond and Segou had developed a relationship focusing on tourism, arts, and culture since 2005 through the Virginia Friends of Mali, a nonprofit based in Richmond, until a sister city relationship was formally established in 2009. In 2005, the Malian Ambassador to the United States, His Excellency Abdoulaye Diop, and the Prime Minister of Mali, Honorable Ousmane Issoufi Maiga, visited Richmond and were impressed to see children learning about Mali in school. This prompted an interest and a request for Richmond and Segou to become sister cities. Since 2009, delegations have visited Richmond and Segou, coinciding with each city’s music festivals. The two sister cities have enjoyed a strong, beneficial relationship based on friendship and understanding over the years. Segou is located in southern Mali, on the Niger River. It is the fifth largest city in Mali, and is the capital of the fourth largest administrative region of Segou. A historic city, Segou was the capital of the Bambara Empire from the 17th to the 19th century. The city is now the administrative and commercial center in the region, known for its pottery, markets, and fishing industry. However, many parts of Segou lack proper health and sanitation facilities, leading to a variety of issues such as disease and environmental degradation. Richmond Sister Cities Commission partnered with Segou Sister Cities Commission to address these sanitation issues by completing several sanitation projects throughout Segou including the construction of latrines and washing facilities at Les Poupons Kindergarten, the Medine Community Health Center, and the Small Water Tower Public Market, and the renovation of the Medine Community Health Center. The sanitation project at Les Poupons Kindergarten consisted of the construction of eight flush latrines for children, four urinals for boys, two flush latrines and two urinals for adult staff, and six wash basins. Connections to the main water supply and electricity were also constructed for the toilet facilities. This will help children to stay in school by allowing them to stay healthy by washing their hands regularly. Latrines and washing facilities were constructed at the Medine Community Health Center, which included the construction of eight flush latrines, four urinals, four wash basins, and 36
  • one washing area with a shower. Connections to the main water supply and electricity were also constructed. The project at the Small Water Tower Public Market also involved the construction of eight flush latrines, four urinals, four wash basins, and one washing area with a shower. Connections to the main water supply and electricity were constructed as well. Since the market is in a busy part of the city, many residents will be able to access the sanitation facilities and maintain proper hygiene. The toilet blocks in all three areas will benefit 1,050 people on a daily basis. Finally, the Medine Community Health Center was renovated using the remaining funds from AUPAP: an extension to the existing building was constructed to include laboratory space, a second labor ward, additional space for a pharmacy, and consulting rooms. The waiting area in the main building was reorganized and renovated. These renovations will improve efficiency and increase access to health care services for the people of Segou. The maternity ward that was completed will benefit 28,000 people in Segou. Through AUPAP, the sister city relationship was strengthened and friendships were deepened. Community leaders, individual facility users, and technical partners were cooperative in the construction and maintenance of improved sanitary facilities. Allan Levenberg, Finance Chair of Richard Sister Cities Commission, said: “Our working relationships were excellent throughout the project cycle.” He and the rest of the committee members enjoyed working with their sister city partners in Segou and bonded with them on a personal level. “I enjoyed the relaxed non- work interactions with our Segou colleagues, seeing them with their families, celebrations, soccer matches, and eating with one another,” shared Mr. Levenberg. Both sister cities took important lessons from their experiences during AUPAP. As Mr. Levenberg says, “I learned that we all really want the same things, just in different expressions. Love of family and community transcends boundaries, and that we are not the only ones with good ideas. I learned and put to use some great lessons in Segou.” As AUPAP has ended, Richmond and Segou have already started working together on two new grants that they have received, including a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation for a pilot HIV/AIDS study in Segou and a Title VI grant to build a study relationship between students at Virginia Commonwealth University and the universities of Bamako and Segou. I learned that we all really want the same things, just in different expressions. Love of family and community transcends boundaries, and that we are not the only ones with good ideas. I learned and put to use some great lessons in Segou. Allan Levenberg, Finance Chair of Richard Sister Cities Commission “ ” 37
  • Riverside, California Obuasi, Ghana At a glance: Objective: To improve sanitation, quality of health care services, and access to clean water Project(s): The upgrade of water facilities of Bossman and St. Philip’s, purchase of Toyota ambulance for Obuasi Government Hospital, and upgrade of the local abattoir Year sister city relationship was established: 2008 Obuasi, Ghana n Population: 175,043 n Area: 627 mi² (1624 km2 ) n Geography: Located in southern Ghana, known for the famous Obuasi gold mine n Economy: Gold mining, tourism Riverside, California n Population: 303,871 n Area: 81 mi² (211 km2 ) n Geography: Located in southern California, 36 miles from the Pacific Ocean, surrounded by small and large mountains including the famous tourist attraction—Mount Rubidoux n Economy: Film/television industry, education, health care services T he sister city relationship between Riverside, California and Obuasi, Ghana began in 2008 after delegations from both cities spent some time investigating opportunities and discussing mutual interests. The delegation from Obuasi was initially attracted to Riverside because of their business interest in growing citrus and increasing their citrus production. Obuasi farmers grow sweet oranges that are famous throughout the country of Ghana and Riverside is similarly known for its own orange production. Since 2008, their relationship strengthened on the basis of cultural understanding, business alliances, and community development. AUPAP gave Riverside sister city members and the Obuasi community the opportunity to improve their nascent sister city relationship and foster friendships through water, health, and sanitation projects that would leave a lasting impact on the