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Engaging readers,writers,researchers walterboro

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  • 1. Creating Engaged Readers, Writers, and Researchers Summer Reading Camp Professional Development
  • 2. Learning Intentions • Provide a glimpse of a typical day in a Reading, Writing, Research classroom. • Explore the integration of an ELA/Social Studies Unit. • Provide instructional strategies for explicit teaching. • Discuss the use of formative assessment to guide instruction. • A plan for daily predictable structures.
  • 3. Essential Question • How do we take readers and writers who are struggling and develop confident, competent, and independent readers and writers in six weeks?
  • 4. Engaging Readers • How do we teach students to engage in reading, writing, and researching? • Why is this important?
  • 5. High-Progress Literacy Classrooms Pressley et al., (1996, 1998, 2001) • Many, many books to read at students’ instructional and independent reading levels, fiction and nonfiction, of interest to readers • “Extensive and diverse” reading and writing with kids fully engaged in reading and writing during most of the time devoted to reading and writing instruction—descriptions of kids “getting lost” in their work • Much small group and individualized instruction • More instruction and support for struggling readers • Extremely positive environments • Teaching of self-regulation and decision-making • Engaging instruction: positive, low-risk, encouraging, accepting, conveying goals, self-selection, ownership of reading and writing topics
  • 6. Significant Time Devoted to Actual Reading (Allington & Johnston, 2000) For each hour of reading instruction • Teachers spent 5-10 minutes preparing students to read • Students read 40-45 minutes • Teachers spent 5-10 minutes engaging students following the reading • While the students were reading, the teacher worked with students in small groups or individually side by side at their seats
  • 7. Engagement • How do we teach students to engage in reading, writing, and researching? – Predictable structures – Just right books that are high interest – Build stamina – Involving students in the meaning making
  • 8. Focusing Attention on the Problem • How do we make engaged reading, writing, and researching everyone's concern? • Jennifer Serravallo, Teaching Reading in Small Groups: – The Serravallo Engagement Inventory From Core to Curriculum 3-5 SCDE Literacy Initiatives, Summer 2013
  • 9. Chris Lehman: Engaging Readers • “Think of anything young children love to do - running through a playground, dressing up in costumes, scribbling art projects. All of these involve tremendous joy, access to materials, lots of choice, time for practice, and modeling (whether from adults in their lives or friends or television). The same conditions are needed to support young children's (though frankly anyone's) development into a thoughtful, engaged reader. What we can do as educators is provide the same conditions.”
  • 10. Life in a Reading-Writing-Research Classroom Research Workshop Writing Workshop Reading Workshop
  • 11. Reading Workshop • 1 hour and 15 minutes (Reading Workshop) • Mini lesson and Setting Purpose – 10 - 15minutes • Teacher is working with small groups (3- 5 students) and conferencing with individual students while the rest of the class is reading independently– 60 minutes • Share Time – 5-10 minutes (Strategies used during reading or book recommendations)
  • 12. Writing Workshop • 1 hour and 15 minutes • Mini-lesson – 10-15 minutes • teacher is conferring with individuals and/ or small groups while students are writing independently • Share Time – 5 – 10 minutes
  • 13. Inquiry/Research • 1 hour and 15 minutes for Inquiry/Research – Units of Study based on 4th Grade standards for Social Studies • Students are in small collaborative groups • Mini-Lesson and Setting Purpose – 10-15 minutes • Teacher is conferring and working with the small collaborative groups
  • 14. Predictable Structures Expected in ELA Instruction (Components of Reading and Writing Workshops) • Explicit Reading Strategy /Process Instruction Mini-lessons (10-15 min.) – Read-Aloud / Think-Aloud – Interactive Read-Aloud – Shared Reading • Independent Reading (45-50 min.) – Teacher Conferring – Small Group Instruction – Literature Discussion Groups • Strategy Share (5-10 min.) • Explicit Writing Strategy /Process Instruction Mini-lessons (10-15min.) – Modeling own process – Studying the process of mentor writers – Studying craft of mentor writers • Independent Writing (45-50 min.) – Teacher Conferring – Small Group Instruction • Strategy Share (5-10 min.)
  • 15. Predictable Structures Expected Research/Inquiry • Explicit Informational Reading Strategy /Process Instruction Mini-lessons Read-Aloud / Think- Aloud – Interactive Read-Aloud – Shared Reading • Independent Reading Teacher Conferring – Small Group Instruction – Discussion Groups • Strategy Share • Explicit Informational Writing Strategy /Process Instruction Mini-lessons Modeling own process – Studying the process of mentor writers – Notebooking strategies – Studying craft of mentor writers • Independent Writing – Teacher Conferring – Small Group Instruction • Strategy Share
  • 16. Explicit Instruction • Instruction that is intentional, based on assessed student needs, carried out in an organized manner, and clearly communicated to students.
