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Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK 2013

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Social collaboration is way more than a classic IT project! If proof were needed, then this study provides it. The cultural and organizational environment is key to the success of corresponding ...

Social collaboration is way more than a classic IT project! If proof were needed, then this study provides it. The cultural and organizational environment is key to the success of corresponding initiatives that in many cases are initiated, coordinated, and financed by the divisions or top-level management and only rarely by internal IT. Divisions in the UK have a pioneering position in this context – but not only because they are more open to networking applications, but also because the environment is right. Here rules for the use of networking services are established, employees have a high level of autonomy, and management plays an active role.

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Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK 2013 Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK 2013 Presentation Transcript

  • © PACSocial Collaboration in Germany,France, and the UK 2013Perspectives from the divisionsMay 2013
  • © PACSponsorsMay 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK2The production and distribution of this study was supported financially by:Atos SE, Beck et al. Services GmbH, SQLI Group and T-Systems International GmbHPremium sponsors:Gold sponsor: Silver sponsor:
  • © PACTable of contentsI.  Introduction●  Background to the study 4●  Executive summary 9●  Key results for the United Kingdom 11II.  Detailed results●  Starting position: Need for action on entry topics for social collaboration? 12●  Status quo: Status of implementation and barriers 21●  Strategies: Requirements, role of external services, implementation and platform strategies 34●  Decisions and budgets: Initiators, decision-makers, budget centers 44III.  Conclusions●  Social collaboration in Europe: Conclusion by Dr. Andreas Stiehler, lead analyst of the study 53●  Social collaboration in United Kingdom: Conclusion by Philip Carnelley, Principal ConsultantPAC UK 54●  Social collaboration in Germany: Conclusion by Nicole Dufft, SVP PAC Germany 55●  Social collaboration in France: Conclusion by Olivier Rafal, Principal Analyst PAC France 56IV.  Company profiles of the premium and gold sponsors●  Atos 58●  Beck et al. Services 59●  T-Systems 60V.  Appendix●  Disclaimer, usage rights, independence and data protection 65●  About PAC 66May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK3 View slide
  • © PACI. Introduction: Background to thestudy and executive summary View slide
  • © PACSocial collaboration is becoming a hot topic5Customer experienceSocial CollaborationCloudProcess AutomationUCC•  “Collaboration” is increasingly becoming a productivity driver – in particular in divisions with ahigh proportion of knowledge work(ers) such as marketing, sales, IT, HR, and R&D.•  Social networking applications – if used and integrated properly – can help to boost the efficiencyand effectiveness of collaboration, which improves process flows.Consumerization,Generation Y, hype aroundFacebook, Twitter etc.Digital transformation, servicing,virtual value-creation networks,integrated offers...Knowledge society,war for talents, openinnovationDivisionsneed to actMay 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK
  • © PACIn this study social collaboration is defined as:•  Concepts and technologies for better networking employees, customers, and partners.•  The aim of social collaboration is to foster cooperation and improve communication flows and businessprocesses.Study as a reality checkSocialcollaboration1.Startingposition2.Status quo3.Strategies4.Decisions &budgets6 May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK
  • © PACInformation from persons in charge of divisionswith a high proportion of knowledge work(ers)7In February and March 2013 253 persons in charge of divisions from companies with more than 500employees in Germany, France, and the United Kingdom were surveyed by telephone.May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK18%43%11%22%6%ITHRMarketing/PRR&DSalesComposition of the sampleby division©PAC2013Shareinpercentageofallcompanies,n=25358%42%Heads of Department/CxOsExecutives in charge (of social collaboration)within the divisionsComposition of the sampleby position of person in charge of division©PAC2013Shareinpercentageofallcompanies,n=253
  • © PAC50%23%26%GermanyFranceUnited KingdomComposition of the sampleby country©PAC2013Shareinpercentageofallcompanies,n=253Study enables country-specific characteristicsto be analyzed8The results were weighted so that the statements provided a representative picture of allcompanies in the respective countries (by sector group and size class).May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK38%49%14%500 999 employees1,000 4,999 employees5,000 employees and moreComposition of the sampleby local employee numbers©PAC2013Shareinpercentageofallcompanies,n=253
  • © PACExecutive summaryThe most important outcomes at a glance9 May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UKThe demand for external service providers is large – across all project phases!Many divisions consider support by external service providers to be important not only in integration,but also in planning and operation. For example, one in five classifies the external support in thedefinition of a social collaboration strategy as very significant.Many social collaboration initiatives have been launched, but many are still at an early stage.• However, one in four divisions has already realized projects in part or in full.• A third of respondents report that they have projects in the testing or planning phase.• The United Kingdom is the pioneering country and Germany lags behind when it comes to implementation.Public social networking services have established themselves in everyday business life.However, so far they have merely been tolerated for the most part, but not usually promoted orintegrated into the implementation of social collaboration. Also, it is common for bans to be in place.In 31% of divisions, for example, the use of microblogging services such as Twitter is forbidden.Interest in social collaboration is fuelled by various topics.The outcomes show a wide spectrum of entry topics for social collaboration, the relevance of whichvaries greatly from country to country.In many cases an open communication culture exists but is not enough!In particular, the autonomy and flexibility of the employees required for effective networking isfrequently lacking. In many cases there are no rules for networking. Ultimately three quarters ofrespondents regret that there is not more active management involvement.
  • © PACExecutive summaryThe most important outcomes at a glance10 May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UKStrategic and cross-divisional planning? Far from it in many cases!Only around half of social collaboration projects in Germany and France are planned according to along-term strategy, as opposed to 75% of projects in the UK. That said, around 60% of projects inGermany, France, and the UK are realized today on a cross-divisional basis.Security concerns are the biggest barriers for social collaboration.Three quarters of divisions have concerns regarding data security and almost half fear an outflow ofcorporate knowledge! Conversely only a few respondents consider no recognizable added-value orlack of acceptance amongst employees to be an obstacle.For two thirds of persons in charge of divisions, a dedicated security concept is a must-have!For many persons in charge of divisions, capabilities for data analysis, integration with contentmanagement and communication applications, and mobile deployment are essential for theimplementation of social collaboration.Social collaboration is not initiated, coordinated, and financed as an IT project.More than three quarters of social collaboration projects were set up at the initiative of the divisionsor top-level management, who as a rule also act as the main points of contacts and sponsors.Internal IT generally plays just a marginal role.The divisions use different approaches for technical realization.More than 40% of divisions – including a disproportionately large number from Germany – usevarious individual applications. A similarly high proportion only use the social collaboration functions ofexisting process, groupware, ECM, or UCC applications. Only one in seven divisions opts for anintegrated social collaboration platform for realization.
