• Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
2,787
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3

Actions

Shares
Downloads
51
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. I ndirect and R eported Q uestions
  • 2. I ndirect and R eported Q uestions
    • W hen you ask someone for information, you can use an indirect question beginning with a phrase such as ‘Could you tell me …’ or ‘Do you know …’.
    • Could you tell me how far it is to the bank?
    • Do you know where Jane is?
  • 3. I ndirect and R eported Q uestions
    • W hen you want to ask someone politely to do something, you can use an indirect question after ‘I wonder’.
    • I wonder if you can help me.
  • 4. I ndirect and R eported Q uestions
    • Y ou also use ‘I wonder’ followed by an indirect question to indicate what you are thinking about.
    • I wonder what she’ll look like.
    • I wonder which hotel it was.
  • 5. I ndirect and R eported Q uestions
    • W hen you are talking about a question that someone has asked, you use a reported question.
    • She asked me why I was so late .
    • He wanted to know where I was going .
    • I asked her if I could help her .
  • 6. I ndirect and R eported Q uestions
    • I n formal and written English, ‘enquire’ (also spelled ‘inquire’) is often used instead of ‘ask’.
    • William had enquired if she did a lot of acting .
    • He inquired whether he could see her .
  • 7. I ndirect and R eported Q uestions
    • I n indirect and reported questions, the subject of the question comes before the verb, just as it does in affirmative sentences.
    • Do you know where Jane is ?
    • I wonder if you can help me .
    • She asked me why I was late .
  • 8. I ndirect and R eported Q uestions
    • Y ou do not normally use the auxiliary ‘do’ in indirect or reported questions.
    • Can you remember when they open on Sundays?
    • I wonder what he feels about it.
    • She asked him if his parents spoke French.
  • 9. I ndirect and R eported Q uestions
    • T he auxiliary ‘do’ can be used in indirect or reported questions, but only for emphasis, or to make a contrast with something that has already been said. It is not put before the subject as in direct questions.
    • She asked me whether I really did mean it.
  • 10. I ndirect and R eported Q uestions
    • Y ou use ‘if’ or ‘whether’ to introduce indirect and reported ‘yes/no’-questions.
    • I wonder if you’d give the children a bath.
    • I am writing to ask whether you would could care to come and visit us.
  • 11. I ndirect and R eported Q uestions
    • ‘ W hether’ is used especially when there is a choice of possibilities.
    • I was asked whether I wanted to stay at a hotel or at his home.
    • They asked whether Tim was or was not in the team.
  • 12. I ndirect and R eported Q uestions
    • Note: You can put ‘or not’ immediately after ‘whether’, but not immediately after ‘if’.
    • The police asked whether or not they were in.
  • 13. I ndirect and R eported Q uestions
    • W hen you are asking a question, the verb in the reported clause is often in the past tense. This is because you are often talking about the past when you are reporting someone else’s words.
    • She asked me why I was too late.
    • Pat asked him if she had hurt him.
  • 14. I ndirect and R eported Q uestions
    • H owever, you can use a present or future tense if the question you are reporting relates to the present or future.
    • Mark was asking if you ’re enjoying your new job.
    • They asked if you ’ll be there tomorrow night.
  • 15. Q uestions? For more slide presentations visit: