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Tasers, Abortion and Parenting: Behind the Curtain of Policing America
 

Tasers, Abortion and Parenting: Behind the Curtain of Policing America

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This book takes you behind the curtain of law enforcement in America providing you with a never before look at how police interact with the day-to-day issues of the ordinary citizen. ...

This book takes you behind the curtain of law enforcement in America providing you with a never before look at how police interact with the day-to-day issues of the ordinary citizen.

Tackling some of the most controversial headlines of today, from bullying in our schools to legalizing marijuana as well as the link between abortion and crime and the use of non-lethal force by way of taser, you may either love or hate this book, but you will definitely be entertained.

What a fascinating read. It’s going to rile folks up as well as having many people yell “Amen!”

Larry Winget, Television personality and five times New York Times/Wall Street Journal bestselling author of “Your Kids Are Your Own Fault” and “The Idiot Factor”

Buy Now for $9.95 @ http://www.lulu.com/product/ebook/tasers-abortions-and-parenting-behind-the-curtain-of-policing-america/15899242

Contents

Preface to Tasers, Abortion and Parenting: Behind the Curtain of Policing America 3

Chapter 1 – The Butterfly Effect 4

Chapter 2 - Societal Mores and the Emergence of the Modern Day Police Force 10

Chapter 3 - An Ounce of Prevention is Worth a Pound of Cure 22

Chapter 4 - Drugs is a Dirty Business 33

Chapter 5 - Anesthetised Parenting 45

Chapter 6 - This Is Going To Hurt Me More Than You . . . 53

Chapter 7 – Cyberspace and the Borderless Crime (A Case Diary) 64

Chapter 8 – Policing Terrorism 111

Chapter 9 – Lord of the Flies: A Metaphor for Schoolyard Justice? 121

Chapter 10 – Policing in a Democratic Society 128

Epilogue 140

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  • Contents

    Preface to Tasers, Abortion and Parenting: Behind the Curtain of Policing America 3

    Chapter 1 – The Butterfly Effect 4

    Chapter 2 - Societal Mores and the Emergence of the Modern Day Police Force 10

    Chapter 3 - An Ounce of Prevention is Worth a Pound of Cure 22

    Chapter 4 - Drugs is a Dirty Business 33

    Chapter 5 - Anesthetised Parenting 45

    Chapter 6 - This Is Going To Hurt Me More Than You . . . 53

    Chapter 7 – Cyberspace and the Borderless Crime (A Case Diary) 64

    Chapter 8 – Policing Terrorism 111

    Chapter 9 – Lord of the Flies: A Metaphor for Schoolyard Justice? 121

    Chapter 10 – Policing in a Democratic Society 128

    Epilogue 140
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    Tasers, Abortion and Parenting: Behind the Curtain of Policing America Tasers, Abortion and Parenting: Behind the Curtain of Policing America Document Transcript

