• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Datadriven
 

Datadriven

on

  • 1,078 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,078
Views on SlideShare
1,078
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
9
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Trainer Notes These notes accompany each slide to assist you with your presentation. Show this slide as participants gather for the session.
  • Trainers Notes Throughout the Data Driven Decision-Making TEKS Tool, various documents and videos will be used from the fictitious Lone Star Middle School.
  • Trainer Notes After the purpose, the agenda reflects the sections of the Data Driven Decision-Making TEKS Tool. Within each section there are activities designed to carry participants toward an understanding of an element or characteristic of data as a basis for curriculum decision-making.
  • Trainer Notes The activities as they appear in the text of the sections are best carried out in a study group setting, particularly when a campus is exploring its needs and options for meeting those needs. As a trainer, you might want to give an hour’s overview of this TEKS Tool and then encourage participants to use one of the models of staff development to make applications to the data driven decision-making process.
  • Trainer Notes
  • Trainer Notes The purpose of this section is to demonstrate the wide variety of documents that constitute data. Materials “ Campus Profile” (page 1 of Lone Star Middle School Documents Supplement) “ Perceptions” (page 3 of Lone Star Middle School Documents Supplement) Procedure At their tables, participants examine “Campus Profile” and “Perceptions” documents for the purpose of arriving at a definition of data. Have seleced tables read their definitions. Show the definition on the slide and ask if the participants agree with the definition. Conclude that data is any evidence that gives information about the state of a campus/district in areas such as student performance, climate, or community involvement. NOTE: Lone Star Middle School is a fictitious campus developed for the purpose of illustrating the results of effective use of data. It is a product of the Instructional Leadership Development (ILD) project of TEA and Education Service Center, Region XIII.
  • Trainer Notes It is important that participants realize that these are the key elements of a goal. It is a model to follow when they set their own goals.
  • Trainer Notes Ask the participants if all of the questions in the formula are represented in the goal. Have participants identify the words and phrases that answer each of the questions in the formula. Ask the participants to identify the basis for the goal. (TAAS Summary Report, page 13 in the Lone Star Middle School documents)
  • Trainer Notes Procedure Ask participants to identify the basis for this goal. (See page 3 of the Lone Star Middle School Documents.) Ask why a school would have a non-academic goal. If time permits, have participants reflect on the documents titled “Implications for Your School” on page 5. Otherwise, encourage them to meet with their colleagues to discuss data and complete the document. If you have time, show the video (about 10 minutes) Social Studies Department Meeting The video shows Lone Star Middle School’s Social Studies Department discussing the school’s goal for reading. Have participants critique the meeting according to the Lone Star Middle School’s overall evidence. Are the teachers in the video making decisions based on data? Background Note : Another video shows the site-based-decision-making team looking at the reading scores and setting a goal without looking at any other data. Reading was the only subject they considered. If you do not have time to show the video, delete the icon from the slide.
  • Trainer Notes The purpose of this diagram is to summarize the testing objectives and to show their relationship to each other and to the Social Studies TEKS. Materials (from the Relating TEKS and TAAS Section) Current Objectives, page 1 Future Objectives, page 2 Diagram, page preceding Current Objectives Procedure In pairs, have participants analyze the diagram and the objectives to determine what the objectives have in common . Point out how the charts that follow on pages 4-22 demonstrate the connection of the objectives with each other and the Social Studies TEKS. Analysis of the charts will take place with other TEKS Tools. Discuss observations and conclusions in the whole group. Note: The objectives and this graphic appear in each TEKS Tool. If you are presenting multiple TEKS Tools to the same audience, do this activity once, then refer to the objectives as a reminder when you present the other TEKS Tools. Time for this activity: About 5 minutes
  • Trainer Notes The purpose of the “Using Released Tests as Data” activity is to emphasize that there is a strong relationship between the TEKS and TAAS. This understanding can build confidence in teachers that they are teaching what is tested. Note: This activity is recommended for groups who want to analyze a released test as data as they focus on ways to improve TAAS scores. Materials “ TEKS and TAAS Alignment” chart on page 21 Grade 8 Social Studies TAAS test from Spring of 2000 located in the “Appendix for Instruction” Grade 8 TEKS Chart paper with markers Procedure Each group is assigned one objective of the Grade 8 TAAS test. (Note that the cover of the test lists the items by objective.) Participants find their test items as they appear in the TEKS. Participants complete the chart “TEKS and TAAS Alignment.” Participants record their findings and comments on chart paper. Each group reports. Debrief by drawing conclusions about the alignment of TEKS and TAAS. Note: If you do not have enough time to address each test item, ask participants to align only two of the five items. Time for this activity: about 25 minutes