  • 17. Instructional Techniques for Explicit Reading Strategy /Process Mini-lessons • Read-Aloud / Think-Aloud • Interactive Read-Aloud • Shared Reading Experience
  • 18. Formative Assessment Formative Assessment will be used throughout the day • Running Records • Anecdotal Notes • RAN Chart • Writing Samples
  • 19. What Do You Think Readers Need To Be Successful? • Create a Graffiti Chart at each table
  • 20. The What To Teach Readers • CCSS • Cognitive Skills – Monitoring for Comprehension – The Kinds of Thinking We Do as Readers • Text Structures & Features – Narrative – Informational Procedures • How it Looks and Sounds in Reading/Writing Workshop • Ways to Hold Thinking • How to Choose Books
  • 21. The “What To Teach”
  • 22. Life in a Reading-Writing-Research Classroom Research Workshop Writing Workshop Reading Workshop
  • 23. Interactive Read Aloud 26
  • 24. Interactive Read Aloud
  • 25. Connection: Explicit Instruction: Active Engagement: Link: Architecture of a Mini-lesson Term coined by Lucy Calkins
  • 26. Architecture of a Mini-lesson Explicit Instruction: The teacher shows students how readers/writers go about doing whatever is being taught. Usually this involves a demonstration, which the teacher sets up and explains.
  • 27. Shared Reading Experiences: a History • Developed by Don Holdaway for use with early readers • Developed to emulate story-book reading or bedtime reading for students who entered school without having had these experiences as preschoolers • The teacher reads naturally from an enlarged text, and students join in the reading as they become familiar with the piece • Reading is fluent, phrased, and expressive • Has been successfully used with students of all ages Literacy Leaders March 2014 38
  • 28. Shared Reading Experiences and Holdaway’s Natural Learning Model • Demonstration (by a more expert other) • Guided participation • Independent practice • Performance: sharing and celebration Literacy Leaders March 2014 39
  • 29. Shared Reading Experiences describe a process • Harder texts than readers can handle independently • High support (teacher-directed) gives way to lower support (teacher-led) gives way to little/no support (student practice and performance) • Repeated readings Literacy Leaders March 2014 40
  • 30. Literacy Leaders March 2014 Shared Reading Experiences: Predictable Format • An Enlarged Text that everyone can see • First Reading usually resembles a read aloud but kids follow along with their eyes • Subsequent Shared Readings teacher and students read aloud together. The teacher not only leads with his/her voice, but stops to work on developing ideas and/or phrasing as needed, and stopping to develop concepts. This work is done to build understandings necessary to express the meaning of the text as it is read. • Subsequent Choral Reading Practice: After students are comfortable with a piece or with a portion of a longer text, the teacher may provide a copy of the text (or a portion of it) for choral reading. Choral reading means that students have their own copies rather than reading along in an enlarged version of the text. • Independent Practice: After students are comfortable with a piece or with a portion of a longer text, the teacher provides a copy of the text to every student and sets up protocols for practice. This practice might be with students in pairs or with students reading independently. • Performance Reading and Celebration: students are afforded opportunities to perform pieces or excerpts for an audience. 41
  • 31. 42 Shared Reading Experience Text needs to be large enough for everyone to see.
  • 32. Shared Reading Experience
  • 33. Guided Reading 44
  • 34. Guided Reading • Teacher supports children’s reading of a new text – Might provide an overview of the book – Allows children to look through the book prior to reading to gather information – May include an orientation to the text, including illustrations – Teacher guides and prompts children to take strategic action to problem-solve at difficulty and to monitor their reading and their understanding. – Focus is on strategic action 45
  • 35. Guided Reading • Video Clip – Leading students to independence
  • 36. Debrief • Turn and Talk about what you noticed in the video.
  • 37. Independent Reading 48
  • 38. Independent Reading • Students should have a good assortment of books they can and want to read. • Students need to be involved in the process of choosing their own books. • Students need a balance of fiction and non- fiction. • Teachers will conference with individual students during this time.
  • 39. Video Clip • Video Clip of Highly Engaged Independent Readers
  • 40. The Key Point in All of This We are teaching readers about what readers do and how readers think.
  • 41. Revisit Chart • What are we doing to engage readers and writers during Reading Workshop?