    • Tasers, Abortions and Parenting:Behind the Curtain of PolicingAmericaSpecial Publisher’s Advanced Edition By Dr. Richard Weinblatt and Jon Hansen 1|Page
    • Initial Review of Tasers, Abortion and Parenting: Behind the Curtain of PolicingAmerica by bestselling author Larry Winget:“What a fascinating read. It’s going to rile folks up as well as having many peopleyell “Amen!” It will also, probably for the first time, give people an understandingabout the direction our society is heading and give them some idea how we got towhere we are now. Plus, your chapter on parenting is dead on and will hopefullycause folks to become more active in the lives of their children!”Larry Winget, Television personality and five times New York Times/Wall StreetJournal bestselling author of “Your Kids Are Your Own Fault” and “The IdiotFactor” 2|Page
    • Preface to Tasers, Abortion and Parenting: Behind the Curtainof Policing AmericaLike the proverbial tip of the iceberg, crime and policing in America usually flash acrossour collective consciousness in a burst of sensational headlines and polarizing events.From incendiary stories such as the accidental shooting of a young girl by a police officerduring a raid in Detroit or the arrest of a respected black Harvard Professor for "actinglike a rich white man," to the purported use of unnecessary force in the Taser death of aforeigner in a Vancouver airport we are at once captivated and ultimately opinionated interms of our initial, gut level reaction. However, rarely if ever, do we actually lookbeyond the immediate headlines for the greater understanding of the how and why. Infact truth be known, we often are exalted to pay little if any attention to the man, womanor issues, behind the curtain that tug at law enforcers, and ultimately, our world.One of my favorite programs on television is Mayday, in which National TransportationSafety Board "NTSB" investigators attempt to unravel the mystery behind an airlinedisaster through a re-creation of the chain of events that led to a crash. What iscompelling is that there is never one single catastrophic event or occurrence that causes aplane to go down but, and as repeatedly pointed out by investigators, are instead theresult of a series of smaller incidences that culminate in the tragedy we see on the sixoclock news. Through what is at times a painstakingly long exercise, investigatorspersevere to discover the truth, and in process learn how to prevent a similar accidentfrom happening again in the future. This of course makes air travel that much safer.From the minor infractions of speeding to serious violent felonies like armed robbery andmurder, there are also a series of life events and individual choices over the long termthat work or perhaps even conspire together that converge into a temporally briefconfrontation between individuals and law enforcement . . . and sometimes with deadlyconsequences.In much the same way that an NTSB investigator works to understand the sequence ofevents that lead to a tragedy, the purpose of this book is to examine the chain ofcircumstances that ultimately find their way into a detached and for many, mind numbingarray of statistical references such as the FBIs Uniform Crime Reports. In essence it isour objective to create a contextual reference that you can equate with your everyday lifeexperiences, and hopefully in the process give meaning and even closure for some to theunthinkable and inexplicable actions of our fellow human beings. It is therefore our hopethat this unique lens through which we will review the issues behind the headlines thatbuffet and create challenges for those men and women who are policing in a democraticsociety, will in some small way inform you and, ultimately help you to find a safer placeboth in your mind and in the world around you. 3|Page
    • Chapter 9 – Lord of the Flies: A Metaphor for SchoolyardJustice?“Lord of the Flies is a novel by Nobel Prize-winning author William Golding about agroup of British schoolboys stuck on a deserted island who try to govern themselves, withdisastrous results. Its stances on the already controversial subjects of human nature andindividual welfare versus the common good earned it position 68 on the AmericanLibrary Association’s list of the 100 most frequently challenged books of 1990–1999.”from Wikipedia, the free encyclopaediaDuring a 2010 interview, Larry Winget, television personality and five time New YorkTimes/Wall Street Journal bestselling author of “Your Kids Are Your Own Fault” and“The Idiot Factor” made the comment that children establishing a pecking order in theschoolyards of America is as natural as Mom’s Apple Pie. Well maybe he didn’t use theexact term Mom’s Apple Pie, but his point was pretty clear . . . kids, for lack of betterreference will be kids.Studies and polls such as a “U.S. 2004 poll of children, would tend to support Larry’sposition. With 86% of more than 1,200 9- to 13-year-old boys and girls polled sayingthat they’ve seen someone else being bullied, with 48% indicating that they’ve beenbullied, and 42% admitted to bullying other kids at least once in a while,” one might evenargue that it is a childhood rite of passage.What is interesting is that bullying has just recently been recognized and recorded as adistinct criminal offence, which is a departure from the light-hearted view of college hi-jinx hazing portrayed in movies such as Animal House or a “boys will be boys” mentalitythat associates aggressive behavior with being a normal part of the adolescent experiencerepresented by the character Flick in the Holiday favorite “A Christmas Story.”The data in terms of criminalizing bullying would seem to support the elevation ofconsequences from a teachers reprimand to possible prosecution under the law.To start, research shows that those who do the bullying are the ones who ultimately paythe greatest price in that “one out of four elementary school bullies have a criminal recordby the time they’re 30.” As these children grow into adulthood, their prospects forsuccess in later life are significantly diminished with many failing in school andultimately never enjoying the career or relationship success that other people enjoy.In terms of a broader societal impact a 2008 paper that was prepared by Deborah Dohertyand Dorothy Berglund titled “Psychological Abuse – A Discussion Paper,” made thefollowing observations: 4|Page