  • © PACKey results for the United Kingdom…and notable differences with Germany and France11 May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK•  In the UK, 38% of surveyed organizations are past the pilot/planning stage and running orimplementing social collaboration projects.•  This is considerably higher than elsewhere in Europe.•  But 44% have yet to even start considering a project, so there is much more to come.•  In the UK, the two primary drivers for social collaboration projects are business-led:-  To improve time-to-market-  To improve customer relations/customer service•  Other countries are focusing on inward-facing goals such as employee engagement.These all indicate a more mature market outlook in the UK. Suppliers should understand the morecompetitive and sophisticated landscape that they are selling into.75% of UK social collaboration projects are part of a long-term strategy with high managementcommitment.
  • © PACII. Survey results:Starting position, status quo, strategies,decisions, and budgets
  • © PACFrequently-used abbreviations in thefollowing analysis13• SC for social collaboration• Div. for division• DE for Germany• FR for France• UK for United KingdomMay 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK
  • © PACStarting position: Need for action on entrytopics for social collaboration
  • © PACInterest in social collaboration is fostered byvarious topics•  Improving customerrelationships (50%)•  Promoting interdisciplinarynetworking (49%)•  Improving collaborationamongst dispersed teams(43%)•  More efficient coordination oftasks and activities (51%)•  Improving resource/projectmanagement (49%)•  Making it easier to provide, share,and find documents and content(52%)•  Identitying experts/knowledgemore quickly (52%)•  Exploiting innovation potential(53%)•  Shortening time for problemresolutions (53%)•  Promoting employee integrationand commitment (51%)Ability toinnovateProductivityNetworkingManagement15 May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UKIn parentheses: % ofdivisions that report a highor very high need to act forthese topicsTop ten fields of activity in DE, FR, and UK
  • © PAC2441372747442414241017142535331932329961691416252730262371821161317Reduce e mail traffic........................................................Improve management ofresources and projects........................................................Make it easier to provide, shareand find documents and content........................................................Make the division moreattractive for employees........................................................Identify more quicklyexperts and know howwithin the company........................................................More efficient coordinationof tasks and activities0 20 40 60 0 20 40 60 0 20 40 60Germany United Kingdom FranceVery high need for action High need for actionShare (weighted) in percentage of all companies, n = 253©PAC2013How high is the need for action in your division with regard to the following objectives?The relevance of typical entry topics for socialcollaboration varies from country to country16 May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UKSelected examples of the different relevance of topics by country of originNote:•  Reducing e-mailtraffic, the rapididentification ofexperts, or theefficientcoordination oftasks areparticularly relevantin Germany as SCtopics.•  The attractivenessof the divs. for theemployees is anissue above all in inFR!
  • © PACIn Germany process efficiency andnetworking are right at the top of the agenda17Shorten time forproblem resolutions/time-to-marketIdentify experts andknowledge in thecompany more quickly64% of divisions in Germany reporthigh or very high need for action inrespect of this topic61% 59%Support theinterdisciplinarynetworking of peoplefrom different divs.More efficientcoordination oftasks and activities57%Make it easier toprovide, share,and finddocuments andcontent56%May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UKTop five fields of activity in DE
  • © PACBetter exploit theinnovative potentialof the divisionTime-to-market and customer service have toppriority in the UK18Shorten time forproblem resolutions /time-to-market54% of divisions in the UnitedKingdom report high or very high need foraction in respect of this topic51% 50%More efficientcoordination of tasksand activitiesPromote integrationand commitment ofemployees47%Improvecustomerrelationships /customer service47%May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UKTop five fields of activity in the UK
  • © PACMake the divisionmore attractive foremployees19Promote integrationand commitment ofemployees51% of divisions in France report highor very high need for action in respect ofthis topic51% 48%Improve customerrelations / customerserviceMake it easier toprovide, share, andfind documents andcontent46%Better exploit theinnovativepotential of thedivision46%May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UKTop five fields of activity in FRIn France the integration and motivation of theemployees play an important role
  • © PACInterim conclusionKey statements at a glance20The study outcomes provide evidence of the wide spectrum of entry topics for socialcollaboration initiatives. For example, around half of persons in charge of divisions citehigh or very high need for action for topics such as• Better exploitation of innovative potential (52%)• Promotion of the integration and commitment of employees (51%)• Promotion of the interdisciplinary networking of various divisions (49%)• Making it easier to provide, share, and find documents and content (52%)• Identifying experts/knowledge more easily (52%)• More rapid problem solutions/time-to-market (53%)The relevance of typical entry topics for social collaboration varies from country tocountry• In Germany opportunities for increasing process efficiency and supporting networkedcollaboration are sought after. There is an above-average emphasis on topics such asreducing e-mail traffic or the shared processing of documents.• Divisions in the UK, on the other hand, focus particularly on the need for improvingcustomer service and a faster time-to-market.• In turn, French respondents ascribe comparatively high weight to employeecommitment and the attractiveness of the division for employees.May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UKStartingposition
  • © PACStatus quo: Status of implementation and barriers
  • © PAC222120111511We have gained no experiencesin this area...........................................................Some employees have been experimenting with this on own initiative...........................................................Some pilot projects havealready been launched...........................................................The planning and testing phaseis about to be completed...........................................................Social collaboration isalready partly being used...........................................................Social collaboration hascompletely been implemented.0 10 20 30Share (weighted) in percentage of all companies, n = 253©PAC2013Which of the statements best describesthe experiences your division hasgained with social collaboration?Many companies have launched socialcollaboration initiatives, but most are still at anearly stage22 May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK•  Around 40% of divs.do not yet have anyconcrete initiatives•  A third ofrespondents reportedthat projects werebeing tested or werein planning•  Around a fourth ofcompanies havealready implementedprojects in full or inpart.
  • © PACThe UK is at the forefront of social collaborationinitiatives – in DE and FR many projects are stillin the testing or planning phase23Nosocial collaborationprojects to dateSocial collaborationprojects in thepilot or planningphaseSocial collaborationprojects partly orfully implementedDE: 21%FR: 27%UK: 38%UK: 18%DE: 33%FR: 36%FR: 39%UK: 44%DE: 46%May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK
  • © PAC27313327362630262626242015141313149Technological solutionQualification of employeesOrganizational requirementsPlanning and conceptionAcceptance among employeesCorporate culture orientedtowards social collaboration.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................0 20 40 60 80Share (weighted) in percentage of all companies, n = 253Completely available Mainly available Partly availableTo what extent is your division well equipped for theimplementation of social collaboration strategies today?©PAC2013Only a minority of divisions consider themselvesto be fully equipped for social collaboration24But:fewer than 30% ofrespondents considertheir corporate cultureto be predominantlysuited to socialcollaboration!May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UKNonetheless:Around 40% of divs.consider themselvesto be well-equippedfor socialcollaboration intechnical andorganizational terms.
  • © PACSocial collaboration culture:in France yes, in Germany no?!2511% of divisions in Germany39% of divisions in the United Kingdom55% of divisions in France•  Respondents inDE also showedthemselves to bemore self-criticalwhen it came toother factors.•  The pioneeringrole of FR on thetopic of culture isrelativized withfurther observations(see followinganalyses).May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK“Our corporate cultureis partly orpredominantly orientedtoward socialcollaboration”
  • © PAC40282812653518151414112253023284151514282526We have a culture of opencommunication and feedback..............................................................We established rules for socialnetworking within our company..............................................................We established rules forsocial networking via publicnetwork services..............................................................Our employees can largelydetermine for themselves how andvia what applications they network..............................................................Our employees can largelydetermine for themselves whereand when they work..............................................................Our management actively usessocial networking applications.80 60 40 20 0 20 40 60 80Share (weighted) in percentage of all companies, n = 253Does not apply at allDoes rather not applyCompletely appliesRather appliesHow do you rate the following statementson the organizational and cultural environment?©PAC2013An open communication culture in itself is notenough!26…two thirds of persons incharge of divisions regretthat there is not moreactive managementinvolvement!Critical: Theautonomy andflexibility ofemployees neededfor theimplementation ofsocial collaborationis not currentlygiven in mostdivisions and...May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK
  • © PAC•  Exemplary: Thepioneering position of theUK is particularly clear interms of managementcommitment.•  Note: The UK is also apioneer in implementingthe rules of socialcollaboration!The United Kingdom’s pioneering position isjustified!Evaluation: “Completely applies orrather applies”DE UK FRWe have a culture of open communicationand feedback76 80 66We established rules for social networkingwithin our company37 69 41We established rules for social networkingvia public network services37 69 34Our employees can largely determine forthemselves how and via what applicationsthey network.26 34 19Our employees can largely determine forthemselves where and when they work22 22 13Our management actively uses socialnetworking applications11 35 1127 May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UKFor topics such asopenness and autonomy,divisions in France displayroom for improvement.
  • © PAC31221818176493941313230163238424229Social networking servicesfor professionals suchas LinkedIn....................................................Microblogging servicessuch as TwitterSocial networking servicesdesigned for privateuse such as FacebookPublic services for storageand sharing of documentssuch as DropboxPublic communicationservices such as SkypePublic collaboration servicessuch as Basecamp................................................................................................................................................................................................................60 40 20 0 20 40 60 80Share (weighted) in percentage of all companies, n = 253Forbidden Tolerated EncouragedIs the professional use of public networkingservices by the employees of your divisioncurrently being encouraged, tolerated, or expressly forbidden?©PAC2013Public social networking services arecommonly tolerated, but rarely promoted!28Interesting: Half ofcompanies at leasttolerate Skype!Critical:•  One in six divisionsprohibits the use ofprofessionalnetworks such asLinkedIn!•  A third of divisionsprohibit theprofessional use ofTwitter.May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK
  • © PACDivisions in the UK also exhibit above-averageopenness when it comes to promoting publicnetwork services!Evaluation: “Promoted” DE UK FRSocial networks for professionals such asLinkedIn28 59 11Microblogging services such as Twitter 19 48 6Social networks for private use such asFacebook16 33 8Public services for storing or sharingdocuments such as Dropbox15 37 6Public communication services such asSkype14 31 12Public collaboration services such asFacebook2 14 529Half of divisions in the UKpromote employeeengagement in publicnetworks such as Twitteror LinkedIn!Important!•  Divisions in the UK arenot only open aboutusing public networkservices,•  ...but they are alsopioneers when itcomes to setting upcorresponding rules!(cf. slide 27)May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK
  • © PAC2831222518162215352427141818126Concerns about data securityLegal concernsConcerns about outflowof corporate knowledgeAdditional workload anddistraction for employeesCorporate culture is notsuitable for social collaborationLack of support fromthe top level managementNo recognizable added valueLack of acceptance among employees..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................0 20 40 60 80Share (weighted) in percentage of all companies, n = 253Very big obstacle Big obstacleTo what extent are the following factors hampering theintroduction or implementation of social collaboration initiatives?©PAC2013A majority of the divisions recognizes theadded value, but has security concerns!30Interesting: For mostrespondents a “lack ofemployee acceptance”does not represent abarrier.May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UKCritical: Two thirdsof respondents haveconcerns regardingdata security andalmost half fear anoutflow of companyknowledge!