  • 42. Life in a Reading-Writing-Research Classroom Literacy Matters Research Team January 2013 Research Workshop Writing Workshop Reading Workshop
  • 43. Grade 3 students: Grade 4 students: Grade 5 students: Research to Build and Present Knowledge Research to Build and Present Knowledge Research to Build and Present Knowledge 7. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic. 7. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic. 7. Conduct short research projects that use several sources to build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic. 54 CCR Anchor Standard 7- Writing - Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
  • 44. Grade 3 students: Grade 4 students: Grade 5 students: Research to Build and Present Knowledge Research to Build and Present Knowledge Research to Build and Present Knowledge 8. Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories. 8. Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; take notes and categorize information, and provide a list of sources. 8. Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information in notes and finished work, and provide a list of sources. 55 CCR Anchor Standard 8- Writing – Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.
  • 45. What is Research? Content: Cool Stuff we Want to Learn About ELA Processes: Reading, Writing, Speaking & Listening (how we learn stuff)
  • 46. Getting Started • Foster Passion, Curiosity, and Fun -----” I have no special talent, I am only passionately curious.” - Einstein 57
  • 47. Stages of Inquiry • Immerse • Investigate • Coalesce • Go Public • Inquiry Circles in Action by Stephanie Harvey and Harvey Daniels 58
  • 48. WESTERN EXPANSION
  • 49. RAN CHART What do you know about the contributions of women and African Americans during the westward expansion? • What do you think you know? • Confirmation • Misconceptions • New Learnings • Wonderings
  • 50. Immersion: Interactive Read Aloud
  • 51. Shared Reading Experience
  • 52. CHAMPION ROPER OF THE WESTERN CATTLE COUNTRY Among cowboys, Nat Love was one of the best. He rode hard, shot straight, could rope the toughest bull, and tame the roughest bronco. Love was born a slave in 1854. His family was set free after the Civil War. When Nat was 15, he left home and followed his dreams westward to where he had heard a man could ride free. He got a job herding cattle and worked hard to perfect his cowboy skills. It didn't take him long.
  • 53. When Love was 22, he took part in a Fourth of July rodeo in the town of Deadwood, in Dakota Territory. He outroped and outshot other cowboys to become the "hero of Deadwood." "The assembled crowd," Love wrote, "named me 'Deadwood Dick' and proclaimed me champion roper of the Western cattle country." Love was proud of the nickname, and used it till the end of his life. (The original "Deadwood Dick" was the hero of a popular series of novels about the Old West.)
  • 54. Love later wrote a book called "The Life and Adventures of Nat Love, Better Known in the Cattle Country as Deadwood Dick." The book is full of both tall tales and true adventures; sometimes, it is hard to tell which is which. But there is no doubt that Love lived a full life during the heyday of the Western frontier. He herded cattle, survived stampedes, had his share of card games and gunfights, encountered Indians as both friend and foe, and weathered the rain, snow, sleet, dust storms, and merciless sun of the open prairie.
  • 55. In 1889, Love hung up his spurs. In 1890, he went to work on the "Iron Horse" instead as a Pullman porter on the railroads that were spreading across the West and pushing "the frontier" to the Pacific. By the time Nat Love died in 1921, the "Wild West" was no more.
  • 56. MINI-LESSON : BUILDING BACKGROUND BY SCANNING ARTIFACTS What are some of the ways individuals build background about a new topic? Building Background From Core to Curriculum 3-5 SCDE Literacy Initiatives, Summer 2013
  • 57. • video
  • 58. MINI-LESSON : BUILDING BACKGROUND BY CLOSELY READING ARTIFACTS AND ANNOTATING THESE TEXTS What are some of the ways individuals build background about a new topic? Building Background From Core to Curriculum 3-5 SCDE Literacy Initiatives, Summer 2013
  • 59. Investigate • What are you wondering?