Obuasi community. The program also “provided the opportunity for our communities to see what we were capable of, to see what we could do,” according to Jalani Bakari, Vice Chairman of the Obuasi Sister City Committee. Riverside members were able to work with the municipality, companies, and various individuals in the community effectively and accomplish their goals. New relationships were established with over 30 schools to work on educational student exchanges between Riverside and Obuasi. Although the sister city relationship is young, the AUPAP projects helped to strengthen their new relationship, providing a solid foundation for future endeavors. Nestled among grassy hills, Obuasi is a town in the southern part of Ashanti, one of the ten administrative regions in Ghana. It is the capital of the Obuasi Municipality, located south of Ashanti’s capital city, Kumasi. Known as the “Golden City,” Obuasi is famous for its gold mine, which is one of the ten largest in the world and a popular tourist attraction. Although the Obuasi gold mine has brought wealth to the area, there are still critical water, health, and sanitation issues that need to be addressed. Locals in Obuasi would have to travel 38
  • far for potable water and medical treatment, even during emergencies. The Obuasi Sister City Committee in Riverside, California partnered with Obuasi Sister Cities International to work on bringing clean water, medical services, and sanitation renovations to the community. Projects included two new water facilities with upgraded faucets, tanks, pumps and tiles in the Bossman and St. Philip’s community, a new Toyota ambulance and medical supplies for the Obuasi Government Hospital, and a renovated slaughterhouse with upgraded water, input electricity, faucets, pumps, tanks, and toilet/shower facilities. These projects were able to assist thousands of households across the Obuasi municipality. The water projects greatly improved access to water in Bossman and St. Phillip’s community—saving time and energy for women and children who no longer had to walk half a mile to get water. The amount of people served by the new water pumps increased by 1,300 people. Mr. Bakari was touched by “how enthused the women and kids were,” saying that it was great to see the excitement and passion. The successful completion of the projects left both sister city committees and the local community in high spirits. Mr. Bakari shared: “It changes the dynamic when people thank you in earnest—makes you feel really good.” Collaboration was key to the success of the projects and is an important value of sister cities; as Bakari said: “I was very impressed with the community citizenry—our objectives were met because of it.” The Riverside-Obuasi Sister City Committee plans to take a group of students to Obuasi to see and learn about medical practices in a different community. Riverside and Obuasi plan to pursue more projects in the future and create new friendships between the two sister cities. It changes the dynamic when people thank you in earnest—makes you feel really good. I was very impressed with the community citizenry— our objectives were met because of it. Jalani Bakari, Vice Chairman of the Obuasi Sister City Committee “ ” 39
  • Seattle, Washington Mombasa, Kenya At a glance: Objective: To improve maternal and dental health of the community Project(s): The renovation and expansion of Utange Dispensary to include a maternal and dental clinic Year sister city relationship was established: 1981 Mombasa, Kenya n Population: 939,370 n Area: 114 mi² (295 km²) n Geography: Located partly on the southern coast of Kenya and on Mombasa Island, characterized by flat topography and a tropical climate n Economy: Trade, tourism Seattle, Washington n Population: 620,778 n Area: 142 mi² (369 km2) n Geography: Located in western Washington between the saltwater Puget Sound (an arm of the Pacific Ocean) to the west and Lake Washington to the east, characterized by a hilly terrain n Economy: Home to the headquarters of Amazon, Starbucks, Nordstrom, Expeditors International of Washington, Costco T he cities of Seattle and Mombasa formed a sister city relationship in 1981 to support educational and cultural exchanges between the two cities, encourage and promote international understanding, goodwill, and an appreciation of pluralism, and promote trade and tourism beneficial to both economies. Since then, there have been many exchanges and projects such as the donation of a much needed ambulance and fire truck to Mombasa; provision of medical supplies, school supplies, books, and auto repair parts to Mombasa; and the development of a pen pal exchange between the school children of both cities. The sister city relationship has been long lasting and beneficial to both cities. Mombasa is the second largest city in Kenya, located on the east coast of Kenya and bordering the Indian Ocean. Due to its coastal location and its prominent seaport Mombasa has been known as a historical trading center. In addition to being a center of trade it is also the regional center of tourism, and attracts a wide variety of visitors. Mombasa’s culture is unique, with both European and Omani influences apparent throughout the city. Although tourism continues to grow in Mombasa, residents still face a number of issues. There is a lack of prenatal and postnatal care in the Utange area of Bamburi in Mombasa, forcing pregnant women to make a 12 mile journey, on foot or by bicycle, into the city of Mombasa to deliver their babies at a hospital. The majority of expectant mothers end up giving birth at home in poor hygienic conditions, resulting in high maternal and infant mortality rates. The lack of dental care for residents is also a cause for concern. The Seattle Mombasa Sister City Association (SMSCA) partnered with the local Mombasa Sister Cities Committee to complete two health projects: the renovation and expansion of Utange Dispensary and inclusion of a maternal and dental clinic. The Utange Dispensary was renovated successfully: the medical, dental, and doctor’s quarters buildings were fully renovated with new doors and windows, a newer water supply system, the installation of electricity, the construction of an incinerator and a placenta soak pit, and the installation of toilets and a septic tank. Medical and dental equipment was purchased and shipped to Utange Dispensary, as well as a fire ambulance. The renovation 40
