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History of pi
History of pi
History of pi
History of pi
History of pi
History of pi
History of pi
History of pi
History of pi
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History of pi

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  • 1. PiA Brief History
  • 2. History of pi ( ) Pi is a very old number. We know that the Egyptians andthe Babylonians knew about the existence of the constantratio pi, although they didnt know its value nearly as well as we do today. They had figured out that it was a littlebigger than 3; the Babylonians had an approximation of 3 1/8 (3.125), and the Egyptians had a somewhat worse approximation of 4*(8/9)^2 (about 3.160484), which is slightly less accurate and much harder to work with.
  • 3. Why pi?Pi (rather than some other Greek letter likeAlpha or Omega) was chosen as the letter to represent the number 3.141592... because the letter [ ] in Greek, pronounced like our letter p, stands for perimeter.
  • 4. Brief History of Pi
  • 5. What is ? The ratio of thecircumference of a circle to its Circumference diameter. diameter
  • 6. 3.14 and Beyond…3. 141592653589793238462643383279502884197169399375105820974944592307816406286208998628034825342117067982148086513282306647093844609550582231725359408128481117450284102701938521105559644622948954930381964428810975665933446128475648233786783165271201909145648566923460348610454326648213393607260249141273724587006606315588174881520920962829254091715364367892590360011330530548820466521384146951941511609433057270365759591953092186117381932611793105118548074462379962749567351885752724891227938183011949129833673362440656643086021394946395224737 The numbers to190702179860943702770539217176293176752384674818467669405132000568127145263560827785771342757789609173637178721468440901224953430146549585371050792279689258923542019956112129021960 the right of the 3864034418159813629774771309960518707211349999998372978049951059731732816096318595024459455346908302642522308253344685035261931188171010003137838752886587533208381420617177669147303 never repeat in a598253490428755468731159562863882353787593751957781857780532171226806613001927876611195909216420198938095257201065485863278865936153381827968230301952035301852968995773622599413891 pattern.249721775283479131515574857242454150695950829533116861727855889075098381754637464939319255060400927701671139009848824012858361603563707660104710181942955596198946767837449448255379774726847104047534646208046684259069491293313677028989152104752162056966024058038150193511253382430035587640247496473263914199272604269922796782354781636009341721641219924586315030286182974555706749838505494588586926995690927210797509302955321165344987202755960236480665499119881834797753566369807426542527862551818417574672890977772793800081647060016145249192173217214772350141441973568548161361157352552133475741849468438523323907394143334547762416862518983569485562099219222184272550254256887671790494601653466804988627232791786085784383
  • 7. Fun Facts aboutHiroyuki Goto, 21, the current world recordholder for the most digits of Pimemorized, required over nine hours to recite42000+ digitsThe modern symbol for pi was first used in ourmodern sense in 1706 by William JonesPi Day is celebrated on March 14th
  • 8. Humor
  • 9. “Probably no symbol in mathematics has evoked as muchmystery, romanticism, misconc eption and human interest as the number pi.” William L. Schaaf, Nature and History of Pi

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