  • 60. Developing Your Questions • Video Clip – Primary Inquiry Circles
  • 61. Gathering Information:Reading a Visual On a sheet of paper, draw 4 squares. Office of Instructional Practices and Evaluations
  • 62. Note Taking Jot down notes in the corresponding square. • What do you notice about the setting? • What do you notice about the people? • What do you notice about actions or activities? • What questions do you have as you look at this part of the image? Office of Instructional Practices and Evaluations
  • 63. Reading a Visual • What are the three most important details you and your partner noticed? • What conclusions about the image can you draw from these details? • If you were to give this image a title, what would it be? Office of Instructional Practices and Evaluations
  • 64. Coalesce
  • 65. Taking Notes What are some of the different ways researchers take notes? 82
  • 66. Research Notebook • Our research notebook will have four sections: • · Table of Contents • · Goals • · Units of Study • · Wonders and Ideas • • Here is how to mark your sections: • 1. Go 3 pages in and put a marker at the top right. The first 3 pages will be our • Table of Contents. • • 2. The next five pages, beginning with this first marker, will be our Goals section. This is where we will write the goals during individual conferences. • • 3. At the end of these 5 pages, we will put in another marker. The big section • we just marked off is going to be the beginning of our Units of Study. Each • time we begin a new unit of study, we’ll add a marker. • • 4. Now go all the way to the back of the notebook and count 5 pages backward • and put in another marker at the very bottom. This section is where we will • keep track of our Wonders and Ideas about other things we may want to investigate…just a place to gather ideas as they come up so we can save them for later. 83
  • 67. Why take Notes? We are becoming Experts and Experts need Facts • How do we become experts? – Read carefully – Stop to think – Ask questions – Notice patterns and themes – Organize information (and reorganize it) – Actively search for new information and determine how it relates to what they already know 84
  • 68. Characteristics of notes • Short • Not usually complete sentences • Not copied • Important information, important details • Relevant • Organized, revised, and reorganized 85
  • 69. Notetaking: Combination Have students take a piece of paper and fold over the right third to make a crease (about 4 kid fingers with the thumb tucked in). Then fold up the bottom about the length of one thumb and crease the page. Label each of the sections. 86
  • 70. Dash Notes • In your research notebook, write the topic you are researching. – Ex. Pandas • Each time you read in a new book , write the title and author. – Ex. Giant Pandas by Gail Gibbons • When you find an interesting fact as you are reading, one that will add to your research, look away from the book. • Write just a few words to hold the facts. Put a dash in front of your “dash notes.” – Ex. –live in mountains of China • Add the page number. – Ex. –live in mountains of China p. 3 – Ex. –member of the bear family p. 7 – Ex. – thick, coarse, oily fur p. 9 – When you are done reading the section or when you are ready to begin drafting that part, turn each dash note into a complete sentence. You may want to combine dash notes into a longer sentence. – Ex. . Pandas, a member of the bear family, are found in the mountains of China. Their fur is very thick and oily. 87
  • 71. Notetaking: Alphaboxes 88
  • 72. Read, Cover, Jot, Reread • Read a small section. • Pause a moment to think about what you read. • Jot notes about your learning. • Reread the same section looking for details or technical vocabulary missed.
  • 73. Comprehension and Collaboration • Take time to look at other mini-lessons in your text.
  • 74. Revisit Chart • What did we do during Research Workshop to engage readers and writers?
  • 75. Life in a Reading-Writing-Research Classroom Research Workshop Writing Workshop Reading Workshop
  • 76. Grade 3 students: Grade 4 students: Grade 5 students: Types and Purposes Types and Purposes Types and Purposes 2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. a. Introduce a topic and group related information together; include illustrations when useful to aiding comprehension. 2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. a. Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g. headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. 2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. a. Introduce a topic clearly; provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. 93 CCR Anchor Standard 2- Writing – Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
  • 77. Grade 3 students: Grade 4 students: Grade 5 students: Types and Purposes Types and Purposes Types and Purposes b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details. c. Use linking words and phrases (e.g., also, another, and, more, but) to connect ideas within categories of information. d. Provide a concluding statement or section. b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic. c. Link ideas within categories of information using words and phrases (e.g.., another, for example, also, because). d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. e. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented. b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic. c. Link ideas within and across categories of information using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., in contrast, especially). d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. e. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented. 94 CCR Anchor Standard 2- Writing – Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
  • 78. Focusing on Writing Workshop • Explicit Strategy Instruction Mini-lessons (10-15 minutes) – Procedures – Process – Genre • Independent Writing (45-50 minutes) – Teacher Conferring – Small Group Instruction • Strategy Share (5-10 minutes)
  • 79. The What To Teach Writers • Procedures – What does writing workshop look like/sound like • Process/Genre – Generating Ideas – Planning and Drafting – Revising and Editing – Publishing • Genre – Structure of the Genre – Characteristics of the Genre
  • 80. Writing Workshop • Teach them how to turn those observations, notes, and sketches into sentences and paragraphs about the topic. – Study the characteristics of informational texts. – Provide craft lessons on the type of informational writing they will be doing. 97
  • 81. • Pathways Video Clip…..Informational Writing<iframe src="//player.vimeo.com/video/55951746" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0" webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen allowfullscreen></iframe> <p><a href="http://vimeo.com/55951746">Using a Learning Progression to Help Students Work Towards Clear Goals as they Lift the Level of Their Information Writing (K-2)</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/tcrwp">TC Reading and Writing Project</a> on <a href="https://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>
  • 82. Overview of Planning a Unit of Study • Gather a stack of texts that are good examples of what we want to study. (Look for short texts found in picture books, magazines, newspapers, collections of writing, internet websites, and excerpts from chapter books.) • Make sure students know what it is they are studying and that they’ll be expected to write in this particular genre. • Immerse students in reading and talking about the texts and what they notice about how they are written. • Study a few of them closely until students become articulate about how people write this kind of text. 99
  • 83. Planning: Step 1 Look through the texts you have selected to use in your writing workshop. Think about: – Length – Topic – Attention to Craft – Real World – Relevance – Variety of Authors These will be the books students will be immersed in reading during this study.