  • of the clinic will benefit approximately 40,000 residents of the Bamburi division of Mombasa, especially the women in the community. The impact of the health project was significant and the local community was thankful for the new facilities. Robin Jones, a member of SMSCA, described what she enjoyed most at the opening ceremony: “They were very appreciative—there was a lot of singing and dancing at the ceremony, showing how happy the occasion was.” The happiness and excitement were infectious, as SMSCA members and local Mombasa Sister Cities Committee members were also happy and proud of the work that they had done. For Ms. Jones, just turning on the faucet and seeing clean water flow was immensely satisfying. It was an incredible moment for her to see the immediate results and impact of the AUPAP project. The impact the project had on women was tremendous, as Ms. Jones said: “AUPAP gave them a voice.” The women in the local community took this opportunity to express their concerns and voice their opinions, and be involved in the planning process. The friendships that Ms. Jones and other committee members made were invaluable, and the professional relationships were beneficial and based on mutual understanding. SMSCA developed new relationships with the hospital, the Ganjoni Clinic, which is run by the University of Washington, the Global Health Department, and the Mombasa-Long Beach Sister Cities Association. These new friendships will allow Seattle to further strengthen their relationship with Mombasa and will enable them to work on more development projects in the future. I feel that Seattle Mombasa Sister City members, Seattle Sister Cities Committee, volunteers, and local companies worked hard to make our AUPAP project a success, and I want to thank them for their time and dedication. Now the goal is to make the maternity and dental clinics sustainable in the long run. Robin Jones, President of Seattle Mombasa Sister City Association “ ” 41
  • Sonoma, California Aswan, Egypt At a glance: Objective: To improve the health and well-being of the people living in Aswan Project(s): The purchase of lower and upper endoscopes for the Aswan Cancer Center and the purchase of trash collection equipment for the El Nasriya Sanitation Project – a waste management system Year sister city relationship was established: 2008 Aswan, Egypt n Population: 290,327 n Area of Aswan Governate: 13,362 mi² (34,608 km²) n Geography: Located in southeastern Egypt just north of the Aswan Dam, on the east bank of the Nile River n Economy: Agriculture, tourism Sonoma, California n Population: 10,648 n Area: 4 mi² (7 km2 ) n Geography: Situated in the Sonoma Valley, with the Mayacamas Mountains to the East and the Sonoma Mountains to the West n Economy: Viticulture and winemaking, tourism T he sister city relationship between Sonoma and Aswan was formalized in 2008, after Ambassador Abderahman Salaheldin, Consul General of the Arab Republic of Egypt in San Francisco, expressed interest in creating a sister city relationship with Aswan. Sonoma was interested in Sister Cities International’s initiative to partner with Muslim communities to promote understanding and diplomacy. Since then, there have been many educational programs and fundraisers to reach out to the people in Sonoma and the communities in Aswan. A past project called Our Beautiful Water was completed from 2009-2010 in Sonoma and Aswan. It was a joint art, health, and education initiative designed to raise environmental and cultural awareness of the importance of water in children’s everyday lives and their responsibility to conserve water in their communities. Middle school children were asked to draw pictures of how they see the importance of water in their lives, and the pictures were then compiled and made into a children’s book, an online interactive game, and an online gallery/blog. The project connected the communities of Sonoma and Aswan and promoted awareness about environmental sustainability. Aswan is a city in southern Egypt and is the capital of the Aswan Governate. Known as a busy market and tourist center, it is located just north of the Aswan Dam, on the east bank of the Nile River. It is the smallest of the three tourist cities on the Nile, with a large Nubian population inhabiting the city. Aswan is a vibrant city with a rich culture that is infused with Egyptian, Nubian, and Bedouin influences. With its beautiful setting on the Nile River and historic attractions, the city attracts many tourists annually who visit Aswan to relax and enjoy the Nubian culture. Despite the tourism that the city of Aswan enjoys, the communities in Aswan lack the medical services and sanitation facilities needed to help people live healthier lives. Cancer presents a significant concern and is a primary cause of mortality in Egypt, and as such early detection of cancer can significantly reduce mortality rates. Proper trash collection and sanitation services are also necessary and crucial to the community’s health and well-being. 42
  • The Sonoma Sister City Committee worked with the Aswan Sister City Committee to complete a medical project and a sanitation project: the purchase of medical equipment for the Aswan Cancer Center and trash collection in the El Nasriya community. The Aswan Cancer Center is the main cancer diagnosis and treatment center for nearly 1,100,000 people. It serves both urban and rural patients of various ethnic affiliations including Egyptian, Nubian, and Bedouin peoples. Additional upper and lower endoscopes were purchased for the Aswan Cancer Center, since the cancer center only had one upper and lower endoscope to use—servicing only up to 500 individuals per year. Providing additional scopes allowed the Aswan Cancer Center to increase their testing capabilities, potentially identifying cancer early and saving lives. As a result of this AUPAP medical project, a strong relationship has emerged between members of the Sonoma-Aswan Sister City Committee and the Aswan Oncology Center. The goal of the El Nasriya Sanitation Project was to improve the facilities in El Nasriya by acquiring equipment and materials for cleanup and to promote the consistent collection of trash by community members. Small and medium garbage trucks, trash cans, gloves, garbage bags, and other sanitation equipment were purchased to be used for trash collection in the narrow neighborhood streets of El Nasriya. The project was also designed to interact with the local community and engage households to participate in the project. The Sonoma Sister City Committee faced an additional, unique set of challenges while working in Egypt. Working on projects and making sure they were completed during the Egyptian revolution was a difficult task due to unforeseen obstacles. However, despite these challenges, the projects were completed successfully and the sister city relationship was strengthened. Interacting and working with new people, and seeing his Egyptian partners’ passion for the project was Chair of the Sonoma-Aswan Committee George McKale’s favorite part of the whole experience. He shared, “My heart is with the city regardless of the sister city relationship.” Together the Sonoma Sister City Committee and the Aswan Sister City Committee were committed to working on health and sanitation projects that would benefit and leave a lasting impact on the community in Aswan. “It’s been a fascinating journey—I believe that both projects were 100% successful,” said Mr. McKale. Members were satisfied with the results and felt that the projects were worthwhile. The Sonoma-Aswan Sister City Committee plans to pursue more projects in Aswan and is intent on continuing to strengthen their sister city relationship with Aswan. It’s been a fascinating journey—I believe that both projects were 100% successful. My heart is with the city regardless of the sister city relationship. George McKale, Chair of the Sonoma-Aswan Committee “ ” 43
