• Like
  • Save

Loading…

Flash Player 9 (or above) is needed to view presentations.
We have detected that you do not have it on your computer. To install it, go here.

Uploaded on

 

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,636
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Waves Physics 2
  • 2. Topic Outline • Pulses in a string • Principle of Superposition • Periodic Waves • Types of Waves • Standing Waves • Sound • Interference of Sound Waves • Doppler Effect • Sound Intensity
  • 3. Pulses in a String
  • 4. Example:
  • 5. Reflection at a Boundary
  • 6. Reflection and Transmission at a  Junction
  • 7. Principle of Superposition When two pulses travel past a point in a string at the same time, the  displacement of the string at that point is the sum of the sum of the  displacement each pulse would produce there by itself.
  • 8. Periodic Waves
  • 9. Three quantities used to describe  waves This formula applies to all periodic waves,  sinusoidal or not.
  • 10. Example:
  • 11. Period Period T of a wave is the time required for one  complete wave to pass a given point.
  • 12. Example:
  • 13. Amplitude The Amplitude A of a wave refers to the  maximum displacement from their normal  positions of the particles that oscillate back and  forth as the wave travels by.
  • 14. Fourier’s Theorem A theorem by Jean  Fourier (1768 – 1830)  shows that any  periodic wave of  frequency f,  regardless of its  waveform, can be  thought of as a  superposition of  sinusoidal waves  whose frequencies are  f, 2f, 3f and so on.
  • 15. Types of Waves Waves may be transverse, longitudinal,  or a combination of both. Waves in stretched string are transverse  waves because the individual segments  of the string vibrate perpendicular to the  directions in which the waves travel. Longitudinal waves occur when the  individual particles travel back and forth  parallel to the direction in which the  waves travel. Waves in the body of water (or other  liquid) are combination of transverse  and longitudinal waves. Each molecules  moves in a circle with a period equal to  period of the wave.
  • 16. Standing Waves Standing waves are results of  waves that travel down the string  in both directions, are reflected at  the ends, proceed across to the  opposite ends and are again  reflected, and so on. Interference is the interaction of  different wave trains. Constructive interference occurs  when the resulting composite  wave has an amplitude greater  than that of either the original  waves, and destructive  interference occurs when the  resulting composite wave has an  amplitude less than that of either  of the original waves.
  • 17. Fundamental Frequency, Overtones,  and Harmonics
  • 18. Example:
  • 19. Resonance Resonance is the response of an oscillator  when a driving force is applied to an  oscillating system at a frequency near the  natural frequency of the system, the  amplitude of the oscillation becomes large.
  • 20. Sound Waves An acoustic wave is any mechanical wave that  propagates through an elastic medium, which may be  solid, liquid or gaseous.  Sound wave is the term used to refer to mechanical  waves, usually in air, having a frequency within the  range of human hearing, about 20 Hz to 20 kHz. Infrasonic waves are those having frequency less than  20 Hz and ultrasonic waves for those frequency  greater than 20 kHz.
  • 21. Speed of Sound
  • 22. Waveforms of Some Musical Sounds
  • 23. Beats Beats are the loudness pulsations of a sound. The origin of bits in sound waves Beats produced by waves whose frequencies differ by 5%
  • 24. Doppler Effect Doppler Effect is the change in frequency of a sound brought  about by relative motion between source and listener.
  • 25. Sound Intensity Level
  • 26. REFERENCE: Modern Technical Physics 6th Edition by Arthur  Beiser Copyright © 1992 by Addison‐Wesley Publishing  Company, Inc. Physics for Students of Science and Engineering  by A.L. Stanford and J.M. Tanner Copyright © 1985 by Academic Press, Inc.