  • 84. Make Notes… • What kinds of topics do writers address with this genre? • What different approaches do people take writing this kind of thing? • What kinds of work(research, gathering, reflecting, observing, etc.) does it seem like writers of this genre must do in order to produce this kind of writing? • What do you notice about how these kinds of text are written? These are the same questions that your students will think about as they are immersed in the texts.
  • 85. Planning: Step 2 Choose Mentor Texts • Gather three to five good examples of the genre that will anchor your study. • Understand the characteristics of this genre. – Content, navigational, structural, language, and graphical • Go through each of the three to five texts and study them closely, identifying all the possible craft lessons you might teach. • From your study, decide if there is some quality of writing that is especially important to this genre that you should emphasize. • Go through the process of writing a piece yourself. 102
  • 86. Found Poems • Found poems take existing texts and refashion them, reorder them, and present them as poems. The literary equivalent of a collage, found poetry is often made from newspaper articles, street signs, graffiti, speeches, letters, or even other poems. • A pure found poem consists exclusively of outside texts: the words of the poem remain as they were found, with few additions or omissions. Decisions of form, such as where to break a line, are left to the poet. • - See more at: http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/5780#stha sh.u05GarKu.dpuf From Core to Curriculum 3-5 SCDE Literacy Initiatives, Summer 2013
  • 87. From Core to Curriculum 3-5 SCDE Literacy Initiatives, Summer 2013
  • 88. Our Definition of Found Poems • Individual words drawn from a larger text, rearranged to create an entirely new work. • There are no precise rules about lines, syllable, or format on the page. From Core to Curriculum 3-5 SCDE Literacy Initiatives, Summer 2013
  • 89. Finding words and phrases • Mine your dash notes, annotations, and the text • Underline or highlight key words, interesting words, and phrases • We will use these to create a found poem From Core to Curriculum 3-5 SCDE Literacy Initiatives, Summer 2013
  • 90. See what you have as a group • As a table, choose words or phrases that teach about and describe the role of women and African Americans in Western Expansion. • Create a found poem. From Core to Curriculum 3-5 SCDE Literacy Initiatives, Summer 2013
  • 91. Performance Assessment • Video Clip from Primary Inquiry Circles – Taking it Public
  • 92. Towards a Product • Other final products will require different process lessons and different craft lessons. • You will need to think about the product before planning for the process. • Students will study texts like the product you want them to produce.
  • 93. Stages of Inquiry • Immerse • Investigate • Coalesce • Go Public • Inquiry Circles in Action by Stephanie Harvey and Harvey Daniels 113
  • 94. Immerse • Invite curiosity • Build background • Find topics • Wonder Inquiry Circles in Action by Stephanie Harvey and Harvey Daniels 114
  • 95. Investigate • Develop Questions • Search for Information • Discover Answers Inquiry Circles in Action by Stephanie Harvey and Harvey Daniels 115
  • 96. Coalesce • Intensity Research • Synthesize Information • Build Knowledge Inquiry Circles in Action by Stephanie Harvey and Harvey Daniels 116
  • 97. Go Public • Share Learning • Demonstrate Understanding • Take Action Inquiry Circles in Action by Stephanie Harvey and Harvey Daniels 117
  • 98. The Key Point in All of This We are teaching writers about what writers do and how writers think.
  • 99. Revisit Chart • What did we do to engage readers and writers during writing workshop?
  • 100. Thinking Forward… • What is your plan for getting these students highly engaged in reading, writing, and researching?
  • 101. Predictable Structures Developing a template for the day…