    • Cost of inter-generational transmission of abuse. Dealing with the aftermath ofindividuals who learn and model disrespectful and domineering behavior to gain controlover others creates significant costs for society. For one, schools must cope with thebehavior problems of children emotionally traumatized by intimate partner violence aswell as respond to the bullying tactics that these children may use on the playground. Inthe long term, these controlling tactics impact negatively in our workplaces, homes andcommunities. Governments must address the range of factors that contribute to the inter-generational transmission of abusive behaviors by allocating significant resources inschool settings for early intervention, anti-bullying and healthy relationship programs.In fact so disconcerting is the growing problem of bullying in America, a U.S. SecretService report went so far as to suggest that bullying had played a part in many schoolshootings, and then went on to emphasize that efforts should be made to “eliminatebullying behavior.”The real question these reports raise is where do you draw the line between what we hadearlier referred to as a childhood rite of passage and the destructive actions in which theimpact overflows or extends into the fabric of American society as a whole?Perhaps the best place to start is to first understand or define that which can actually becalled bullying. After all, the more common scenarios by which we define the termbully, such as at the school level, is not a new phenomenon in that it has been part of thehuman condition from the beginning of time.Norwegian researcher Dan Olweus defined bullying as being when a person is “exposed,repeatedly and over time, to negative actions on the part of one or more persons.”According to Olweus “negative actions” include a pattern of behavior in which a person“intentionally inflicts injury or discomfort upon another person, through physical contact,through words or in other ways.”In other words, bullying can take on many forms including physical, emotional andverbal elements where there is a real or perceived “imbalance of power with the morepowerful individual or group,” abusing those who are “less powerful.”Interestingly enough, this can occur at multiple levels of societal interaction including thehome, work or within entire neighbourhoods. It even occurs on an international or globallevel. For example, when one country exercises undue power or influence over another itis referred to as Jingoism.So now that we know what bullying is, at least as defined by the experts, how do weestablish a range of tolerance or acceptability? 5|Page
    • Where do we establish the line, in which an individual’s or group’s actions go beyond therealms of a boys-will-be boys or girls-will-be girls shrug, to one that can be perceived asa bonafide threat either in the imminent future or somewhere down the road?When do we in our reactions to a bullying situation depart from a sticks and stonesattitude of a measured and practical response, to being one of the paper machè wimps towhich Winget often refers - the kind that would put a cast on a hangnail?An even more challenging question is how you establish a standard that makes senseacross the board in which individual circumstances that would present mitigating factorsrisk being ignored. At this point, the Casey Heynes story immediately comes to mind.For those who may have like the Geico commercial suggests, been living under a rock or,were away from the planet for a short time in March and April 2011, the video of arotund boy finally standing up to one of his tormentors went viral on YouTube.Casey Heynes of course was the somewhat overweight lad in Australia who while beingfilmed took a few shots to the face by the much smaller but more aggressive bully.Having been on the receiving end of both physical and mental abuse over several years,Casey finally stood up for himself and literally picked-up the bully and body slammedhim to the ground.Viewing this incident in isolation one might be inclined to suggest that both boys warrantdisciplinary action from the school including a possible suspension. But here’s the thing,the torment to which Casey was exposed on a daily basis, and which actually hit thecritical point of tolerance when he told his sister that he was contemplating suicide, wasbeing filmed.If Casey had not made the choice to stand up for himself, while still being able todemonstrate tremendous restraint by walking away after the bully miscreant wasdisengaged by way of the pavement, the group of troublemakers would have posted adifferent kind of video to YouTube. Would the humiliation from a prime time clip on thechubby kid clip have been enough to have pushed Casey over the edge re hiscontemplating suicide?While we will likely never know the answer to this question, one thing is certain, theuniversal support for Casey reflected in the millions of people who viewed both theoriginal video, as well as subsequent interviews speaks to the global interest and reach ofthe bullying question.The Heynes case also highlighted the fact that generally speaking parents seem to havefor the most part been asleep at the wheel in terms of instructing their children on properconduct towards others, and in the process have abdicated their responsibilities fordisciplining their children when they do cross the line from normal childhood discourseinto destructive behaviour. 6|Page
