Th ch 5 mdl school part a
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Th ch 5 mdl school part a Th ch 5 mdl school part a Presentation Transcript

  • Integrating Language Study in the Middle School Curriculum Teacher’s Handbook Chapter 5 Dr. Valerio
  • Subjects Covered Definition of middle school The middle level learner Middle level programs
  • Subjects Covered Sequential vs. exploratory language programs Classroom management Cultures and Comparisons standards PowerPoint Part A ends with Culture
  • Subjects Covered The three Ps: practices, products, perspectives Kluckhohn Method Cross-Cultural Adaptability Inventory
  • Subjects Covered Cultural simulators Sample thematic units Assessment of middle school performance
  • Concepts Emphasis on teaching language at middle school level relates to two factors:1. Change in approach to teaching 11- to 14-year-old learners (more student centered)
  • Concepts Emphasis on teaching language at middle school level relates to two factors:2. Attempt to begin language learning experiences earlier in formal education
  • Concepts DefinitionsPurpose: Developmentally responsive to needs of young adolescentsUniqueness: Separate autonomous unit, separate from elementary school and high school
  • Concepts DefinitionsOrganization: Includes grade levels with the largest number of students who are becoming adolescentsCurriculum and Instruction: Connect to everyday lives of students and actively involves them in learning
  • Concepts Research-Based Presumptions1. interdisciplinary teaming (two to five team members in two, three, or four subject areas whose schedules allow them to plan and collaborate on interdisciplinary lessons)
  • Concepts Research-Based Presumptions2. advisory programs that consist of a small group of students (usually 20 or fewer) assigned to a teacher, administrator, or other staff member for a regularly scheduled meeting to discuss topics of concern to students
  • Concepts Research-Based Presumptions3. varied instruction integrating learning experiences, addressing students’ own questions, focusing upon real-life issues relevant to the student; actively engaging students in problem solving and accommodating individual differences; emphasizing collaboration
  • Concepts Research-Based Presumptions4. programs that capitalize on the innate curiosity of young adolescents, exposing them to a range of academic, vocational, and recreational subjects for career options, community service, enrichment, and enjoyment
  • Concepts Research-Based Presumptions5. transition programs that focus on creating a smooth change of schools for the young adolescent
  • Key concept“Good middle level education allows students to experience old things in new ways and entirely new fields of learning in varied ways.”
  • The Middle Level Learner Social AspectsDifferent from elementary and high school learners due to many physical, cognitive, and emotional changes that occur over a relatively short period of time.
  • The Middle Level LearnerSocial AspectsGreatest differences between students occur during this period
  • The Middle Level LearnerSocial AspectsGreatest differences between students occur during this periodRapid physical changes
  • The Middle Level LearnerSocial AspectsGreatest differences between students occur during this periodAlternating periods of high energy and listlessness…
  • The Middle Level LearnerSocial AspectsGreatest differences between students occur during this periodStudents may need to squirm and move around or vent energy through physical exercise…
  • The Middle Level LearnerSocial AspectsGreatest differences between students occur during this periodAware of physiological changes and become preoccupied with self-image
  • The Middle Level LearnerSocial AspectsGreatest differences between students occur during this periodStudents may be sensitive to topics that focus on personal appearance or daily routines dealing reflexively
  • The Middle Level LearnerSocial AspectsGreatest differences between students occur during this periodStudents are “romantic learners” who enjoy knowing, and bring a great deal of curiosity to classroom
  • The Middle Level LearnerSocial AspectsGreatest differences between students occur during this periodStudents like to explore challenges beyond everyday experience such as nobility, courage, genius…
  • The Middle Level LearnerSocial AspectsGreatest differences between students occur during this periodViews issues as right or wrong
  • The Middle Level LearnerSocial AspectsGreatest differences between students occur during this periodStrong sense of justice
  • The Middle Level LearnerSocial AspectsGreatest differences between students occur during this periodWill work conscientiously for worthy cause
  • The Middle Level LearnerSocial AspectsGreatest differences between students occur during this periodAble to memorize lots of details
  • The Middle Level LearnerSocial AspectsGreatest differences between students occur during this periodIn order to learn a language, students need to see a connection between the language and their real lives and interests
  • The Middle Level LearnerSocial AspectsGreatest differences between students occur during this periodMay be less accepting of social differences unless they can discover how others think and feel
  • The Middle Level LearnerSocial AspectsGreatest differences between students occur during this periodBe sure to read the details provided on pp. 128-129
  • The Middle Level LearnerCognitive AspectsBrain research indicatesThe brain changes its structure in response to external experiences
  • The Middle Level LearnerCognitive AspectsBrain research indicatesThe brain always searches for meaning
  • The Middle Level LearnerCognitive AspectsBrain research indicatesThe brain always searches for meaning by looking for patterns in the information it receives
  • The Middle Level LearnerCognitive AspectsBrain research indicatesEmotions drive attention to meaning and remembering…
  • The Middle Level LearnerCognitive AspectsBrain research indicatesAdolescents experience progressively slower brain growth, which may impact cognitive skills and complex thinking processes
  • The Middle Level LearnerCognitive AspectsBrain research indicatesAdolescent learners demonstrate a wide diversity of skills and abilities
  • Language Instruction in the Middle School Standards advocate language learning at lower age levels NCLB (No Child Left Behind) negatively impacted foreign language in the middle school due to time required to focus on academic subjects in order to maintain compliance
  • Language Instruction in the Middle School Middle schools are organized around thematic units within an interdisciplinary team of teachers
