• Save
Heat
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Heat

on

  • 1,419 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,419
Views on SlideShare
1,389
Embed Views
30

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

4 Embeds 30

http://hei.donbosco.net 23
http://www.guru-app.com 4
http://rushika.siliconleaf.com 2
http://guru-app.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Heat Heat Presentation Transcript

  • Heat Physics 2
  • Topic Outline • Internal energy • Specific Heat Capacity • Changes of State • The Triple Point • Heat Conduction • Thermal Resistance • Convection • Radiation
  • Heat Heat is internal energy in transit from one body of matter  to another by virtue of a temperature difference between  them. Because heat is a form of energy, the correct SI unit of heat  is the Joule. However, two older units are still used, the  kilocalorie (kcal) and the British Thermal Unit (Btu). View slide
  • The Kilocalorie and British Thermal Unit The kilocalorie is the amount of heat required to  raise/lower the temperature of 1 kg of water through  1oC.  1 kcal = 4185 J The British Thermal Unit is the amount of heat  added/removed to raise the temperature of 1 lb of  water by 1oF. 1 Btu = 1054 J = 0.252 kcal = 778 ft‐lb View slide
  • Specific Heat Capacity The specific heat capacity (symbol c) is the amount of heat  that must be added or removed from a unit mass of the  substance to change its temperature by 1o.
  • Average specific heat capacities of  various substances
  • Example:
  • Example:
  • Example:
  • Changes of State Adding or removing heat from a sample of matter does not always lead to a  change in its temperature. Instead the sample may change its state from solid to  liquid or from liquid to gas when heat is added, or it may change from gas to liquid  or from liquid to solid when heat is taken away.
  • Heat of Fusion and Heat of Vaporization The heat of fusion of a substance is the amount  of heat added to turn 1 kg of the substance at its  melting point from solid to the liquid state. The  heat of fusion of water is 335 kJ/kg. The symbol  used is Lf. The heat of vaporization of a substance is the  amount of heat needed to turn 1 kg of the  substance at its boiling point from the liquid to  the gaseous state. The heat of vaporization of  water is 2260 kJ/kg. The symbol used is Lv.
  • Heat of fusion and vaporization and melting and boiling points  of various substances at atmospheric pressure
  • Example:
  • Example:
  • Example:
  • The Triple Point The Triple Point is the intersection  of the vaporization, fusion, and  vaporization fusion sublimation curves of a substance.  All three states of a substance may  exist in equilibrium at the  temperature and pressure of its  Fusion curve triple point. Solid The fusion and vaporization curves  Sublimation curve of water intersect at a temperature  of 0.01oC and pressure of 4.6 torr.  Along the fusion curve, ice and  water can exist together, and along  the vaporization curve, water and  water vapor can exist together.
  • Heat Conduction In conduction, heat is transported by successive  molecular collisions in a body. Gases are poor conductors, because molecules  are relatively far apart and so do not collide  often. The molecules of liquids and non metallic  solids are closer together leading to somewhat  higher thermal conductivities. Metals exhibit by  far the greatest ability to conduct heat.
  • Heat Conduction
  • Thermal Conductivities
  • Example: A door of pine wood is to be installed in a brick wall 10‐in thick. If the rate  of heat conduction is to be no greater than before, what minimum thickness should the door have?
  • Example:
  • Thermal Resistance
  • Example: Find the rate at which heat flows through an 2.3 ft2‐oF/(Btu/h) pine door  7.0 ft high and 2.5 ft wide when the inside temperature is 70oF and the  outside temperature is 20oF.
  • Convection Convection is the motion of the a volume of hot fluid from one place to  another. Convection may be natural or forced. In natural convection, the buoyancy  of a heated fluid leads to its motion. In forced convection, a blower or  pump directs the heated fluid to its destination.
  • Radiation Heat transfer by radiation takes place by means of electromagnetic  waves, which require no material medium for their passage.
  • Electromagnetic Waves In the process of radiation, energy is carried by electromagnetic waves. These  waves travel at the speed of light (3.00 x 108 m/s = 186,000 mi/s) and require no  material medium for their passage. The figure below shows the classification of electromagnetic waves according to  wavelength.
  • Example:
  • Greenhouse Effect The greenhouse effect refers to the heating of the earth’s  atmosphere not by direct sunlight but by infrared light  reradiated by the surface and absorbed mainly by  atmosphere carbon dioxide.
  • REFERENCE: Modern Technical Physics 6th Edition by  Arthur Beiser Copyright © 1992 by Addison‐Wesley  Publishing Company, Inc.