    • The schools of course are not equipped to deal with the growing problem, at least not ona case-by-case basis, but instead deferring to a zero tolerance policy that holds everyone– even the child being bullied accountable.Once again we turn to the Casey Heynes case as a means of illustrating just howineffective the school system can be in terms of dispensing discipline.Casey, who has previously stated, had been the target of abuse over an extended period oftime to the point that he like so many other children who face tormentors on a daily basiscontemplated taking his own life, showed amazing restraint when he finally decided thatenough was enough.The bully, who was playing for the camera of his friend, taunted and then punched Caseyin the face at least 3 times, before the gentle giant as some have called him picked him upand threw him to the ground. At that moment one might have reasonably expected thepent up anger and hurt that had been building in Casey as a result of enduring the verbaland physical abuse over a period of years would have seen him then pummel the bully.Instead, Casey turned and walked away.The school’s responses . . . suspend both Casey and the bully. What kind of messagedoes this send?What caused even greater consternation was an interview that was given by the bully’smother who while admitting that her son was wrong in what he did, went on to say thathe is really a good boy and that she hoped that he would apologize to Casey. Hoped?! Inthis word and corresponding sentiment we find the perfect example of an absence ofparental intervention.Back in the day, if a child had pulled a stunt like that there would not be a question as towhether or not the aggressor would have to apologize, as most parents would haveassisted their wayward offspring to the front door of the kid that had been tormented andensured that an apology would have been forthcoming.This of course leads to an even more controversial question which is when, if at all,should a parent be held responsible for the actions of their child?Earlier in this book we had talked about the “Susan and Anthony Provenzino case, inwhich the couple was ordered to pay a fine of $1,000 plus court costs for their purportedfailure to in effect properly parent their son, which violated a city ordinance that “parentsmust exercise reasonable control over children under 18.” The son, who abusedmarijuana, had a long history of committing burglaries in an effort to support his habit. 7|Page
    • Holding parents accountable is based on a growing and strong belief which questionswhy society as a whole is made to pay for the poor parenting skills of those adults(emphasis on adults), who fail to provide the needed direction, care and love to theirchildren. After all, it is in most instances the parents who are ultimately to blame fortheir children’s’ behavior, and therefore should bear the greater if not full burden for theconsequences of this absence of interest and involvement. This is particularly true whenit comes to the issue of bullying, as many experts believe that the origins of the problemcan be linked to a troubled home life.Perhaps, and similar to the Provenzino case, if parents are forced to pay restitution eitherfinancially or through their child’s removal from a school bus or the school itself, or evenrestricting Internet access in the home, maybe just maybe the needed changes will takeplace.In the case of Massachusetts 15 year old Pheobe Prince, who’s suicide has directly led tofelony charges being laid against 2 boys and 4 girls aged between 16 to 18 years, therelentless taunting she suffered during the preceding 3 month period in which there wasno intervention from the school, should serve as a warning to us all both now and in thefuture.As discussed earlier in this chapter, with 25 percent of elementary school bullies having acriminal record by the time they’re 30” if the problem of bullying is not addressed in theschool yard, it will expand to our society as whole where the damage is calculably greaterin areas such as a clogged judicial system and lost work hours.In a May 23rd, 2011 New York Times article, it was reported that conditions inCalifornia’s “overcrowded prisons are so bad that they violate the Eight Amendment’sban on cruel and unusual punishment.”As a result, and in a 5 to 4 decision, the Supreme Court ordered the state to reduce itsprison population by more than 30,000 inmates.Operating at 137.5 percent of the prison system’s capacity, the article indicates that thecurrent total inmate population is more than 140,000. The 30,000 figure represents justfewer than 22 percent, so it is easy to imagine what the impact of effective preventativemeasures might be in terms of addressing school yard bullies while they are still at ayoung and presumably influential age. Or as one grandmother used to say, little kids –little problems, big kids – big problems.In terms of the workplace, and according to a July 2009 study, the impact of bullies inour day-to-day business life contributes to an estimated $180 million in lost time andproductivity each year. 8|Page
    • The study titled “The Cost of Workplace Bullying: How much is your corporate bullycosting you?” by Catherine Michael Mattice, M.A. also referenced the WorkplaceBullying Institute estimate that between “turnover and lost productivity a bully could costa Fortune 500 company an astounding $24,000,000,” plus an added “$1.4 million forlitigation and settlement costs.”What is simultaneously interesting and disturbing is that the problems associated withbullying in the workplace have become so prevalent in American business that it hasactually led to the creation of a method for calculating the tangible financial loss directlyrelated to the disruption caused by a bully.Regarding top-line considerations, GreatPlaceJobs conducted a study and found thatcompanies who have been recognized as being a great place to work have on averagegenerated revenues that were 30 percent higher than companies who were not identifiedas providing their employees with a healthy and happy work environment.Even Wall Street recognizes the importance that workplace morale plays in a company’ssuccess, as the same study found that stock prices were 10 percent higher for companieswho have received awards as being great places to work, as opposed to those that havenot.So what is the next step in addressing the problems of bullying?Perhaps this is another instance in which the Broken Windows theory championed byJames Q. Wilson and George