Comparatives and Superlatives: Forms

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Comparatives and superlativess: forms

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Comparatives and Superlatives: Forms

  1. 1. Comparatives and Superlatives: Forms
  2. 2. Comparatives and Superlatives: Forms You add ‘-er’ for the comparative form and ‘- est’ for the superlative form of one-syllable adjectives and adverbs. If they end in ‘-e’ you add ‘-r’ and ‘-st’ cheap - cheaper - cheapest safe - safer - safest
  3. 3. Comparatives and Superlatives: Forms cold light rough young large fast poor small nice hard quick weak close wide They worked harder. I’ve found a nicer hotel.
  4. 4. Comparatives and Superlatives: Forms If they end in a single vowel and consonant (except ‘-w’), you double the consonant. big - bigger - biggest fat hot sad thin wet The day grew hotter. Henry was the biggest of them.
  5. 5. Comparatives and Superlatives: Forms With two syllable adjectives ending in a consonant followed by ‘-y’, you change the ‘-y’ to ‘-i’ and add ‘-er’ and ‘-est’. happy - happier - happiest angry dirty friendly heavy silly busy easy funny lucky
  6. 6. Comparatives and Superlatives: Forms It couldn’t be easier. That is the funniest bit of the film.
  7. 7. Comparatives and Superlatives: Forms You use ‘more’ for the comparative and ‘most’ for the superlative of most two-syllable adjectives, all longer adjectives, and adverbs ending in ‘-ly’. careful - more careful - most careful beautiful - more beautiful - most beautiful seriously - more seriously - most seriously
  8. 8. Comparatives and Superlatives: Forms Be more careful next time. They are the most beautiful gardens in the world. It affected Clive most seriously. Note: For ‘early’ as an adjective or adverb, you use ‘ealier’ and ‘earliest’, not ‘more’ and ‘most’.
  9. 9. Comparatives and Superlatives: Forms With some common two-syllable adjectives and adverbs, you can either add ‘-er’ and ‘-est’, or use ‘more’ and ‘most’. common gentle likely pleasant simple cruel handsome narrow polite stupid
  10. 10. Comparatives and Superlatives: Forms Note: ‘Clever’ and ‘quiet’ only add ‘-er’ and ‘- est’. It was quieter outside. He was the cleverest man I ever met.
  11. 11. Comparatives and Superlatives: Forms You normally use ‘the’ with superlative adjectives in front of nouns, but you can omit ‘the’ after a link verb. It was the happiest day of my life. It was one of the most important discoveries. I was the happiest when I was on my own.
  12. 12. Comparatives and Superlatives: Forms Warning: When ‘most’ is used without ‘the’ in front of adjectives and adverbs, it often means almost the same as ‘very’. This book was most interesting. I object most strongly.
  13. 13. Comparatives and Superlatives: Forms A few common adjectives and adverbs have irregular comparative and superlative forms. good/well - better - best bad/badly - worse - worst far - farther/further - farthest/furthest old - older/elder - oldest/eldest
  14. 14. Comparatives and Superlatives: Forms Note: You use ‘elder’ or ‘eldest’ to say which brother, sister, or child in a family you mean. Our eldest daughter couldn’t come.
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