  • St. Louis, Missouri Saint Louis, Senegal At a glance: Objective: To improve the cleanliness of the HLM District; to improve the management of diabetes treatment; to improve the sanitation of the Rawane Ngom School Project(s): The purchase of trash collection equipment; provision of screenings and medical equipment for diabetes care; renovation of the Rawane Ngom School Year sister city relationship was established: 1994 Saint Louis, Senegal n Population: 176,000 n Area: XXXX n Geography: Located on the northwestern coast of Senegal, bordering the Atlantic Ocean and Mauritania; characterized by the Sahel, marshes, and the Langue de Barbarie (a 373 mile long stretch of sand from Nouadhibou, Mauritania to Saint-Louis) n Economy: Trade, tourism, agriculture, sugar production St. Louis, Missouri n Population: 318,172 n Area: 66 mi² (171 km2 ) n Geography: Located on the eastern border of Missouri, with a major port on the Mississippi River, and the famous tourist attraction— the Gateway Arch n Economy: Manufacturing, trade, transportation of goods, service, tourism I n 1994, St. Louis, Missouri and Saint Louis, Senegal formed a sister city relationship, due in large part to interest expressed by Gouye Seddele, an organization founded by a group of men in Saint Louis, Senegal dedicated to the growth and development of their city. Following the formalization of the sister city relationship, there have been cultural exchanges between the two cities, as well as local celebration of Senegalese culture in St. Louis, Missouri. Saint Louis Missouri-Senegal Sister Cities (SLM-SSC) has supported local Senegalese merchants and institutions through donations of portable typewriters, a computer, school supplies, and textbooks. The relationship between St. Louis and Saint Louis was strengthened during AUPAP, despite the challenges and obstacles that were met along the way. The relationships between the two communities deepened, as members from both sister cities worked together to ensure Saint Louis was provided health care services and sanitation facilities. A local school in the HLM District in Saint Louis—the Rawane Ngom School—was part of the AUPAP sanitation project, resulting in a newfound relationship between St. Louis and the school. A relationship was also formed with the local Rotary Club, which was interested in contributing to the AUPAP project. Together, SLM-SSC and the Saint Louis Sister City Committee pursued projects that would help alleviate urban poverty in Saint Louis. Saint Louis is located on the northwestern coast of Senegal, bordering the Atlantic Ocean and the country of Mauritania. Saint Louis’ geographic features give the city a unique appearance, since the heart of the colonial city is situated on a narrow island in the Senegal River. It is the capital of the Saint Louis region in Senegal, and is 199 miles north of the country’s capital, Dakar. Colonized by the French, Saint Louis was once the capital of the French colony of Senegal from 1673-1902. The city’s main economic activities are trade and tourism, as well as fishing, pastoral farming, and agriculture. Saint Louis is also the commercial and industrial center for sugar production. Although Saint Louis is seeing growth in the tourism industry, it faces many health and sanitation issues. Proper waste management is particularly lacking in the HLM district of Saint Louis, where residents’ health conditions are poor due to inadequate sanitation facilities and poor hygiene. Saint Louis does not have a center for the diagnosis and treatment of diabetes, forcing diabetic residents (10% of the population or about 20,000 people) to travel44
  • all the way to Dakar to receive medical treatment. Schools are not adequately equipped to support their young students and need major renovations and repairs. SLM-SSC worked with the Saint Louis Sister City Committee on several different projects throughout Saint Louis: the HLM sanitation program, the diabetes care services project, and the renovation of Rawane Ngom School. HLM District lacks a waste management system due to the lack of waste collection equipment, household trash bins, and regular trash pick-up. Trash bins, motorcycles, and maintenance equipment were purchased to help collect and dispose the neighborhood’s trash. The sanitation project was successful in improving the cleanliness of the HLM District. Renee Franklin, Chair of SLM-SSC shared a personal story about a woman she met in Saint Louis, who was overjoyed about the trash collection: “We filmed a woman who was so obviously happy to have a trash can and have trash picked up every day—even I don’t get my trash picked up every day! She was just beaming with excitement.” Ms. Franklin said that everyone involved, including her, felt a sense of personal accomplishment when the projects were completed. SLM-SSC partnered with the Diabetes Association of Saint Louis and the Regional Hospital of Saint Louis to provide screenings and medical services to diabetic patients. Modern equipment was installed at the Regional Hospital to improve patient access to quality services and increase capacity for patient care. Gestational diabetes in particular is an issue and was the main focus—diabetes was monitored in pregnant women, and the women were educated about better eating habits and lifestyle habits. Finally, the Rawane Ngom School was renovated: the school walls were painted, cement floors were repaired to prevent further damage, chalkboards were resurfaced, over 130 desks were refurbished and repaired, and window frames, locks, and doors were completely replaced. Students from Washington University in St. Louis were brought over to Saint Louis to help out, and youth from the local community were hired to renovate the school, which got the community involved and engaged in the project. Ms. Franklin felt that the school project was the most rewarding for her and the most efficient project since it was completed in ten days. She said, “To get work done, you need to be in-country. We got a lot of work done when we were right there.” When she visited Saint Louis after the projects had been completed, she shared what she enjoyed most: “I really enjoyed the outcomes the most—to be able to go back to the communities and see them leading happier, healthier lives.” St. Louis and Saint Louis look to pursue more projects in Saint Louis, to continue the journey they began during AUPAP. I really enjoyed the outcomes the most— to be able to go back to the communities and see them leading happier, healthier lives. Renee Franklin, Chair of Saint Louis Missouri-Senegal Sister Cities “ ” 45
  • Toledo, Ohio Tanga, Tanzania At a glance: Objective: To improve sanitation and provide access to maternal health care services Project(s): The construction of toilet facilities at Sakarani Garden, Mgandini Market, and Mkwakwani Market and the construction of the Duga Maternity Ward Year sister city relationship was established: 2001 Tanga, Tanzania n Population: 242,640 n Area: 207 mi² (536 km2 ) n Geography: Located on the eastern coast of Tanzania, bordering the Indian Ocean and characterized by sandy beaches and coastal mangroves n Economy: Tourism, export of sisal, coffee, tea, cotton Toledo, Ohio n Population: 287,208 n Area: 84 mi² (218 km2 ) n Geography: Located in northern Ohio near Lake Erie, situated in a sandy oak savanna called the Oak Openings Region n Economy: : Manufacturing, glass industry, automotive industry, clean energy T he sister city relationship between Toledo and Tanga was formalized in 2001, after a group of citizens led by Virginia Haywood-Smith expressed an interest in cultivating international relations with a city in Africa. Since then, the Toledo Sister Cities Committee and Tanga Sister Cities Committee have engaged in various projects including the donation of a used fire truck, provision of medical supplies to a health clinic, donations to an AIDS orphanage in Tanga, and the establishment of a pen pal relationship between high school and middle school students in Toledo and students in Tanga. Tanga is one of the largest cities in Tanzania, located on the Indian Ocean and near the border of Kenya. Since Tanga is a port, major exports such as sisal, coffee, tea, and cotton, often go through the city. It is also an important railway center, connecting much of the interior of Tanzania with the Indian Ocean. Tanga has a vibrant culture and is increasingly becoming a tourist attraction due to its sandy beaches and historical ruins. With the constant influx of people, tourists and residents of Tanga alike, a variety of services are becoming more and more crucial. Public health and hygiene are issues of concern, and pregnant women are forced to travel far to go to the regional hospital, which poses a health hazard both for the women and their unborn children. Sanitation is also an issue, and good toilet facilities are important to the growing tourism industry in Tanga. The Toledo Sister Cities Committee partnered with the Tanga Sister Cities Committee to address health and sanitation issues by working on several projects: the construction of three toilet blocks at Sakarani Garden, Mgandini Market, and Mkwakwani Market, and a maternity ward at Duga Dispensary in Tanga. The toilet facilities were constructed successfully at strategic locations for public use, allowing easy access to residents. 46
  • Sakarani Garden, Mgandini Market, and Mkwakwani Market are all busy locations with high foot traffic, and the facilities will serve approximately 50,000 people. They will be charged a nominal fee for use, which will ensure the maintenance and sustainability of the facilities. The facilities are important for proper sanitation and associated health issues. The maternity ward at Duga Dispensary was constructed to provide prenatal and maternal health services to expectant mothers, serving up to 25,000 women and children. More often than not, when expectant mothers cannot reach the Regional Hospital they end up giving birth in their homes or other places where it is not safe for the mother and the newborn. The ward was equipped with all the necessary equipment and supplies by the Toledo and Tanga Sister City Committees and use of the maternity ward will help reduce maternal mortality and HIV transmission between mother and child due to cleaner, more sterile, and professional surroundings. The completion of the toilet facilities and maternity ward was a tremendous moment for both sister cities—the ceremonial signing was the highlight of the experience for Norma King, Secretary of Toledo Sister Cities Committee, since it symbolized the fruit of their meaningful collaboration and hard work throughout the program. Through AUPAP, the sister city relationship was strengthened— though they were friends already, the committees became closer while working on the projects. Ms. King shared, “People are really the same no matter where they are.” She and her committee were invested in “making the community a better place” and truly enjoyed working with their sister city partners. The Toledo Sister Cities Committee is excited to continue their sister city relationship and is looking to pursue more development projects in Tanga in the future. People are really the same no matter where they are. We were invested in making the community a better place. Norma King, Secretary of Toledo Sister Cities Committee “ ” 47
  • Urbana, Illinois Zomba, Malawi T he sister city relationship between Urbana and Zomba was formalized in March of 2008, after a mutual interest in health and safe drinking water was expressed. Although the sister city relationship is young, an informal relationship between Urbana and Zomba had already existed for ten years. The First United Presbyterian Church in Urbana has supported a clean well water initiative called the Shallow Wells Mission in Zomba, which has fostered friendships and built connections between the two cities throughout the years. Delegations from both cities have met several times to discuss educational exchanges between elementary and middle schools. Located in southern Malawi, Zomba lies at the base of the Zomba Plateau, in the Shire Highlands. It is the administrative capital of the Zomba District and was once the capital of the British Central Africa Protectorate. Zomba’s British colonial past can be seen in the architecture of many of the older homes and buildings. The town is the center for the tobacco and dairy farms of the surrounding area, which also produces rice, corn, fish, and softwoods. In the city of Zomba, there is a need for health and sanitation infrastructure, since these areas are not equipped to support the increasing population. The Urbana Sister Cities Committee partnered with the Zomba Local Community Committee to complete two sanitation projects: the construction of Ventilated Improved Pit (VIP) latrines at three elementary schools and an ablution block (toilets and showers) at the Guardian Shelter at the Zomba Central Hospital. The toilet facilities were expanded and completed at Chikamveka, Chalomwe, and Thundu