S. Kelling, who advocate fixing problems proactively whenthey are small (like children) would also make sense, as petty crimes and low-level anti-social behavior seems to have been deterred by their approach, coupled with anexpectation that there will be a corresponding reduction in major crime down the road.The problem of course with the concept of policing the school yards of America is thatlogistics of doing so, as well as the likely response from both parents and schooladministrators. Allowing the police to intervene and possibly lay charges might verywell be viewed as turning our education systems into a police state.Similar to those situations where the police are called in to investigate the on-field or on-ice actions of professional athletes, such as in the case of Zdeno Chara’s recent hit onMontreal’s Max Pacioretty, or the notorious mugging of the Colorado Avalanche’s SteveMoore by Todd Bertuzzi, who sucker punched the player from behind and then landed onhim causing a concussion, several broken vertebrae and facial lacerations. 9|Page
    • Although Bertuzzi was sued by Moore in both Colorado and British Columbia, he wasconditionally discharged by a British Columbia court. The absence of a conviction inwhich the incident was compellingly witnessed by millions of television viewers as wellas those in the arena’s stands speaks to the complexity and problems of policeinvolvement in the more ambiguous realms of schoolyard violence. This is especiallytrue when minors are involved.So if law enforcement is not the most effective means by which to address the issue ofbullying, and the school’s ability to properly respond are muted by bureaucratic conflictsand political expediency, the onus must once again fall on the parents.This brings us back to the question of holding disinterested parents accountable in asimilar manner to those whose children commit criminal acts through the issuance of aparental order, which would seem to be the logical first step in reversing the bullyingtrend.While highly controversial and likely to cause considerable uproar with some parentswho lament that they are doing the best they can, Winget’s book (and books like it)should serve as the guidebook for defining parental responsibility in that it leaves nodoubt as to who is responsible for doing what and when starting with accessibility.Based on the 2004 poll, in terms of the differences between boys and girls, the resultsindicated that boys were “more likely to say they would fight back than girls (53% ofboys vs. 38% of girls), whereas girls were more likely to say they would talk to an adultthan boys (32% of girls vs. 19% of boys).”This latter point about talking with an adult is a critical first step towards dealing with theproblem, as open and meaningful communication with an adult should lead to a morelevel headed response either through direct parental advice or parental engagement withthe school itself. The key is that the child whether it be a boy or a girl, has to feel thattheir parents are in fact there for them with an attentive ear. Something that doesn’t seemto be happening in America given Winget’s reference to another study which found thaton average parents spend less than 3 minutes per week in meaningful conversation withtheir children.Unless American parents wake up and face up to the fact that caring for their childrengoes far beyond putting a roof over their heads and buying them the latest electronicsgizmo, the increase in incidents of bullying will likely continue to rise, and with it afurther deterioration of our society as a whole.In the case of bullying, it all truly starts and ends in the home. 10 | P a g e
    • About Dr. Richard Weinblatt:Dr. Richard Weinblatt, former police chief, is a police expert who has served as acriminal justice professor and police academy director/instructor.He has worked in several regions of the country in reserve and full-time sworn positionsranging from auxiliary police lieutenant in New Jersey to patrol division deputy sherriffin New Mexico to Police Chief in North Carolina.Dr. Weinblatt has written extensively on law enforcement topics since 1989. He hasprovided media commentary on police matters for local and national media including AP,CBS, CNN, HLN, MSNBC, and The Washington Post.He is also the host of “The Cop Doc Radio Show” which airs LIVE from Orlando,Florida, Tuesday & Thursday nights from 10:00 pm-11:00 pm (EST) across the BlogTalk Radio Network.About Jon Hansen:As the lead writer for the PI Social Media Networks Procurement Insights and PIWindow on Business Blogs since their introduction in May 2007 and June 2009respectively, syndicated monthly readership has grown to more than 1.2 millionworldwide.Collectively, Jon has written 1,300 articles and papers on subjects as diverse as supplychain practice, public sector policy, emerging business trends as well as social media.Jon is also the host of the highly acclaimed PI Window on Business Show on Blog TalkRadio (BTR). As a BTR Network featured host, Jon has welcomed leaders andbestselling authors from the world of business discussing both timely and thoughtprovoking topics. The PI Window on Business Show airs throughout the week between12:30 and 1:30 PM EST and 9:00 to 10:00 PM ESTOn November 2, 2009 Jons critically acclaimed first book, "Your Show Will Go Live in5 Seconds" was released. This represented the first instalment in what will become thePersonal Branding in Social Media Series. In "Your Show Will Go Live" Jon shared hisexperiences and insights in helping individuals and organizations to create and host ashow that informs, empowers and enriches your audience, your guests and yes, evenyourself.His second book, "The Unsociable Business of Social Networking And Why The So ActSocial Network Will Change The World" was released in February 2010. Both books areavailable through Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble bookstores.His collaboration with Dr. Weinblatt on Tasers, Abortions and Parenting: Behind theCurtain of Policing America his Jon’s third book 11 | P a g e
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