• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Reading october
 

Reading october

on

  • 352 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
352
Views on SlideShare
352
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Reading october Reading october Presentation Transcript

    • Research Proven Strategies in Language Arts/Literacy Katie Drummond CCSSO, October 20, 2003
      • Definitive research base still building
      • Controversies continue (e.g., Fletcher & Lyon, 1998)
      • Concern over identification:
      • reading deficit vs. reading disability
      • (e.g., Snow, Burns, & Griffin, 1998)
      • Literacy acquisition is problematic for many
      Reading: Prominent Issues
    • The Evidence Base
      • 5 strands from Reading Panel (NRP, 2000):
        • Phonemic Awareness
        • Phonics
        • Fluency
        • Vocabulary
        • Comprehension
      • Literacy for adolescents
      • Writing
    • Phonemic Awareness & Phonics
      • Best when explicit, systematic
      • Not a complete program
      • System is complicated; teachers’ skills need to be developed (Moats, 2001)
      • Need to ensure that materials are carefully constructed (Stein, Johnson & Gutlohn, 1999)
    • Fluency
      • Accurate and quick reading of text
      • Repeated, monitored, & modeled oral reading is best mode of achieving
      • (Chard, Vaughn, & Tyler, 2002)
      • Passages need to be at independent-reading level
    • Vocabulary
      • Extended instruction
      • Repeated exposure
      • Word substitution
      • Multiple methods work best
    • Comprehension
      • Use of graphic organizers
      • Question answering/generation
      • Structure-- fiction and expository (Gersten, Fuchs, Williams, & Baker, 2001)
      • Summarization
      • Mixed methods work best
    • Reading and Verbal Competency
      • As skill in decoding grows, general linguistic competency accounts for more of reading outcomes (Shankweiler et al., 1999)
        • Metalinguistic awareness
        • Background knowledge (Shankweiler et al., 1999)
        • Engagement with complex ideas
        • (Beck, McKeown, Hamilton, & Kucan, 1998)
    • Older Readers
      • Need to transact with text (Peterson, Caverly, Nicholson, O’Neal, & Cusenbary, 2000)
      • Evidence of late-emerging reading disability (Leach, Scarborough, & Rescorla, 2003)
      • Still need basics; higher level decoding (Moats, 1998)
      • Need ways to engage with complex ideas even if they cannot read it yet
    • Writing
      • Process and self-regulation are key
      • Mechanisms for consistency
      • Tools for planning (Harris & Graham, 1992)
      • Attention or compensation for handwriting and spelling issues (Mastropieri & Scruggs, 2004)
    • Overall
      • More conclusive findings on general strategies than programs/curricula
      • Expertise of teachers
      • Rigor of instruction time (Chard & Kameenui, 2000; Vaughn, Levy, & Coleman, 2002)
      • Metacognitive strategies, integration important for special needs (Vaughn, Gersten, & Chard, 2000)
      • More research
    • This content was developed by staff at The Access Center: Improving Outcomes for All Students K-8 , funded by U. S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs and housed at the American Institutes for Research. Retrieved [today's date], from the World Wide Web: http://www.k8accesscenter.org