  • © PACBarriers: the “German anxiety” emergesin the case of social collaborationEvaluation: “Large or very largebarrier”DE UK FRConcerns about data security 72 50 57Legal concerns 52 70 49Fear of an outflow of corporate knowledge 56 38 46Additional workload and distraction ofemployees39 43 33Corporate culture is not suitable for socialcollaboration34 31 42Lack of support from top-levelmanagement30 33 43No recognizable added value 29 43 39Lack of acceptance among employees 16 22 2731Concerns about datasecurity represent thebiggest barrier for socialcollaboration both inGermany and in France.Note:•  Whilst decision-makers inDE stress securityissues, respondents in FRpoint to cultural barriers.•  In the “pioneering countryUK” there are pronounceddoubts about the addedvalue and concernsregarding additionalworkload of theemployees.May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK
  • © PACInterim conclusionKey statements at a glance32Just under 60% of divisions have already launched initial social collaborationinitiatives, but their implementation is often still at an early stage. Nonethelessprojects had been at least partly implemented in a quarter of divisions, and in a third theinitiatives are still in the planning phase. More than 40% of divisions have not yetlaunched any dedicated initiative in this field.Only a minority of divisions considers itself to be fully equipped for SC today. Inparticular, the autonomy and flexibility of the employees required for effective networkingis lacking. In many cases there are no rules for networking. Ultimately three quarters ofdivisional executives regret that there is not more active management involvement.Public networking services have already established themselves broadly in theeveryday business of the divisions. However, to date they have largely just beentolerated, but not usually promoted or integrated into the implementation of socialcollaboration. Further, many companies still deal with the topic using bans. For example,an eighth of divisions forbid the use of professional networks such as LinkedIn, and in athird Twitter use is expressly banned.Security concerns are today the biggest barrier to the implementation of socialcollaboration, alongside legal issues. Three quarters of respondents have concernsregarding data security and almost half fear an outflow of corporate knowledge!Conversely, no recognizable added value or a lack of acceptance among employees areless significant barriers.May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UKStatus quo
  • © PACInterim conclusionKey statements at a glance33The status quo varies greatly between the three countries!The United Kingdom has a clear pioneering position when it comes to the subject ofsocial collaboration: there 38% of divisions have already implemented projects in part orin full. Half the divisions also promote the professional use of public networks such asTwitter or LinkedIn. The environment is also right: more than two thirds of divisions haveset up rules for networking and in a third of companies management also actively usessocial networking applications.Germany is something of a straggler in comparison to the UK. Only 21% of divisionshave (partially) implemented projects to date. Also, when it comes to assessing theprerequisites the respondents are considerably more pessimistic than their colleagues inthe UK and France, although the environment really is not so negative on a closer look.However, the fear of the outflow of corporate knowledge and concerns about datasecurity are particularly pronounced.France ranks ahead of Germany in the implementation of social collaboration (26%). Yetthe analysis shows substantial room for improvement in the creation of an environmentamenable to social collaboration. In terms of “open communication culture“ andautonomy of the employees, French divisions rank substantially behind the UK andGermany. Finally, in the view of the French survey participants, cultural barriers pose acomparativey large obstacle to the realisation of social collaboration.May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UKStatus quo
  • © PACStrategies: Requirements, role of externalservices, implementation, and platform strategies
  • © PAC143241374548663632322317Dedicated securityconceptEvaluation and analysis ofdata from social networksIntegration with contentmanagement systemsUse on different devicesIntegration with processand business applicationsIntegration withcommunication applications.........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................0 20 40 60 80Share in percentage of all companies, n = 253Must have Nice to haveWhich requirements does your division consider a must have,which are nice to have, and which do you consider irrelevantwhen implementing social collaboration?©PAC2013A dedicated security concept is an absolute“must-have”35Two thirds ofpersons in chargeof divisionsconsider adedicated securityconcept to beessential for socialcollaboration!May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UKNote: Integration withcontent managementapplications isconsidered by manyto be more importantthan integration withprocess andcommunicationapplications.
  • © PACDivisions in DE haveabove-average demandson social collaboration,whereas people aremore relaxed in France.Different countries – different demandson social collaborationEvaluation: “Must-have” DE UK FRDedicated security concept 83 63 36Evaluation and analysis of data fromsocial networks39 62 9Integration with content managementsystems47 26 10Use on different devices 41 36 9Integration with process- and businessapplications35 10 10Integration with communicationapplications18 26 836Note:The analyses in the“pioneering country” ofthe UK indicate a growingsignificance of socialanalytics and theintegration of SC andcommunicationapplications.May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK
  • © PAC3229232028242619171619211214911Implementation andintegrationAnalysis of processesand potentialsUser training andcoachingDefinition of a socialcollaboration strategyTechnological planning andselection of solution componentsIdentification of thebusiness case/ROIOperationChange management........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................0 20 40 60Share (weighted) in percentage of all companies, n = 253Great importance Certain importanceHow important are external services when it comes to the implementationof collaboration initiatives in the following project phases?©PAC2013Note:Demand for externalsupport is significantacross all projectphases.Half of divisions opt for support from externalservice providers for social collaboration37A fifth of personsin charge ofdivisions considerexternal support tobe very significantfor strategydevelopment!May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK
  • © PACThe following analyses focus onstatements bycompanies with experience in thetopic of social collaboration.Only companies who have launchedat least initial pilot projects aroundsocial collaboration were questioned.Note!38 May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK
  • © PAC46%54%We tend to implement social collaboration tools ad hocand then we see how they are accepted.We have a comprehensive social collaboration strategy,which we implement step by step.Implementation strategy for social collaborationWhich statement rather applies to your company?©PAC2013Share(weighted)inpercentageofallcompanies,whichhavestartedfirstpilotprojectsonSocialCollaborationatleast,n=135Only half of divisions realize “social collaboration”on the basis of a holistic strategy39Not so in the UK! Whilst in DEand FR only around half ofdivisions (46% / 50%) have astrategic approach, in theUnited Kingdom more thanthree quarters have anunderlying holistic strategy!May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK
  • © PAC60%40%The planning and implementation of social collaborationtake place at company level/ are coordinated across divisions.The planning and implementation of social collaborationare carried out independently by individual departments.Implementation strategy for social collaborationWhich statement rather applies to your company?©PAC2013Share(weighted)inpercentageofallcompanies,whichhavestartedfirstpilotprojectsonSocialCollaborationatleast,n=142Nonetheless 60% of social collaborationinitiatives are realized across divisions!40The shares are distributedsimilarly across all threecountries.May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK
  • © PAC421814998Use of differentindividual toolsCRM or ERP solutionIntegrated socialcollaboration platformCommunication orUC solutionWorkflow or documentmanagement solutionGroupware solution.....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................0 10 20 30Share (weighted) in percentage of all companies, which havestarted first pilot projects on social collaboration at least, n = xxx©PAC2013What technological solution does your division preferablydeploy to implement social collaboration initiatives?Divisions use different approaches in thetechnical implementation of social collaboration41An integratedsocialcollaborationsuite is currentlyonly used in aroundone in sevenprojects.Note:More than 40% ofdivisions deploy theSC functions ofexisting solutionsin the ERP, CRM,UCC, groupware, orECM environment.May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK
  • © PACIn DE various individual applications are stillin use, whereas in FR and UK existing systems areextended in the main42Socialcollaborationfunctions ofexisting systems(ERP, CRM, ECM,UC, or groupwaresolution)Integrated socialcollaborationplatformUse of variousindividualapplications forsocial collaborationUK: 28%FR: 30%DE: 52%FR: 9%UK: 15%DE: 16%DE: 32%UK: 57%FR: 61%May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK
  • © PACInterim conclusionKey statements at a glance43From the perspective of the persons in charge of divisions, a dedicated security conceptis one of the basic requirements: two thirds consider it to be a “must-have” for socialcollaboration. In many cases opportunities for data analysis, integration with contentmanagement systems, and mobile use are also sought after. Half of those surveyedconsider the support of external service providers to be important n theimplementation of SC – and this is so across all project phases.More long-term-oriented, cross-divisional strategies have only establishedthemselves to a limited extent in the implementation of social collaboration initiatives.Only half of projects are strategically planned for the long term, although 60% arerealized across divisions. In terms of technical implementation individual applications arefrequently combined (42%), whereas integrated social collaboration suites are onlydeployed in one in seven projects. More than 40% of initiatives deploy the SC functionsof existing ERP, CRM, UCC, groupware, or ECM solutions.Divisions in the United Kingdom are pioneers in the implementation of socialcollaboration strategies with a long-term-orientation. They highlight in particular “socialanalytics” and integration with communication applications as must-haves.Divisions in Germany are particularly strict in terms of requirements – especially on thesubject of security, which over 80% classify as a “must-have”.Divisions in France are more relaxed about requirements. As in the UK, they are morelikely to use the functions of existing applications, whereas in DE individual socialcollaboration applications are combined more frequently.May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UKStrategies
  • © PACDecisions & budgets:Initiators, decision-makers, budget centers
  • © PAC353213118Our own division.............................................Top level management.............................................Other divisionInternal ITA dedicated person incharge of social collaboration..........................................................................................0 10 20 30 40Share (weighted) in percentage of all companies, which havestarted first pilot projects on social collaboration at least, n = 142©PAC2013Who initiated/initiates social collaboration?The initiative is usually set in motion by thedivision itself or top-level management45•  Note:The internal ITdepartment playsa minor role as theinitiator of socialcollaboration.•  A “Chief SocialCollaborationOfficer” (CSO)has to date beenestablished in onlya few companies.One in three socialcollaborationprojects today isinitiated by top-level managementMay 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK
  • © PACIn DE social collaboration initiatives are primarilyset in motion by the divisions; in France, by top-levelmanagement46The divisionitself oranotherdivisionFR: 48 %UK: 48%DE: 63%Top-levelmanagementInternal ITCSOA dedicatedperson (ordivision)responsiblefor SCDE: 22%UK: 39%FR: 45%DE: 10%FR: 12%UK: 13%UK: 0%DE: 4%FR: 22%May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK
  • © PAC372718881Our own division..................................................Top level management..................................................Internal IT..................................................Other divisionA dedicated person in chargeof social collaborationAn external services provider....................................................................................................0 10 20 30 40Share (weighted) in percentage of all companies, n = 240©PAC2013Who is/would be the main contact when itcomes to realizing social collaboration?Social collaboration is not usually realized asan IT project47Note:For only just under afifth of socialcollaborationinitiatives the internalIT department is thefirst point of contact!Interesting: For twothirds of projects thedivision itself or top-level managementacts as the first pointof contact.May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK
  • © PACNonetheless one in five SC projects in FRis coordinated by a CSO48The divisionitself oranotherdivisionFR: 31 %DE: 46%UK: 58%Top-levelmanagementInternal ITCSOA dedicatedperson (ordivision)responsiblefor SCDE: 25%UK: 26%FR: 35%UK: 13%FR: 15%DE: 23%UK: 4%DE: 4%FR: 19%May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK
  • © PAC6630151311Top level managementOur own divisionInternal ITOther divisionA dedicated person in chargeof social collaboration................................................................................................................................................................................................................0 20 40 60Share (weighted) in percentage of all companies, n = 148©PAC2013Who provides the budgets for social collaboration?Top-level management is the most importantsponsor of social collaboration initiatives49Top-levelmanagement actsas the sponsor intwo thirds of socialcollaborationinitiatives!•  Note: Multipleresponses to thisquestion werepossible.•  Note:Only 10% of SCprojects are (co-)funded from the ITbudget.•  For a tenth of SCprojects there isclearly adedicated SCbudget.May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK
  • © PACInitiatives in the UK are usually (co-)financed via thedivisional budget, in DE and FR this tends to be via othersponsors50The divisionitself oranotherdivisionFR: 29%DE: 36%UK: 77%Top-levelmanagementInternal ITCSOA dedicatedperson (ordivision)responsiblefor SCFR: 51%UK: 66%DE: 74%FR: 0%DE: 21%UK: 23%DE: 3%UK: 15%FR: 19%May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK
  • © PACInterim conclusionKey statements at a glance51Internal IT only plays a marginal role in most social collaboration initiatives. More thanthree quarters of projects in this field were initiated by the divisions or top-levelmanagement, who in most cases also act as the main points of contact andsponsors.In around 90% of social collaboration initiatives IT is neither the initiator, nor are theprojects funded from the IT budget. In just under 20% of projects IT acts as the mainpoint of contact.The role of “Chief Social Collaboration Officer” (CSO) is not yet widely established. ACSO acts as the initiator or main point of contact in fewer than 10% of projects. Theproportion of projects that are (co-)funded via a dedicated social collaboration budget issimilarly high.In the United Kingdom social collaboration projects are primarily initiated, coordinated,and funded by the divisions themselves.In Germany projects are also primarily initiated by the divisions. However, here internalIT still plays a relatively important role as the main point of contact, coordinating justunder a quarter of social collaboration projects.In France considerably more projects are initiated centrally and coordinated by top-levelmanagement as compared to the UK or Germany. Here the CSO appears to beconsiderably better established as initiator, coordinator, or budget center.May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UKDecisions &budgets
  • © PACIII. Conclusions: Analysts’ assessment
  • © PACSocial collaboration in DE, FR, UKConclusion by Dr. Andreas Stiehler, Principal Analyst at PAC andLead Analyst of the studySocial collaboration is way more than a classic IT project! If proof were needed, then this study provides it. The culturaland organizational environment is key to the success of corresponding initiatives that in many cases are initiated,coordinated, and financed by the divisions or top-level management and only rarely by internal IT. Divisions in the UKhave a pioneering position in this context – but not only because they are more open to networking applications, butalso because the environment is right. Here rules for the use of networking services are established, employees have ahigh level of autonomy, and management plays an active role.The high significance of the cultural and organizational environment can also be seen in the wide range of localcharacteristics identified in this study. These characteristics need to be taken seriously – both by the executives in therealization of local and international social collaboration projects and also service providers who need to address thistopic diferently in the various countries. Conversely, it is also worth looking beyond national borders to find approachesto more effective implementation. Thus, social collaboration in the UK already appears to be consideably moreadvanced than in the other two countries.However, the study also shows that IT is an essential component of social collaboration. More than 80% of divisionsconsider a dedicated security concept to be an absolute must-have, which is also true of data-analysis options for over60%. Integration with other IT applications is becoming ever more important. The CIO therefore does not need tomorph into a CSO, but does need to be at the table during the planning phase. For IT service providers it is becomingever more important to act as an intermediary between IT and business. Doing so offers them the opportunity to servicetheir customers as a strategic partner at the top end of the value-creation chain. The interaction between IT andbusiness – in my interpretation of the study outcomes – is the key to the success of social collaboration.53 May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK
  • © PACSocial Collaboration in the UKConclusion by Philip Carnelley, Principal Analyst at PAC UKMay 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK54The UK is a particularly enthusiastic adopter of social collaboration tools in the consumer space as well as business: ithas a considerably higher penetration of Facebook users, for example, than either France or Germany, and similarlywith Twitter and LinkedIn.Also, the UK is the number one target for US software vendors looking to launch overseas, for cultural reasonsincluding the common language, and perhaps in consequence is the largest country market in Europe for Enterprisesocial collaboration vendors like Salesforce (Chatter), Yammer, IBM/Lotus, as well as having indigenous suppliers likeHuddle (which has had particular success in UK Government, Sazneo (now Access) and more, giving supplier push aswell as market pull.Furthermore, UK organizations – private and public sector – have now had several years of real focus on driving outcost from IT operations, being by far the most enthusiastic of adopters of IT outsourcing across Europe. And, the moveto online commerce is well-advanced in the UK, too – online retail is growing strongly.Therefore, it is no surprise to see that the UK view the potential for social collaboration technologies in terms ofcustomer service and a faster time-to-market. Nor that the UK has a higher proportion of social collaboration projectspartly or fully implemented than other European countries. This, in our view, is a clear sign of a more mature marketthan other areas of Europe, and these results are encouraging news for those who wish to see wider adoption of socialcollaboration anywhere across Europe.However, there is no room for complacency, even in the UK. PAC has seen many collaboration initiatives wither on thevine due to waning interest and declining motivation to contribute, once the novelty has worn off. Attempts to driveparticipation against a wave of apathy just don’t work: self-motivation based on real and continued value forparticipants is a critical success factor. Ease of use is just table stakes in the age of Facebook and Twitter. Keepingpeople engaged is paramount
  • © PACSocial collaboration in GermanyConclusion by Nicole Dufft, Senior Vice President at PAC GermanyMay 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK55In this study Germany looks to be something of a straggler when it comes to the topic of social collaboration. Only onein five divisions in Germany reports that they have partly or fully implemented initiatives in this field. That is a pitybecause effective collaboration is essential, especially for German companies, many of whom cite knowledge as theirmost important strategic resource, and who act globally and make their living from their ability to innovate. The need foraction reported by German divisions in core topics such as “interdisciplinary networking”, “shared processing ofdocuments”, or “efficient task management” confirms this.The substantial skepticism of German divisions when assessing the environment is only partially justified. In terms of an“open communication culture” or employee autonomy, Germany companies have no need to be shy. Instead, the mostsignificant brakes are pronounced security concerns and, also connected, above-average demands on implementation.This “typically German” desire for perfection is definitely apparent in sub-topics. However, it is also dangerous because“social collaboration” needs to develop – it cannot be planned perfectly. Yet those who first wait and impose bans untilthe environment is perfect risk falling behind the competition.German companies need to open up further and proactively support this topic. Proactivity does not mean recklesslyopening the floodgates for networking, but strategically planning social collaboration initiatives, promoting the use ofcorresponding applications by employees in a targeted manner, defining rules, and integrating social networking intoprocesses both in technical and organisational terms. Management bears special responsibility in this respect. Yet it isnot enough just to initiate new initiatives or pilot projects: executives also need to actively use the new opportunitiesthemselves, that is to say: lead by example on social collaboration. The UK shows that this is possible and that it works.