  • Trainer Notes Emphasize that curriculum decisions and plans are learner-centered and come from data that reveal student needs.
  • Trainer Notes The purpose of meeting Cheryl and Kelley is that this entire section deals with these two fictitious teachers’ practices and performances. By analyzing their products, participants can realize that data giving information about the state of a campus includes much more than summary reports and statistics. Procedure (If you have time) Participants work in pairs to read the introductions on page 1 and complete the “Anticipated Teaching Performances” on that page. Discuss findings in the whole group. Note: This section of the TEKS Tool begins with an alternate approach to the section. If you have only one hour to present the entire Data Driven Decision-Making TEKS Tool, you will want to use the alternate plan. If you have two hours, it would be beneficial to have the participants go through all of the steps outlined in this section. The alternate plan is outlined on the following slide.
  • Trainer Notes Examination of the Self-Report accomplishes two purposes. It gives insight into the attitudes and outlooks of Cheryl and Kelley, and it reminds participants of some of the key elements of effective curriculum. Materials Cheryl’s Documents and Kelley’s Documents Documents on pages 2 and 3 of the section Procedure Participants complete the charts of Sections II and III of Cheryl’s and Kelley’s self-report (page 2). In groups, participants complete “Analyzing the Teacher Self-Report” on page 3. Discuss findings in the whole group. Alternate Procedure for the Designing and Aligning Learning and Assessment Section Materials Cheryl’s and Kelley’s Documents (ivory and blue) “ An Alternate Approach to This Section for Trainers: Cheryl’s and Kelley’s Data” (before page 1) Procedure for Alternate Approach Form groups at the tables to carry out the alternate activity as outlined in “An Alternate Approach to This Section for Trainers: Cheryl’s and Kelley’s Data.” Show this slide when discussing these questions with the whole group.
  • Trainer Notes The lesson plans as a single piece of data are not sufficient to form ideas about Cheryl and Kelley. However, as each of the data selections in this section are analyzed, a pattern emerges. Materials Cheryl’s Documents and Kelley’s Documents Pages 4 and 5 of the section Procedure Participants answer the questions in the Lesson Plans as Data activity. Discuss findings in the whole group. Discuss how the accumulation of data gives insight into a teacher’s performance. Procedure for Alternate Approach Show this slide as you discuss lesson plans with the whole group.
  • Trainer Notes This part of the analysis of the teacher’s practices is important because it indicates the level of the two teachers’ attempt at being learner-centered. Materials Cheryl’s and Kelley’s Documents Pages 6 - 8 of the section Procedure Participants answer the analysis of Cheryl’s and Kelley’s instructional strategies. Discuss findings in the whole group. Review the evidence for the participants’ conclusion. Procedure for Alternate Approach Show this slide when discussing the questions with the whole group.
  • Trainer Notes This part of the analysis of each teacher’s practices is important because it reveals how learner-centered each classrooms is. Materials Cheryl’s and Kelley’s assessment pieces: tests and grade books Cheryl’s and Kelley’s lesson plans and homework assignments to check for alignment of what is taught and what is tested Video Procedure Participants answer the analysis of Cheryl’s and Kelley’s assessments. Discuss findings in the whole group. Review the evidence for the participants’ conclusion. Procedure for Alternate Approach Show this slide when discussing the questions with the whole group. Show the video in both procedures. The Video The video shows Cheryl and Kelley teaching their lesson plans. What does the tape show about Cheryl’s and Kelley’s teaching performances? Do participants’ impressions of the teachers based on their paper work align with their impressions based on the video? Why? Or why not?
  • Trainer Notes It is important for participants to understand that data come from many sources and contributes to the decision-making process as schools identify their and needs and find solutions. Procedure Participants complete the “Summing Up” activity. If you have time, have participants apply their knowledge about data relating to Cheryl and Kelley by completing the Curriculum and Instruction Checklist.. In groups, have participants discuss the items in the “Implications for Your Campus/District” activity. In the whole group, discuss all observations and conclusions. Procedure for Alternate Approach Briefly discuss each question on the slide as a whole group.
  • Trainer Notes The purpose of this slide is to apply the concepts of the Data Driven Decision-Making TEKS Tool to the overall purpose of the TEKS Tools. Point to a part of the graphic and ask participants how the TEKS Tool applies to that part. Select several of these parts and ask for applications. Ask participants if they see other applications. Special Note: There is another section titled “Reflect and Apply” for this TEKS Tool as well as for the other TEKS Tools. This section will be addressed in the final reflection time for trainers.

