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Much, Little, Many, Few, More, Less, Fewer
 

Much, Little, Many, Few, More, Less, Fewer

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Much, Little, Many, Few, More, Less, Fewe

Much, Little, Many, Few, More, Less, Fewe

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  • In slide 14, I'm afraid you have an incorrect use. It is never correct or acceptable, even in informal English, to say 'less computers'. Computers can be counted, so it should always be 'fewer computers'.
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    Much, Little, Many, Few, More, Less, Fewer Much, Little, Many, Few, More, Less, Fewer Presentation Transcript

    • M uch, l ittle, m any, f ew, m ore, l ess, f ewer
    • M uch, l ittle, m any, f ew, m ore, l ess, f ewer
      • Y ou use ‘much’ to talk about a large quantity of something, and ‘little’ to talk about a small quantity of something. You only use ‘much’ and ‘little’ with uncount nouns.
      • I haven’t got much time .
      • We’ve made little progress .
    • M uch, l ittle, m any, f ew, m ore, l ess, f ewer
      • Y ou use ‘many’ to talk about a large number of people or things, and ‘few’ to talk about a small number of people or things. You can only use ‘many’ and ‘few’ with plural count nouns.
      • He wrote many novels .
      • There were few visitors to our house.
    • M uch, l ittle, m any, f ew, m ore, l ess, f ewer
      • Y ou normally use ‘much’ in negative sentences and questions.
      • He did n’t speak much English.
      • Why have n’t I given much attention to this problem?
    • M uch, l ittle, m any, f ew, m ore, l ess, f ewer
      • I n affirmative sentences you do not use ‘much’, you use ‘a lot of’ or ‘plenty of’ instead. You can use them with both uncount nouns and plural nouns.
      • He demanded a lot of attention .
      • I make a lot of mistakes .
      • I have plenty of money .
    • M uch, l ittle, m any, f ew, m ore, l ess, f ewer
      • Note: You can use ‘so much’ and ‘too much’ in affirmative sentences.
      • She spends so much time there.
      • There is too much chance of error.
    • M uch, l ittle, m any, f ew, m ore, l ess, f ewer
      • Y ou use ‘so much’ to emphasize that a large quantity of something is involved.
      • I have so much work to do.
      • They have so much money .
    • M uch, l ittle, m any, f ew, m ore, l ess, f ewer
      • Y ou use ‘too much’ and ‘too many’ to say that the quantity of something, or the number of people or things, is larger than is reasonable or necessary.
      • He has too much work .
      • Too many people still smoke.
    • M uch, l ittle, m any, f ew, m ore, l ess, f ewer
      • Y ou use ‘very many’ to emphasize that a large number of people or things are involved.
      • Very many old people live alone.
      • Note: ‘Very much’ is used with nouns and verbs.
      • There isn’t very much time .
      • I liked it very much .
    • M uch, l ittle, m any, f ew, m ore, l ess, f ewer
      • Y ou use ‘few’ and ‘little’ to emphasize that only a small quantity of something or a small number of people or things are involved. They can be used with ‘very’ for greater emphasis.
      • The town has few monuments .
      • I have little time for anything but work.
      • Very few cars had reversing lights.
      • I had very little money left.
    • M uch, l ittle, m any, f ew, m ore, l ess, f ewer
      • Note: ‘A few’ and ‘a little’ just indicate that a quantity or a number is small.
      • He spread a little honey on a slice of bread.
      • I usually do a few jobs for him in the house.
    • M uch, l ittle, m any, f ew, m ore, l ess, f ewer
      • Y ou use ‘more’ with uncount nouns and plural count nouns to refer to a quantity of something or a number of people or things that is greater than another quantity or number.
      • His visit might do more harm than good.
      • He does more hours than I do.
    • M uch, l ittle, m any, f ew, m ore, l ess, f ewer
      • Y ou use ‘less’ with uncount nouns to refer to an amount of something that is smaller than another amount.
      • The poor have less access to education.
      • This machinery uses less energy .
    • M uch, l ittle, m any, f ew, m ore, l ess, f ewer
      • Y ou use ‘fewer’, or ‘less’ in informal English, with plural nouns to refer to a number of people or things that is smaller than another number.
      • There are fewer trees here.
      • They have sold less computers this year.
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