  • Middle School Language Program DesignExploratory vs. SequentialThere is a big difference in the philosophies toward the proper approach for language at the middle school level due to the unique features of these learners
  • Middle School Language Program Design Exploratory vs. SequentialForeign language exploratory or foreign language experience (FLEX) programs
  • Middle School Language Program Design Exploratory vs. SequentialForeign language exploratory or foreign language experience (FLEX) programs Language readiness courses that introduce how language works (vocab roots, grammar, syntax, etc)
  • Middle School Language Program Design Exploratory vs. SequentialForeign language exploratory or foreign language experience (FLEX) programs Multiple minicourses in language or potpourri courses that expose students to several languages that
  • Middle School Language Program Design Exploratory vs. SequentialForeign language exploratory or foreign language experience (FLEX) programs …focus on cultural awareness and limited survival skills
  • Middle School Language Program Design Exploratory vs. SequentialForeign language exploratory or foreign language experience (FLEX) programs Interdisciplinary courses that focus on topics from the perspective of more than one content area like
  • Middle School Language Program Design Exploratory vs. SequentialForeign language exploratory or foreign language experience (FLEX) programs foreign language plus geography, social studies, history, and/or literature
  • Middle School Language Program Design Exploratory vs. SequentialForeign language exploratory or foreign language experience (FLEX) programs enabling students to explore ideas from a new point of view
  • Middle School Language Program Design Exploratory vs. SequentialForeign language exploratory or foreign language experience (FLEX) programs Auxiliary or noncurricular language programs that take place outside of school day including before-
  • Middle School Language Program Design Exploratory vs. SequentialForeign language exploratory or foreign language experience (FLEX) programs and after-school programs, summer camps, immersion week- ends, summer day programs…
  • Middle School Language Program Design Exploratory vs. SequentialForeign language exploratory or foreign language experience (FLEX) programs Proponents argue that exploratory programs are “learner friendly”
  • Middle School Language Program Design Exploratory vs. SequentialForeign language exploratory or foreign language experience (FLEX) programs and provide beneficial connections to other disciplines, cultures, learning strategies, career paths…
  • Middle School Language Program Design Exploratory vs. SequentialForeign language exploratory or foreign language experience (FLEX) programs
  • Middle School Language Program Design Exploratory vs. SequentialForeign language exploratory or foreign language experience (FLEX) programs Sequential proponents maintain that the goals of exploratory program can be better achieved
  • Middle School Language Program Design Exploratory vs. SequentialForeign language exploratory or foreign language experience (FLEX) programs through sequential language programs, which are more likely to enable functional language skills
  • Middle School Language Program Design Exploratory vs. SequentialForeign language exploratory or foreign language experience (FLEX) programs in a cultural context rather than talking in English “about” language and culture
  • Key concept “The longest possible sequence oflanguage learning should be provided,beginning with exploratory programs in the elementary school, followed by middle school courses in a singlelanguage with multiple entry points for new and transfer students. Opportunities to study additional languages should also be provided in late middle school and high school.”
  • Integrating Cultures and Comparisons Middle school learners have more positive feelings toward people unlike themselves when they know more about them
  • Integrating Cultures and Comparisons These learners are at an ideal level for exploring target cultures and comparing the target culture with their own culture
  • Integrating Cultures and Comparisons Of course, these standards areas should be an integral part of language study at other levels, but the middle school is an especially good time
  • Cultures goal area Emphasize acceptance of diversity Develop sensitivity to differences in others—both within and without the classroom  Students begin to realize it is okay for them to be different, which supports their own self-esteem
  • Cultures goal area Practices—patterns of behavior accepted by society (knowledge of what to do, when, and where)
  • Cultures goal area Products—things created by members of the culture, both tangible (art, books, foods) and intangible (ideas, music interpretation, games)
  • Cultures goal area Perspectives—traditional ideas, attitudes, meanings, and values of member of that society
  • Cultures goal area Refer to the figures on page 135 The culture paradigm lends itself to a constructivist approach to learning about culture
  • Cultures goal area Constructivist approach emphasizes1. constructive process to understand the three Ps and their inter- relationships; and2. connections and associations between new and existing knowledge
  • Cultures goal area Appendix 5.2 online discusses ways to design the culture portfolio http://admin.wadsworth.com/resource_uploads/static_resources/1413004628/5280/app5_2.pdf
  • Next session We will begin discussing the Comparisons goal area.
  • For now Look at your 10-day unit Decide how you could adapt those lessons to fit middle school learners based on what we have covered so far
  • For now Write a paragraph beneath each detailed lesson plan in the adaptations section“Adaptations for middle school learners:” and write how you could adapt each lesson based on these principles
  • Next session We will discuss comparisons and finish chapter 5 Then you’ll go back in and state additional adaptations or revise your first entry to blend in the comparisons and assessments we will cover through the remainder of this chapter.
  • View and discussLINK to video: http://www.learner.org/resources/series185.html Select #12 What functional goals does Ms. Granville have for her students? What does she want them to be able to do with French? How does she involve backward design in her lesson planning? How does the teacher involve her students in authentic oral history?
  • View and discussLINK to video: http://www.learner.org/resources/series185.html Select #11 How do these sixth graders acquire vocabulary in this lesson? What is the role of TPR in facilitating vocabulary acquisition? How are students involved in hands-on learning? How are language and culture integrated?