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May 2012 GOAC Briefing Presentation Highlights
 

May 2012 GOAC Briefing Presentation Highlights

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    May 2012 GOAC Briefing Presentation Highlights May 2012 GOAC Briefing Presentation Highlights Presentation Transcript

    • Mountain Pine Beetle Briefing
    • Mountain Pine BeetleMountain pine beetle takingflight. They are not good flyersand will normally only fly ashort distance. However, theycan be carried for hundreds ofmiles on wind currents.! Photo compliments of Josh Birnbaum/National Association of State Foresters
    • History of MPB in the Black Hills Deadwood was established in 1876 during the Black Hills gold rush. In 1875, a miner named John B. Pearson found gold in a narrow canyon in the Northern Black Hills. This canyon became known as "Deadwood Gulch," because of the many dead trees that lined the canyon walls at the time.Mountain pine beetles are native to the Black Hills. Since recordedhistory, there have been periodic outbreaks (epidemics) on abouta twenty year cycle and each outbreak lasted from 10 – 14 years.
    • Killed Trees 18 9 18 4 9 19 7 0 19 0 0 19 3 0 19 6 0 19 9 1 19 2 1 19 5 1 19 8 2 19 1 2 19 4 2 19 7 3 1st epidemic 1894-1909 19 0 3 19 3 3 1933-1942 19 6 2nd epidemic 3 19 9 4 19 2 4 19 5 4 19 8 5Year 19 1 5 19 4 5 1945-1957 3rd epidemic 19 7 6 Black Hills 1894-2001 19 0 6 19 3 6 19 6 6 19 9 7 19 2 7 19 5 7 19 8 8 19 1 8 1963-1981 Schematic history of mountain pine beetle activity: 4th epidemic 19 4 8 19 7 9 19 0 9 19 3 9 Current 19 6 epidemic (ongoing) 99
    • The current epidemic is the largest in recorded history and has impacted – to date – over 400,000 acres (one quarter) of forest land in the Black Hills.This picture of the Black ElkWilderness is only one of many inthe central area of the Hills thatlook like this! Photo compliments of Josh Birnbaum/National Association of State Foresters
    • Latest MPBDigital Mapping (Summer of 2011) This map was generated from digital photos taken by the Black Hills National Forest. These photos were analyzed by State GIS professionals to map the mountain pine beetle infestations.Red areas are MPB infestations.Light Blue areas are private landswithin the Black Hills.
    • MPB Aerial Survey Numbers Acres of Infested TreesNumber of acres withMPB by year. 200000 1996 – 1,755 acres 180000 1997 - 6.930 acres 1998 – 13,460 acres 160000 1999 – 19,160 acres 140000 2000 – 13,546 acres Number of Acres 2001 – 102,218 acres 120000 2002 – 103,246 acres 100000 2003 – 189,655 acres 2004 - 57,843 acres* 80000 2005 – 19,464 acres** 60000 2006 - 40,022 acres 40000 2007 - 25,387 acres 2008 - 25,163 acres 20000 2009 - 22,424 acres 0 2010 - 44,100 acres 2011 - 66,111 acres Year * Survey conducted 6 weeks early . ** USFS changed survey design.
    • Accomplishments 2012 - To DateFor landowners and treatments that were processed through thestate database and payment system:Survey & Marking – 111,243 acres completed 1,650 landowners served 184,873 infested trees markedTreatments Completed – 23,014 acres completed (Reimbursement Payments) 345 landowners served 56,563 infested trees treatedEmergency Funds - 345 landowner claims $459,642 reimbursements paid $1,000,000 outstanding payments
    • Treatments for MPB
    • Most beetles fly less than 300 feet to find a new host as long as suitable hostmaterial is available so attacks often appear as slowly enlarging pockets thatcoalesce Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4
    • Direct controls are measures that directly killthe beetles rather than change theenvironmentDirect controls include: Cutting and chunking Chipping Spraying
    • Cutting and chunking works by dryingout the wood and killing a significantmajority of the beetles before theybecome adults and emerge.Chipping the wood is also effective. Inaddition to drying the wood faster, italso kills the beetles by mechanicaldamage.