primary schools. The number of latrines doubled at each school, which reduced the drop hole to student ratio from 1 drop hole to every 187 students to a post-project ratio of 1:76. This was a significant improvement—it improved time and efficiency for students in school and allowed them to spend more time in the classroom. The increase in the number of latrines also improved hygiene and sanitation. At a glance: Objective: To improve access to sustainable water and sanitation facilities among low income communities Project(s): The construction of toilet facilities at elementary schools and an ablution block at Zomba Central Hospital Year sister city relationship was established: 2008 Zomba, Malawi n Population: 87,366 n Area of Zomba District: 996 mi² (2,580 km²) n Geography: Located in southern Malawi, characterized by the Zomba Plateau and Lake Chilwa to the north, Mount Mulanje to the southeast, and the Shire River to the west n Economy: Retail trade, construction, manufacturing, transport, marketing, finance, social services, public administration Urbana, Illinois n Population: 41,581 n Area: 12 mi² (30 km2 ) n Geography: Located in central Illinois, bordering the city of Champaign and situated in the Sangamon River Valley, characterized by a large, flat plateau n Economy: Technology, education 48
  • The ablution block at the Zomba Central Hospital was completed successfully, and is now equipped with running showers for men and women in individual stalls, new design water- flush sanitary platform toilets, proper ventilation, electric lights, and connection to the city sewer system. A large outdoor clothes washing area was also constructed with deep concrete sinks, running water, and sewer connection. Both the drop hole ratio and the available shower ratio decreased from 1:200 to 1:28. This significantly improved efficiency and hygiene at the hospital. It will help prevent the spread of disease and infection among hospital patients. Overall, the projects were successful, and the sister city committees were in high spirits as Scott Dossett, AUPAP Project Manager, shared: “Feeling that you’re helping people is wonderful.” There was a deep sense of appreciation by the Zomba community for the work the two sister cities had done. The impact the projects had on the community was tremendous. AUPAP helped strengthen and deepen the sister city relationship, through meaningful projects that made a difference in Zomba’s communities. “AUPAP was a wonderful opportunity… It was great for a young group,” said Dennis Roberts, Chair of Urbana Sister Cities-Zomba. He was involved from the beginning, along with Mr. Dossett, and the two became good friends along the way. Long lasting friendships were made through AUPAP, as Mr. Roberts expressed: “I feel like we have true friends in Zomba—the friendships have become so valuable.” New relationships were formed between different groups in the communities. More doors were opened between the Urbana Sister Cities Committee and the University of Malawi, allowing for a potential relationship between the University of Illinois and the University of Malawi. The Urbana Rotary Club is also interested in pursuing more water projects in Zomba in the future. Following the success of the AUPAP projects in Zomba, the two sister cities worked together on the Sino-African Initiative (SAI), another grant funded through the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation that addressed the manner in which Chinese, African, and U.S. cities can collaborate on economic development and urban poverty issues in Africa. Urbana and Zomba, along with Haizhu District in China, focused on waste management in Zomba. They restored sewer lines, constructed new communal refuse bankers and manholes, constructed a compost site, and procured a garbage truck and tools for composting. The SAI project was a success, and the two sister cities plan to work on more development projects in Zomba, in conjunction with churches in both of their cities. AUPAP was a wonderful opportunity. It was great for a young group. I feel like we have true friends in Zomba— the friendships have become so valuable. Dennis Roberts, Chair of Urbana Sister Cities-Zomba “ ” 49
  • Wilmington, Delaware Osogbo, Nigeria At a glance: Objective: To improve the living conditions of the residents of Osogbo by providing a reliable source of clean water to the communities Project(s): The construction of 29 hand pump boreholes throughout all seven Osogbo districts Year sister city relationship was established: 2000 Osogbo, Nigeria n Population: 156,694 n Area: 18 mi² (47 km²) n Geography: Located in southwestern Nigeria, characterized by hills and mountainous terrain, known for the Osun-Osogbo Sacred Grove n Economy: Agriculture, commerce, tourism Wilmington, Delaware n Population: 70,851 n Area: 17 mi² (44 km2 ) n Geography: Located at the meeting point of the Christina River and Delaware river, characterized by flat, low-lying, and sometimes marshy coastal plain lands n Economy: Finance (a national financial center for the credit card industry), insurance T he sister city relationship between Wilmington and Osogbo started in 2000, when Dr. Tunde Durosomo, Senior Economic Development Advisor in the Wilmington City administration, first proposed the idea of establishing a sister city relationship with his native Nigerian city of Osogbo. This sister city relationship reflected and recognized Wilmington’s growing African American population, many of whom have Yoruba roots. Since then, there have been delegation visits to each sister city. In order to celebrate their sister city’s culture, Sister Cities of Wilmington established an Osun Festival at the banks of the Brandywine River in Wilmington, a celebration in honor of the Yoruba river goddess Osun—the same celebration that takes place in Osogbo. Wilmington has also hosted artists from Osogbo and established an educational exchange between the University of Delaware and Osun State University. Osogbo is a vibrant city located in southwestern Nigeria, and is the capital of Osun State. It has been named the “City of Peace” because no foreign army has ever ruled over Osogbo. Situated among hills and mountains, Osogbo is the center of trade of the farming region, where yams, cassava, grain, tobacco, and cotton are grown. It is home to a significant Yoruba population and is one of the foremost centers of Yoruba arts and culture. Ever since Osogbo attained the status of a state capital in 1991, there has been an astronomical increase in population. This put a strain on government water supply services, since the existing water facilities are extremely inadequate. Over 65% of the residents in the city’s informal settlements do not have access to potable water, forcing them to travel far to fetch water from streams and shallow wells. This untreated water from streams and wells has become a health hazard for the community. Sister Cities of Wilmington partnered with Osogbo-Wilmington Sister Cities Committee to address this water issue and in the process, strengthen their sister city relationship. Through 50
  • AUPAP, the relationship grew, despite some bumps along the way. Wilmington also worked with members of Asheville Sister Cities International, which is also partnered with Osogbo, to complete projects in their shared sister city. Together, Wilmington, Asheville, and Osogbo addressed water and health issues in the area. Valeria Watson-Doost of Asheville described her relationship with the people of Osogbo: “I’m a part of a family now, and they’re a part of mine.” Their close sister city relationship made the Sister Cities of Wilmington well known in Osogbo. The two cities completed a major water project: the construction of 29 hand pump boreholes throughout all seven districts in Osogbo. The project succeeded in creating hand pump boreholes throughout traditional compounds and public places like hospitals and market centers. The boreholes allow easy access to clean, potable water, improving the living conditions of the urban poor. They provide a reliable source of water in the communities, within a reasonable walking distance. The close proximity of the boreholes was especially beneficial to women and children, since they are the ones who primarily fetch water for their families. The construction of boreholes also reduced water borne diseases and has improved hygiene and sanitation. The people of Osogbo were incredibly appreciative of the work that the sister city committees of Wilmington, Asheville, and Osogbo did to help the community. The committees were dedicated to the project and felt a connection with the community. Ms. Watson-Doost shared that her favorite moment during AUPAP was when people thanked her in earnest: “Nothing beats the gratitude shown by a community; some with smiles and handshakes, some with letters of appreciation, and some with gifts.” It was a moving experience for her and the other members. Everyone in Osogbo celebrated the success of the water project. Dennis Sheer, President of Sister Cities of Wilmington, was proud of the work everyone did and the project’s accomplishments. He enjoyed seeing photos from the visits and seeing the new wells in the community—“we really felt like we helped the community.” After AUPAP, Asheville and Osogbo worked together on the Sino-African Initiative (SAI), another grant funded through the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation that addressed the manner in which Chinese, African, and U.S. cities can collaborate on economic development and urban poverty issues in Africa. During SAI, Asheville and Osogbo, along with the sister cities of Raleigh, North Carolina and Xiangyang, China, renovated and upgraded a primary healthcare center to offer emergency obstetric care, provide extra equipment, and establish a drug revolving fund. The project was a success, and the sister cities look forward to working on more projects to address the water and healthcare issues that still exist. Nothing beats the gratitude shown by a community; some with smiles and handshakes, some with letters of appreciation, and some with gifts. I’m a part of a family now, and they’re a part of mine. Valeria Watson-Doost, Chair of Osogbo Committee of Asheville Sister Cities “ ” 51
  • Acknowledgements Baltimore, Maryland - Luxor, Egypt Abdelkareem Khalil Abdelkareem, Amal Agamy, Abdelaty Ali Ahmed, Amani Mohamed Almadany, Dr. Elham Edesy, Ahmed Edris, Abdelwahab Elabd, Samia Elias, Mohamed El-Menshawy, Ehab Gaddis, Girgis Samuel Girgis, Mohamed Nagib Hegazy, Mohamed Abed Mursal, Ahmed Noubi, Azzeldin Shafie Owies, Amy Riolo. Boulder, Colorado - Kisumu, Kenya Erick Oniango Ananga, Matt Bardocz, Darryl Brown, Sally Brown, Robert Harberg, Maurice Osiro Jack, Haggai Kadiri Hezron Mc’Obewa, Paul Achayo Ochieng, Winnie Opar, Jared Odhiambo Oriadha, Barbara Paradiso, Kim Smith, Sarah Summers. Chicago, Illinois - Casablanca, Morocco Hassan Aaddak, Iliasse Boujnal, Marilyn Diamond, Dr. Jamal Elamarti, Najah Elhallou, Abderrazak Sebaa Ellil, Noureddine El Moumni, Said Essoufi, Abderrahim Lahmoudi, Adil Loulidi, Dr. Fatima Marouan, Nicole Matuska, Boubker Mazoz, Fatima Mouqaby, Janet Murphy, Mostapha Naji, Hasna Oumimoun, Julie Stagliano, Adrienne Tongate. Corvallis, Oregon - Gondar, Ethiopia Amha Aligaz, Current Mayor Getinet Amare, Asaye Asnake, Rollie Baxter, Lee March, Ayanaw Mengesha, Don Prickel, Richard Raymond, Kathy Seeburger, Robel Tadesse, Former Mayor Habtamu Tedla. Delray Beach, Florida - Moshi, Tanzania Bernadette Kinabor, Viane Kombe, Frederick E. Monyo, Richard Reade, David Schmidt. Fort Worth, Texas - Mbabane, Swaziland Joel Burns, Gcinile Buthelezi, Carlo Capua, Joshua Cauthen, Irene Chase, Avis Davis, Mayor Clr. Arnold Dlamini, Bongani Dlamini, John Dlamini, Njabulo Dlamini, Nonhlanhla Dlamini, Sikhatsi Dlamini, Vusumuzi Dlamini, Skhumbuzo Dube, Dr. Staussa Ervin, Salvador Espino, Mae Ferguson, Benedict Gamedze, Dr. Paul Geisel, Jones Benito George, Kelly Allen Gray, Juna Allen Harris, Kathleen Hicks, Tom Higgins, Alfred Hlatshwako, Mike Hyatt, Jim Lane, Barney Magagula, Sabelo Magagula, Themba Magongo (posthumous), Brad Mahon, Musa Mamba, Nganono Manyatsi, Drew Martin, Fikile Mathunjwa, Ellen Matsenjwa, Gideon Mhlongo, Thulani Mkhonta, Mayor Mike Moncrief, Dan Morales, Phil Moroneso, Frank Moss, Lindelihle Nhlabatsi, Sthembiso Nhlandze, Mayor Clr. Zephania Nkambule, Thabiso Nsibande, Mary Palko, Mayor Betsy Price, Joseph Ramirez, David Reeves, Ann Rice, Eva Rodriguez, Danny Scarth, Wendy Shabay, Dennis Shingleton, Kennedy Shongwe, Alfred Tsabedze, Arcadoa Viveros, Beth Weibel, Zim Zimmerman. Grand Rapids, Michigan - Ga East/Ga West, Ghana Kofi Acquah, Benjamin Amponsah, Joseph Ata-Baah, Laud Binka, Jamani Dramani, Mary Edmond, Heather Gluszewski, Laura Moody, Simon Odamtten, Kwao Sackey, Nii Armah Tackie, Kojo Quartey. Jacksonville, Florida - Port Elizabeth, South Africa Hester Botha, Ernestine “Tina” Daniels, Executive Mayor Cllr Benson Fihla, Ron Van Johnson, Steve Manis, Deputy Mayor Cllr Chippa Ngcolomba, Waltter Shaidi, Former Cllr Nancy Siswaye, Former Cllr Zanoxolo Wayile. Lansing, Michigan - Akuapem South, Ghana Rev. Samuel Adjei, Nana Agyakwabea I, Nana Akotua II, Elizabeth Asherow, Nana Okyere Bekoe, Virg Bernero, William Biney, William Brewer, Willie Davis, Nana Toah Djan II, Mark Amoako Dompreh, Judy Gardi, Maxine Hankins-Cain, Otoobour Nana Djan Kwasi, Theodore Loudon, Barbara Roberts Mason, Michael C. Murphy, William Neequaye, Windylove Gifty Ofori, Thomas Kissiedu Okae, Gloria Saulsberry, Daniel D. Tetteh, Dr. Sophia Winful. Long Beach, California - Mombasa, Kenya Marvin Colbert, Jon Dufendach, Rose Munupe, Agnes Mwagwabi, Andrew Mwangale, Leonard Mwrigi, Rev. Ernest