Behaviorism<br />By: Amanda <br />Catherine <br />Jessica<br />Tabitha <br />Ashley<br />
What is Behaviorism?<br />The Theory that states:<br />There is not an internal cognitive processing of information when l...
Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936)<br />Discovered classic conditioning<br />The natural reflex which occurs in response to a stimulu...
B.F. Skinner (1904-1990)<br />Discovered operant conditioning<br />Learning is controlled and behavior is shaped through s...
Albert Bandura(1925-present)<br />Discovered the Social Cognitive Theory aka social learning<br />Self-regulation and moti...
A Teacher’s Role in Behaviorism<br />Teachers can mold their students behavior based on the theories of classic conditioni...
Behavior can be encouraged and discouraged based on the positive or negative reward a teacher gives a student.
Also, teachers are to be a role model for students as students will be mimicking their behavior(observational modeling).
A teacher can model the use of technology such as a new software or computer program for all students to see, and the stud...
Another example would be the teacher modeling a new technological device and showing the kids how to use it and then letti...
How Do Students Use the Behaviorism Theory While Using Technology?<br />Below are some examples of how a student uses this...
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Behaviorism EME Module 13

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Behaviorism EME Module 13

  1. 1. Behaviorism<br />By: Amanda <br />Catherine <br />Jessica<br />Tabitha <br />Ashley<br />
  2. 2. What is Behaviorism?<br />The Theory that states:<br />There is not an internal cognitive processing of information when learning<br />There is no difference between a human and an animal<br />Animals and humans learn to behave through a series of positive and negative rewards<br />
  3. 3. Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936)<br />Discovered classic conditioning<br />The natural reflex which occurs in response to a stimulus. <br />His experiment:<br />Provided dogs with a stimulus (food) and rang a bell at the same time<br />Dogs eventually associated the bell with the food and salivated to the sound of a bell even when food was no longer provided<br />
  4. 4. B.F. Skinner (1904-1990)<br />Discovered operant conditioning<br />Learning is controlled and behavior is shaped through stimulus-response patterns<br />His experiment:<br />Rewarded pigeons when they performed desired behavior<br />When they did a certain behavior it was a stimulus and the response was the food rewarded<br />Found that reinforcement was a powerful motivator<br />
  5. 5. Albert Bandura(1925-present)<br />Discovered the Social Cognitive Theory aka social learning<br />Self-regulation and motivation cause people to act a certain way, not just the environment<br />Discovered observational modeling<br />Watching someone and then copying their behavior<br />Focused on Self-efficacy<br />Personal observation about your perceived ability to feel <br />
  6. 6. A Teacher’s Role in Behaviorism<br />Teachers can mold their students behavior based on the theories of classic conditioning, operant conditioning, and social learning. <br /><ul><li>They can use these theories to enforce rules such as when the lights go off, everyone is to be quiet.
  7. 7. Behavior can be encouraged and discouraged based on the positive or negative reward a teacher gives a student.
  8. 8. Also, teachers are to be a role model for students as students will be mimicking their behavior(observational modeling).
  9. 9. A teacher can model the use of technology such as a new software or computer program for all students to see, and the students can copy his or her ways.
  10. 10. Another example would be the teacher modeling a new technological device and showing the kids how to use it and then letting them copy her actions and try it themselves.</li></li></ul><li>How Do Students Use the Behaviorism Theory Without Using Technology?<br />With the behaviorist theory children learn from positive or negative stimuli or feedback.<br />The students use this theory in multiple ways without technology..<br />A student raises their hand before speaking, so the teacher rewards the student with a piece of candy. This child has now learned that raising their hand to speak is a good thing behavior, and positive feedback will follow this action.<br />A student did a good deed and helped out a classmate, so the teacher gave the child a gold star on their chart. The student has now learned if they do good deeds, they will earn gold stars.<br />A student pushes another student over, so the teacher makes that child sit out of recess. The student has learned not to push their peers because the consequence is sitting out of recess.<br />
  11. 11. How Do Students Use the Behaviorism Theory While Using Technology?<br />Below are some examples of how a student uses this theory while using technology…<br />A student is taking a quiz on the computer. He/she answers the question correctly, so a smiley face appears and congratulates the student. Or the student answers incorrectly and a sad face appears, telling the child to try again.<br />The student has a button that they press every time they need assistance from the teacher, this notifies the teacher to come over and offer help. <br />
  12. 12. Relating to Our Own Teaching<br />We wouldn’t fully teach our classes according to the Behaviorist theory<br />Behaviorist classrooms rely only on reactive, not proactive, learning and leave no room for abstract thinking – only concrete answers. <br />We would however use Behaviorist concepts in our classrooms to help promote positive and fun learning experiences and games and for behavior modification processes. <br />
  13. 13. Relating to Our Own Teaching Continued…<br /><ul><li>Behavior Modification
  14. 14. Games and Positive Learning
  15. 15. Students who fully participate and answer questions correctly will receive positive reinforcement in the form of candy, prizes, points, etc.
  16. 16. Students who participate, but do not answer questions correctly will receive positive reinforcement in the form of praise for their efforts, but nothing else.
  17. 17. Students who do not participate at all will receive some form of negative punishment, such as taking away participation points.
  18. 18. Students who behave properly in classroom settings will receive positive reinforcement such as praise.
  19. 19. Students who misbehave in the classroom will receive negative reinforcement such as time out, not being able to play at centers, or receiving letters home. </li></li></ul><li>Credits<br />http://www.lifeatuni.com/academics/psych/abnormal-psych-01/bandura/bandurabio.php<br />http://faculty.weber.edu/pstewart/6030/6030.html<br />http://biolinguistic.yolasite.com/ape-primitive-man-and-child.php<br />Shelly, Gary, and Thomas Cashman. Intergrating Technology and Digital Media in the Classroom. 5th. Boston, MA: Shelly Cashman Series, 368-371. Print. <br />
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