  • © PACSocial Collaboration in FranceConclusion by Olivier Rafal, Principal Consultant at PAC FranceMay 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK56Given the figures of this study, France has no need to be ashamed: United Kingdom is much more advanced in terms ofdeployed solutions and projects, but France is the country where there are the most projects initiated. French peopleeven say they are willing to work collaboratively and underline the importance of corporate social collaboration as a wayto attract, motivate and retain talent within the company. But turning this will into reality is very complex. In France,impetus must come from the highest level of corporate hierarchy, whereas lack of CxOs implication is obvious. Forinstance, France is the most restrictive country regarding employees’ autonomy and use of social networks.However, French companies are well aware of these difficulties and the need for strong change management supportfrom external companies. This use of consulting is essential and must come at a very early stage, especially to helpidentify business objectives. If French companies indeed see social collaboration tools as a way to foster innovation,they do not know exactly what to ask from them – if not a better response to the recurring problem of document sharingwithin the company: a low-level application of these new technologies, which does not affect the business processes.Social collaboration, on the contrary, must be leveraged to transform the way a company does business.Social collaboration is too often handled at a very low level in France. As proof, a majority of companies simplyintegrate collaborative capabilities into their existing systems rather than invest in specialized, integrated platforms.There are still considerable efforts to be made to show the business potential of social collaboration to businessleaders. This lesson has been learned by UK companies. If French companies do not get it, they will continue tounnecessarily question the ROI of such projects, whereas the only valid question is about business objectives.Fortunately, many in France have understood this, and will, hopefully, serve as examples.
  • © PACPremium Sponsors – Profiles
  • © PACCompany profile AtosAtos is an international information technology services company with annual 2011 pro forma revenue of EUR 8.5 billion and74,000 employees in 48 countries. Serving a global client base, it delivers hi-tech transactional services, consulting and technologyservices, systems integration and managed services. With its deep technology expertise and industry knowledge, it works withclients across the following market sectors: Manufacturing, Retail, Services; Public, Health & Transports; Financial Services;Telecoms, Media & Technology; Energy & Utilities.Atos is focused on business technology that powers progress and helps organizations to create their firm of the future. It is theWorldwide Information Technology Partner for the Olympic and Paralympic Games and is quoted on the Paris Eurolist Market. Atosoperates under the brands Atos, Atos Consulting & Technology Services, Atos Worldline and Atos Worldgrid.For more information, visit: www.atos.net.Atos SERiver Ouest 80Quai Voltaire95877 BezonsFranceContact: Mr. Russ Norton, Global Key Offering Manager – Social Collaboration and Zero EmailTMPhone: +44 (0)7805910855Email: russ.norton@atos.netWeb: www.atos.netMay 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK58
  • © PACCompany profile Beck et al. Services GmbHMaking social media work for youAt Beck et al. Services GmbH, we don’t just allow our staff to get involved in the company from their very first day with us – weactively encourage them to do so! Everyone is welcome to share their thoughts and ideas with colleagues, even if these conceptsare still at a very early stage. We transform monologues based on e-mail into interlinked dialogues. This all forms part of everydaylife at our company, a Munich-based, owner-managed, international IT service provider, which uses social collaboration to facilitatemore efficient teamwork between staff on all hierarchical levels.Our services constantly focus on providing added value to end-users and management. We use our smart IT service concept toconvert social, mobile, and cloud-based technologies into business processes and results, thus bridging the gap between IT andbusiness and generating real results for our clients.Our company complements traditional communication in companies by providing processes and instruments for an open webculture that transcends hierarchies and locations. Our international team helps our clients to become an enterprise 2.0 andprovides solutions for using social software effectively and sensibly.We help small and medium-sized enterprises, as well as global organizations, to make use of the benefits of social networking andcollaborative working methods. This allows their staff and clients to work together efficiently, particularly beyond corporateboundaries.As a pioneer in social collaboration, we do not only have the necessary technical expertise for social business collaboration, butalso keep an eye on the organizational and cultural issues involved in a successful implementation strategy from the start. Ourinternational team has a profound understanding of organizational structures and business processes. This allows us to ensurethat our clients’ IT supports all necessary processes in the right way.May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK59
  • © PACCompany profile Beck et al. Services GmbHWe use our special, modular social business collaboration program to analyze the biggest challenges facing an organization whenit introduces social business collaboration. We identify these challenges by using our certified social readiness check, a thoroughevaluation tool that identifies an organization’s maturity in terms of its communication and collaboration conduct. We then use theresults of the social readiness check to draw up the correct implementation concept, thus improving the quality of collaboration inthe organization.We help our clients to introduce and implement social business collaboration projects. Our services range from the selection anduse of suitable platforms, the installation of mobile e-mail communication and the organization of virtual conferences to the analysisof communication on social software.Our turnover was €7 million in 2012. We employ around 45 people in Germany and Switzerland, and 35 people in Romania andBrazil. Our clients include Continental AG, Infineon Technologies AG, Daiichi Sankyo Europe GmbH, KWS Saat AG, and ZürcherKantonalbank.Our clients value our excellent service, international scope, wealth of experience, the pragmatic approach taken by our entire team,and last but not least, the personal commitment and dedication of all our employees.We do not only obtain the best results for our clients, but also for our own staff. People are at the heart of everything we do. Thishas been recognized by prestigious awards for our particularly high attractiveness as an employer. We were named EuropeanWorkplace of the Year 2012 and awarded the Great Place to Work prize for the IT sector in 2013.Beck et al. Services GmbHZielstattstraße 42, 81379 Munich, GermanyContact: Mr. Siegfried LautenbacherPhone: +49 (0) 89 - 538863-0Email: info@bea-services.deWeb: http://www.bea-services.comMay 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK60