Datadriven Datadriven Presentation Transcript

    • Social studies
    TEKS Tool: Data Driven Decision-Making WELCOME!!! to Social Studies TEKS Tool Data Driven Decision-Making!!! Overview and Rationale
  • Instructional Leadership Development training provided information about making data driven decisions through their creation of Lone Star Middle School.
    • Purpose of the Data Driven Decision-Making TEKS  Tool
    • Making Data Driven Decisions
    • Relating TEKS and TAAS
    • Designing and Aligning Learning and Assessments
    • Reflection and Application
    TEKS Tool: Data Driven Decision-Making Overview and Rationale Agenda
    • It is recommended that one hour be given to each  TEKS Tool.
    • However, there is more material in each TEKS Tool  than one hour’s attention will address.
    • Therefore, as we proceed through each TEKS Tool,  we will spend time on features that fall within the  one-hour range, but please notice that there are  more activities for those campuses that would  benefit from a deeper study of the material.
    TEKS Tool: Data Driven Decision-Making Overview and Rationale Please Note:
    • To provide direction for designing  curriculum, instruction, and  assessment that will lead to  student success based on  decisions made from appropriate  data.
    TEKS Tool: Data Driven Decision-Making Overview and Rationale Purpose of the Data Driven Decision-Making TEKS Tool
    • Examine pages 1-6 from the fictitious  Lone  Star  Middle School.
    • At your table, complete this sentence:
    • Data  is …
    • Definition: Any evidence that informs  school  personnel about the state of the  campus or district  in areas such as  student performance, school  climate, or  community involvement.
    TEKS Tool: Data Driven Decision-Making Making Data-Driven Decisions What is Data?
    • To formulate a goal based on data,  answer the following questions:
      • Who?
      • What?
      • When?
      • To what extent?
    TEKS Tool: Data Driven Decision-Making Making Data-Driven Decisions Formulating Goals Based on Data
    • Ninety percent of all students and student  groups in Lone Star Middle School will pass  the reading portion of the Texas Assessment  of Academic Skills (TAAS) in 2000-2001.
    • What is the basis for this goal? (See TAAS  Summary Report on page 13 of the Lone  Star  Middle School data.)
    TEKS Tool: Data Driven Decision-Making Making Data-Driven Decisions Lone Star Middle School's Goal
    • Ninety percent of parent/guardian responses  on the 1999-2000 climate survey will be  favorable toward Lone Star Middle School.
    • What is the basis for this goal? (See page 3 of  the Lone Star Middle School documents.)
    • Why have a non-academic goal?
    TEKS Tool: Data Driven Decision-Making Making Data-Driven Decisions Lone Star Middle School's Non-academic Goal
  • The Relationship Between and Among Grade 8 Social Studies TAAS, U.S. History End-of Course Exam, and TAAS II Objectives
    • Common to All Objectives
    • Historical issues and events
    • Geographic influences on
    • historical issues and events
    • Economic and social influences
    • on historical issues and events
    • Political influences on
    • historical issues and events
    • Critical Thinking
    Grade 8 TAAS Objectives U.S. History End-of-Course Objectives TAAS II Objectives Citizenship Historical Concepts Interpret Social Studies Data Domestic and Foreign Affairs Problem-solving and Decision-making
    • What do you think about this statement?
    • “ If you are teaching the TEKS, you are  teaching for TAAS.”
    • An analysis of released Grade 8 Social  Studies tests affirms that there is  definitely a close relationship.
    TEKS Tool: Data Driven Decision-Making Relating TEKS and TAAS Using Released Tests as Data TEKS and TAAS go hand-in-hand.
    • To demonstrate how to make  learner- centered instructional  decisions based on data that  address:
      • High cognitive thinking
      • Assessing student progress
      • Alignment of learning objectives to  TEKS/TAAS
    TEKS Tool: Data Driven Decision-Making Designing and Aligning Learning and Assessment The purpose of This Section
    • Cheryl Downing and Kelley  Taylor teach Grade 8 Social  Studies at Lone Star Middle  School.
    TEKS Tool: Data Driven Decision-Making Designing and Aligning Learning and Assessment Meet Cheryl and Kelley
    • Examine Cheryl and Kelley’s PDAS  Self-Report. (See Cheryl’s and  Kelley’s Documents.)
    • What impressions do you have  about the teaching performances  of Cheryl and Kelley based on  their self-reports?
    TEKS Tool: Data Driven Decision-Making Designing and Aligning Learning and Assessment PDAS Teacher Self-Report as Data
    • Examine Cheryl’s and Kelley’s  lesson plans.
    • What observations and inferences  do you make about their teaching  performances based on their  plans?
    TEKS Tool: Data Driven Decision-Making Designing and Aligning Learning and Assessment Lesson Plans as Data
    • What does an examination of the  use of instructional strategies by  Cheryl and Kelley reveal about  their teaching performances?
    • Why are the social studies skills  important in using instructional  strategies?
    TEKS Tool: Data Driven Decision-Making Designing and Aligning Learning and Assessment Instructional Strategies as Data
    • What does an examination of Cheryl’s  and Kelley’s assessments reveal about  their teaching performances?
    • How closely does each teacher pay  attention to TEKS and TAAS? (See  grade books)
    • How closely do the assessments align  with the instruction? (See lesson plans  and sample  homework.)
    TEKS Tool: Data Driven Decision-Making Designing and Aligning Learning and Assessment Assessment Samples as Data
    • What does putting all of the data from  Cheryl’s and Kelley’s documents reveal  about their teaching performances?
    • How does an analysis of these teachers’  performance relate to student  performance?
    • What are your thoughts about collecting  data and using it to make decisions?
    TEKS Tool: Data Driven Decision-Making Designing and Aligning Learning and Assessment Summing Up
  • Student Success Data Driven Decisions TEKS Based Curriculum A Social Studies Compass: Setting Directions for Success TAAS Objectives Across the Grades Effective Learning Designs Well-aligned Assessments Appropriate Strategies Appropriate Staff Development Evaluation of Programs Active Learning Collaboration Real World Experiences Relevant Applications