Ombeva, Tubmun Otieno, Dr. Pauline Merry, Nyambura Ruhiu, Ahmed Saafir, Joshua Sila, Robin Thorne, Phyllis Venable, Amina Zuberi. Louisville, Kentucky - Tamale, Ghana David Abdulai, Alhaji Haruna Abdulai, Prince Muhammed Abubakari, Dr. Braimah Abubakari, Mauriamma Achel, Baba Salifu Alhassan, Dr. Seidu Alhassan, Mahama Aliu, Renee Campbell-Mapp, Sarah-Lynn Cunningham, Mohammed Haroon, Susan Herlin, Roberta Hershberg, Steve Hubbs, Shedrick Jones, Jehanfo Kaleem, Alhassan Kpabia, Joanne Lloyd-Triplett, Dexter Mahaffey, Fati Munkaila, Agnes Nandzo, Iddrisu Niendow, Daniel Nyankamawu, Mubarack Osman, Thomas Syvertsen, Steve Tecku, Connie Williams, John Wright, Wei-Bin Zeng. Maryland State - Bong/Maryland County, Liberia Dr. P. Bai Akridge, Josephine Allison, Roland Bailea, Honorable Fred Bartoe, Elder Flomo T. Barwolor, Anthony W. Bedell, John Brandy, Jean Van Buskirk, Dixon Q. Butty, Steven Carr, Gerald Cooper, Roberta Brown Cooper, Viola Cooper, Dr. Elizabeth Davis-Russell, James Dongboi, Moses Dowee, Sheila Durant, Harrison Flomo, Honorable Melita Gardiner, Alice Garmo, Fairnoh Theo Gbilah, Honorable Lucia Herbert, Dr. Robert Hill, Dr. Joseph Isaac, Honorable Ranney B. Jackson, Sr., George Kaicora, Luana Kiandoli, Charles King, Morris Koffa, Augustine M. Kollie, Calvin Kollie, William Kollie, Seimon Kollie, Jacob Manyongar, Honorable Selena Mappy, Nathanial Massaquoi, Honorable John McDonough, Senator (Ret.) Michael Bowen Mitchell, Darrell Mobley, Dr. Harriet Nettles, Mindy Nitsch, Biah Kun Nkanda, Martin Nyeka, Dr. Francis Obiazi, Dorothy Nyema Oye, Sharon R. Pinder, Anthony Robinson, Solomon S. Smith, Amos Sackie, Honorable Regina W. Sampson, Cyrus Sneh, Shelonda Stokes, Honorable Alfred T. Thompson, Tabie Thompson, Dr. Ian Wachekwa, Honorable Ester C. Worbey, Victor N. B. Walker, Nancy P. Wallace, Dr. Robert L. Wallace, G. Nyema Wisner, John Weah, Abraham Wilson, Anna Yankova. 52
  • Acknowledgements Milwaukee, Wisconsin - uMhlathuze, South Africa Alderman Joe Davis, Sr., Magugu Davis, Zamo Gwala, Sebelo Hlela, Steve Mahan, South Africa Ambassador Nomvume Magaqa, Neville Matjie, Mayor Elphas Mbatha, Former Mayor Zakhele Mnqayi, Former Chicago South Africa Consul General Yusuf Omar, United Sates Consul General Taylor Ruggles,Wallace White. Milwaukee County, Wisconsin - Buffalo City, South Africa Mark Anderson, Terrence Cooley, Marina Dimitrijevic, Darby Gounden, Lee Holloway, Michael Mayo, Sr., Emily Schmidlkofer, Kitty Shekoski. Oakland, California - Sekondi-Takoradi, Ghana Isaac Aidoo, Joseph B. Acquaye, Nana Kwamina Ahinkofi IV, Mohammed B. Ali, Frank Gershon Alorka, Charles E. Arhizi, Elizabeth Arthur, Isaac Asare, Natalie Bayton, Gail Berkley-Armstrong, Brenda Brumfield-Ross, Hon. Captain Anthony Cudjoe (Rtd.), Georgina Danso-Gyan, Anthony M. Hayford, Paula E. Kirkendoll, Aziz Mahmoud, Jacob A. Ntiamoah, Maxwell Obeng-Mensah, Nina Tanner-Smith, Fredonia Thompson, Abdulai Zakari. Richmond, Virginia - Segou, Mali Moussa Ballo, Moutian Coulibaly, Mme Kadiatou S. Diao, Ana Edwards, Djibril Guisse, Boubacar Keita, Namory Keita, Allan Levenberg, Bassirou Minta, Dr. Michelle Poulton, Dr. Robin Poulton, Mahamadou Sangare, Abdoulaye Sidibe, Madani Sissoko, My Lan Tran, Dana Wiggins. Riverside, California - Obuasi, Ghana Lalit N. Acharya, John Alexander Ackon, Robert Airhart, Osei Amo- Mensah, Thomas Annan, Jalani Bakari, Frank Boateng, Nana Yaw Boateng, Lisa Brown, Dr. Lawrence Geraty, Ambrose Gyable, Whiskey Hamenoo, Larry Krepps, Daryl Lee, Ronald Loveridge, Vincent Moses, Karin Roberts, Emmanuel Wilson Sey, Cate Whitmore. Seattle, Washington - Mombasa, Kenya Jasawna Bowen, Dr. Chidagaya, Matilda Fatuma, Russell Hebert, Dr. Robin Jones, Oscar Jones, Pastor Charity Kamau, Winni Kasayo, Martine Katana, Amos Lewa, Alice Maitha, Esther Masika, Mika Omorro, Sister Emily Mwaringa, Joshua Mwavita, Rachel Ndawa, Rose Ngowa, Hussein Omar, Dr. Millie Russell, Kim Scott, Winnie Shehe, Eric Shume, John Thoya, Tubmun Otieno, Wahida Omar Mohamed, Tata Weaver, Tammy Wilson. St. Louis, Missouri - Saint Louis, Senegal Dr. Amadou Lamine Ba, El Hadji Goro Ba, Nafissatou Diagne Ba, Dr. Abdoulaye Barry, Charles Bryson, Momar Sourang Cisse, Oumar Diagne, M. Diallo, Cheikh Mamadou Abiboulaye Dieye, Dr. Mawdo Dieye, Aime Cesaire Diompy, Amadou Diop, Babacar Fall Diop, Birahim Diop (deceased), Maimouna Diop, Lala Diouri, Amadou Fall, Latyr Fall, Magette Faye, Renee Franklin, Dr. Abdoukarim Gueye, Dr. Nanette Hegamin, Dr. Ibrahima Malick Ndao, Abdoulaye Ndiaye, Arona Ndiaye, Mamadou Ndoye (deceased), Mary Teuw Niane, Mamadou Niang, Florence Pullen, Ndieme Sene, Diop Mame Seye (deceased), Magueye Siby, Dr. Robert Smith, Ameth Ian Sow, Dr. Wilmetta Tolver-Diallo, Marcel de Tovi, Clayvon Wesley, Dr. John Wright. Sonoma, California - Aswan, Egypt Farrel Beddome, Bill Boerum, Shymaa Alla El-Deen, Sherri Ferris, Soad Thabet Karmy, George McKale, Magdy Mohamed Rabie. Toledo, Ohio - Tanga, Tanzania Frances Amison, Norman Bell, Althalene Harrison, Leslie Henriquez , Charles Hozza, Wellington Kamala, Norma King, Margaret Ruhinda, Julius Shoo. Urbana, Illinois - Zomba, Malawi Fatima Bhima-Naliwa, Merle Bowen, Umar Chilumpha, Alick Chima, Elizabeth Chingayipe, Busta Chiona Rebecca Cortright, Mike Dalious, Katjia Dietrich, Ian Dolozi, Scotty Dossett, Terri Gitler, Joseph Gwara, Tholani Hlongwa, Carol Inskeep, Allan Kagan, Charles Kalemba, Rogers Kaunda, James Kilgore, Gerri Kirchner, Stephen Koop, Chelsea Krieger, Martin Kumbani, Jamie McGowan, Margret Miller, Mussa Mwale, Fred Nankuyu, Lazerous Nantakanya, Ludoviko Naphiyo, Gomezgani Nysulu, Dickson Vuwa Phiri, Mayor Laurel Lunt Prussing, Marcia Richards, Dennis Roberts, Barb Sartin, Sam Smith, Chris Stohr, Kadeon Thomas. Wilmington, Delaware - Osogbo, Nigeria Nurudeen Adeagbo, Prof. C.W. Adegoke, Remi Adegoke, M. Tella Adeniran, Dr. O.O Adenle, Dr. Oladapo Adetoro, Sijuwade Morisade Adeyemi, Dr. J. A. Agboola, J. A. Akinlade, Adetoyese Shitu Alamu, Dr. Oluseyi Atanda, S.O. Aworeni, S.S. Bankole, Yetunde Bolaji, Chief J.B. Buraimoh, Wallace Bohanan, John Byrne, Brit Castaneda, Alhaja. S. A. Daodu, Oyebimpe Oye Davis, Joseph DiPinto, Rainer Doost, Babatunde Durosomo, Dr. Tunde Durosomo, Ratus Fischer, Carroll Hughes, Azzez Ibrahim, Dr. K. Lawal, Alhaji Raji Mufutau, Pade Odedele, Arch. Bamedele Ojo, Arch. Bamidele Ojo, Dr. Femi Oladimeji, Alhaji Olaiya, Hassan O. Olayiwola, Silifat Omotoso, Oyebimpe Oyelami, Olalere Oyeyemi, Alhaji Muraina Salami, Dennis Sheer, Valeria Watson-Doost. Sister Cities International Godwin Amar, Tom Connolly, Jim Doumas, Lorna K. Johnson, Adam Kaplan, Dace Mahanay, Grace Isis Ocansey, Albertina Omaboe, Bonnie Walters, Amena Zaman, Africa Global Sister Cities Foundation, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Eastern Africa Sister Cities Foundation, Sister Cities Africa. 53
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