  • © PACGold Sponsor – Profile
  • © PACCompany profile T-Systems International GmbHWe shape the networked future of business and society and create value for customers, employees and investors thanks toinnovative ICT solutions.T-Systems is Deutsche Telekom’s corporate customer arm. Using a global infrastructure of data centers and networks, T-Systemsoperates information and communication technology (ICT) systems for multinational corporations and public sector institutions. Withoffices in over 20 countries and global delivery capabilities, T-Systems serves companies in all industries – from the automotive industryto telecommunications, the financial sector, retail, services, media, energy and the manufacturing industry all the way to governmentagencies and the healthcare sector. Approximately 48,200 employees worldwide use their industry expertise and ICT know-how toprovide top-quality service. T-Systems generated revenue of around EUR 9.2 billion in the 2011 financial year.Tapping into future markets with “intelligent networks”As a driver of innovation within the Deutsche Telekom Group, T-Systems provides ICT solutions for connecting business and society, inparticular in the “intelligent networks” growth area. The main focuses here are connected cars, the health sector and efficient energymanagement. Examples include satellite-based toll systems developed and operated by T-Systems and, in the future, convenient in-carInternet access for navigation, automatic emergency calls and voice-controlled e-mail. The healthcare sector, comprising clinics andhealth insurance providers, also relies on the industry expertise of T-Systems. The company connects the various parties with securetransmission paths and convenient solutions. In doing so, T-Systems also supports what is known as integrated healthcare, wherepatients benefit from cross-sectoral care and treatment – from hospital doctors, GPs, specialized therapists and rehabilitation clinics.A solution is already available for efficient energy use in the form of smart metering, which provides minute-by-minute data on powerconsumption in private households. With its knowledge on operating complex networks and industry expertise in the energy sector, T-Systems is currently developing a solution for the energy networks of the future – so-called smart grids, which balance fluctuatingproduction (wind, sun) and consumption.With integrated solutions, networks and services, T-Systems assists administrative bodies at all levels, security authorities andeducational facilities in the optimization of processes, the reduction of costs and the provision of faster, improved services for citizens.May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK62
  • © PACCompany profile T-Systems International GmbHNumber 1 worldwide for dynamically scalable SAP servicesThe service provider offers information and communication technology from a single production source, guaranteeing a high level ofquality for complex ICT projects, especially major outsourcing contracts. Today, when it comes to supplying customers with dynamicallyscalable SAP services (Cloud Computing), T-Systems is the number one worldwide. For example, the Deutsche Telekom subsidiary hasconcluded a contract with electronics company Philips on global data center services and dynamic SAP services. In South Africa, T-Systems took over the ICT service provider arivia.kom, making it the biggest SAP service provider on the Cape.Turbo for telecommunications networksThe Deutsche Telekom subsidiary is setting up and operating a global voice network with the latest technology for the oil group BP. Thetourism company TUI Travel, headquartered in London, is also relying on T-Systems for the new pan-European telecommunicationsnetwork for its company sites in seven countries.The human factorWhen customers entrust T-Systems with their information and communications technology, this often also involves taking overemployees. And as is the case with any service, the quality depends on the people providing it. The integration of new employeestherefore plays a key part in providing customers with outstanding service. Thousands of new employees have joined T-Systems throughoutsourcing and acquisitions. And experience has shown that success hinges on the amalgamation of different corporate cultures in newcustomer projects.T-Systems International GmbH T-Systems International GmbHFasanenweg 5, 70771 Leinfelden-Echterdingen, Germany Dachauer Str. 651, 80995 Munich, GermanyContact: Herrmann Hänle, Market Intelligence Contact: Thomas Wolfgang Müller,Phone: +49 711 9996720 Product Leader Workplace Solututions & ArchitectEmail: hermann.haenle@t-systems.com Phone: +49 89 545509484Web: http://www.t-systems.com/ Email: thomas.mueller@t-systems.comMay 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK63
  • © PACAppendix
  • © PACDisclaimer, usage rights, independence anddata protectionDisclaimerThe contents of this study were compiled with the greatest possible care. However, no liability for their accuracy can beassumed. Analyses and evaluations reflect the state of our knowledge in April 2013 and may change at any time. Thisapplies in particular, but not exclusively, to statements made about the future. Names and designations that appear inthis study may be registered trademarks.Usage rightsThis study is protected by copyright. Any reproduction or dissemination to third parties, including in part, requires theprior explicit authorization of the sponsors. The publication or dissemination of tables, graphics etc. in other publicationsalso requires prior authorization.Independence and data protectionThis study was produced solely by Pierre Audoin Consultants (PAC). The sponsors had no influence over the analysis ofthe data and the production of the study. The participants in the study were assured that the information they providedwould be treated confidentially. No statement enables conclusions to be drawn about individual companies, and noindividual survey data was passed to the sponsors or other third parties. All participants in the study were selected atrandom. There is no connection between the production of the study and any commercial relationship between therespondents and the sponsors of this study.May 2013Social Collaboration in Germany, France, and the UK65
  • © PACFrom strategy to execution, PAC delivers focused andobjective responses to the growth challenges ofInformation and Communication Technology (ICT)players.Founded in 1976, PAC is a privately held research &consulting firm for the software and ICT servicesmarket.PAC helps ICT vendors to optimize their strategies byproviding quantitative and qualitative market analysisas well as operational and strategic consulting. Weadvise CIOs and financial investors in evaluating ICTvendors and solutions and support their investmentdecisions. Public institutions and organizations also relyon our key analyses to develop and shape their ICTpolicies.For more information, please visit: www.pac-online.comPAC’s latest news: http://blog.pac-online.com"About usMay 2013Dr. Andreas StiehlerPrincipal AnalystConnected Enterprise+49 (0)351 30 91 20 05a.stiehler@pac-online.comPhilip CarnelleyPrincipal AnalystSoftware+44 (0)20 7553 3961p.carnelley@pac-online.comMelanie FlugAnalystConnected Enterprise &Software Markets+49 (0)30 28 52 96 24m.flug@pac-online.com